Los Angeles Department of City Planning - City Clerk Internet Site

Los Angeles Department of City Planning - City Clerk Internet Site

DEPARTMENT OF City of Los Angeles EXECUTIVE OFFICES CITY PLANNING 200 N. Spring Street, Room 532 CALIFORNIA VINCENT P. BERTONI, AICP Los Angeles...

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DEPARTMENT OF

City of Los Angeles

EXECUTIVE OFFICES

CITY PLANNING 200 N. Spring Street, Room 532

CALIFORNIA

VINCENT P. BERTONI, AICP

Los Angeles, CA 90012-4801

DIRECTOR

(213) 978-1271

CULTURAL HERITAGE COMMISSION

A

RICHARD BARRON

A

KEVIN J. KELLER, AICP

i

* /

.

PRESIDENT

&

GAILKENNARD

a/

VICE PRESIDENT

PILAR BUELNA JEREMY IRVINE BARRY A MILOFSKY

DEPUTY DIRECTOR

(213) 978-1272 USA M. WEBBER, AICP DEPUTY DIRECTOR

(213) 978-1274 JAN ZATORSKI DEPUTY DIRECTOR

(213) 978-1273

ERIC GARCETTI

ROCKY WILES

MAYOR

COMMISSION OFFICE MANAGER

(213) 978-1300

http://planning.lacity.org

January 18, 2016

Los Angeles City Council Room 395, City Hall 200 North Spring Street Los Angeles, CA 90012

Attention:

Sharon Dickinson, Legislative Assistant Planning and Land Use Management Committee

CATALINA SWIMWEAR; 443 SOUTH SAN PEDRO STREET; (435-451 SOUTH SAN PEDRO STREET; 336 EAST WINSTON STREET AND 342 EAST WINSTON STREET); CASE NO.: CHC-2016-3620-HCM Honorable Members of the City Council, At its meeting of December 15, 2016, the Cultural Heritage Commission took the actions below to include the above-referenced property in the list of Historic-Cultural Monuments, subject to adoption by the City Council:

1

.

2

.

Determined that the proposed designation is categorically exempt from CEOA, ENV2016-3621-CE, pursuant to CEOA Guidelines, Section 15331 and Article III, Section 1, Class 8 and 31 of the City CEQA Guidelines. Determined that the property conforms with the definition of a Monument pursuant to LAAC Section 22.171.7. Recommended that the City Council consider and designate the subject property as a Historic-Cultural Monument.

Moved: Seconded: Ayes:

Buelna Irvine Barron, Kennard and Milofsky

Vote:

5-0

The Cultural Heritage Commission would appreciate your inclusion of the subject property to the list of Historic-Cultural Monuments.

1 Etta Armstrong, Commission Executive Assistant I Cultural Heritage Commission

Time for Council to Act The Commission action will be transmitted to the City Council for consideration. Pursuant to Section 22.171.10 (f) of the Los Angeles Administrative Code, the Council may approve or disapprove in whole or in part an application or initiation for a proposed designation of a Monument. The Council shall act in 90-days of the public hearing held before the Commission. The 90-day time limit may be extended by the Council for good cause for a maximum of 15 days. If the Council does not act on the application or initiation within this 105days total time limit, the application or initiation to designate a Monument shall be deemed to have been denied. The Council may override a Commission recommendation of denial of Council initiated designation by a minimum of 10-votes. Attachment: c:

Staff Report with Findings; Cultural Heritage Ordinance Councilmember Jose Huizar, Fourteenth Council District Clare Eberle, Planning Deputy, Fourteenth Council District Ken Bernstein, Principal Planner Lambert Giessinger, Architect Ifa Kashefi, Department of Building and Safety, Permit and Engineering Bureau Chief Larry Galstian, Department of Building and Safety, Inspection Bureau Chief Betty Dong, Department of City Planning, GIS Chief

CATALINA SWIMWEAR BUILDING 443 South San Pedro Street CHC-2016-3620-HCM ENV-2016-3621-CE Agenda packet includes: 1.

Final Staff Recommendation Report

2.

Categorical Exemption

3.

Under Consideration Staff Recommendation Report

4.

Nomination

Please click on each document to be directly taken to the corresponding page of the PDF.

Los Angeles Department of City Planning RECOMMENDATION REPORT CULTURAL HERITAGE COMMISSION

CASE NO.: CHC-2016-3620-HCM ENV-2016-3621-CE

HEARING DATE: TIME: PLACE:

December 15, 2016 10:00 AM City Hall, Room 1010 200 N. Spring Street Los Angeles, CA 90012

EXPIRATION DATE:

January 3, 2017

Location: 443 South San Pedro Street; 435-451 South San Pedro Street; 336 East Winston Street; 342 East Winston Street Council District: 14 Community Plan Area: Central City Area Planning Commission: Central Neighborhood Council: Downtown Los Angeles Legal Description: Calo Tract, Lot A and Subdivision of the Property of Mrs. M.M. Shaw, Lot FR 7

PROJECT:

Historic-Cultural Monument Application for the CATALINA SWIMWEAR BUILDING

REQUEST:

Declare the property a Historic-Cultural Monument

OWNER/

Kent Hawkins Tailor Lofts, LLC 4940 Campus Road Newport Beach, CA 92660

APPLICANT:

PREPARER:

Tara Hamacher Historic Consultants 256 S. Robertson Boulevard #2401 Beverly Hills, CA 90211

RECOMMENDATION

That the Cultural Heritage Commission:

1.

Declare the subject property a Historic-Cultural Monument per Administrative Code Chapter 9, Division 22, Article 1, Section 22.171.7.

2.

Adopt the staff report and findings.

Los Angeles

VINCENT P. BERTONI, AICP Director of Planning

[SIGNED ORIGINAL IN FILE]

[SIGNED ORIGINAL IN FILE]

Ken Bernstein, AICP, Manager Office of Historic Resources

Lambert M. Giessinger, Preservation Architect Office of Historic Resources

[SIGNED ORIGINAL IN FILE] Melissa Jones, Planning Assistant Office of Historic Resources

Attachments:

Historic-Cultural Monument Application

CHC-2016-3620-HCM 443 South San Pedro Street Page 2 of 4

FINDINGS ®

The Catalina Swimwear Building “reflects the broad cultural, economic, or social history of the nation, state, or community” as an intact example of a garment factory in Downtown Los Angeles representative of the growth of the local garment industry.

CRITERIA The criterion is the Cultural Heritage Ordinance which defines a historical or cultural monument as any site (including significant trees or other plant life located thereon) building or structure of particular historic or cultural significance to the City of Los Angeles, such as historic structures or sites in which the broad cultural, economic, or social history of the nation, State or community is reflected or exemplified, or which are identified with historic personages or with important events in the main currents of national, State or local history or which embody the distinguishing characteristics of an architectural type specimen, inherently valuable for a study of a period style or method of construction, or a notable work of a master builder, designer or architect whose individual genius influenced his age.

SUMMARY The Catalina Swimwear Building is a six-story, industrial building constructed in 1923 located in Downtown Los Angeles at 443 South San Pedro Street, on the southwest corner of South San Pedro and East Winston Streets. It was designed and constructed by William Douglas Lee (1894­ 1965) for Pacific Knitting Mills, which in 1928 became the Catalina Swimwear Company. Constructed during a period of rapid growth in Los Angeles, this building was Lee’s first major commission as an independent architect and is a relic of the early development of the Garment District in Downtown Los Angeles. Rectangular in shape, the Catalina Swimwear Building is of reinforced concrete construction with a Neoclassical fagade sheathed in a Flemish Bond brick pattern. The roof is flat, but interrupted by sawtooth monitors, with east-facing windows providing light to the upper story. The roofline displays a molded projecting cornice across the primary, eastern fagade. Characteristic of Neoclassical design, the sixth story of the building features a projecting balconet, molded stringcourse, arched windows, and end bay rounded arch windows framed by pilasters and topped by a broken Classical pediment. Also on the sixth story, window openings are topped by a segmental arch motif, and original monitor roof skylights provide natural light. The upper portion of the primary fagade is nine bays wide, with seven central bays containing clusters of steel-sash windows. The outermost bays on the north and south sides of the fagade feature a single opening, also with steel sash, operable awning windows. The north elevation shows a concrete framework and the west and south elevations are stucco, with exposed concrete framing. On the first story of the building there is a modified retail storefront with a recessed central entrance. Original terra cotta pilasters with Classical capitals are in place on the front of the structural piers. On the interior, the first floor entrance features an original terrazzo floor abutting the entrance doors. Other notable interior characteristics include a large volume of interior floors, evenly-spaced mushroom columns, and exposed ceiling beams. William Douglas Lee (1894-1965) was a prominent Los Angeles-based architect and designer whose career spanned 40 years, during which time he worked on many diverse types of buildings: commercial, residential, medical, and educational. Lee obtained his architect license in 1918 and initially worked for Los Angeles architect John M. Cooper; a few years later, in 1922, he started

CHC-2016-3620-HCM 443 South San Pedro Street Page 3 of 4

his own practice. One of the hallmarks of Lee’s early work was the formal articulation of building fagades in Revival styles, notably in his design of manufacturing buildings which would otherwise appear utilitarian. Other buildings in Los Angeles designed by Lee include the Textile Center Building (1926, HCM-721); Garment Capitol Building (1926, HCM-930); and El Royale Apartments (1929, HCM-309). Alterations to the Catalina Swimwear Building include the stuccoing of the exterior, plastering over the original terra cotta pilasters on the retail storefront, removal of partition walls on the ground floor in 1960, and the conversion of the property to residential use as artist loft housing in 1992. The Catalina Swimwear Building was identified in the City’s historic resources survey, SurveyLA, as individually eligible for listing at the local, state, and national levels as an excellent, intact example of a garment factory in Downtown Los Angeles.

DISCUSSION The Catalina Swimwear Building successfully meets one of the Historic-Cultural Monument criteria: it “reflects the broad cultural, economic, or social history of the nation, state, or community” as an intact example of a garment factory in Downtown Los Angeles representative of the growth of the local garment industry. While the applicant argues that the subject property is an example of “a notable work of a master builder, designer, or architect whose individual genius influenced his or her age” as a work of noted architect William Douglas Lee, staff do not find that the property meets this criterion due to the significant alterations to the first floor exterior. From the time it was constructed in 1923 until 1960, the subject property served as a women’s swimwear factory for the Catalina Swimwear Company, one of the oldest clothing manufacturers in California. Garment factories were typically housed in industrial lofts, which feature an emphasis on verticality, rectangular massing, and regular bays of industrial sash windows. Other key characteristic elements of industrial buildings include reinforced concrete construction; 13-15 foot ceilings; open interior floor plan on upper stories; and freight elevators between floors. Within the context of garment factories, the Catalina Swimwear Building continues to exhibit distinctive character-defining features and retains sufficient integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association to convey its significance.

CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT (“CEQA”) FINDINGS State of California CEQA Guidelines, Article 19, Section 15308, Class 8 “consists of actions taken by regulatory agencies, as authorized by state or local ordinance, to assure the maintenance, restoration, enhancement, or protection of the environment where the regulatory process involves procedures for protection of the environment.” State of California CEQA Guidelines Article 19, Section 15331, Class 31 “consists of projects limited to maintenance, repair, stabilization, rehabilitation, restoration, preservation, conservation or reconstruction of historical resources in a manner consistent with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties with Guidelines for Preserving, Rehabilitating, Restoring, and Reconstructing Historic buildings." The designation of the Catalina Swimwear Building as an Historic-Cultural Monument in accordance with Chapter 9, Article 1, of The City of Los Angeles Administrative Code (“LAAC”) will ensure that future construction activities involving the subject property are regulated in

CHC-2016-3620-HCM 443 South San Pedro Street Page 4 of 4

accordance with Section 22.171.14 of the LAAC. The purpose of the designation is to prevent significant impacts to a Historic-Cultural Monument through the application of the standards set forth in the LAAC. Without the regulation imposed by way of the pending designation, the historic significance and integrity of the subject property could be lost through incompatible alterations and new construction and the demolition of an irreplaceable historic site/open space. The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation are expressly incorporated into the LAAC and provide standards concerning the historically appropriate construction activities which will ensure the continued preservation of the subject property. The use of Categorical Exemption Class 8 in connection with the proposed designation is consistent with the goals of maintaining, restoring, enhancing, and protecting the environment through the imposition of regulations designed to prevent the degradation of Historic-Cultural Monuments. The use of Categorical Exemption Class 31 in connection with the proposed designation is consistent with the goals relating to the preservation, rehabilitation, restoration and reconstruction of historic buildings and sites in a manner consistent with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties. Categorical Exemption ENV-2016-3621-CE was prepared on November 21, 2016.

BACKGROUND On October 20, 2016, the Cultural Heritage Commission voted to take the subject property under consideration. On November 17, the Commission and staff members from the Office of Historic Resources visited the property.

CITY OF LOS ANGELES

COUNTY CLERK'S USE

CITY CLERK'S USE

OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK 200 NORTH SPRING STREET, ROOM 360 LOS ANGELES. CALIFORNIA 90012 CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT

NOTICE OF EXEMPTION (California Environmental Quality Act Section 15062) Filing of this form is optional If filed, the form shall be filed with the County Clerk, 12400 E Imperial Highway, Norwalk, CA 90650, pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21152 (b). Pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21167 (d), the filing of this notice starts a 35-day statute of limitations on court challenges to the approval of the project Failure to file this notice with the County Clerk results in the statute of limitations being extended to 160 days___________________________________________________________ LEAD CITY AGENCY COUNCIL DISTRICT 14 City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning PROJECT TITLE Catalina Swimwear Building

LOG REFERENCE IENV-2016-3621-CE ; CHC-2016-3620-HCM

PROJECT LOCATION 443 South San Pedro Street, Los Angeles, CA 90013 DESCRIPTION OF NATURE, PURPOSE. AND BENEFICIARIES OF PROJECT: Designation of the Catalina Swimwear Building as an Historic-Cultural Monument. NAME OF PERSON OR AGENCY CARRYING OUT PROJECT. IF OTHER THAN LEAD CITY AGENCY: AREA CODE 213

CONTACT PERSON Melissa Jones

ITELEPHONE NUMBER 978-1192

|

EXT

EXEMPT STATUS. (Check One) STATE CEQA GUIDELINES MINISTERIAL

CITY CEQA GUIDELINES

Sec. 15268

Art. II, Sec.

DECLARED EMERGENCY

Sec. 15269

Art. II, Sec. 2a (1)

EMERGENCY PROJECT

Sec. 15269 (b) & (c)

Art. II, Sec 2a (2) & (3)

CATEGORICAL EXEMPTION

Sec. 15300 et seq.

Art. Ill, Sec. 1

Class OTHER

8& 31

Category

2b

(City CEQA Guidelines)

(See Public Resources Code Sec. 21080 (b) and set forth state and City guideline provision.

JUSTIFICATION FOR PROJECT EXEMPTION: Article 19, Section 15308. Class 8 of the State’s Guidelines applies to where project's consists of 'actions taken by regulatory agencies, as authorized by state or local ordinance, to assure the maintenance, restoration, enhancement, or protection of the environment where the regulatory process involves procedures for protection of the environment" Class 31 applies "to maintenance, repair, stabilization, rehabilitation, restoration, preservation, or reconstruction of historical resources in a manner consistent with the Secretary of Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Buildings.” Designation of the Catalina Swimwear Building as an Historic-Cultural Monument will assure the protection of the environment by the enactment of project review regulations based on the Secretary of Interior s Standards to maintain and preserve the historic site.____________________________ IF FILED BY APPLICANT, ATTACH CERTIFIED DOCUMENT ISSUED BY THE CITY PLANNING DEPARTMENT STATING THAT THE DEPWfMENT HAS FOUND THE PROJECT TO BE EXEMPT. SIGNATURE FEE,

RECEIPT-NO.

! TITLE | Planning Assistant REC’D. BY

DISTRIBUTION: (1) County Clerk, (2) City Clerk, (3) Agency Record IF FILED BY THE APPLICANT. NAME (PRINTED)

DATE

SIGNATURE

DATE November 21, 2016 DATE

l

Los Angeles Department of City Planning RECOHSVSEMDATSON REPORT

CULTURAL HERITAGE COMMISSION

CASE NO.: CHC-2016-3620-HCM ENV-2016-3621-CE

HEARING DATE: TIME: PLACE:

Location: 443 South San Pedro Street; 435-451 South San Pedro Street; 336 East Winston Street; 342 East Winston Street Council District: 14 Community Plan Area: Central City Area Planning Commission: Central Neighborhood Council: Downtown Los Angeles Legal Description: Calo Tract, Lot A and Subdivision of the Property of Mrs. M.M. Shaw, Lot FR 7

October 20, 2016 10:00 AM City Hall, Room 1010 200 N. Spring Street Los Angeles, CA 90012

PROJECT:

Historic-Cultural Monument Application for the CATALINA SWIMWEAR BUILDING

REQUEST:

Declare the property a Historic-Cultural Monument

OWNER/

Kent Hawkins Tailor Lofts, LLC 4940 Campus Road Newport Beach, CA 92660

APPLICANT:

PREPARER:

Tara Hamacher Historic Consultants 256 S. Robertson Boulevard #2401 Beverly Hills, CA 90211

RECOMMENDATION

That the Cultural Heritage Commission:

1. Take the property under consideration as a Historic-Cultural Monument per Los Angeles Administrative Code Chapter 9, Division 22, Article 1, Section 22.171.10 because the application and accompanying photo documentation suggest the submittal warrants further investigation.

2. Adopt the report findings.

VINCENT P. BERTONI, AICP Director of Planning

[SIGNED ORIGINAL IN FILE]

[SIGNED ORIGINAL IN FILE]

Ken Bernstein, AICP, Manager Office of Historic Resources

Lambert M. Giessinger, Preservation Architect Office of Historic Resources

[SIGNED ORIGINAL IN FILE] Melissa Jones, Planning Assistant Office of Historic Resources

Attachments:

Historic-Cultural Monument Application

CHC-2016-3620-HCM 443 South San Pedro Street Page 2 of 3

SUMMARY The Catalina Swimwear Building is a six-story, industrial building constructed in 1923 located in Downtown Los Angeles at 443 South San Pedro Street, on the southwest corner of South San Pedro and East Winston Streets. It was designed and constructed by William Douglas Lee (1894­ 1965) for Pacific Knitting Mills, which in 1928 became the Catalina Swimwear Company. Constructed during a period of rapid growth in Los Angeles, this building was Lee’s first major commission as an independent architect and is a relic of the early development of the Garment District in Downtown Los Angeles. Rectangular in shape, the Catalina Swimwear Building is of reinforced concrete construction with a Neoclassical fagade sheathed in a Flemish Bond brick pattern. The roof is flat, but interrupted by sawtooth monitors, with east-facing windows providing light to the upper story. The roofline displays a molded projecting cornice across the primary, eastern fagade. Characteristic of Neoclassical design, the sixth story of the building features a projecting balconet, molded stringcourse, arched windows, and end bay rounded arch windows framed by pilasters and topped by a broken Classical pediment. Also on the sixth story, window openings are topped by a segmental arch motif, and original monitor roof skylights provide natural light. The upper portion of the primary fagade is nine bays wide, with seven central bays containing clusters of steel-sash windows. The outermost bays on the north and south sides of the fagade feature a single opening, also with steel sash, operable awning windows. The north elevation shows a concrete framework and the west and south elevations are stucco, with exposed concrete framing. On the first story of the building there is a modified retail storefront with a recessed central entrance. Original terra cotta pilasters with Classical capitals are in place on the front of the structural piers. On the interior, the first floor entrance features an original terrazzo floor abutting the entrance doors. Other notable interior characteristics include a large volume of interior floors, evenly-spaced mushroom columns, and exposed ceiling beams. William Douglas Lee (1894-1965) was a prominent Los Angeles-based architect and designer whose career spanned 40 years, during which time he worked on many diverse types of buildings: commercial, residential, medical, and educational. Lee obtained his architect license in 1918 and initially worked for Los Angeles architect John M. Cooper; a few years later, in 1922, he started his own practice. One of the hallmarks of Lee’s early work was the formal articulation of building fagades in Revival styles, notably in his design of manufacturing buildings which would otherwise appear utilitarian. Other buildings in Los Angeles designed by Lee include the Textile Center Building (1926, HCM-721); Garment Capitol Building (1926, HCM-930); and El Royale Apartments (1929, HCM-309). Alterations to the Catalina Swimwear Building include the stuccoing of the exterior, plastering over the original terra cotta pilasters on the retail storefront, removal of partition walls on the ground floor in 1960, and the conversion of the property to residential use as artist loft housing in 1992. The Catalina Swimwear Building was identified in the City’s historic resources survey, SurveyLA, as individually eligible for listing at the local, state, and national levels as an excellent, intact example of a garment factory in Downtown Los Angeles.

CRITERIA The criterion is the Cultural Heritage Ordinance which defines a historical or cultural monument as any site (including significant trees or other plant life located thereon) building or structure of particular historic or cultural significance to the City of Los Angeles, such as historic structures or

CHC-2016-3620-HCM 443 South San Pedro Street Page 3 of 3

sites in which the broad cultural, economic, or social history of the nation, State or community is reflected or exemplified, or which are identified with historic personages or with important events in the main currents of national, State or local history or which embody the distinguishing characteristics of an architectural type specimen, inherently valuable for a study of a period style or method of construction, or a notable work of a master builder, designer or architect whose individual genius influenced his age.

FINDINGS Based on the facts set forth in the summary and application, the Commission determines that the application is complete and that the property may be significant enough to warrant further investigation as a potential Historic-Cultural Monument.

/',r® «*> vi ■

NOMINATION FORM 1. PROPERTY IDENTIFICATION Proposed Monument Name:

Catalina Swimwear Building

First Owner/Tenant

Other Associated Names:

street Address:

zp

443 s. San Pedro Street, Los Angeles

Council District.

Community Name:

Range of Addresses on Property: Assessor Parcel Number:

9Q013

5148011018

Tract;

Calo Tract

Block:

14

Downtown

|\|/A

Lot:

A

Identification cont’d: Proposed Monument

Building

Property Type:

Structure

Site/Open Space

Object

Natural Feature

Describe any additional resources located on the property to be included in the nomination, here:

2. CONSTRUCTION HISTORY & CURRENT STATUS •

Year built: 1923

Factual

Estimated

Threatened?

None

Architect/Designer: Wj|liam Douglas Lee

Contractor: c.L.Peck

Original Use: Manufacturing

Present Use Artist in Residence Lofts

Is the Proposed Monument on its Original Site?



Yes

Unknown (explain in section 7)

No (explain in section 7)

3. STYLE & MATERIALS Architectural Style:

Stories g

Beaux Arts Classicism (Neoclassical)

SECONDARY

PRIMARY

FEATURE CONSTRUCTION

Type:

CLADDING

Material:

“ype:

Concrete poured/precast Brick

Flat

Type-

Select

Material: Type

Stucco, smooth Select

ROOF Material-

Type:

Rolled asphalt

Awning

Material:

select

Type.

WINDOWS Material:

steel

Plan Shape

Material

ENTRY

Style;

Centered

Style:

DOOR

Type.

Paneled, glazed

Type:

Select

Select

Rectangular

tie

NOMINATION FORM 4.

ALTERATION HISTORY List date and write a brief description of any major alterations or additions. This section may also be completed on a separate document. Include copies of permits in the nomination packet. Make sure to list any major alterations for which there are no permits, as well.

5.

38140

August 20, 1923. Loft Building Under Construction

74653

Nov, 14, 1960 Plaster Breast to Cover Existing terra cotta and interior partitions, first floor

89-22751

Certificate of Occupancy Issued for Artist in Residence conversion

EXISTING HISTORIC RESOURCE IDENTIFICATION (if known) Listed in the Natrona! Register of Historic Places Listed in the California Register of Historical Resources Formally determined eligible for the National and/or California Registers Contributing feature Located in an Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ) Non-contributing feature Survey Name(sl: Determined eligible for national, state, or local landmark status by an historic resources survey(s)

Other historical or cultural resource designations:

6.

APPLICABLE HISTORIC-CULTURAL MONUMENT CRITERIA

The proposed monument exemplifies the following Cultural Heritage Ordinance Criteria (Section 22.171.7): Reflects the broad cultural, economic, or social history of the nation, state, or community Is identified with historic personages or with important events in the main currents of national, state, or local history

Embodies the disttnguising characteristics of an architectural-type specimen, inherently valuable for study of a period, style, or method of construction

v/

A notable work of a master builder, designer, or architect whose individual genius influenced his or her age

3

-a

NOMINATION FORM 7. WRITTEN STATEMENTS

This section allows you to discuss at length the significance of the proposed monument and why it should be designated an Historic-Cultural Monument. Type your response on separate documents and attech them to this form. A. Proposed Monument Description - Describe the proposed monument's physical characteristics and relationship to its surrounding environment. Expand on sections 2 and 3 with a more detailed descrip­ tion of the site. Expand on section 4 and discuss the construction/alteration history in detail if that is necessary to explain the proposed monument's current form. Identify and describe any character­ defining elements, structures, interior spaces, or landscape features.

B. Statement of Significance - Address the proposed monument's historic, cultural, and/or architec. tural significance by discussing how it satisfies the HCM criteria you seiected in Section 6. You must support your argument with substantial evidence and analysis. The Statement of Significance is your main argument for designation so it is important to substantiate any claims you make with supporting documentation and research.

8. CONTACT INFORMATION Applicant Name:

Company.

Kent Hawkins

Street Address:

4940 Campus Drive

Zip. 92560

Phone Number:

Tailor lofts, LLC

City: Newport Beach 949 752 7120

Property Owner

Email: [email protected]

Is the owner in support of the nomination?

Name.

Company:

Street Address

City

Phone Number.

Zip.

State: CA



ves

Unknown

No

State: Email

Nomination Preparer/Applicant's Representative Name:

Company:

Tara Hamacher

Street Address: Zip: 90211

256 S. Robertson Blvd., #2401 Phone Number

213-379-1040

Historic Consultants

City: Beverly Hills

State: CA

Email [email protected]

CITY OF LOS

NGELES

Office of H'St-

ic Resources/Cuuufal Heritage Commission

M

NOMINATION FORM 9. SUBMITOL When you have completed preparing your nomination, compile all materials in the order specified below. Although the entire packet must not exceed 100 pages, you may send additional material on a CD or flash drive.

APPLICATION CHECKLIST

1

y/

Nomination Form

S.

y/

2.


Written Statements A and B

6.

y/

Copies of Primary/Secondary Documentation Copies of Building Permits for Major Alterations (include first construction permits)

3.

y/

Bibliography

4.

/

Two Primary Photos of Exterior/Main Facade

7. (SxlO, the main photo of the proposed monument. Also

^

S.

Additional, Contemporary Photos Historical Photos

email a dlgitial copy of the mam photo to: planning ohrtSlIacity.org)

9.

y/

Zimas Parcel Report for all Nominated Parcels (including map)

10. RELEASE Please read each statement and check the corresponding boxes to indicate that you agree with the statement, then sign below In the piovided space. Either the applicant or preparer may sign. i acknowledge that all documents submitted will become public records under the California Public Records Act, and understand

v/

that the documents will be made available upon request to members of the public for inspection and copying.

n/

Angeles, and understand that permission is granted for use of the photographs and images by the City without any expectation

I acknowledge that all photographs and images submitted as part of this application will become the property of the City of Los of compensation. I acknowledge that I have the right to submit or have obtained the appropriate permission to submit all information contained

s/

in this application.

x. y N

3

/

L.J"// Date:

Ou,- nr v

Signature

Mail your Historic-Cultural Monument Submittal to the Office of Historic Resources.

Office of Historic Resources Department of City Planning 200 N. Spring Street, Room 620 Los Angeles, CA 90012 Phone: 213-978-1200 Website: preservation.lacity.org

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Proposed Monument Description - Describe the proposed monument's physical characteristics and relationship to its surrounding environment. Expand on Sections 2 and 3 with a more detailed description of the site. Expand on Section 4, and discuss the construction/alteration history in detail if that is necessary to explain the proposed monument's current form Identify and describe and character-defining elements, structures, interior spaces, and/or landscape features.

The Catalina Swimwear Building is a six story, industrial building constructed in L923. The facade has Neoclassical features and articulation that reflect early twentieth century architecture, more formal than typical for a building intended for manufacturing purposes. The building was designed by William Douglas Lee, and is Lee’s first major commission as an independent architect in Los Angeles. The Catalina Building is located on the southwest corner of San Pedro and Winston Streets. Two other buildings of similar character and scale, the Westinghouse Electric Building, 420 S. San Pedro Street, (HCM #937) and the Renaissance Building/Elias Katz Shoe Company at 442 S San Pedro, 1926, occupy the opposite corners on the east side of San Pedro Street The Renaissance Building, (now the Downtown Women's Center), is located directly opposite the Catalina Swimwear Building and is also a William Douglas Lee design It features a formal fagade with Tudor stylistic details. The formal articulation of a fagade in various Revival styles would become the hallmark of Lee's early work, notably in his design of manufacturing buildings of the period which would otherwise appear completely utilitarian. The Catalina Swimwear building is a rectangular shape, measuring 160 feet x 102 feet, and encompassing 92,538 square feet on the six floors. The upper portion of the primary (east.) fagade is nine bays wide, with seven central bays containing clusters of steel-sash windows in rectangular openings. The outermost bays on north and south sides of the fagade feature only a single opening, aiso with steel sash, awning windows. The center portion of each window unit is an operable awning sash. The brick of the upper facade is set in a flemish Bond pattern, using variegated, slightly-textured bricks with a light brown color There is a molded stringcourse above the fifth floor windows, setting off the sixth story from the lower fagade. The end bays of the sixth story have round arched windows, framed by pilasters and topped by a broken Classical pediment. A projecting balconet at the base of the sixth floor windows is integral with the stringcourse, a combination often displayed by Neoclassic designs. The sixth story window openings are topped by a segmental arch motif, again accentuating the upper story. The articulation of the sixth story is consistent with formal Neoclassical design, and therefore distinguishes the building as more than a typical utilitarian industrial structure. There is a fire escape on the fagade, likely original, but it is not ornamental in any manner. The brick veneer and upper story articulation at the sixth story extends around the first bay of the north elevation, highlighting that corner of the building The remainder of the north elevation shows a concrete framework, and stucco in the central portion of this surface The windows are set within incised, rectangular openings, and are regularly spaced, similar to the facade There is also a fire escape on this elevation. The rear, (west) elevation and south elevations are stuccoed, with exposed concrete framing. Window openings are inegularly placed, but have the same steel, awning sash, although on this elevation the

1

openings and windows are of varying dimensions. By contrast, the south elevation only features three rectangular windows, all of the same size, evenly spaced and located on the fourth, fifth, and sixth stories. The roofline features a molded projecting cornice across the fagade The roof is flax, but interrupted by saw tooth monitors, with east-facing windows providing for light to the upper story. These monitors are not visible from the ground level. The base of the building features a modified retail storefront with a recessed central entrance. The date of this alteration is unclear in the record, but it would appear that the current fagade dates to 1960. A building permit (LA 74653) dated November 14, I960 describes adding a '"piaster breast to cover exiting terra cotta, and interior partitions", with improvements at a height of 17 feet This description is consistent with the current appearance of the storefront/retail portion of the fagade. It is evident that the lower fagade has been furred out, obscuring the original storefront design and detailing, although the spacing of the storefront bays is consistent with the upper fagade. forensic examination shows that the furring consists of stucco applied to metal mesh, connected with rebar from the fagade to the interior wall. Fortunately, original wood window frames 3re intact, although the glass is gone.

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more fortunate, original terra cotta pilasters with Classical capitals, are also in place on the front of the structural piers. These pilasters are visible in profile only, but it is clear that they are intact and are stylistically consistent with the Classical detailing of the sixth story. The existence of the original fabric indicates that the alteration of the retail level is reversible and the original appearance could be authentically restored based on the extant fabric. The Catalina Swimwear building was subsequently converted to residential use as artist loft housing. The conversion was completed by 1992 when a Certificate of Occupancy (39 LA 22751) was issued. The first floor entrance features a terrazzo floor abutting the entrance doors, but that is the only vestige of the original entry area that remains. The building permit for the alteration of the fagade in 1960 references removal of partitions, presumably a reference to internal walls between the storefronts. The large volume of the interior floors and evenly-spaced mushroom columns are a notable characteristic. There are no significant or character-defining ornamental features or partitions remaining on the upper stones, suggesting that there were originally open and unobstructed, which would be consistent with the manufacturing use. The only difference between the upper floors is that on the sixth floor, original monitor roof skylights provide natural light and break up the expanse of the ceiling plane

2

B. Statement of Significance - Address the proposed monument's historic, cultural and/or historic architectural significance by discussing how it satisfies the HCM criteria you selected in Section 6 You must support your argument with substantial evidence and analysis. The Statement of Significance is your main argument for designation, so it is important to substantiate any claims you make with supporting documentation and research, Criteria: A notable work of a master builder, designer, or architect whose individual genius influenced his or her age. This building appears to be the first major commission of W. Douglas Lee as on independent architect. His application of Period Revival details to a basic industrial building became his signature detail for buildings in the Garment District. The Catalina Swimwear Building appears to be the first major industrial and manufacturing facility designed by architect W Douglas Lee The Catalina Swimwear Building was constructed in 1923, less than 2 years after Lee began bis independent practice, initiating what would be a prolific and influential 40 year career in Los Angeles The building is of reinforced concrete construction, with a traditional Neoclassrc fagade sheathed in brick its construction is documented by City of Los Angeles Building Permit #88140, issued for a 6 story' building with a concrete frame on the southwest corner of San Pedro and Winston Streets. W. Douglas Lee became a licensed architect in 1918 and initially worked for Los Angeles architect John M. Cooper Cooper was a Yale-trained architect, and apparently was Lee’s mentor. Their projects included commercial buildings, schools, hospitals and offices. This affiliation appears as early as 1916, as noted in a Southwest Building and Contractor listing jlj, according to a Los Angeles Times article referring to the Hotel Gothic (2). Cooper and Lee would separate when Lee earned his professional certification. The two would become competitors in Los Angeles generally for the remainder of their careers. Cooper's primary building in the Garment District is the Maxfield Building completed in 1926, and noted for its use of concrete formed to be ornamental. In contrast, Lee’s work remained more traditional due to his application of Period Revival details, at least through the 1920's when Lee was in collaboration with the development firm of Casler and Lloyd in the garment district W. Douglas Lee received his Certificate to Practice Architecture, granted by the State Board of Architecture in 1921. {3), and started working on his own by early 1922. Again, Southwest Builder and Contractor notes that "Archt. W. Douglas Lee has established an office at 610 Gross Building and desires catalogs and samples of building materials and appliances.1"(4) Initially, Lee was engaged in public work. In 1922, Lee was awarded a contract to design an 8 unit school including auditorium by the Los Angeles Board of Education. (5) Lee was preparing plans for a single story warehouse on 17th St. between Mam & Hill St, for C. Henry Frost Lee also designed a brick store and apartment building on the southwest corner of 3rd St & Vermont Ave All of this work was relatively small scale but was sufficient to establish Lee's professional practice. In 1923, the Catalina Swimwear Building represents a larger commission that would set the stage for the initial phase of Lee's career, during which Lee would establish the architectural identity of the Garment District. Directly across San Pedro Street from the Catalina Swimwear building, W. Douglas Lee designed the Elias Katz Shoe Factory originally named the Renaissance Building, (6) now known as the Los Angeles Woman’s Center. In this case, Lee held a 99 year lease on the site, and would own the building upon 3

completion, leasing it to the Elias Katz Shoe Company for 25 years. (?) He was also the contractor on the project. Lee owned and developed several of his buildings, ultimately through the Realty Holding Corporation which Lee founded in 1928 in order to build and finance income properties in the Los Angeles area. (8) Both the Catalina Swimwear Building and the Renaissance Building are similar to the extent that they are functional industrial buildings, but distinguished by a formal fa£3de representing Neoclassic and Tudor Revival designs associated with the early 1920's. These two buildings are adjacent to the Westmghouse Electric Building (HCM#937), completed in 1922, that would serve as the Westinghouse headquarters until 1948. While not known to be a Lee design, the Westmghouse Building is consistent in scale and character with the adjacent structures at this intersection. The Catalina Swimwear Building is an early, signature work that would lead to Lee's subsequent association in 1924 with the influential development team of Florence Caster and William K. Lloyd. Lee's hallmark design formula for these buildings, endorsed as a goal by Florence Casler, was the combination of a forma! facade representing various Revival styles of the 192Q's, applied to an otherwise functional and utilitarian manufacturing building. Florence Casler is known for being one of the first female developers in Los Angeles and the only woman involved in the construction of high-rise buildings, and particularly in the Garment district. Following completion of the Catalina Swimwear Building, W. Douglas Lee was commissioned by Casler and Lloyd to create a series of seven specialized industrial buildings that are the centerpieces of the Garment District in the area of Pico Boulevard and Maple Avenue, a few blocks to the west of the cluster of earlier industrial/manufacturing buildings on San Pedro Street. Lee's designs would establish the architectural/stylistic identity of the Garment district by featuring several Gothic and Renaissance Revival buildings. The team earned acclaim for developing major buildings reflecting, modern and efficient industrial design, detailed in various Revival styles of the period. The majority of the buildings were 12 stories, which is a function of the overriding height limit of 150 feet that governed the core of Los Angeles until 1950. In the case of the Garment District, construction of buildings to the height limit necessitated that they have a very effective vertical circulation and elevator component in order to be efficient for garment manufacturing to be viable in the central core of the city. Garment manufacturing in fact remained active in the central city into the 1950's when most of the manufacturers moved to suburban locations. Foremost among the Casler and tee buildings is the Garment Capitol Building (217 E. 8W Street), a 12 story building featuring Gothic Revival detailing (HCM# 930). The collaboration with Casler, working exclusively with Douglas Lee, created six additional buildings in the Garment District, including: Allied Craft Building 1925 407 E. Pico Blvd Textile Center Building 1926, 315 E. 8th Street (HCM #712) Graphic Arts Building, 417 E. Pico Blvd Furniture Exchange Building, 1206 Santee Street Printing Center 1928, 1220 Maple Avenue Merchants Exchange Building, 719 S, Los Angeles Street

4

Another prominent manufacturing building in the immediate vicinity, although not a garment building, is the Bendix Building, 1206 Maple Avenue. Constructed for the Bendix Corporation for their aviation business, it was completed in 1929. It was developed for Bendix by Lloyd and Casler, again using W Douglas Lee as the architect The Bendix Building follows the formula of a light manufacturing building with an ornamental facade, similar to Lee's other industrial/manufacturing buildings in the Garment District. Notably, it appears to be the last building developed by Lloyd and Casler, and marks the end of the Lee’s successful affiliation with Casler and Lloyd as well as being the last building developed by Florence Casler. Following his work with Lloyd and Casler, W. Douglas Lee's practice would change direction and include more diverse building types. Lee would be credited with the design of numerous major buildings, including apartments and hotels The earliest residential work is the Guardian Arms Hotel, in Hollywood, completed in 1927 Consistent with his extensive utilization of Period Revival features, the Guardian Arms boasts ornate Classical detailing, an ornamental Mansard roof, and Tudor-arches Compared to his later work, the Guardian Arms is a relatively modest Tudor Revival design for an apartment building that catered primarily to the working class clientele of the movie industry, In contrast to the Guardian Arms, the most prestigious and well known of Lee's hotel work is the El Royale Apartments at 450 Rossmore Avenue, 1929. (HCM &309) It is one of a series of 'New York Style’ sophisticated apartments near VVilshlre Country club catering to an elite and powerful clientele. The owner, Barco Investment Company announced construction in August 1929. They hired W. Douglas Lee. known as the 'iconic architect’ of the period. The El Royale would feature the Renaissance Revival styles that characterized Lee's other buildings. The clear competitor in to the E! Royale in tee's hotel portfolio Is the Chateau Marmont, 8221 Sunset Boulevard, (HCM #151), the grand hotel catering to the Hollywood elite. W. Douglas Lee was the primary architect, working in conjunction with Arnold A. Weitzman In his later career, W. Douglas Lee represented the forefront of the modern movement in Los Angeles. In 1959, working with his son, Douglas Everett Lee, they designed the Lee Tower building at 5455 Wilsbire Boulevard. In this case, W Douglas Lee was also the developer and buiider, through the lee Tower Corporation. Completed in 1961, The Lee Tower introduced the appearance of the modern skyscraper in Los Angeles (9). The Lee Tower was the first skyscraper to surpass the 150 foot height limit following repeal of the height restriction by the Los Angeles City Council The Lee Tower would far surpass the limit by rising to 280 feet, with 21 stories. Clearly of modern design, it is dramatically different from the Period Revival designs of Lee's earlier career Constructed with a steel frame, it epitomizes the early phases of steel frame and glass curtain wall design that would typify much of the office tower design of the 1960s, altering the skyline of Los Angeles Catalina Swimwear Company Although not intended to be the topic of this nomination, it is relevant to reference the significance of Catalina Swimwear, the long term occupant of the building from circa 1923, until the building was sold and in 1960, and they relocated to City of Commerce, CA in i960.

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The Catalma Swimwear Company was an influential manufacturer of women's swimwear from the 1920's to the 1%0's One cf the oldest clothing manufacturers in California, the company was founded in 1907 by John C. Bentz. Named the 3entz Knitting Mills, the company was known for men's and women's underwear and sweaters. Bentz changed the name to Pacific Knitting Mills in 1912, at the time they began production of swimwear. He changed the name of the company again to Catalina Swimwear in 1928, matching the name of his best-selling swimsuit, the Catalina.

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Bentz transitioned the business by capitalizing on the emerging trends in women's swimwear that began to appear in southern California. From a beginning of producing mostly simple one-piece suits for women, Catalina shifted to production of increasingly fashionable and revealing women's swimsuits. The fashion trends were coming out of France and European countries. In addition, as the 1920's moved in to the Prohibition era, the culture of Hollywood celebrities going off shore to places like Santa Catalina Island and the Town of Avalon of the coast of Los Angeles, led the island to be at the forefront of trends in the American swimwear industry. The construction of the Catalina Casino in Avalon, 3nd its correlation with the film and movie industry, made Santa Catalina island a mecca for Hollywood actresses and the film industry, along with the beach and fashion culture that were closely integrated. The emerging changes in swimsuit fashion brought competition from the sports world from companies like iantzer, for athletic suits and Cole of California, as well as various European swimwear designers. However, during the 1930's, 3entz and Catalina Swimwear remained a leader in the movement in America as Bentz developed his swimsuit line to be sleeker, with more skin exposure. In the 1930s and 40's, Catalina Swimwear created a strong relationship with the Hollywood movie culture and its association with fashion Warner Brother costume designer Grry Kelly and color consultant Perc Westhorne designed swimwear for Catalina. Actresses, including Ginger Rogers, Joan Crawford, and Marilyn Monroe, were photographed in Catalina Swimwear.

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The swimwear industry was also associated with the advent of the "pin-up" girl posters, many of which featured women in Catalina swimsuits. This trend began with advertisements in Esquire Magazine in the mid-1930's, and continued in the years prior to World War 2.

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Catalina swimsuits were also heavily advertised in Life magazine in the 1940’s, and at the time there were matching materials and designs for men and women. Advertisements also played off the California beach reputation, and the Hollywood affiliation with the slogan " Sweethearts in Swimsuits, Styled in California" for the Stars of Hollywood, and YOU" (10) Catalina swimsuits would remain dominant through the 1950's, although the introduction of the modern bikini in 1946 by French engineer Louis Reard would introduce another change the swimwear fashions, especially in Europe. The gradual acceptance of the bikini by international models and actresses during the 1350's would lead to the fashion trend becoming more acceptable in America by the 1960's, and ultimately brought about the decline of companies like Catalina. In the 1960's, Catalina affiliated with Cole of California, another swimwear firm and former competitor, dating back to 1925. Catalina Swimwear was also associated with the origins of the Miss America Beauty Pageant in 1921, Started by promoters in Atlantic City as a way to extend the summer season, the pageant was focused on the swimsuit competition until a talent section was added in 1938. in the early years, the swimwear competition was the main event, and by the 1940's all girls wore the same Catalina suits. This continued until 1949, There was no pageant in 1950, and then in 1951, one contestant, Yolanda Betbeze refused to pose for the swimsuit competition. Catalina withdrew its sponsorship at that time, and in 1952, Catalina's parent company Pacific Knitting Mills founded the Miss Universe Pageant.

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Footnotes 1.

Southwest Builder and Contractor 9/9/1916, pg 13)

2-

Los Angeles Times, Taking Bids for Hostelry, Sixth Street Project to Start Soon, July 16, 1916

3

Southwest Builder and Contractor, 11/4/21.

4.

Southwest Builder and Contractor 4/21/1922, pg. 10

5.

Building & Engineering News, 12/3/1922, pg. 13.)

6.

Los Angeles Times, October 17,1926

7.

Los Angeles Times, Six Story Block to Rise, October 17,1926)

8.

Los Angeles Times, Display Ad, April 22,1928.

9.

Los Angeles Times, May 30,1959. Tower Building Permit issued. Pg. A8

10.

Life Magazine, June 4, 1928, advertisement, p. 120

Bibliography

Announcing Formation Realty Holding Corporation of California, Display Ad, Los Angeles Times, April 22, 1928 Announce Loft Structure, Los Angeles Times, June 20, 1926 Chattel, Robert, and Swerdlow, Shane, Los Angeles Historic and Cultural Monument nomination, Maxfield Building, 2014 En.rn.wikiepdia.org, Catalina Swimwear En.m Wtkipedia.org, Catalina Casino GlamourSurf.com, Catalina Swimwear and the Miss America Pageant, February 2008 newsletter Https:/ fc-dericr-rJec?lii'<..rn.a.wofCpies-j.cfiir-/201C/l l/JS/cataima-swiniwe

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Emerging California

Coastal Culture Height-Limit Unit Planned. Fashion Center Building to Cost 51,350,000, Los Angeles Times, January 22. 1928 Leased to Shoe Factory, Six Story Block to Rise, Los Angeles Times, October 17, 1926. Life Magazine, May 24, 1954, Voi 36, No, 21, page 44 Life Magazine, June 7,1948, p. 147 Life Magazine, June 14,1948, p. 120 Life Magazine, May 9,1949, page 194 Life Magazine, June 20,1949

9

Mears, Hadley, Meet the Powerhouse Female Developer of 1920's Downtown IA, Curbed LA, March 12, 2015, Mears, Hadley, The story of the El Royale. The Most Glamorous Apartment Building in Los Angeles, Curbed LA, June 1, 2015 Rites Planned for Architect W D, Lee, LA Times, 17 Aug, 1965, pA2 Skyscraper's Opening Scheduled Tuesday. Los Angeles Times, March 19, 196i Skyscraper Opens orr Miracle Mile, Los Angeles Times, March 24,1961 Taking Bids for Hostelry, Sixth Street Project to Start Soon, Los Angeles Times, July 16.1916 Tower Building Permit Issued, Los Angeles Times, May 30,1959 Twenty One Story Structure Slated for Miracle Mile Corner, Los Angeles Times, Feb 23, 1958, pg FI Twelve Story Apartment Started, Rossmore and Rosewood, Los Angeles Times, August 26,1923 Types of Left and Residential Structures, Los Angeles Times, June 20, 1926.

10

WILLIAM DOUGLAS LEE

llREAl | ABOUT THE ARCHITECT

(1894-1965)

The Bendix Building is one building in a line of many treasures designed by Master Architect William Douglas Lee. A celebrated designer in Los Angeles, Lee garnered great attention during the 1920s when his idea to transform the city's aesthetic with famed builder Florence Casler took hold.Together Lee and Casler erected what Florence termed a"utopian commercial area”centered around Pico Boulevard and Maple Avenue. Between 1924 and 1929 they erected at least 7 major specialized industrial buildings. These include the Textile Center Building, the Allied Crafts Building, the

Graphic Arts Building, the Garment Capitol Building, the Furniture Exchange Building, the Printing Center, and the Merchants Exchange Building. Lee shared Florence's love of modern design enhanced with revival accenting and molding in terra cotta and stone, which lifted their buildings above the utilitarian norm. Even after their partnership Lee became responsible for designing some of the most iconic buildings in Los Angeles. These include Chateau Marmont and El Royale Apartments. FHis style remains relevant even in today's booming modern architectural world.

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13,

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14.

Material of foundation;

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iwtiw.X«sn

addiaon—

.Size lootings

........._Sre
, JDapth below ground-.,

Sire of interior bearing studs,.....,,

13. “ Size af Redwood Mudsills.

Size of,interior nrm-beatirig studs..

..x.

Id.

.Size of exterior studs.—...

I 7,

Size' of first floor Joists..—

1 8.

Will all provisions of State Dwelling House Act be complied with?

Second floor joisli..

'•***»»'

K ■

' l Have carefully examined and read the above blunt and know the some Is true and correct and that'all pro­ visions of the Ordinances surd- LaVr, governing Building Construction will be complied with, whether herein specified or not *.

»

(Sign here).

(Cwnnr or AtithwctTfuS Arent>.

FOR DEPARTMENT USE ONLY

J

APPLICATION

O.Kr

CONSTRUCTION

O.K.

ZONING"

0.-E.'

'

SET-BACK UNE

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3



O.K.

ORD. 33761 (N. S.)

O.K.

FIRE DISTRICT

Q-K,

f

£

T •ft

REMARKS

, i

/j I hereby agree to locate and erect this building or structure and every portion thereof, except nnenclosed porcbesRback a distance from the front property line equal to the lot-back line of the nearest building now erected on any lot in thia block in Zone "A", or “B" on the same side of the sheet

Owner.

} J. *.

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flFtuItT-MMn f Ml 1'1-ANMl)

i.»C'*»v» 5I.i5H.0HU .

HEIGHT-LIMIT UNIT PLANNED Fashion Cantor Building to

Cost 51,350,000 Sbyscraper

to

Operate

on

French Plan Seven-Story Apartment IT’ill Rise Immediately Two structures, one it Fashion Center Building coating *1,358,000 d the other h 5250,000 apartmenthouse lor F.lfiv*

^‘rriiTv r .enth

JIocve'r

at reela, wire out* acanding in announeemnaM of 4 I new building® ,y made yesterday. work wm be* gin in thirty L.V days on con* arruetjaa trf a ♦. wel re-itory basemen* and sttfc-fc a a e m e n t CUm*A loft and > office building on tit: Loa Angeles street, Just south W.COUG LA.fi> tE£. of Seventh end adjoin I ng tUe Transportation Building:. which, when completed, e?iU represent an invertmens of HI.350,COO, it tv-ea announced yesterday by V/. Bougiaa Let. archi­ tect and engineer, who J« completing plans for the project. The building ' is expected to be it any for occupancy by August. 1 and will .front 28} jeer on Los Any.Wei* street by 123 uxt m drpth. The new structure will be Known as the fash­ ion center Building it is designed, in the modern Gothic style with brick from tna terra cotta trim, tnarble *«Ub«k and lobby, three high-speed pasuttn^cr e>vccan». two trssght carrier!?, ahlpptag plat forms for Sacoming and outgoing freight and epeciat devices for quick, handling The Interior will be fin­ ished in Philippine mahogany, raartle ond rubber tiled flooring. Sight Jioorss will be devoted exclu­ sively to mamiJaetiirers. Tha struc­ ture baa been specially planned to obtain the maximum amount of llght sad will cantata every aom convenience required by t-iie tnnr.u* fseforem of garments and allied Unco. tho equipment being to ir.suro efficient operation at the Icrw«t*t production costs. Four floors wlU be used as offices and display rooms for Jobbers etc manufacturers. club toorriR and ban­ quet rooms lot visitors and the bold­ ins of function!) while the roof will be turned, into a garden. The two basements will servo an garage? tor Btvtrei hundred cars of tha tenants arid tbdr customers. Announcement of the bunding ngaollwa the ttrt»t major undertakJn? of the Realty Ko’<ig Corporation slue's tbt formation a- few week* ego. The eigattiaaitoa. which bar* underwritten the entire cost -of the building, merits the adoption here of o construe’Jen end ownership Srttaxclng plan similar to the Fred F. Preach Plan of New ■Vori. under which aore thou fkoo.00004W worth vt uui/djj?g» have pone up In the eastern city, within the last few years. rho JocaS plan will probably be known as tbs Lw Plan., in which tho public may bo Riven tva onoorfcuhltv laser to parftcl* pate, it ^os an* cebneed by Paul E. Watson, sec­ retary of the cor* \S poratioa. Only sp>. major improve­ ;» ment* will he undertaken and 7; the ‘concern's ac­ tivities will em­ brace every T>ba%et oi realty owncrahtp, court ruc­ tion and raange[V>'-:di liV*iSUkiTSW j mmi, he «*M. Waixon •visa r authority for the ? PAUL H. '

m

2

t...

aftAtemtut

that I

IVATSOM

40 oer cent of the 531.600 square feet of Sour ere® ; fa tbs new building have already been '

icon tinned on Pagr ?, Column 4> PnMc.*u«'j

'!)< i><.-)Trtifc*iOn 'J1 t«f C-

HEIGHT-LIMIT UNIT PLANNED (Continued from First Page) leased. The etracture ha* been de­ signed to accommodate the growing neede of the garment Industry in Loa Angeles, which has advanced from sueth piece to second place to New York a* a stylo renter In th# short apace of five yean. Officers and directors of the Realty Holding corooratlon of California in­ clude W. Douglas Lee. architect and engineer, president; Jack Irvine of the Mortgage Guarantee Company, vice-president; Nathan T. Poiver, president of the Thrift Corporation oi America, treasurer; Paul H. Vtati son, formerly with the National City Company of New York, secretary; , Commodore J. Stuart BInckton, capi­ talist, motion-picture magnate and a director of the Bank of Hollywood. . director; John Camphouse, president , ot the Bank of Hollywood and the J Bank of West Hollywood, director; i H. G. Cary of the H. G. Cory Com- j J pany, plumbing contractors, d>rector; Grover O. Gearhart of the Ham- : xnond Lumber Company and p.x'si-, dent of the Foreign Trade Club of Los Angeles, director; Fred J. Hulls, j member of the Realty Board, director,1 and Andrew 8eablom, local brick con­ tractor, director. SEVEN-STORY APARTMENT Rising seven stories with steel frame, a Class-A $350,000 apartmenthouse will be erected Immediately at the northwest comer of Eleventh and Hoover streets, according to F, E. Temple, builder, and Hlllier and Sheet, architects for the new struc­ ture. The mtas of the owner has been withheld. Construction needs anal approval of plans. The Qrsfc floor of the apartment will be devoted to a lobby and lounge end ft dining-room to accommodote 200 people. Bachelor and regular apartment uhita are included In the plans which reU for Mediterranean architecture. Finishing will be of colored stucco. Tile roof and most modern equipment are provided. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner Further reproduction prohibited without permission

Stores aid l,(d't for lointli: IIO i l l. It) lit CONSTRI < i l l) Work tin Sen ... y.i/v tngeies fttficx ii'/2TC utTem hthr feb I. 1{12> ProQuesi l Jisioncul Nc*\^papers !

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05 Angeles "I imes {lb‘81-1 $S91

Stores and Loft for Fourth ■s .

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Tills Hlurc and loft StriicMure is bn I rip built on tins northwest corner of Fourth nnd Wal! streets for Dr. J. Leon Movers.

HOTEL TO BE CONSTRUCTED Work

on

New

lngleu)ood

Project

to

be

Started

Tomorrow and Rushed lo Completion [LOCAL COHUESPONDiSNCEJ INGLEWOOD, Jan. 31.—Work will begin Monday by John A. Malloy, contractor, on a $100,000 hotel building at the northwest cor­ ner pf Commercial and Regent streets for the l. M. C. Finance Corv.nrnrien nf this ci!v. of which Henrv StfilcUt in the president. This company comprises the In­ foot frontage on Commercial street glewood Mercantile Company In- und a 110-foot frontage on Re­ . ipresis and is a $250,000 closed cor­ gent. Another $100,000 hotel, the Hiltporation. Lfrnmn O. Calkins, pres­ crest tnn, la rapidly approaching ident of the mercantile company. completion at the southwest cor­ ner or HUlcrest Boulevard and Is secretary of the corporation und Leb Calkins is the vice-president. KitRt Queen streets, the owner be­ ing 11. W. Long fellow. • Work will bn rushed In order to have the entire building ready for occupancy by April 25. A six-year lease on the hotel has been taken by Mr. and Mrs. F. Bergln of Pomona, for many years successful hotel proprietors In that city. There will bo thirty-live out­ side rooniH on the second floor. On the ground floor will be the en­ barber trance, lobby, cute and shop, all fronting on Commercial street. A drug store will occupy the ground Moor corner, Young's Market luis another ground Moor Commercial street frontage.' while titers win be two storerooms on Regent street. The building will be two stories ir. height, of ornamental brick. The roof will be of tile. There is a 1 50Reproti l

with permission of the copyright owner Further reproduction prohih (ed without permission

21-M Om SI Ri C l l Ml SI. \ I U) I OR MIR \( i I Mil I < OKM R: S' M SMIRI HI M DIM i IVtH / h‘‘. >

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FOR WILSHtRE SITE—Here's design of 21-story Lee Tower office buildinq set to rise at northwest corner of Wilshire Bfvd, and Cochran Ave., in the Mirada Mile section of the boulevard. The scheduled start of the 510,000,000 project has been announced by W. Douglas Lee, president of the Lee Tower Carp.

21-STORY STRUCTURE SLATED FOR MIRACLE MILE CORNER Plans for construction of a 21-story office structure to ns known as the Lee Tower at the northwest corner of WUshire Blvd. and Cochran Ave, in the Miracle Mile section of the boulevard were announced yesterday by W. Douglas Lee. president of the Lee Tower Corp., developer and builder of the project, in accordance with the amended Los Angeles buildmg-neignt regulation which permits buildings to reach above the former 150-foot limitatton, the planned structure, announced as representtng an investment ol 510,000,000, will rise to a height of some 280 feet on a 22,000-square-foot site at 5455 Wilshire Blvd. with I3C feet of frontage on thebou’e. vard and depth of 170 feet

The project, described as feet which was obtained two an ultramodern glass and years ago, and recently se­ steel skyscraper, is set for quired the 60xl70-foot lot start of construction within on the west. Lawrence Block 60 days. Co., Inc., Beverly Hills, Lee, for years a well- handled both sales, known Southern California Facilities architect, said the structure n r , „„ ...5? - . will contain 330,000 square, t' V '.Tv ?w w’ feet of floor space, including T' , !?.ui a 150,000-square-foot garage 7" ^;'‘ ..P;,* fVe­ area extending from the ^ d 'building»if te basement to the sixth floor‘tP will "fncorparate and to accommodate aO0 cars.,* { ot 5C, ‘ alu» Also disclosed was that thejart ,'nc> kwi w-,th the most corporation acquired the sitej' ^/n „Ccbanical msUllain two parcels, the first bemg the corner area of 70\17tI Turn to Pago-2, Column 3

Reproduced with permiss'an ot She copyright owner

Further reproduction prohibited without permission

WILSHIRE

Continued from First Pago tions to afford the utmost in service, comfort and effi­ ciency." Beaumont . Henry „ , G.YT111 ... , Co., ,, cl Beverly Hills, will handle .easing and management with leasing details under direction of Jerry;B. Miller, it was, announced, Henry -G. Beaumont is a past national president of the Institute of Real Estate Management. Other Features

Among features announced for the building is an exclusive luncheon club at the top of the structure that will afford a wide panoramie view of the Los Angeles area, ocean and moun* tains. It will be called the Skyview Club to be operated by a leading restaurateur, it was stated..

BUILDING

Also planned is a roof-top recreation area tor tenants. Other items stated are year-round air conditioning, electronically controlled au­ toxnatic elevators, television mas^er antennae with multiple coaxial cable connec^ two-duct multizone system will control the air conditioning.

reduce noises. Flexibility of office arrangements is pro vided for in the plans. Pointed out by the an­ nouncement was that \V. Douglas Lee was also the ar­ chitect of well-known Los Angeles structures, among them* the EL Ttoyale Apart­ ments, Merchants Exchange Building, Textile Center Building and Bendix Build; mg.

°

D. Everett Lee explained that the structure’s exterior walls will be curtain-walltype composed of insulated panels and neutral-tinted heat-absorbing glass to re-i duce glare and provide light diffusion and unobstructed daylight, Latest- type fluorescent lighting fixtures will be incorpbrated into the flush acoustical ceilings. Faridtions or dividing walla will

be treated and insulated to

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.

SKYSCRAPER OPENS ON MIRAC LE MILE Los Angeles Tunes (1923-Current File); Mar 24. I %!: ProQuesi Historical Newspapers: Los Angeles Times (1881-1989) pg. Bl

SKYSCRAPER

ON

The

OPENS

MIRACLE

22-story

skyscraper

at

Lee

5455

Tower

Wilshire

MILE

vance

which

make

this

"has

area

one

Blvd* was hailed as a beacon

world’s

for

shopping centers/'

of

the

future

Southern

Rep.

Gordon

(R-CaD nies

at

held

top floor

development California

L.

W.

.McDonough 0f

opening

the

Douglas

the

Lee

of

business

Lee,

Tower

the and

builder

with

his

ceremo- son, D. Everett Lee, was pre-

Thursday of

by

finest

helped to

$10

on

the sented a resolution from the

million Board

structure.

of

Supervisors

citing

his contributions to the econ-i

McDonough

was

the omy of Los Angeles County

speaker at a luncheon attend- through the design and con-; ed by 100 business, building struction of many buildings.! and civic leaders gathered to mark

the formal

opening

the building.

Another

of resolution City

The Congressman recalled to the Mile Lee

growth and

of

the

declared

Tower

is

A,

Miracle developer that

another

the Mile,

adopted

Council W.

congratulatory!

was

Ross, of

by

the

presented!

founder and! the

Miracle

by Councilman Harold

ad- Henrv.

I

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner Further reproduction prohibited without permission

NEW FACTORY PLANNED Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File); Feb 4, 1923;

ProQuesi Historical Newspapers: Los Angeles Times (1881-1989)

'AtETW FACTORY FTiAX>~E1> Plans are being prepared for the erection of a one-story factory building: at 8X2 San Pedro street for the Quality Electric Company* W. Douglas Dee is the architect. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission

tl.spt^v All >»

Nri 1 ilk

iCHEl1

^/fimoumcimg Formation of

s

RealtyHolding (bRFos&riaH OF CAUSFOIIMA

*• &

OFFICERS and DIRECTORS W. DOUGLAS LEE. President. Arckltesl ami Conelrncticn Eiminter.

JACK IRVINE, Vice-President,

■c

MnrtBGftc Gnuranfec Company.

NATHAN T. PORTER, Secretary-Treasurer Vfciidst i hfniiannl Thrift Corpora! inn vf A"if r;r,.

COM. J. STUART BLACKTON, Director Pioneer Motion Piet Pfcnireccr Dirt-e.scr, The Bank of Hollywood. Member Bocrd o/ Governors, California ruwiuiq

Company. FRED

Director,

J. HVJ.TS,

Realtor.

3

G. C. GEARHART. Director. He.tnm.ond Lumber Camtsunb.

ANDREW SEABLOM. Directot. General Brick Con tractor.

R«*tty Holding Corporation of California was organized to build ami finance income structures in Los Angeles and vicinity. The corporation functions under one head as arch­ itect, builder, real estate manager, under­ writer and owner.

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CAPITALIZATION Fre (turn'd iSi«ch 755 Ctu»u!Bisv«

(Far 31#) ............. Common shock

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S.«lipd rtarga

§

Tho corporation's first project, the Fash­ ion Center Building, is now under construc­ tion at 719 South Los Angeles St- This Class A building is valued in excess of 51,300,000. The Fashion Center Building is located in the center of the textile and garment district of the city, and wilt be the largest building of its kind west of Chicago. JF-ftOmate*! ttet tennesi J»se -,t imfo** income ww »rti (J8.Dreels.iicK *i'f,tle.aht» tr. preferred ururtj* » tJW.S'tn, j»rr tere&o OiviOfftd rratHt'tr’-'tfe, Jt~fd(5. Realty ft*M
h Rlaijx Hotnixn Qxiporathtn. "Cauww

*64 ttaoih ‘•prtf'B .Street law A*$*<**

HWB

tt>on» TRlnKr MIW».

RICHFIELD STROMBERG BANCITALY At present market prices, we believe Rlchfiald Oil, Stromberg Carburetor, listed on the Nfiw York Stock Exchange, and Bandtaly listed on the New York Curb, are good buys and should reflect higher prices In the Immediate future. Our established New York Banking eonoeatlons enable ue to accept your order* lor execu­ tion for these and other listed securities on on exceptional liberal margin. Up-to-date etatistical Information and In­ stant quotation sendee on request without obligation. Telegraph a' Telephone Your Orders

t IHIloth &Cks. Stocks -Borrjds

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651 So Spring St, Los Angclea ■

TttINlTY~030i

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Tower Building Permit Issued Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File). May 30, ll>59. ProQuesi Historical Newspapers: 1 os Angeles 1 imes ( 1881-1989) pg. A 8

Tower Building

Permit Issued

A 22-story building cost­ ing $6 million \Vill be erected at Wilshire Blvd. and Coch­ ran Ave. under a permit is­ sued by the Building and Safety Department yester­ day to W. Douglas Lee Co. The Lee Tower Building will have parking for 453 automobiles on the first six floore as well as in the base­ ment, with offices on the re­ maining floors. A heliport will be built on the roof. The department said it is reviewing plans for several other proposed buildings of similar height and the city is entering into a new era of skyscraper construction fol­ lowing the repeal of the old height limit which held structures to 13 stories. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner Further reproduction prohibited without permission

antl °l»cnin8 »tMiHlern Apartment Also Par. Proi.1uc.si Hisu'rical Newspapers PE f I

• \m*elcs linns (l#KI-lt>K,>i

ANNOUNCE LOFT STRUCTURE Completion and Opening of Modern Apartment Also Part of Week's Activities Building in. Los Angcice continues to advance. A height-limit btnicture Is planned for the northwest corner of Eighth and Santee streets. It will cost approximately $800,000. Tho site is 55x125, Tho building was de­ signed by Architect W. Dougins Lea of this city, it will be owned by Lloyd Casler, Inc., which concern announced tlmt actual construction work, will begin in a few days. There will be a ldbby and stores CONTRACT AWARDED on the first floor. A battery of oleSAN FERNANDO. June 19.—Con­ valors will services the oftlccs and tract for tho work of building dor­ lofts above. The structure will be mitories and bath rooms on tho San built of reinforced concrete, trimmed Fernando Lemon Association property externally in lace brick and terra at Pico and Court streets has been cotta. •! awarded to Hugart and Dooley of tho The owner will erect the structural Mission district. The plana for the under the supervision of the arch!-1 buildings were prepared by Alex Shaw tect. Tho owners declared that plans Tho improvements under construcwould bo filed with the building dc- «°o conslat of three buildings, two partment to obtain the permit to- twenty-four by ninety-four feet and morrow or Tuesday. k’ i ot-her sixteen by twcnt>-fou., Raddon Hall, an exclusive apart- ¥*#***^*^**^**^**¥** | Fedora £ 2. i ment-liotel at Eighth and streets, wan formally opened yester­ ii MONTH’S PERMITS *i day. It Is owned by Ohemdorf j* s Brothers. Inc. The owners declared ^ TOTAL $7,943,973 1| that 8500,000 has been invested In ,v the project. Building permits numbering A Tudor Gothic stylo of design was followed by S. Charles Lee. the •716, aggregating $1,896,466 were architect who planned the structure, c issued by the building depart- * Entrance to the building in made v through a garden-court.- A fountain i ment from the 12th to 18th is one of the features of this ap? £ lnst-, making a total of 1072 proach. X. permits valued at t>7,943,97?

bjrSeXXm

J «•

the owners eald. The Interior decoration includes panels typifying tho Gothic period.

*

WALNUT PARK GROWS Increased population of Walnut Park is Indicated through a report of the Walnut Park Mutual Water Company, made to Victor Girard, who built tho community a few years now meters agO' In May thirty-five , , were put in. supplying aa many new houses; in Juno there were 130. meter changes, while 1499 feet of water mains were laid last month. It is re­ ported. The town was started in a 500-acre walnut grove and Ls now largely- built up. . ..

Reproduced with permission of (he copyright owner

MW. «*, to-

tal for the year to 18.132 p»rmlts valued at $39,240,286. According to the local ebapter of the Associated Genera! •• Contractors the permits issued this month to date surpass tho ' stmiia;' interval last month during which time 2040 permits aggregating $6,991,421 were au± 4. , . J tnorizea. a. From January l tp June 18, last year 21,840 permits valued <{: at $78,402,771 were authorized.

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Kossniorc and Rosewood Slrnrlurr lo ('o>! Sl.250.000

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3V?r Castles or Homes Projected by Rarer

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ALl*SNO lor nr. cXju'txKliUe o S . M.DOQ tor g>uUtiing twn

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gtsunfi. eonsttu«u«n c? * •x-icivMtery CJass-A A.pwlrr.en,r hows? fcfcn Isynshed ar U»r ojeitbswft eorncr o! RcssTwcrc an;

Rotriwjad cvemics for vbe Barer

In; Ktnier.i Compnny. An uarumWu^l ftDsrttDCni-Jioaj? d«!gr.psi :o bcoysoe r cMt!^ o! homes Jir the nwt distrifnSnnUns: tcaafits. is tji? an

luxurtoasly

rvcimrcd slm of the hxwtscobt com­ pany. The awpsr-aUcd rgeffU nf< anunged ir. horaellko manner hi itfcJilwcv v/. Doujioa Lee- Tm project '.mi lace tie Wilshire Coontry C1U3 with Jta acres of rolllnj

ETtfH KOH eourite- dlrecUy acrav :he street to the a-est, with a pano­ ramic vie»- o; Hciiroooe ana ui« Jfolb’sfood Moanwusa to the aarth and surrounded by raider,ual m-

tawi. Tncne will be rooms divides: info suites cf three to tea rooms The cictenth and floors wii house 1x5 sevea.roMa deluxe, du­ plex rspartments with bex1r:.-am dl»u!m an-i tlvin^-roonui dosn i'.&iTi, all richly decorated und sur­ rounded fey a fertttiUlui roct carden AH the ntJarlEscnis will have coion.'d ui« floor, reception halls >flidWK to living-rofctts with richly hMnS«deco.r*fed oil painted miflls crlist it fire |ila«. laryjt attwetlvrr dining-rootris, nuper-aircd, light. r.iry bedmomc 'nth more than amF> clostt suae* latrrcteduircssmsruoa’j iv..U scfca, (Uc bn,Ww with

*Uw dcor inciwed sijowcj.-.. tiled

(tiithcaa with spccisl vcctUattoK to remove iii cc-o^ng odors elertrtc refrigeration and apec'ftl iacintsutor system. Arehtfeeciure vail be of modern Spanish r?mr There will be a fcaxeraent end sub-b«smtfU, «» gnrage. T:.r npartmeru will oe given aa nfimt and syli; fee kiwnlt ordy e? «o McrttJ Ray.more, patterned alter lhs Jdct now la!)cured in ««.»

V&ri: by eweutiive apartments Tenants: »Sl ec ert«!ed with vitr.txi are. U it declared, dosenh c. cnap* I'ton wtfi ha juperlnUndent for itn

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Stucco Church Confracf Let Confersci tor a frame And stucco church at £ev-;nty;fU(h street and Normcnate nvenue has i>m» nwmrdcd to R. 5- Martin pf s>oi OabrSei for J4IJJS by the United PrcjbyWrlan Church, it announced I«ut wee's- Tho edifice wit] occupy a tile 44 by 20* fret, will have maple ur.d tfrr.anfc flc»>ra hsrdwfxxj and Vnc trim, v.-revught Iran wcric and

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■ TWO SIG ONES— Pictured ere 'wo Los Angeles skyscraper projects that hove followed the obot-pri c- c iv's 13-storv l*c:ghf limit. Above is com. P«£fCc' s?ee) treble ck Colffprnta Bank's new head* Quarters building r.t southeast corner of Spring «nd 6rh St, .n downtown Los Angeles, with some r! »fs n-rgf se*cr*r«n hav-pg cement cavea.ig :o >>r ’ocod with I to1.1:'? end ryprlvong entire beauD‘.;i ;r ‘t. Thfi SI a r.-.jliiOn 1S-Story budding wrj hove* because cf unusual >'c cht cl >c»re cr ils stones, ihc cppcc'arce of 21 ij 22-story structure. * abo has fqu«r boserrents. BuiId'ng's hei'ghf oocv* the street level is 267 feet. At right is design of SI 0 million, 22-story Lee Tower ln W'-rcJe Mile scoticn Structure will rise 280 fecr above sh'-cef •* vi will be lollest of rice budding fur which work has been E'o'ted in Las Angeles, if was cnnouoced oy V/ Douglas Lee, p-cs'dcr.; cf Lee Tower Co»p. ric an..i His son, 0 Everctl' Lee, ore orchuects for !!,e iteel, concrete end glass ■structure, announced about’ a veer ago in th section cf The Tintes. It's exceeded in height m LA only by e City Hall. General ccr.'racTor tor c is VV. Douglas Lee Co., Inc. Leosi ng end management will be handled by Henry G. Beoumsnf Co., Beverly Hills, with the leasing under direction of Jerry R. Miller of the Beaumont Co. The- fust six Hears and the base­ ment, excepting pciHon cf qround floor, will have Pecrufr-v. vi M -i. \ >;in fpr i imv n ' 'T D :i so nclu :• lo lit occ cn thp.rpcf jpr helicopters.,

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CATALINA SWIMWEAR BUILDING, 443 S. San Pedro Street, Los Angeles, CA

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Former storefront openings conform to window placement on upper facade. Original pediment remains over recessed central entrance.

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The new owner is planning a rehabilitation of the building including the facade. Recent investigations have revealed that the original facade exists under the current material. Plans are being prepared by the architect for the project and fagade restoration. This photo shows the two areas that were exposed.

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CATALINA SWIMWEAR BUILDING, 443 S. San

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CATALINA SWIMWEAR BUILDING, 443 S. San Pedro Street, Los Angeles, CA

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CATALINA SWIMWEAR BUILDING, 443 S. San Pedro Street, Los Angeles, CA

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The Renaissance Building, immediateiy across San Pedro Street from the Catalina Swimwear Building, was also designed by W. Douglas Lee.

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PROPERTY ADDRESSES

PARCEL PROFILE REPORT Address/Legai Information

342 E WINSTON ST

PIN Number

127-5A213 105

435 S SAN PEDRO ST

Lot/Parcel Area (Calculated)

19,218.8 (sq ft)

439 S SAN PEDRO ST

Thomas Brothers Grid

PAGE 634 - GRID G5

441 S SAN PEDRO ST

Assessor Parcel No. (APN)

5148011018

443 S SAN PEDRO ST

Tract

CALO TRACT

445 S SAN PEDRO ST

Map Reference

M B 116-80

447 S SAN PEDRO ST

Block

None

449 S SAN PEDRO ST

Lot

LT A

451 S SAN PEDRO ST

Arb (Lot Cut Reference)

None

Map Sheet

127-5A213

ZIP CODES

Jurisdictional Information

90013

Community Plan Area

Central City

Area Planning Commission

Central

RECENT ACTIVITY

Neighborhood Council

Downtown Los Angeles

CHC-2016-3620-HCM

Council District

CD 14 - Jose Huizar

ENV-2016-3621 -CE

Census Tract #

2062.00

ZA-2002-603-ZAD-EXT

LADBS District Office

Los Angeles Metro

CASE NUMBERS

Special Notes

None

CPC-2010-213-CA

Zoning

[QJR5-2D

CPC-2008-4502-GPA

Zoning Information (Zl)

ZI-2374 LOS ANGELES STATE ENTERPRISE ZONE

Planning and Zoning Information

CPC-2008-4502-GPA

ZI-2452 Transit Priority Area in the City of Los Angeles

CPC-2005-361-CA

ZI-2385 Greater Downtown Housing Incentive Area

CPC-2005-1124-CA

General Plan Land Use

High Medium Residential

CPC-2005-1122-CA

General Plan Footnote(s)

Yes

CPC-1986-606-GPC

Hillside Area (Zoning Code)

No

ORD-164307-SA1170

Baseline Hillside Ordinance

No

ORD-137036

Baseline Mansionization Ordinance

No

ORD-135901

Specific Plan Area

None

ORD-129944

Special Land Use / Zoning

None

ZA-2002-603-ZAD

Design Review Board

No

ZA-1987-1070-CUZ

Historic Preservation Review

No

ZA-15461

Historic Preservation Overlay Zone

None

ENV-2013-3392-CE

Other Historic Designations

None

ENV-2010-214-ND

Other Historic Survey Information

None

ENV-2008-4505-ND

Mills Act Contract

None

ENV-2008-4505-ND

POD - Pedestrian Oriented Districts

None

ENV-2005-362-CE

CDO - Community Design Overlay

None

ENV-2005-1125-CE

NSO - Neighborhood Stabilization Overlay

No

ENV-2005-1123-CE

Sign District

No

ENV-2002-604-CE

Streetscape

No

AF-89-163019-LT

Adaptive Reuse Incentive Area

Adaptive Reuse Incentive Areas

Ellis Act Property

No

Rent Stabilization Ordinance (RSO)

No

CRA - Community Redevelopment Agency

City Center Redevelopment Project

Central City Parking

Yes

This report is subject to the terms and conditions as set forth on the website. For more details, please refer to the terms and conditions at zimas.lacity.org (*) - APN Area is provided "as is” from the Los Angeles County’s Public Works, Flood Control, Benefit Assessment.

zimas.lacity.org

|

planning.lacity.org

Downtown Parking

Yes

Building Line

None

500 Ft School Zone

No

500 Ft Park Zone

No

Assessor Information Assessor Parcel No. (APN)

5148011018

Ownership (Assessor) Ownerl

TAILOR LOFTS LLC

Address

4940 CAMPUS DR STE C NEWPORT BEACH CA 92660

Ownership (Bureau of Engineering, Land Records) Owner

TAILOR LOFTS LLC

Address

4940 CAMPUS DR STE C NEWPORT BEACH CA 92660

APN Area (Co. Public Works)*

0.443 (ac)

Use Code

Not Available

Assessed Land Val.

$388,335

Assessed Improvement Val.

$1,179,927

Last Owner Change

02/19/16

Last Sale Amount

$20,050,200

Tax Rate Area

3263

Deed Ref No. (City Clerk)

552618-9 439058-9 3-27 2368101 2295852 180117 1468569 1-178

Building 1 Year Built

1923

Building Class

CX

Number of Units Number of Bedrooms

0 0

Number of Bathrooms

0

Building Square Footage

92,538.0 (sq ft)

Building 2 Year Built

1946

Number of Units Number of Bedrooms

0 0

Number of Bathrooms

0

Building Square Footage

2,582.0 (sq ft)

Building 3

No data for building 3

Building 4

No data for building 4

Building 5

No data for building 5

Additional Information Airport Hazard

None

Coastal Zone

None

Farmland

Area Not Mapped

Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zone

No

Fire District No. 1

Yes

Flood Zone

None

Watercourse

No

Hazardous Waste / Border Zone Properties

No

Methane Hazard Site

None

This report is subject to the terms and conditions as set forth on the website. For more details, please refer to the terms and conditions at zimas.lacity.org (*) - APN Area is provided "as is” from the Los Angeles County's Public Works, Flood Control, Benefit Assessment.

zimas.lacity.org

|

planning.lacity.org

High Wind Velocity Areas

No

Special Grading Area (BOE Basic Grid Map A13372)

No

Oil Wells

None

Seismic Hazards Active Fault Near-Source Zone Nearest Fault (Distance in km)

1.41652752

Nearest Fault (Name)

Puente Hills Blind Thrust

Region

Los Angeles Blind Thrusts

Fault Type

B

Slip Rate (mm/year)

0.70000000

Slip Geometry

Reverse

Slip Type

Moderately / Poorly Constrained

Down Dip Width (km)

19.00000000

Rupture Top

5.00000000

Rupture Bottom

13.00000000

Dip Angle (degrees)

25.00000000

Maximum Magnitude

7.10000000

Alquist-Priolo Fault Zone

No

Landslide

No

Liquefaction

No

Preliminary Fault Rupture Study Area

No

Tsunami Inundation Zone

No

Economic Development Areas Business Improvement District

LOS ANGELES DOWNTOWN INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT

Promise Zone

No

Renewal Community

No

Revitalization Zone

Central City

State Enterprise Zone

LOS ANGELES STATE ENTERPRISE ZONE

Targeted Neighborhood Initiative

None

Public Safety Police Information Bureau

Central

Division / Station

Central

Reporting District

147

Fire Information Bureau

Central

1

Batallion District / Fire Station

9

Red Flag Restricted Parking

No

This report is subject to the terms and conditions as set forth on the website. For more details, please refer to the terms and conditions at zimas.lacity.org (*) - APN Area is provided "as is" from the Los Angeles County's Public Works, Flood Control, Benefit Assessment.

zimas.lacity.org

|

planning.lacity.org

CASE SUMMARIES Note: Information for case summaries is retrieved from the Planning Department's Plan Case Tracking System (PCTS) database. Case Number

CPC-2010-213-CA

Required Action(s):

CA-CODE AMENDMENT

Project Descriptions(s):

AN AMENDMENT TO ARTICLE 4.5 AND SECTION 16.05 OF ARTICLE 6.1 OF THE LOS ANGELES MUNICIPAL CODE (LAMC), AND RELEVANT SECTIONS OF THE LOS ANGELES ADMINISTRATIVE CODE, TO MODIFY THE AUTHORITY AND PROCEDURES FOR EFFECTUATING A TRANSFER OF FLOOR AREA RIGHTS (TFAR) AND TO MAKE OTHER TECHNICAL CHANGES TO REFLECT THE EXPIRATION OF THE AMENDED CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA.

Case Number

CPC-2008-4502-GPA

Required Action(s):

GPA-GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT

Project Descriptions(s):

PLAN AMENDMENT, PLAN MAP AMENDMENT

Case Number

CPC-2008-4502-GPA

Required Action(s):

GPA-GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT

Project Descriptions(s):

PLAN AMENDMENT, PLAN MAP AMENDMENT

Case Number:

CPC-2005-361-CA

Required Action(s):

CA-CODE AMENDMENT

Project Descriptions(s):

CODE AMENDMENT TO UPDATE RESIDENTIAL STANDARDS AND INCENTIVIZE HOUSING IN THE CENTRAL CITY AREA.

Case Number:

CPC-2005-1124-CA

Required Action(s):

CA-CODE AMENDMENT

Project Descriptions(s):

TO REQUIRE PROJECTS IN THE CENTRAL CITY COMMUNITY PLAN TO COMPLY WITH DESIGN AND STREETSCAPE GUIDELINES

Case Number:

CPC-2005-1122-CA

Required Action(s):

CA-CODE AMENDMENT

Project Descriptions(s):

INCENTIVES FOR HTE PRODUCTION OF AFFORDABLE AND WORKFORCE HOUSING IN THE CENTRAL CITY PLAN AREA

Case Number:

CPC-1986-606-GPC

Required Action(s):

GPC-GENERAL PLAN/ZONING CONSISTENCY (AB283)

Project Descriptions(s):

GENERAL PLAN/ZONE CONCSISTENCY - CENTRAL CITY AREA - COMMUNITYWIDE ZONE CHANGES AND COMMUNITY PLAN CHNAGES TO BRING THE ZONING INTO CONSISTENCY WITH THE COMMUNITY PLAN. INCLUDING CHANGESOF HEIGHT AS NEEDED

Case Number

ZA-2002-603-ZAD

Required Action(s):

ZAD-ZA DETERMINATION (PER LAMC 12.27)

Project Descriptions(s):

TO PERMIT CONVERSION OF PART OF THE SECOND AND THIRD FLOOR TO 8 ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE UNITS.

Case Number:

ZA-1987-1070-CUZ

Required Action(s):

CUZ-ALL OTHER CONDITIONAL USE CASES

Project Descriptions(s):

THIS IS A CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT TO ALLOW EXISTING BUILDING INM ZONE TO BE USEDFOR 25 ARTIST WORKING AND LIVING QUARTERS.

Case Number

ENV-2013-3392-CE

Required Action(s):

CE-CATEGORICAL EXEMPTION

Project Descriptions(s):

THE PROPOSED ORDINANCE MODIFIES SECTION 22.119 OF THE LOS ANGELES ADMINISTRATIVE CODE TO ALLOW ORIGINAL ART MURALS ON LOTS DEVELOPED WITH ONLY ONE SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURE AND THAT ARE LOCATED WITHIN COUNCIL DISTRICTS 1, 9, AND 14.

Case Number

ENV-2010-214 ND

Required Action(s):

ND-NEGATIVE DECLARATION

Project Descriptions(s):

AN AMENDMENT TO ARTICLE 4.5 AND SECTION 16.05 OF ARTICLE 6.1 OF THE LOS ANGELES MUNICIPAL CODE (LAMC), AND RELEVANT SECTIONS OF THE LOS ANGELES ADMINISTRATIVE CODE, TO MODIFY THE AUTHORITY AND PROCEDURES FOR EFFECTUATING A TRANSFER OF FLOOR AREA RIGHTS (TFAR) AND TO MAKE OTHER TECHNICAL CHANGES TO REFLECT THE EXPIRATION OF THE AMENDED CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA.

Case Number

ENV-2008-4505-ND

Required Action(s):

ND-NEGATIVE DECLARATION

Project Descriptions(s):

PLAN AMENDMENT, PLAN MAP AMENDMENT

Case Number:

ENV-2008-4505-ND

Required Action(s):

ND-NEGATIVE DECLARATION

Project Descriptions(s):

PLAN AMENDMENT, PLAN MAP AMENDMENT

Case Number

ENV-2005-362-CE

Required Action(s):

CE-CATEGORICAL EXEMPTION

This report is subject to the terms and conditions as set forth on the website. For more details, please refer to the terms and conditions at zimas.lacity.org (*) - APN Area is provided "as is" from the Los Angeles County’s Public Works, Flood Control, Benefit Assessment.

zimas.lacity.org

|

planning.lacity.org

Project Descriptions(s):

CODE AMENDMENT TO UPDATE RESIDENTIAL STANDARDS AND INCENTIVIZE HOUSING IN THE CENTRAL CITY AREA.

Case Number:

ENV-2005-1125-CE

Required Action(s):

CE-CATEGORICAL EXEMPTION

Project Descriptions(s):

TO REQUIRE PROJECTS IN THE CENTRAL CITY COMMUNITY PLAN TO COMPLY WITH DESIGN AND STREETSCAPE GUIDELINES

Case Number:

ENV-2005-1123-CE

Required Action(s):

CE-CATEGORICAL EXEMPTION

Project Descriptions(s):

INCENTIVES FOR HTE PRODUCTION OF AFFORDABLE AND WORKFORCE HOUSING IN THE CENTRAL CITY PLAN AREA

Case Number:

ENV-2002-604-CE

Required Action(s):

CE-CATEGORICAL EXEMPTION

Project Descriptions(s):

TO PERMIT CONVERSION OF PART OF THE SECOND AND THIRD FLOOR TO 8 ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE UNITS.

DATA NOT AVAILABLE ORD-164307-SA1170 ORD-137036 ORD-135901 ORD-129944 ZA-15461 AF-89-163019-LT

This report is subject to the terms and conditions as set forth on the website. For more details, please refer to the terms and conditions at zimas.lacity.org (*) - APN Area is provided "as is" from the Los Angeles County's Public Works, Flood Control, Benefit Assessment.

zimas.lacity.org

|

planning.lacity.org

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CHAPTER 9 DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING Article 1

Cultural Heritage Commission

ARTICLE 1 CULTURAL HERITAGE COMMISSION Section 22. i 7!

Purpose of the Commission.

22.171.i

Composition of the Commission and Term of Office.

72

Members' Compensation.

]7]

22.171.3

Organization of the Commission.

22.171.4

Appointment and Duties of the Commission Secretary.

22.171.5

Quorum and Actions of the Commission.

22.171.6

Duties of the Commission.

22.171.7

Definition of Monument.

22.171.8

Inspection and Investigation.

22.171.9

List of Monuments.

22.171.10

Procedures for Designation of Monuments.

22.171.11

Preservation of Monuments.

171.12 Temporary Stay of Demolition, Substantial Alteration or Removal Pending Determination to Designate a Monument. 22.171.1

Notice of Designation and Subsequent Actions.

22.171.14

Commission Review.

22.173.15

Time for Objection by the Commission.

22.171.16

No Right to Acquire Property.

22.171.17

Rules and Regulations of the Commission.

22.171.18

Cooperation with the Commission.

Sec. 22.171. Purpose of the Commission. The Cultural Heritage Commission (Commission) shall perform those functions relating to historic and cultural preservation of sites, buildings, or structures that embody the heritage, history, and culture of the City. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07. Sec. 22.171.1. Composition of the Commission and Term of Office. (a) Qualifications. The Commission shall be composed of five members who are qualified electors of the City of Los Angeles. Each Commissioner shall be appointed, and may be removed in accordance with Charter Section 502. The Commissioners shall have a demonstrated interest, competence or knowledge of historic preservation. To the extent feasible and legally permissible, at least two of the Commissioners should be professionals who meet the qualifications for various disciplines outlined by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior, Code of Federal Regulations, 36 CFR Part 61. These disciplines include history, architecture, architectural history, planning, pre-historic and historic archeology, folklore, cultural anthropology, curation, conservation and landscape architecture or related disciplines, such as urban planning, American studies, American civilization, or cultural geography, to the extent that these professionals are available in the community. . (b) Term. The term of office for each Commissioner shall begin with the first day of July and shall be a term of five years. An appointment to fill a vacancy on the Commission shall be for the period of the unexpired term. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07. Sec. 22.171.2. Members' Compensation. The members of the Commission shall be paid $25.00 per meeting for each Commission meeting attended, but not to exceed $125.00 in any one calendar month.

SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178.402, Eff. 4-2-07. Sec. 22.171.3. Organization of the Commission. During the last meeting of July of each year, the Commission shall elect a President and Vice President, which officers shall hold office for one year and until their successors are elected, unless their membership on the Commission expires sooner. The Commission may at any meeting fill any vacancy for any unexpired term occurring in the office of President or Vice President. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07. Sec. 22.171.4. Appointment and Duties of Commission Secretary. The Director of Planning (Director) of the Department of City Planning (Department), or his or her designee, shall assign an employee of the Department, other than the Director, to be the Secretary of the Commission and assign duties to the employee, which shall be in addition to the duties regularly prescribed for that employee. The Secretary shall attend Commission meetings and keep a record of the proceedings and transactions of the Commission, specifying the names of the Commissioners in attendance at each meeting and the ayes and noes upon all roll calls. The Secretary shall post and publish all orders, resolutions and notices, which the Commission shall order to be posted and published, and shall perform any other duties imposed by this chapter, or by order of the Commission. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07. Sec. 22.171.5. Quorum and Actions of the Commission. A majority of the members of the Commission must be present at any meeting to constitute a quorum. The powers conferred upon the Commission shall be exercised by resolution or motion and adopted by a majority vote of its members and recorded in the minutes with the ayes and noes. The action shall be attested to by the signature of the Secretary of the Commission. SECTION HISTORY

Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.6. Duties of the Commission. In addition to the duties set forth in this article, the Commission shall perform those duties imposed on it by Los Angeles Municipal Code Section 12.20.3 relating to Historic Preservation Overlay Zones. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.7. Definition of Monument. For purposes of this article, a Historic-Cultural Monument (Monument) is any site (including significant trees or other plant life located on the site), building or structure of particular historic or cultural significance to the City of Los Angeles, including historic structures or sites in which the broad cultural, economic or social history of the nation, State or community is reflected or exemplified; or which is identified with historic personages or with important events in the main currents of national, State or local history; or which embodies the distinguishing characteristics of an architectural type specimen, inherently valuable for a study of a period, style or method of construction; or a notable work of a master builder, designer, or architect whose individual genius influenced his or her age. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.8. Inspection and Investigation. The Commission, a sub-committee, or the staff of the Department acting on behalf of the Commission shall inspect and investigate any site, building or structure, including but not limited to, touring, or reviewing photographic or videographic records of the site, building or structure, in the City of Los Angeles, which it has reason to believe is or will in the future be a Historic-Cultural Monument. Inspection and investigation shall also include soliciting opinions and information from the office of the Council District in which the site, building or structure is located and from any department or bureau of the City whose operations may be affected by designating the site, building or structure a Monument. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.9. List of Monuments.

The Department shall compile and maintain a current list of all sites, buildings and structures, which have been designated as Historic-Cultural Monuments (List of Monuments or List). SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.10. Procedures for Designation of Monuments. A site, building or structure may be designated as a Monument in accordance with the procedures set forth in this section. (a) Initiation. The City Council, the Commission, or the Director, may initiate consideration of a proposed designation of a site, building or structure as a Monument. Any initiation by the Council or the Commission shall be by majority vote. The Council or the Commission shall forward the proposed designation to the Director for a report and recommendation. (b) Application. Any interested individual may apply for a proposed designation of a Monument. The applicant shall complete the application for the proposed designation on a form provided by the Department, include all information required, pay the required fee, if any, and file the application with the Department. (c)

Action on the Initiation or Application.

1. Authority. The Commission may recommend approval or disapproval in whole or in part of an application or initiation of a proposed designation. Unless otherwise specified, the recommendation shall be made to the Council for its action pursuant to the procedures set forth in this section. No designation of a site, building or structure as a Monument shall be effective unless the designation has been adopted by the Council. 2. Procedure for Council-Initiated Designations. Upon receipt of any proposed designation initiated by the Council, the Commission shall, pursuant to Section 22.171,8 of this article, inspect and investigate the proposed Council-initiated designation. The Director shall thereafter prepare a report and recommendation on the proposed designation. After receipt of the Director's report and recommendation, the Commission shall hold a public hearing regarding the proposed designation and determine whether the site, building or structure conforms with the definition of a Monument set forth in Section 22 ! .7.12L of this article. After the Commission submits a report and recommendation, the Council may consider the matter. If the Commission recommends approval of a Councilinitiated designation, the Council may adopt the designation by a majority vote. If the Commission recommends disapproval of a Council-initiated designation, the Council may adopt the proposed designation by a two-thirds vote. The Council shall act within the time specified in Subsection (f) of this section.

3. Procedure for Commission- or Direct®r-Initiated Designations. After initiation of a proposed designation by the Commission or the Director, the Commission shall, pursuant to Section 22.171.8 of this article, inspect and investigate the proposed designation. The Director shall thereafter prepare a report and recommendation on the proposed designation. After receipt of the Director's recommendation, the Commission shall hold a public hearing regarding the proposed designation and determine whether the site, building or structure conforms with the definition of a Monument set forth in Section 22.171.7 of this article. If the Commission recommends approval of a Commission- or Director-initiated designation, the Commission shall submit a report and recommendation to the Council. The Council may consider the matter and may approve the recommendation by a majority vote. If the Commission disapproves the proposed designation, the Commission's decision is final. 4. Procedure for Applications for Designations. Once a complete application is received, as determined by the Director, the Commission shall determine at a public meeting whether the proposed designation merits further consideration. If the Commission determines to take the proposed designation under consideration, it shall conduct an inspection and investigation pursuant to Section 22.171.8 of this article. The Director shall thereafter prepare a report and recommendation on the proposed designation. After receipt of the Director's report and recommendation and conducting its inspection and investigation, the Commission shall hold a public hearing regarding the proposed designation and determine whether the site, building or structure conforms with the definition of a Monument as set forth in Section 22.17! .7 of this article. If the Commission recommends approval of an application for a proposed designation, the Commission shall submit a report and recommendation to the Council. The Council may consider the matter and may adopt the designation by a majority vote. If the Commission disapproves the proposed designation, the decision is final. (d)

Notice. Notice shall be given as set forth below.

For the purpose of this article, the owner of the site, building or structure shall be deemed to be the person appearing as the owner of the property on the last Equalized Assessment roll of the County of Los Angeles and appearing as the owner of the property on the records of the City Clerk. If the records of the City Clerk and the County Assessor indicate the ownership in different persons, those persons appearing on each of those lists shall be notified. Initiation of a Proposed Designation by the Council, Commission or Director. The owner of record of a property and the owner's representative, if any, shall be notified forthwith in writing of: any determination by the Council, Commission or Director to initiate a proposed designation; and the Temporary Stay pursuant to Section 22.171.12 of this article. The Notice shall be sent via Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested. 1.

2. Commission Action to Take Under Consideration Proposed Designation by Application. The owner of record of a property and the owner's representative, if any,

shall be notified forthwith in writing of: the Commission's decision after the Commission determines to take a proposed designation under consideration; and the Temporary Stay pursuant to Section 22.1 71. i.' of this article. The Notice shall be sent via Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested. 3. Commission Action on Proposed Designation by Initiation or Application. The time, place and purpose of the public hearing on the proposed designation shall be given by mailing written notice at least ten days prior to the date of the hearing, to the applicant, if any, and to the owner of record of a property or the owner's representative, if different from the applicant or if the designation was proposed by initiation. Notice to the record owner or the owner's representative shall be sent via Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested.

4.

Council Action on Proposed Designation by Initiation or Application. The

time, place and purpose of the public hearing on the proposed designation shall be given by mailing written notice at least ten days prior to the date of the hearing, to the applicant, if any, and to the owner of record of a property or the owner's representative, if different from the applicant or if the designation was proposed by initiation. Notice to the record owner or the owner's representative shall be sent via Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested. (e)

Time for the Cultural Heritage Commission to Act.

1. Action on Application. The Commission shall determine at a public meeting held within 30 days of the filing of a complete, verified application, as determined by the Director, whether to take a proposed designation of a Monument under consideration. This time limit to take a proposed designation under consideration may be extended by mutual consent of the applicant and the Commission. After providing all notice required under this article, the Commission shall hold a public hearing on the proposed designation. The Commission shall, pursuant to Section 22.171.10 of this article, make a report and recommendation on the application within 75 days of the meeting where the proposed designation was taken under consideration. If the Commission fails to act on an application within the time allowed by this section, the Commission shall be deemed to have denied the application. 2. Action on Initiation. If the proposed designation of a Monument w'as proposed by initiation rather than application, the Commission shall, after providing all notice required under this article, hold a public hearing on the proposed designation. The Commission shall, pursuant to Subsection (c) of this section, make a report and recommendation on the application wdthin 75 days of the date of the receipt of the proposed initiation. If the Commission fails to act on the initiation within the time allowed by this section, the Commission shall be deemed to have recommended denial of the proposed designation. (f) Time for Council to Act. The Council may approve or disapprove in whole or in part an application or initiation for a proposed designation of a Monument. The

Council shall act within 90 days of the public hearing held before the Commission on the proposed designation. The 90 day time limit to act by the Council may be extended by the Council for good cause for a maximum of 15 days. If the Council does not act on the application or initiation within this 105-day total time limit, the application or initiation to designate a Monument shall be deemed to have been denied. The Council may override a Commission recommendation of denial of a Council-initiated designation by a minimum of ten votes. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.11. Preservation of Monuments. The Commission shall take all steps necessary to preserve Monuments not in conflict with the public health, safety and general welfare, powers and duties of the City of Los Angeles, or its several boards, officers or departments. These steps may include assistance in the creation of civic citizens' committees; assistance in the establishment of a private fund for the acquisition or restoration of designated Monuments; and recommendation that a Monument be acquired by a governmental agency where private acquisition is not feasible. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.12. Temporary Stay of Demolition, Substantial Alteration or Removal Pending Determination to Designate a Monument. Upon initiation by the Council, the Commission or the Director of a proposed designation of a Monument, or upon the Commission's determination that an application for a proposed designation merits further consideration, no permit for the demolition, substantial alteration or removal of that site, building, or structure shall be issued, and the site, building or structure, regardless of whether a permit exists or does not exist, shall not be demolished, substantially altered or removed, pending final determination by the Council that the proposed site, building or structure shall be designated as a Monument. The Commission shall notify the Department of Building and Safety in writing not to issue any permits for the demolition, alteration or removal of a building or structure. The owner of the site, building or structure shall notify the Commission, in writing, whenever application is made for a pennit to demolish, substantially alter, or remove any site, building or structure proposed to be designated as a Monument. The Council shall act on the proposed designation within the time limits contained in Section 22.171.10(f) of this article. If, after the expiration of the final period of time to act, the Council has not taken an action on the application or initiation to designate a

Monument, then the demolition, alteration or removal of the site, building or structure may proceed. EXCEPTION: If the Commission determines that the site, building or structure proposed to be designated does not meet the definition for Monument set forth in Section 22.1 71.' of this article, then the temporary prohibition on the issuance of a permit to demolish, substantially alter or remove the site, building or structure and the temporary prohibition on demolition, substantial alteration or removal of the site, building or structure shall terminate, except when the designation of a site, building or structure as a Monument was proposed by Council-initiation. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.13. Notice of Designation and Subsequent Actions. The Commission shall notify the appropriate Department and Board, if any, and the owner of each site, building, or structure in writing that his or her site, building or structure has been designated a Monument, and shall give the owner as defined in Section 22.171.10(d) of this article, written notice of any further action, which it takes with respect to the Monument. Notice shall be mailed to the address shown on the Assessment Roll or the City Clerk's records, as applicable, as soon as practicable after the property is designated or the Commission takes any further action regarding the site, building or structure. The designation shall be recorded with the County Recorder. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.14. Commission Review. No permit for the demolition, substantial alteration or relocation of any Monument shall be issued, and no Monument shall be demolished, substantially altered or relocated without first referring the matter to the Commission, except where the Superintendent of Building or the City Engineer determines that demolition, relocation or substantial alteration of any Monument is immediately necessary in the interest of the public health, safety or general welfare. (a) Standards for Issuance of a Permit for Substantial Alteration. The Commission shall base a determination on the approval of a permit for the substantial alteration of a Monument on each of the following: 1. The substantial alteration, including additional buildings on a site containing multiple buildings with a unified use, complies with the Standards for Rehabilitation approved by the United States Secretary of the Interior; and

2. Whether the substantial alteration protects and preserves the historic and architectural qualities and the physical characteristics that make the site, building, or structure a designated Monument; and 3. Compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act, Public Resources Code Section 21000 et seq. (b) Standards for Issuance of a Permit for the Demolition or Relocation of a Site, Building or Structure Designated a Monument. The Commission shall base its determination on the approval of a permit for the demolition or removal of any Monument on the following: 1. A report regarding the structural soundness of the building or structure and its suitability for continued use, renovation, restoration or rehabilitation from a licensed engineer or architect who meets the Secretary of the Interior's Profession Qualification Standards as established by the Code of Federal Regulations, 36 CFR Part 61. This report shall be based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Architectural and Engineering Documentation with Guidelines; and

2. Compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act, Public Resources Code Section 21000 et seq. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07. Sec. 22.171.15. Time for Objection By the Commission. Where any matters subject to Section 22.17 1.14 of this article are referred to the Commission by its staff, the Commission shall have 30 days from the date of the referral to object to the proposed demolition, substantial alteration or relocation. If no objection is filed with the appropriate Department or Board within 30 days, all objections shall be deemed to have been waived. If the Commission objects to the proposed demolition, substantial alteration or relocation, it shall file its objection with the appropriate Department or Board. Any objection by the Commission shall be set for a public hearing. The objection and the fact that the matter will be scheduled for a public hearing by the Commission shall be noted by Commission staff on the clearance worksheet utilized by the appropriate Department or Board for the issuance of the permit. The filing of an objection shall suspend the issuance of any permit for the demolition, substantial alteration, or relocation of the Monument (Stay) for a period of not less than 30 nor more than 180 days, during which time the Commission shall take all steps within the scope of its powers and duties as it determines are necessary for the preservation of the Monument to be demolished, altered or relocated.

At the end of the first 30 days of the Stay, staff of the Department shall report any progress regarding preservation of the Monument to the Commission, which may, upon review of the progress report, withdraw and cancel its objection to the proposed demolition, substantial alteration or relocation. If the Commission determines, upon the basis of the progress report to withdraw and cancel its objection, it shall promptly notify the appropriate Department or Board concerned of its action. Upon receipt of notification of withdrawal of the objection, the permit may be issued and the Monument may be demolished, altered or relocated. If the Commission does not withdraw and cancel its objection, the Stay shall remain in effect. If the Commission, or the staff of the Department acting on the Commission's behalf, finds at the end of the first 100 days of the Stay that the preservation of the Monument cannot be fully accomplished with the 180-day Stay period, and the Commission determines that preservation can be satisfactorily completed within an additional period not to exceed an additional 180-day Stay, the Commission may recommend to the City Council that the Stay be extended to accomplish the preservation. No request for an extension shall be made after the expiration of the original 180-day Stay. The Commission’s recommendation for an extension of the Stay shall set forth the reasons for the extension and the progress to date of the steps taken to preserve the Monument. If it appears that preservation may be completed within the time extension requested, the City Council may approve the request for extension of the Stay not to exceed an additional 180 days for the purpose of completing preservation of the Monument. No request for an extension of the Stay shall be granted where the Council determines, after consulting with the appropriate Department or Board, that granting an extension is not in the best interest of the public health, safety or general welfare. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.16. No Right to Acquire Property. The Commission shall have no power or right to acquire any property for or on behalf of itself or the City, nor shall it acquire or hold any money for itself or on behalf of the City. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.17. Rules and Regulations of the Commission.

The Commission may adopt rules and regulations necessary to carry out the purpose and intent of this article. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

Sec. 22.171.18. Cooperation with the Commission. All boards, commissions, departments and officers of the City shall cooperate with the Commission in carrying out the spirit and intent of this article. SECTION HISTORY Added by Ord. No. 178,402, Eff. 4-2-07.

CHC-2016-3620-HCM DECLARATION MAILING LIST MAILING DATE: 01/18/2017

Representative Tara Hamacher 256 S. Robertson Blvd. #2401 Beverly Hills, CA 90211

Council District 14 City Hall, Room 465 Mail Stop: 223

Applicant Kent Hawkins, Tailor Lofts, LLC 4940 Campus Dr. #C Newport Beach, CA 92660