Manure Management Plan - Minnesota Pollution Control Agency

Manure Management Plan - Minnesota Pollution Control Agency

Manure Management Plan A Step-by-Step Guide for Minnesota Feedlot Operators Revised February 2010 Name of farming operation MPCA registration number...

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Manure Management Plan A Step-by-Step Guide for Minnesota Feedlot Operators Revised February 2010

Name of farming operation

MPCA registration number

wq-f8-09

Comments Welcome, More Information Available Written by Jim Courneya, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, with special thanks to the University of Minnesota Extension Service and Kevin Blanchet who developed many of the forms used in developing this Manure Management Plan. The MPCA welcomes your comments or suggestions for improving future editions of this handbook. Please send them to feedlot staff at your regional office. Brainerd (218) 828-2492 Detroit Lakes (218) 847-1519 Mankato (507) 389-5977 Marshall (507) 537-7146 Rochester (507) 285-7343 St. Paul (651) 296-6300 Willmar (320) 214-3786 More information about MPCA feedlot programs and regulations, as well as an electronic version of this handbook and forms which can be printed out on a home computer, are available on the Web: • http://www.pca.state.mn.us/hot/feedlot-management.html • http://www.pca.state.mn.us/hot/feedlot-publications.html

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Introduction to Developing a Manure Management Plan Manure should not be considered a waste product requiring disposal. Rather, it should be stored, handled and applied with the same care given to expensive commercial fertilizers. Applied properly, manure can yield considerable savings in fertilizer costs. If over-applied, nutrients will be wasted and water resources can be negatively impacted. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) feedlot regulations require many farms to develop and follow a manure management plan (sometimes called a nutrient management plan). A manure management plan can help all feedlots comply with application requirements near waters, and is required when applying for a permit for construction or expansion. Most feedlots with 300 animal units or more are required to have a completed manure management plan by Jan. 1, 2006.

Can’t get to a workshop? This guide provides “home schooling” There are numerous consultants available to write manure management plans for producers and computer programs are available from the University of Minnesota and MPCA. In addition, the University offers workshops designed to allow producers to write at least a portion of a manure management plan in a classroom setting. This guide was developed using the forms and procedures taught in University of Minnesota workshops and is designed to allow those unable to attend a workshop to develop and follow a Manure Management Plan at home by answering these four main questions: Step 1. How much manure is produced on the farm? Step 2. How many nutrients are contained in the manure? Step 3. How many nutrients are needed for a growing crop and how much should be applied? Step 4. How should manure be managed in sensitive areas and high phosphorous soils? Some sections need to be updated annually, such as the Field Nutrient Management Plan. For more information on manure management plan components, a checklist is available at: http://www.pca.state.mn.us/hot/feedlot-management.html

Manure Management Plan table of contents • Step 1: Completing the Manure Storage, Handling and Testing Form.. page 4 • Step 2: Completing the Manure Nutrient Generation Worksheet …….. page 7 • Step 3: Completing the Field Nutrient Management Plan ……………. page 12 (includes completing the Manure Nutrient Generation Worksheet page 15) • Step 4: Sensitive Area Mgmt, High Phosphorus Soils ……. page 19 • Final Steps: Aerial photos, Soil and Manure Testing, Final Instructions ... page 25 • Index A: Nutrient/Manure Information Tables -- Table A1 (Annual manure production and nutrient excretion)………... page 26 --Table A2 (Nitrogen losses from storage) ……………………………... page 26 --Table A3 (Estimated nutrient content of liquid and solid manure) …… page 26 --Tables A4 and A5 (Nitrogen availability based on application method/ Nutrient removal in harvested crop)……………. page 27 • Extra forms ……………………………………………………………… page 28 3

Step 1. How much manure is produced on the farm? (Completing the Master Worksheet - Manure Storage, Handling and Testing) Begin by filling out the Master Worksheet - Manure Storage, Handling and Testing worksheet. This will become the main worksheet for the plan. Notice that the vertical columns on this worksheet are labeled “Manure Source #1” and “Manure Source #2.” When calculating manure and nutrient production on the farm, each barn or open lot should be treated as a separate manure source, unless feeding and management for each lot is essentially the same. If more than two barns or lots are in use, an additional copy of this worksheet is included at the end of the booklet. This may also be photocopied along with any of the other forms or tables in this booklet. I.

Livestock Information Indicate the animal type, number and size. Size is defined as the average weight of the animal during the time it is in the building. For example, the size of a hog that increases from 40 pounds to 300 pounds while in the building would be the initial weight plus the final weight divided by two (300+40 = 340/2) or 170 pounds. The far right column shows examples of how to enter the information.

II.

Manure Storage a. Storage type - Indicate the type of storage for each building or lot. Some common examples include: above ground tank, under-floor pit, earthen basin, poured concrete pit, manure pack or stockpile. b. Storage capacity - Indicate the storage capacity in tons (for dry manure) or gallons (for liquid). 1. Capacity in gallons for rectangular liquid basins can be determined by multiplying Length (in feet) x Width (in feet) x Depth (in feet) x 7.48 gal/ft3 (gallons per cubic foot). 2. Capacity in gallons for round or cylinder shaped tanks or basins can be determined by multiplying the Diameter (in feet) x Diameter (in feet) x Height or Depth (in feet) x 0.785 x 7.48 gal/ft3. c. Storage time - Indicate the average length of time manure is stored in each location prior to field application.

Completing the “Master Worksheet – Manure Storage, Handling and Testing” form continued on page 6

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Master Worksheet – Manure Storage, Handling and Testing Producer name/operator ____________________

Date ___________________

Manure Source #1

Manure Source #2

Example Dairy Barn

I. Livestock Information Animal (#1) type Animal (#1) number, size Animal (#2) type Animal (#2) number, size II. Manure Storage Storage type Storage capacity (tons, gal) Storage (days, months) III. Application Methods Commercial hauler Spreader type1 Spreader calibrated (date) When applied2 Application method3 Incorporation timing4 IV. Manure Analysis Sampling frequency Sampling methods Date analyzed N (lbs./ton or 1000 gal) P2O5 (lbs. per ton, 1000 gal) K2O (lbs./ton or 1000 gal) V. Annual Manure/Nutrients Generated Manure volume or tons per year Manure volume/tons based on records Annual amount N (lbs.)5 Annual amount P2O5 (lbs.)5 Annual amount K2O (lbs.)5 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Dairy cows 50 @ 1400 lbs. Dairy heifers 7 @ 800 lbs. Above ground tank 5000,000 gallons 7 months No Slurry tanker Yes, 11/03/2001 Fall and spring Knife inject Immediate Annually Spreader during filling 11/03/2001 24 lbs./1000 gal 18 lbs./1000 gal 29 lbs./1000 gal

450,000 gallons Yes 24 x 450=10,800 lbs. 18 x 450 = 8,100 lbs. 29 x 450 = 13,050 lbs.

“Spreader types” are: Slurry tanker, Solids spreader, Towed hose, Center pivot, Other sprinkler “When applied” choices: Daily, Every other day, Weekly, Every 2 weeks, Monthly, Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer “Application method” choices: Surface broadcast, Sweep inject, Knife inject “Incorporation time” choices: Immediate, less than 12 hours, 12-96 hours, greater than 96 hours Annual nitrogen from manure (in lbs) to be land applied after accounting for storage losses.

An additional copy of this worksheet is located on page 28.

5

Completing the “Master Worksheet – Manure Storage, Handling and Testing” form (continued)

III.

Application Method a. Commercial Hauler - Indicate whether or not you hire a commercial hauler or applicator. b. Spreader Type - Refer to footnote #1 at the bottom of the worksheet to indicate the type of spreader used. c. Spreader Calibrated - Enter the date the spreader was last calibrated. Spreaders should be calibrated to accurately determine the application rate. Refer to the Minnesota Extension bulletin “Calibrating Manure Spreaders” found at http://www.manure.umn.edu/applied/calibration_of_manure_spreaders/index.html or contact your NRCS office for assistance in calibrating your spreader. d. When Applied – Refer to footnote #2 at the bottom of the worksheet and indicate the time period or interval that best describes your practices. e. Application Method – Refer to footnote #3 at the bottom of the worksheet and enter your application method. f. Incorporation Timing – Refer to footnote #4 at the bottom of the worksheet. For any type of injection, enter “immediate” on this line.

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Step 2. How many nutrients are contained in the manure? The second step in creating a good manure management plan is determining the nutrient content of each source of manure, as well as the total amount of nutrients produced on the farm. Continue with the Master Worksheet – Manure Storage, Handling and Testing. IV.

Manure Analysis a. Sampling frequency b. Sampling methods c. Date Analyzed Ideally, manure from each source should be sampled and analyzed each year for three consecutive years to develop an average nutrient analysis for each source. After the initial three years of sampling, each source should be sampled at least once every four years or whenever feeding or management changes significantly. This allows you to maintain a “rolling” average analysis and helps to fine tune manure nutrient application. If you have manure nutrient sample results, they should be entered here. Sampling must be done for manure sources from 100 animal units or more. If you do not have manure sample results, refer to Table A3 Estimated nutrient content of liquid and solid manure on page 26 until an actual manure test result is available. Find the animal type for each manure source on your farm and fill in the N, P2O5 and K2O on the worksheet. Be sure to use the numbers under the appropriate heading “Liquid” or “Solid.”

V.

Animal Manure/Nutrients Generated Determine the annual amount of manure produced and the annual amount of nutrients produced from each manure source. There are two methods of finding the amount of manure produced on the farm: 1. Past farm records of the annual amount of manure that was hauled from each manure source. Or, 2. Animal manure excretion estimates using the Manure and Nutrient Generation Worksheet on page 9. If you have records for the amount of manure in thousand gallon units or tons, multiply this number by the manure analysis in pounds of nutrient per 1000 gallons or tons from Section IV. See example.

Example – In the far right column of the worksheet on Page 5, 450,000 gallons are produced annually and the analysis for nitrogen was 24 lbs. per thousand gallons (from Section IV) so: 450 (thousand gallons) x 24 (pounds N per 1000 gal.)=10,800 lbs. of N produced annually Repeat this procedure for P2O5 (phosphate) and K2O (potash)

NOTE: If you do not have records or do not know the amount of manure produced on the farm, you must fill out the Manure and Nutrient Generation Worksheet that follows before you can complete Section V.

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Instructions for completing the Manure and Nutrient Generation Worksheet (Complete if you do not have records or know the amount of manure produced on the farm. Enter results in Section V of Master Worksheet.) Instructions for Top Half The top half of this worksheet is devoted to determining the amount of manure produced annually. Use a new worksheet for each manure source. The bottom half of this worksheet will determine the quantity of nutrient produced annually after storage losses. At the top of the page, indicate the source or collection area such as “barn pit # 1”, “earthen basin”, or “north lot” etc. Indicate whether manure is liquid or solid. Then proceed to the top of table titled: “I. Annual Estimated Manure Production from Livestock.” (a) Enter the animal type. This should be the same as the animal type you entered a. in Section I of the Master Worksheet. (b) Enter the number of animals. Again, this should be the same number entered on the master worksheet. (c) Enter the average weight of the animals over the entire time they are housed in this barn or lot. For example: The average weight of “growing and finishing” swine during the entire time they are on the farm might be 165 lbs. This number should be the same as the number entered in Section I of the Master worksheet. (d) Multiply (b) x (c) or (animal number x animal size) then divide the result by 1,000. Enter this final result in column (d). (e) Find Table A1 on page 26 of this booklet. Find the “Animal Type” and look under the first two columns “Manure Production” to find the correct “Manure Production Factor”. For example: Grow-Finish swine with liquid manure shows a Manure Production Factor of 2166. Find the correct factor for your animal type and manure type and enter it in column (e) of the worksheet. (f) Multiply (d) x (e) or (Total livestock weight x Manure Production Factor) and enter the result in column (f). (g) Determine the number of days the animals are in the lot or barn and divide that number by 365. For example: if the animals are in the facility for 180 days, then 180 / 365 = 0.493. Enter your result in column (g). (h) Enter the percent of manure (expressed as a decimal) produced by these animals that is collected. In total confinement housing, this number will generally be 1.0. For example, 75% would be expressed as 0.75. (i) Multiply (g) x (h) and then multiply the result x (f). Enter the result in column (i). 8

Manure and Nutrient Generation Worksheet

Date: _____________

Annual Manure and Nutrient Generation for: _____________________________ Manure Source or Collection Area

Manure Type: _______________ Solid or Liquid

I. Annual Estimated Manure Production from Livestock1 (a) Animal Type

(b) Animal Number

(c) Animal Size (lbs.)

(d) Total livestock Weight (000)

(e) Manure Production Factor

(b x c)/1,000

(Table A1)

(f) Estimated Annual Manure Production (tons or gals) (d x e)

(g) Length of time livestock spend in facility (days/365)

(h) Percent Manure Collected (%)

(i) Annual Manure Volume or Weight (tons or gals) fxgxh

Total Estimated Manure Volume or Weight Produced Per Year 1. Annual estimated manure production does not include dilution from bedding or water

II. Annual Estimated Nutrients Excreted by Livestock (a) Animal Type

(b) Total livestock Weight (000)

Nutrient Production Factors (Table A1) (c) (d) (e) N P2O5 K2O

(f) Nitrogen Availability After Storage (1 - % N loss) (Table A2)

(g) Length of time livestock spend in facility (days/365)

Annual Excreted Nutrients After Storage Losses (h) (i) (j) N (lbs) P2O5 (lbs) K2O (lbs) bxcxfxg bxdxg bxexg

N (lbs) Total Estimated Nutrients Excreted Per Year after Storage Losses

9

P2O5 (lbs) K2O (lbs)

Date: _____________

Manure and Nutrient Generation Worksheet Annual Manure and Nutrient Generation for: _____________________________ Manure Source or Collection Area

Manure Type: _______________ Solid or Liquid

I. Annual Estimated Manure Production from Livestock1 (a) Animal Type

(b) Animal Number

(c) Animal Size (lbs.)

(d) Total livestock Weight (000)

(e) Manure Production Factor

(b x c)/1,000

(Table A1)

(f) Estimated Annual Manure Production (tons or gals) (d x e)

(g) Length of time livestock spend in facility (days/365)

(h) Percent Manure Collected (%)

(i) Annual Manure Volume or Weight (tons or gals) fxgxh

Total Estimated Manure Volume or Weight Produced Per Year 1. Annual estimated manure production does not include dilution from bedding or water

II. Annual Estimated Nutrients Excreted by Livestock (a) Animal Type

(b) Total livestock Weight (000)

Nutrient Production Factors (Table A1) (c) (d) (e) N P2O5 K2O

(f) Nitrogen Availability From Storage (1 - % N loss) (Table A2)

(g) Length of time livestock spend in facility (days/365)

Annual Excreted Nutrients After Storage Losses (h) (i) (j) N (lbs) P2O5 (lbs) K2O (lbs) bxcxfxg bxdxg bxexg

N (lbs) Total Estimated Nutrients Excreted Per Year after Storage Losses

10

P2O5 (lbs) K2O (lbs)

Completing the Manure and Nutrient Generation Worksheet (Bottom Half) The bottom half of this form is used to determine the estimated quantity of nutrients produced. You cannot simply multiply the estimated amount of manure produced by the analysis of N, P and K because there will be storage losses for N. Storage losses are already accounted for when you sample and test manure before application. If samples have not been tested, you must do the calculations on this page before entering the final numbers on the Master Worksheet. Refer to the bottom half of the worksheet titled “II. Annual Estimated Nutrients Excreted by Livestock” (a) Enter the animal type exactly as you did in the top half of this worksheet. (b) Enter the total livestock weight in thousands of pounds. For example, if the total weight is 70,000 pounds, enter “70.” The total livestock weight is found by multiplying the “animal number” (b) by “animal size” (c) from the top half of this worksheet. (c) , (d) and (e). Turn to Table A1 (page 26) and look at the last three columns under the heading “Excreted Nutrients in Manure per 1,000 lbs. of Animal Weight.” Find the Nutrient Production Factor for each nutrient (N, P2O5 and K2O) that corresponds to the correct animal type. For example: the factors for a dairy milk cow would be 263, 135 and 146 for N, P2O5 and K2O, respectively. Enter the correct numbers for each animal type on the worksheet. (f) Return to the tables on page 26 and find Table A2, “Nitrogen losses from animal manure as affected by method of storage.” Find the manure storage and handling method employed on your farm for each manure source. Be sure to distinguish between “liquid” and “solid.” The number on the far right of this table represents the percentage of Nitrogen that is lost during storage. For example, in a “Daily scrape and Haul” management system, 25 percent of the nitrogen will be lost before it is applied. If you subtract 25 percent from 1, the remainder will be 0.75. Subtract the storage loss of your storage and handling method from “1” and enter it in column (f) of the worksheet. (g) If animals are kept in a barn, lot or facility for less than a full year, divide the number of days they are in the facility by 365 and enter this factor in column (g). If animals are in the facility the entire year, enter a “1” in column (g). (h) Multiply (b) x (c) x (f) (g)= lbs. N. In our example we had 70 (thousand pounds) x 263 (N production factor for dairy cows) x 0.75 (remaining N in storage system after storage loss) x (g) [time in facility factor] = 13,807 lbs. of N produced by our dairy cows. Do the calculations using your numbers. (i) And (j) For P2O5 and K2O, multiply (b) x (d) x (g) = lbs. of P2O5. or (b) x (e) (g) for K2O Do Not multiply by the storage loss %. Storage loss is only used when calculating Nitrogen. Once you have calculated the “Annual Excreted Nutrients” for each type of animal, add up the numbers and fill them in at the bottom of the worksheet. Now return to the Master Worksheet – Manure Storage, Handling and Testing and also enter these numbers in the final spaces in Section V, “Annual amounts of N, P2O5 and K2O.”

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Step 3. How many nutrients are needed for a growing crop? (Completing the Field Nutrient Management Plan) The next step is to start planning manure applications to specific field and crop situations. Before you start the planning process, you will need to gather basic field information such as field size and location, sensitive features, past soil testing, and crop information. You will need to gather aerial photos and/or field maps for all fields that could receive manure from your livestock operation. On these maps or photos, each field should be identified and outlined. Show any sensitive features (ditches, tiles, lakes, streams, wetlands etc.), for each field and the planned setbacks from those features. Refer to the MPCA publication “Applying Manure in Sensitive Areas” for complete information on how to identify sensitive areas. This publication is available on the Web at: http://www.pca.state.mn.us/publications/feedlots-manureapplication.pdf The next step is completing a Field Nutrient Management Plan for each field that may receive manure. Two copies of this form are provided on the following pages. Before filling out the form(s), make numerous copies so you will have one for each field as well as extras for yearly plan updates. At the top of the form, fill in the individual field information. Be sure to include any sensitive features. (a) Fill in the most recent soil test information for this specific field. In order to get the most benefit from manure nutrients, it is vital to perform regular soil testing. If you do not know the Soil Name/Map Unit, you can obtain this from your local SWCD.

(b) Determine Crop Nutrient Recommendation for each field by using the soil test and crop information that was previously gathered. For most crops besides corn, refer to the University of Minnesota publication “Fertilizer Recommendations for Agronomic Crops in Minnesota” which you may have received with this manure management planning booklet. It can also be found, along with corn recommendation publications, at: http://www.extension.umn.edu/Corn/genfertility.html. Fruit and vegetable publication can be found at http://www.extension.umn.edu/Vege&Fruit/. Information is also available at http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/cropsystems/DC3553.html. Completing the “Field Nutrient Management Plan” continued on page 15

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Field Nutrient Management Plan

Crop Year _________

Farm Name/Tract # ______________________

Field ___________________________________

Field Location ___________________________________________________ Acres ____________ Sensitive Features ___________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ Soil Test Information (a) NO3N lbs/acre

P ppm

Date Tested ______________ K ppm

Percent Organic Matter

pH

Soil Name/Map Unit:

Soil Texture:

Crop Nutrient Recommendation Source of UMN Nitrogen Recommendation  UMN Nitrogen Tables  Western MN Soil Nitrate Test

Planned Crop _____________ Yield Goal _______________ Previous Crop _____________ Quality/Yield ___________

Pounds Per Acre N

(b) -------____

P 2O 5

K2O

---------

--------

Other Nitrogen Credits (c) ______ ------------- ----(d) ______ (e) ______ (f) ______

UM Broadcast Nutrient Recommendation First-year legume nitrogen credits are already accounted for on line (b)

Second-Year Legume Nitrogen Credit Crop/Quality ____________ Second-Year Manure Nitrogen Credit Nitrogen Credit Based on Early-Spring Soil Nitrate Test

_______

______

Net Nutrients Needed

(g) ______ _______

______

Planned Manure Applications Manure Source

Timing

Method

(h) ______

_______

______

Supplemental Nutrient Needs

(i) ______

_______

______

Planned Fertilizer Application Fertilizer form

(j) ______ _______

_______

Timing

Method

Rate/acre

N

P2O5

K2O

Rate/acre

N

P2O5

K2O

Total Nutrients to be Applied in Planning Year

Sensitive Area Management (See page 19)

13

Field Nutrient Management Plan

Crop Year _________

Farm Name/Tract # ______________________

Field ___________________________________

Field Location ___________________________________________________ Acres ____________ Sensitive Features ___________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ Soil Test Information (a) NO3N lbs/acre

P ppm

Date Tested ______________ K ppm

Percent Organic Matter

pH

Soil Name/Map Unit:

Soil Texture:

Crop Nutrient Recommendation Source of UMN Nitrogen Recommendation  UMN Nitrogen Tables  Western MN Soil Nitrate Test

Planned Crop _____________ Yield Goal _______________ Previous Crop _____________ Quantity/Yield ___________

Pounds Per Acre N

P2O5

(b) -------- --------____

K2O

--------

Other Nitrogen Credits (c) ______ (d) ______ ------------- ----(e) ______

UM Broadcast Nutrient Recommendation First-year legume nitrogen credits are already accounted for on line (b)

Second-Year Legume Nitrogen Credit Crop/Quality ______________ Second-Year Manure Nitrogen Credit Nitrogen Credit Based on Early-Spring Soil Nitrate Test

(f) ______

_______

______

Net Nutrients Needed

(g) ______

_______

______

Planned Manure Applications Manure Source

Timing

Method

(h) ______

_______

______

Supplemental Nutrient Needs

(i) ______

_______

______

Planned Fertilizer Application Fertilizer form

(j) ______

_______ _______

Timing

Method

Rate/acre

N

P2O5

K2O

Rate/acre

N

P2O5

K2O

Total Nutrients to be Applied in Planning Year

Sensitive Area Management (see page 19)

14

Completing the “Field Nutrient Management Plan” - continued (c) If forage legumes were in the rotation of this field in the last 2 years, refer to Table 19 and the discussion on the top of page 12 of the University of Minnesota fertilizer recommendations booklet for second year legume nitrogen credits when growing corn. For other crops to be grown this year, refer to the text in the discussion sections of the publication. (d) If manure was applied last year on this field, enter the second-year available nutrients as determined on the Manure Nutrient Credit Worksheet. (e) If you performed an early spring soil nitrate test, enter the result here. If you enter a result here, do not enter a second year legume credit (c) or a second year manure credit (d) since this test will be measuring these nitrogen sources. (f) Subtract the nitrogen credits identified in (c), (d) and (e) from the U of Minnesota recommendations listed in (b) and record the Net Nutrient Needs for this field. (g) In order to determine the amount of nutrients that will be available from your planned manure application, you will now take a break from this form and fill out the Manure Nutrient Credit Worksheet. Once completed, the results from the worksheet (d-1, d-2, and d-3) will be entered here and you will resume filling out the Field Management Plan on page 18.

Completing the Manure Nutrient Credit Worksheet (see p. 17) I. Manure Nutrient Credit If your manure applicator is calibrated to apply a specific amount in tons or thousand gallons, enter the rate here. For instance, if your applicator applies 3,500 gallons per acre, enter “3.5,” and then move on to Section III. If you do not have a set calibrated application rate, complete Section II next. II. Manure Rate Determination (a) Choose the Nutrient for which your application rates will be determined. In most cases, you will determine your rate of application based on the nitrogen content of the manure and the nitrogen needs of the crop to be planted. In the case of high or very high phosphorus soil tests, refer to the High Phosphorus Soils worksheet on page 23 of this booklet. (b) Fill in the nutrient content for the nutrient you chose to base your application rates on. This number can be found in section IV of the Master Worksheet.

15

(c) Fill in the crop nutrient need for the listed nutrient. This can be found in your partially completed Field Nutrient Management Plan. (d) Fill in the crop. (e) Turn to Table A4 (page 27) which begins with the words “Nitrogen availability and loss…….” Find the type of animal you raise and follow the Year 1 line across the table. These numbers are the percentage of nitrogen available for crop use based on different manure application methods. Copy these numbers for your animal type into column (e) of this form. Remember that the numbers in the table are expressed as a percentage so you need to put a decimal point in front of them when copying into column (e). For example if the number in Table A4 is 25, write it in column (e) as 0.25. Note: The percentages listed in Table A4 are used for nitrogen only. If you base your manure application rate on Phosphorus, always use 0.80 as the first year available percentage and would therefore enter 0.80 behind all application methods in column (e). (f) Multiply the nitrogen content in your manure (b) by each of the decimal percentages in column (e) and enter them in column (f). (g) Divide the crop nutrient needs (c) by the results recorded in column (f) and record the results in column (g). Column (g) represents the amount of manure in “tons” or “1000 gallons” you would need to apply to fully meet the crop nutrient needs in the first year.

III. First- and Second-Year Nutrient Availability to Crops (a) Fill in the nutrient analysis of your manure from section IV of the Master Worksheet. (b) Enter the manure application rate in tons or thousand gallons. This can be an application rate chosen after completing section II of this worksheet or a calibrated rate at which you normally apply manure. (c) Multiply (a) x (b) under each of the nutrients. This is the total pounds of each nutrient you will apply before calculating first year availability. First and Second Year Availability – Multiply the first-year availability percentage (expressed as a decimal) x the Total Nutrients Applied (c). Notice that the percentage availability for P2O5 and K2O are set at 0.80 and 0.90 respectively, regardless of application method or animal type. For nitrogen, refer to Table A4 (page 27) to find the appropriate first and second year availability percentage for your application method. The calculated pounds per acre first-year and second-year available nutrients are used when planning manure applications to individual field and crop situations. Complete this worksheet and transfer the results (d-1, d-2, and d-3) to line (g) of the Field Nutrient Management Plan.

16

Manure Nutrient Credit Worksheet

Date _____________

Crop Year ______________

Producer/Operator ____________________________________________

I. Manure Nutrient Credits for: _________________________________ Manure Source or Collection Area

Calibrated Application Rate ___ Yes ___ No (If NO, then complete section III below before continuing) Rate Amount ___________________ (tons or 1,000 gal) Manure Application Method ______________________

II. Manure Rate Determination (a ) Nutrient for which to base application rate (N, P2O5 or K2O) (b) Nutrient content of manure for the nutrient listed above ______________ (lbs./ton or 1,000 gal) (c) Crop nutrient need for the listed nutrient ___________________ (lb/acre) (d) Crop _______________

Application Method

(e) Percent First-Year Nutrient Availability (Table A4)

(f) First-Year Nutrients Available (lb/ton or 1,000 gal) (b x e)

(g) Manure Application Rate (tons or 1,000 gal/acre) (c / f)

Broadcast no incorporation Broadcast (incorporated 12-96 hours) Broadcast (incorporated <12 hours) Sweep injected Knife injected

III. First- and Second-Year Manure Nutrient Availability to Crops N Manure Analysis (lbs./ton or 1,000 gals.) Application Rate (tons or 1,000 gal/acre) Total Nutrients Applied (lbs./acre)

Nutrient Availability to Crops First-Year Availability Second-Year Availability

P2O5

K2O

(a)

(a)

(a)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(a x b) = (c)

(a x b) = (c)

(a x b) = (c)

N (lbs./acre)

(d-1) (% N available from Table A4) x (c) = (% N available from Table A4) x (c) = 17

P2O5 (lbs./acre)

K2O (lbs./acre)

(d-2) (0.80) x (c)=

(d-3) (0.90) x (c)=

Field Nutrient Management Plan (continued from page 15) Returning to Step 3, Completing the Field Nutrient Management Plan (pages 13, 14) (h) (Supplementary nutrient needs) Subtract the nutrients from Planned Manure Applications (g) from the Net Nutrients Needed (f) and fill in the result here. If the nutrients from manure are higher than the Net Nutrients Needed, then you may be over applying at your planned application rate and you may need to reduce the manure application rate. If this field has a high phosphorus soil test, you should plan a long-term strategy of how often manure can be applied so that soil test levels do not continue to increase. Refer to Part 14 on page 23. (i) Record any planned fertilizer applications such as starter fertilizers or supplemental broadcast fertilizer needed to complete the crop needs. Enter the fertilizer type under “fertilizer form” and fill in the timing, method, rate/acre and actual pounds of each nutrient. (j) Add the Nutrients from Planned Manure Applications (g) and Planned Fertilizer Applications (i) and enter the result here. These are the total nutrients to be applied to this field in the planning year. At the bottom of the page, record any sensitive area management and complete the form on p. 24. Remember, you must fill out one of these Field Nutrient Management Plan forms for each field on the farm. This form is a vital part of your overall Manure Management Plan that should be updated each year to help you manage manure nutrient application on your farm. An additional copy of the Field Nutrient Management Plan form is provided on page 29. Use this copy to make photocopies.

18

Step 4. How Will I Manage Manure in Sensitive Areas and High Phosphorus Soils? If you apply manure in sensitive areas, you are required to include sensitive area management in your overall manure management plan before it will be considered complete. Instructions: Step 1. Fields – In the middle of the top row of Sensitive Area Management Table on page 20, list the field name or identification number (for all fields to receive manure). If more than nine fields are used, photocopy this form and complete for remaining fields. Make sure that the field acreage and location information for these same field names is listed in the manure management plan. Step 2. Sensitive Areas – For each field listed on Sensitive Area Management Table, check all of the sensitive features that are in the field or adjacent to the field. For surface waters, check the box if the water type is within 300 feet of areas receiving manure. For floodplains, only check if manure is to be applied within a floodplain that is more than 300 feet from the water. A “public well management area” can be identified by asking city water managers (check if the fields are within about a mile of a community water supply well). Whenever one or more fields has a sensitive feature, look at the right hand column to find out which part of the following pages (“Sensitive Areas parts 1-14”) needs to be completed. For example if a field has an open tile intake, then complete part 4 in sensitive areas (identify the setback option to be used for each field with an open tile intake). If no tile intakes are found in any field, then part 4 of Sensitive Areas does not need to be completed. Step 3. Soil Test Phosphorus – For each field listed on Sensitive Area Management Table, check either a, b, c, or d, based on the field average soil phosphorus test levels. Only one of the four boxes should be checked. If b, c, or d are checked for any of the fields, then follow the instructions in the right hand column (e.g. complete the corresponding Parts 13 and/or 14). Step 4. Timing of application – For each field in Sensitive Area Management Table, check one of the five seasons that corresponds to the time manure will be applied onto that field. Follow the instructions in the right hand column of the Table. For example, if manure is to be applied to frozen or snow-covered soils, then complete Sensitive Areas Parts 11 and 12. Step 5. Soil Conservation – All CAFOs and NPDES permitted feedlots must include a description of soil conservation practices. For all fields receiving manure from your CAFO facility, complete part 12 of Sensitive Areas. Part 12 is also required when manure will likely be applied onto frozen or snow-covered soils.

19

Field name/tract # Show same field name/tract # on maps or aerial photos of fields

Example field A

Sensitive Area Management Table 1

2

3

4

5

6

9

10

Sensitive areas parts 1-14 are found on the following pages.

(check each feature that is within 300 ft of field)

Complete Sensitive Areas part 1 Complete Sensitive Areas part 2 Complete Sensitive Areas part 2

X

Complete Sensitive Areas part 3

X

Complete Sensitive Areas part 4 Complete Sensitive Areas part 5 Complete Sensitive Areas parts 6 and 7 Complete Sensitive Areas part 8 Complete Sensitive Areas part 9 Complete Sensitive Areas part 10 Complete Sensitive Areas part 2, if CAFO Note: Use field average P No state restrictions on P applications If field is within 300 ft of sensitive areas a,b,c,or d, above, then complete Sensitive Areas part 13 If field is within 300 ft of the sensitive areas a, b, c, d or e above, then complete Sensitive Areas part 14 Complete Sensitive Areas part 14

X

c. 76-150 Bray P1 or 61-120 Olsen

d. Over 150 Bray P1 or 120 Olsen Timing of application (check one) June, July or August

Describe cover crop: ______________ If CAFO, no application to coarsetextured soils until soil temps drop below 50º F No added requirements Complete Sensitive Areas parts 11 and 12 No added requirements

September to mid/lateOctober Late Oct. to soil freeze Frozen or snow-covered soils Spring application to unfrozen soils Soil Conservation Is feedlot a CAFO or NPDES permitted site?

8

What is needed to complete the manure management plan when one or more fields are checked in the row?

Sensitive areas a. Lake or Stream b. Intermittent stream c. Drainage ditch without protective berms d. Wetlands over 10 acre (public waters wetland) e. Open tile intakes f. Wetlands under 10 acres g. Sinkhole, well, mine or quarry h. Floodplain i. Public well mgmt. area k. Shallow soil over fractured rock l. Other conduits to water Soil test Phos. (ppm) check one (a-d) a. Under 22 ppm Bray P1 or 17 Olsen b. 22-75 Bray P1 or 17-60 Olsen

7

X

N

Complete Sensitive Areas part 12 if the feedlot is a CAFO

20

Sensitive Areas Parts 1-14 Part 1. Lake or perennial stream Option A inject or incorporate within 24 hours and prior to rainfall (within 300 feet), and 25 foot setback with no manure applied avoid long term soil P build-up Option B – 100 ft wide non-manured grassed buffer Option C – 100 ft non-manured setback with at least one rod (16.5’) as grassed buffer Option D – other (describe) ____________________________________

Field _______________ Field _______________ Field _______________ Field _______________ Field _______________

Part 4. Tile intakes Option A inject or incorporate within 24 hours and prior to rainfall (within 300 ft of intake) 25 foot setback with no manure applied avoid long term soil P build-up Option B inject or incorporate within 24 hours and prior to rainfall (within 300 ft of intake), and Use a riser pipe that allows at least 75% solids settling in ponded area surrounding the intake* Option C – 35 foot non-manured grassed buffer Option D – 100 foot non-manured setback with at least one rod (16.5’) as grassed buffer Option E – other (describe) ____________________ ___________________________________________ * Note: needed if NPDES permitted facility

Option ___ Option ___ Option ___ Option ___ Option ___

Part 2. Intermittent stream or drainage ditch without protective berm

All fields………………… Option ___ Field _______________ Option ___ Field _______________ Option ___ Field _______________ Option ___ Field _______________ Option ___

Option A inject or incorporate within 24 hours and prior to rainfall (within 300 feet), and 25 foot setback with no manure applied Avoid long term soil P build-up Option B – 50 ft wide non-manured grassed buffer Option C – 100 ft non-manured setback with at least one rod (16.5’) as grassed buffer Option D – other (describe) __________________ _________________________________________

Part 5. Wetlands under 10 acres No specific state-wide requirements. Check which practices will be followed to meet any permit conditions and/or to voluntarily protect water quality: □ Setback of ___________ ft □ Grassed buffer ___________ ft wide □ No long term soil P build-up □ Incorporate manure within _________ ft □ Soil conservation practices □ Other ___________________________________ □ Other ___________________________________

All fields………………… Option ___ Field _______________ Option ___ Field _______________ Option ___ Field _______________ Option ___ Field _______________ Option ___ Field _______________ Option ___

Part 6. Sinkhole Option A inject or incorporate within 24 hours and prior to rainfall (upslope and within 300 ft), and 50 ft setback with no manure applied (100 ft setback for CAFOs) Option B – Diversion berm to prevent runoff into the sinkhole

Part 3. Public waters wetland (i.e. >10 acres) Option A inject or incorporate within 24 hours and prior to rainfall (within 300 feet), and 25 ft setback with no manure applied avoid long term soil P build up Option B – 50 ft wide non-manured grassed buffer Option C – 100 ft non-manured setback with at least one rod (16.5’) as grassed buffer Option D – other (describe) _________________ ________________________________________

All Fields………………. Field _______________ Field _______________ Field _______________

Field _______________ Field _______________ Field _______________ Field _______________ Field _______________ Field _______________ Field _______________

Option ___ Option ___ Option ___ Option ___ 21

Option ___ Option ___ Option ___ Option ___ Option ___ Option ___ Option ___

Part 11. Winter Application Sites Fields used for winter application Field Slope Distance to nearest water

Part 7. Wells, Mines, Quarries 50 ft setback – minimum required (100 ft if CAFO applying near agricultural wellhead)

Field _____________ setback ___________ Field _____________ setback ___________ Field _____________ setback ___________ Field _____________ setback ___________ Field _____________ setback ___________ Field _____________ setback ___________

Check which practices will be followed for winter application fields.

Part 8. Floodplains extending beyond 300 feet of waters

Required for all sites: □ I will not apply manure to frozen or snow-covered soils within 300 feet of lakes, streams, intermittent streams, public waters wetlands, drainage ditches without berms, and open tile intakes.

No minimum state-wide requirements. Check which practices will be followed: □ Avoid manure application during peak flooding periods □ Incorporate or inject manure when there is a risk of flooding □ Avoid winter-time manure applications □ Other __________________________________

Management Options Check which will be followed (all are Required for CAFOs) □ Avoid spreading during snowmelt that creates runoff or when rainfall over ¼ inch is expected within 24 hrs □ Spread liquid Manure to slopes less than 2 percent and solid Manure to slopes less than 6 percent. □ Spread manure where tillage is on the contour (if slopes >2%) □ Apply liquids at rates that prevent runoff during the application process □ Find alternative fields or management where MPCA determines that water will be polluted

Part 9. Public Well Management Areas i.e. Those vulnerable to contamination No state requirements specifically for these areas. Check which practices will be followed: □ Follow practices recommended in city wellhead protection plans □ Maintain a setback of _________ ft □ Soil nitrate test will be used to refine nitrogen rate management decisions □ Apply no earlier than late October, or when soil temperatures are less than 50ºF □ Use crops that mine nitrogen out of the soil (e.g. alfalfa, legume grasses, etc.) □ Other _________________________________

Part 12. Conservation Practices Check which conservation practices will be used: □ grassed waterways

fields: _______________________________ □ field edge buffers

fields: _______________________________ □ contour stripcropping

fields: _______________________________ □ chisel or disk tillage w/residue

fields: _______________________________

Part 10. Shallow soil over fractured bedrock

□ contour buffer strip

(i.e. < 3 feet above limestone)

□ no-till

No specific state requirements Check which practices will be followed: □ Use composted manure or other processes which kill bacteria □ Till manure into soil □ Maximize separation between fractured bedrock and manure □ Other __________________________________

□ sediment control basin

fields: _______________________________ fields: _______________________________ fields: _______________________________ □ terrace

fields: _______________________________ □ cover crop

fields: _______________________________ □ rotations that include crops other than row crops

fields: _______________________________ □ meets tolerable soil erosion losses “T” defined by NRCS

□ Other _______________________________

22

Below, circle the option(s) that will be used for soils exceeding the thresholds in the above table for extremely high P soils. Check appropriate boxes and fill in other needed information.

Part 13. High phosphorus soils Over 21 ppm Bray P1 (weak Bray); Over 16 ppm Olsen; or Over 30 ppm Mehlich III

Option A. Discontinue manure applications to the following fields. Field ______________________ Field ______________________ Field ______________________ Field ______________________

If applying manure to high phosphorus soils that are within 300 feet of lakes, streams, intermittent streams, public waters wetlands (i.e. over 10 acres), and drainage ditches without protective berms, check the box and insert the planned frequency of application.

□ I will maintain or reduce my soil P levels when applying manure within 300 feet of waters by applying manure no more than _____ times during a six-year period. Additionally, I will test my soils and further reduce manure rates and/or frequency of application if soil test levels are found to continue to increase.

Option B. I will follow all NRCS 590 standards for extremely high P soils as stated in the three conditions below:

To determine the number of times that manure should be applied during a six year period to prevent long-term soil P build-up follow the three steps below.

manure no more than _____ times during a six-year period to all manured fields with extremely high P (use same procedure as described for high P soils near waters).

□ I will Maintain or reduce soil P levels by applying

Step 1. Determine average P removal during the crop rotation (multiply expected yields by the crops’ P 2O5 removal rates as listed in Table A5 on page 27). Example: Corn/soybean rotation with 160 bushel corn and 45 bushel beans Corn – [160 * 0.34] = 54 lbs P2O5 removed per year Soybeans [45 * 0.82] = 37 lbs P2O5 removed per year Average – 45 lbs P2O5 removed per year

□ I will not apply manure to fields with sheet and rill erosion exceeding 4 tons/acre, unless a 100 foot grassed buffer is along all receiving waters and erosion is less than 6 tons/acre (list fields that will not receive manure due to these conditions): Field ______________________ Field ______________________ Field ______________________ Field ______________________

Step 2. Determine the amount of P2O5 that is typically applied in manure applications (multiply rate of application times manure P2O5 content times 0.80). Example: 4000 gals/ac * 28 lbs P2O5 /1000 gals * 0.8 = 90 lbs P2O5 applied

□ I will not apply manure within 300 feet of waters if soil P exceeds 150 ppm Bray P1 (or 120 Olsen), except if a 100 foot grass buffer exists along the water and erosion is less than 2 tons/acre (list fields that will not receive manure due to these conditions): Field ______________________ Field ______________________ Field ______________________

Step 3. Divide result of step 2 by result of step 1. Example: 90/45 = 2 (i.e. manure can be applied on average once every 2 years or three times in a 6-year rotation without expecting soil P build-up).

Option C □ I have used the University of Minnesota soil phosphorus index and will only apply manure to those fields which show a low or very low rating. The phosphorus index can be found at the following web site: www.mnpi.umn.edu. Attach P index results for fields where manure applications are planned.

Part 14. Extremely high phosphorus soils Proximity to waters* Within 300 ft of waters or open tile intakes All other land away from waters and intakes

Bray P1 (ppm) >75

Olsen (ppm) >60

Mehlich III (ppm) >90

□ Additionally, I will maintain or reduce my soil P >150

>120

levels by only re-applying manure after the manure P is removed by crops planted after the manure application (see attached table of crop P removal).

>180

23

Definitions of Sensitive Features Tile intakes – a direct conduit (e.g. piping) from the ground surface to waters of the state and any other mechanism used to drain surface runoff ponding from fields that does not result in effective treatment or removal of pollutants (i.e. including blind inlets or rock inlets). This also includes side inlets through berms along drainage ditches. Drainage ditch – edge of field drainage ditches (typically shown on U.S. Geological Survey quadrangle maps), excluding ditches that have berms sufficiently high to prevent runoff into the ditch. Lakes, River or Stream – Lakes can be generally considered as bodies of waters over 25 acres. Rivers or streams flow continuously. Intermittent streams – Streams which do not flow all year. They can flow continuously for long or short periods of time, and when a storm or major snowmelt occurs. They are denoted by dashed lines on U.S. Geological Survey Topographic maps. Wetlands over 10 acres (public waters wetlands) – DNR protected wetlands, which are typically over 10 acres in rural areas. Wetlands under 10 acres (non-farmed wetlands) – Wetlands under 10 acres, excluding wetlands that are used for agricultural purposes. Floodplains – Land that regularly floods during the spring or during large storms. Public well management area – Drinking water supply management areas delineated in accordance with Minnesota Health Department rules, where the aquifer/well is considered vulnerable. The well owner/manager should know whether the land is in such an area. Shallow bedrock – Areas with bedrock less than 36 inches below the soil surface as identified in the soil survey, field checks, or NRCS evaluations. Sinkhole – A surface depression caused by a collapse of soil or overlying formation above a fractured or cavernous bedrock. Well, Mine or Quarry – Active wells, inactive unsealed wells, or any human excavations to remove stone, gravel, sand, iron, or other minerals. Other conduits to waters – This category can include road ditches, especially those which are mapped as intermittent streams, or other pipes or channels that lead directly to waters of the state.

24

Final Steps, Additional Forms Aerial Photographs As discussed on page 12, your Manure Management Plan is not complete until you secure aerial photos of each field you will have access to for manure spreading. On the photos, outline each field and also outline any sensitive areas or areas of special concern where you might need to use special management practices such as setbacks or immediate incorporation. It is suggested that you staple these photos to the back page of this booklet.

Soil and Manure Test Results It is also a good idea to gather copies of all soil test results and manure nutrient analysis results and keep them with this booklet for quick reference.

A Living Document Remember that this Manure Management Plan is a living and working document. That is, once completed, it needs to be updated each year with new cropping information or any changes in management or test results. If it is not followed, you will not benefit from the maximum value of the manure nutrients produced on your farm.

Extra Forms Additional copies of the Master Worksheet and Field Nutrient Management Plan are located on the following pages. Use these copies to make any additional photocopies you may need to develop or update your plan. Additional information on sensitive area management, including additional forms, is available on the MPA Web site: http://www.pca.state.mn.us/hot/feedlots.html#forms http://www.pca.state.mn.us/publications/feedlots-manureapplication.pdf

Check the Checklist Remember to download and use the Manure Management Plan Requirements and Checklist available on the MPCA Web site to make sure you have completed all the necessary components of the plan. http://www.pca.state.mn.us/hot/feedlot-management.html

25

Nutrient/Manure Management Information Tables Table A1. Annual manure production and nutrient excretion from livestock. Animal Type

Manure production per 1,000 lbs. Animal Weight

Excreted Nutrient in Manure per 1,000 lbs. of Animal Weight

Solid (tons/year)

Liquid (gals/year)

N

P2O5

K2O

19.5

4591

162

73

130

finishing

9.0

2141

131

39

83

cow

16.8

3982

128

66

106

calf

14.6

3358

146

24

122

heifer

11.0

2536

112

39

112

lactating

20.3

4876

263

135

146

dry

9.3

2241

110

40

88

veal

4.8

1153

44

29

73

nursery

13.9

3358

292

146

146

finishing

9.0

2166

219

73

97

gestating

4.1

998

61

37

49

lactating

8.5

2025

165

107

127

boar

3.8

900

49

37

37

Calibrating Your Manure Spreader

BEEF calf

DAIRY

1. Determine manure weight (solid manure) or manure volume (liquid manure) per spreader load. (Use measured manure weight or 90% of the manufacturer’s listed volume for liquid.)

SWINE

POULTRY broiler

17.3

4198

383

256

183

layer

9.1

2068

316

97

146

turkey (female)

8.6

2044

285

186

124

turkey (male)

6.8

1606

203

135

88

duck

20.1

4836

392

310

237

9.9

2394

66

22

22

7.5

1825

146

73

146

2. Calculate rate based on loads applied per field OR Calculate rate based on acres covered per load.

HORSE pleasure

SHEEP feeder

Adapted from Manure Characteristics, MWPS-18 Section 1, MidWest Plan Service, 2004

Table A2. Nitrogen losses by storage/handling method

Table A3. Estimated nutrient content of liquid and solid manure. Liquid Manure lbs./1,000 gals Solid Manure lbs./ton Animal type N P2O5 K2O N P2O5 K2O Beef 29 18 26 14 9 14 Feeder cattle Cow 20 16 24 11 7 9 Dairy 32 14 28 13 12 19 Heifer Cow 25 15 27 11 7 9 Swine – 15 12 11 14 6 4 Sow, litter

Storage, handling method

Manure type

%N loss

Daily scrape, haul

Solid (tons)

25

Manure pack

Solid (tons)

30

Open lot

Solid (tons)

50

Litter

Solid (tons)

35

Above ground tank

Liquid (gals)

20

Liquid (gals)

20

Nursery

25

19

22

13

8

4

Liquid (gals)

25

Grow, finish

53

39

29

16

9

5

Solid (tons) Liquid (gals) Liquid (gals) Liquid (gals)

25 20 30 75

Gestation Poultry - Layers Broilers Turkey Horse Sheep

25 57 63 53

25 52 40 40

24 33 29 29

9 34 46 44 14 18

7 51 53 63 4 11

5 26 36 34 14 26

Below ground covered pit Below ground open pit Under-floor dry Under-floor liquid Earthen storage Lagoon

Page 26

Sources: Manure Management in Minnesota, WW-03553 (2007), University of Minnesota Extension Service; Manure Characteristics, MWPS-18 Sec. 1, MidWest Plan Service, 2004; Livestock Waste Facilities Handbook, MWPS-18, MidWest Plan Service, 1985

Table A4. Nitrogen availability and loss as affected by method of manure application and animal type 2 Broadcast Incorporation Timing Injection Year Available Conversion Factors > 96 hrs 12 - 96 hrs < 12 hrs Sweep Knife 2 1 acre = 43,560 ft Beef Percent of Total Nitrogen Available Per Year 1 cubic ft = 7.48 gallons Year 1 25 45 60 60 50 1 gal of water = 8.33 lbs Year 2 Lost Dairy Year 1 Year 2 Lost Swine Year 1 Year 2 Lost Poultry Year 1 Year 2 Lost

25 40

25 20

25 5

25 5

25 10

20 25 40

40 25 20

55 25 10

55 25 5

50 25 10

35 15 50

55 15 30

75 15 10

80 15 5

70 15 15

45 25 30

55 25 20

70 25 5

NA NA

NA NA

Soil Testing Conversions Plow layer (6-7 in.) = ppm x 2 = lb/acre Top 12 in. = ppm x 4 = lbs./acre Top 24 in. = ppm x 8 = lbs./acre P2O5 x 0.44 = P P x 2.29 = P2O5 K2O x 0.83 = K K x 1.20 = K2O

Fertilizer Conversions 1 gal of UAN (28%) = 10.66 lbs 1 gal (10-34-0) = 11.65 lbs 1 gal (7-21-7) = 11.0 lbs 1 gal (9-18-9) = 11.11 lbs

Adapted from: Manure Planning Record Keeping Guide, BU-6957, University of Minnesota Extension Service, 2001 1. Third year available N is not listed but can be computed by adding years 1 and 2 and lost percentages and subtracting this sum from 100. 2. Timing categories: length of time between application and incorporation.

Table A5. Nutrient removal in harvested portion of the crop – Source (http://plants.usda.gov/plants/index.html) Common Fertilizer Analysis Crop Nutrient Removal (lbs. per unit) Fertilizer Analysis Crop Yield Units Alfalfa Alsike clover Barley (grain) Barley (grain and straw)

Tons (air dry) Tons (air dry) Bushels

Birdsfoot trefoil

Tons (air dry)

Canola Corn (grain) Corn silage Edible beans Grass hay or pasture

Cwt. Bushels Tons (as fed) Pounds

Grass/legume Oats (grain) Oats (grain and straw) Peas Potatoes Red Clover Rye (grain) Rye grain, straw Soybeans Sugar beets Sunflowers Sweet corn Wheat (grain) Wheat (grain and straw)

N 50.4 40.8

Bushels

45.3

P2O5 10.8 10.5 0.41

K2O 46.2 54.0 0.28

0.55

1.67

9.3

41.1

1.3 0.34 3.8 0.01

1.1 0.19 7.4 0.03

Tons (air dry)

27.1

8.9

31.3

Tons (air dry)

43.5

11.2

41.3

Bushels

0.25

0.16

Bushels

0.32

1.31

Pounds

0.01

0.01

Cwt.

0.14

0.56

10.8

41.1

Bushels

0.44

0.31

Bushels

0.59

1.25

0.82 2.2 0.01 11.0 0.53

1.0 7.3 0.01 13.9 0.3

0.64

1.5

Tons (air dry)

Bushels Tons Pounds Tons Bushels Bushels

45.1

3.5

27

Nitrogen (N) Anhydrous ammonia Ammonium nitrate Urea

82-0-0 34-0-0 46-0-0

UAN solution (Urea Ammonium Nitrate) Aqua ammonia Ammonium sulfate Phosphorous (P) Triple superphosphate Diammonium phosphate

28 to 32-0-0

Monoammonium phosphate (MAP) Ammonium polyphosphate liquid Ammonium polyphosphate Dry

11-48-0

Potassium (K) Potassium chloride (Muriate of potash) Potassium sulfate Potassium-magnesium sulfate (Sulf-fo-mag) Potassium nitrate

20-0-0 21-0-0-24(S) 0-44 to 46-0 18-46-0

10-34-0 15-62-0

0-0-60 0-0-50-18(S) 0-022-22S11(Mg) 13-0-44

More information from the Extension Service is available online: http://www.manure.umn.edu/applied/application.html

Master Worksheet – Manure Storage, Handling and Testing Producer name/operator ____________________

Date ___________________

Manure Source #1

Manure Source #2

Example Dairy Barn

I. Livestock Information Animal (#1) type Animal (#1) number, size Animal (#2) type Animal (#2) number, size II. Manure Storage Storage type Storage capacity (tons, gal) Storage (days, months) III. Application Methods Commercial hauler Spreader type1 Spreader calibrated (date) When applied2 Application method3 Incorporation timing4 IV. Manure Analysis Sampling frequency Sampling methods Date analyzed N (lbs per ton or 1000 gal) P2O5 (lbs per ton, 1000 gal) K2O (lbs per ton or 1000 gal) V. Annual Manure/Nutrients Generated Manure volume or tons per year Manure volume/tons based on records Annual amount N (lbs)5 Annual amount P2O5 (lbs)5 Annual amount K2O (lbs)5 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Dairy cows 50 @ 1400 lbs. Dairy heifers 7 @ 800 lbs. Above ground tank 5000,000 gallons 7 months No Slurry tanker Yes, 11/03/2001 Fall and spring Knife inject Immediate Annually Spreader during filling 11/03/2001 24 lbs./1000 gal 18 lbs./1000 gal 29 lbs./1000 gal

450,000 gallons Yes 24 x 450 = 10,800 lbs 18 x 450 = 8,100 lbs 29 x 450 = 13,050 lbs

“Spreader types” are: Slurry tanker, Solids spreader, Towed hose, Center pivot, Other sprinkler “When applied” choices: Daily, Every other day, Weekly, Every 2 weeks, Monthly, Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer “Application method” choices: Surface broadcast, Sweep inject, Knife inject “Incorporation time” choices: Immediate, less than 12 hours, 12-96 hours, greater than 96 hours Annual nitrogen of manure in lbs to be land applied after accounting for storage losses.

28

Field Nutrient Management Plan

Crop Year _________

Farm Name/Tract # ______________________

Field ___________________________________

Field Location ___________________________________________________ Acres ____________ Sensitive Features ___________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ Soil Test Information (a) NO3N lbs/acre

P ppm

Date Tested ______________ K ppm

Percent Organic Matter

pH

Soil Name/Map Unit:

Soil Texture:

Crop Nutrient Recommendation Source of UMN Nitrogen Recommendation  UMN Nitrogen Tables  Western MN Soil Nitrate Test

Planned Crop _____________ Yield Goal _______________ Previous Crop _____________ Quality/Yield ___________

Pounds Per Acre N

(b) -------____

P2O5

K2O

---------

--------

Other Nitrogen Credits (c) ______ ------------- ----(d) ______ (e) ______

UM Broadcast Nutrient Recommendation First-year legume nitrogen credits are already accounted for on line (b)

Second-Year Legume Nitrogen Credit Crop/Quality ____________ Second-Year Manure Nitrogen Credit Nitrogen Credit Based on Earl-Spring Soil Nitrate Test

(f) ______

_______

______

Net Nutrients Needed

(g) ______

_______

______

Planned Manure Applications Manure Source

Timing

Method

(h) ______

_______

______

Supplemental Nutrient Needs

(i) ______

_______

______

Planned Fertilizer Application Fertilizer form

(j) ______

_______

_______

Timing

Method

Rate/acre

N

P2O5

K2O

Rate/acre

N

P2O5

K2O

Total Nutrients to be Applied in Planning Year

Sensitive Area Management (see page 19)

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Aerial Photos Attach aerial photos here

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