Narrative Writing Common Core Standard W.CCR.3 Grades 6 - 12

Narrative Writing Common Core Standard W.CCR.3 Grades 6 - 12

Narrative Writing Common Core Standard W.CCR.3 Grades 6 - 12 Teacher Directions ● The article and photographs provide the information needed to addre...

501KB Sizes 0 Downloads 3 Views

Recommend Documents

Narrative Nonfiction - Scholastic Common Core
C O M / S T O R Y W O R K S • O C T O B E R 2 0 1 3 5. DARK. WATER. Jack Thayer, 17, was on the voyage of a lifetime.

Narrative writing marking guide
... grammatical items. 78. Spelling reference list ..... titles: Mr, Mrs, Miss, Ms etc. ..... space, robot, second, foun

DEFINITION OF NARRATIVE WRITING
thrown into this mix (me and my friends just act goofy at times; other animals might be in a zoo), resulting in a ... Ov

Common Core
Fali River, Massachusetts 02720—3791. OFFICE of. SUPERINTENDENT ... The understanding in the Diocese of Fall River, an

Das Narrative Interview - Core
Rosenthal, Gabriele ; Loch, Ulrike: Das Narrative Interview. ... Loch & Schulze 2002; Rosenthal im Druck). ... Harry Her

Traits Writing CCSS Grade 8 - Common Core Scholastic
relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an ... follows: Students examine how knowing about best-selli

Physical Education and Health Curriculum Grades 9-12 Standard
breathing, aerobic/anaerobic. • Lead up games. • Games. • Aerobic muscular conditioning exercises: a) sit-ups b) p

grades k-6 - Booksource
Sep 27, 2016 - New Books, Popular Series, Content Areas, Genre and Thematic Texts ..... School Reading Checklist ......

DIPLOMARBEIT Social Network Narrative - Core
assoziativ, wie zum Beispiel bei How I Met Your Mother, Dexter oder Veronica Mars.2 Es stellt sich die Frage, weshalb ge

6
Justin Grossman. William Knopp. Lance Kay. Durjoy Maitra. Practice Friday 4:30-5: ... Coach: Jonathan Lev. Irmuun Boldba

Narrative Writing Common Core Standard W.CCR.3 Grades 6 - 12 Teacher Directions ●

The article and photographs provide the information needed to address the prompt, and students should read the text independently before writing. Encourage students to refer back to the text while writing and to take notes.



Students should be given three sessions for the prompt. Allow approximately 45 minutes for each, but the prompt should not be strictly timed. Students should be given as much time as needed to plan, write, and proofread.



Remind your students to write a story that is an appropriate length for this assignment.



The writing must be done without help, but students may have access to personal dictionaries, or any other resources to support spelling and mechanics that they are accustomed to using while writing. ○

Be sure students have paper to take notes or do whatever pre-planning they might choose to do.



If students are writing by hand, provide lined paper from your classroom for writing. If they are using a word processor, make sure they save their work so it can be accessed the next day.



This will be first draft writing, but encourage students to proofread and correct any errors they find.



Use this link to play a PBS video (via youtube - use your Barracuda Filter log-in first) about the dust bowl: ​https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7Uwg8BT6qQ

Grades 6 - 12, Prompt for Narrative Writing Common Core Standard W.CCR.3

Great historical events often have deep effects upon the people who live through them. Depending on the person and the situation, those effects can be very different. You are going to watch a video about the Dust Bowl. You may take notes during the video. Next you will read a short article about the Dust Bowl days in American history titled “Black Blizzard.” You will also look at some photographs taken during that time period. As you read and study the photographs, think about how this experience may have affected the individual people who lived through it. Finally, you will write a narrative, showing how a particular small moment during this experience affected one person. Remember, a good narrative: ●

Establishes a clear point of view



Focuses closely on one character or characters



Includes story elements such as conflict and resolution



Uses strong sensory details to make the character(s) and event come alive



Uses precise language



May use dialogue and description to capture the character(s) and event

Here are your choices for your narrative. Circle your choice: A. A young child watching the “black blizzard” rolling in over the plains B. A young child, watching a tractor knock down his family home in Oklahoma, several years into the Dust Bowl drought C. A mother sitting on her front steps in a migrant camp in California D. An unemployed father, arriving at a squatter camp in California from Oklahoma

You will have three class periods to complete this reading/thinking/writing task. The narrative will have a single draft and you may want to take some time to plan your writing before you begin work. When you have finished, be sure to proofread.

Black Blizzard From ​Teaching Students to Read Nonfiction, Scholastic, 2003 Used by permission of ​Teaching Students to Read Nonfiction Imagine this: You’re eating breakfast one Tuesday morning, minding your own business. You chance to look out the window. “Ma! Dad!” you yell, “It’s back. Take cover!” Even though it’s nine A.M., the sky in the distance is pitch black. A dry tidal wave of dust and dirt – 7,000 feet high – is rolling, howling towards you. Your parents race to cram wet towels in the spaces under doors and windows, as the huge black cloud rumbles closer. It’s an eerie sight. In front of the cloud, birds fly and rabbits run, terrified. Soon the cloud is here. The sky is pure black. The wind is screaming, pelting your tiny house with dirt. Your mom hands you a wet towel, which you put over your face, but you can still taste the dust, feel it with every breath, gritty between your teeth. You huddle in the middle of the room with your family in total darkness, waiting for the dust storm to end. A Natural Disaster In the mid 1930’s, large areas of Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, New Mexico, and Colorado were hit by hundreds of these storms. Together, these storms made up some of the worst natural disasters in America’s history. The dust storms destroyed the land, ruined the economy of the whole area, and threatened the lives of most of the population. Everyone who could picked up and moved west. It became the greatest peacetime migration ever in America. How did it happen? From 1900 to 1930, many families bought or leased small parcels of land in the Plains states, and built farms. The area was mostly dry grasslands, where crops are difficult to grow. With hard work, the farmers were able to grow wheat and corn, and to raise cattle. But in 1931, a terrible drought fell across the middle of the nation. America was already suffering from the stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression. Now, from 1931 to 1935, farmers got almost no rain at all. For five years in a row, their corn and wheat crops failed. Farmers had no income, and couldn’t pay their mortgages. And soon their financial troubles were matched by the horror of their surroundings. The Soil Blew Away

With no rainfall, the soil in the area became loose, dry, and dusty. The region’s native wild grasses, which had served to hold the soil together, had been replaced long ago by crops, which now dried up and blew away. Soon, heavy winds began to howl, picking up the dust and soil. When the winds reached 50 or 60 miles an hour, they picked up the topsoil right off the ground. The flying dust buried roads. It flew through the walls and windows of flimsy farmhouses. It killed cattle, and ruined the engines of vehicles. Old people and children caught outside were suffocated. Thousands of others died slowly of “dust pneumonia.” The dust storms were the last straw for many area farmers. They had already suffered through five years with little or no income because of the drought. Now, banks and mortgage companies took their farms, sending tractors to knock their houses down and run them off the land. The farmers, with no other choice, packed up their families and meager belongings and headed west. More than one million people migrated west from the Plains states during that time. Poor, dirty, and hungry, they rumbled down Route 66, searching for work picking crops, digging roads – anything that would keep their families from starving. Tough Times But things were tough in the West, too. There were not enough jobs for all the new arrivals. Few could afford housing. Most of the migrant families camped or “squatted” where they could. Many native Californians resented the migrants, calling them “Okies,” and spreading rumors that they were mentally retarded. They felt the migrants were ruining local schools with overcrowding. Mobs of local men, armed with clubs and ax handles, raided the squatters’ camps and tried to beat the migrants into leaving. Eventually, as America came out of the Great Depression, things began to improve for the migrants in California. Within a few years, the rains returned to the Dust Bowl, and people began farming again. Over the decades since, there have been several other serious droughts in the Plains states. But the Dust Bowl of the 1930’s will always be remembered as the worst of all.

​Dust storm coming in. National Geographic Used by permission of ​National Geographic

Top left: squatters tent in California. California State University, Bakersfield Used by permission of California State University, Bakersfield Top right: Migrant Mother with children, Dorothea Lange photograph, 1936 Used by permission of Dorothea Lange photograph Bottom left: migrant child, Oklahoma (History.com, Dust Bowl Photo Gallery) Used by permission of (History.com, Dust Bowl Photo Gallery)

GUSD – Narrative Rubric Grade __6___

Purpose CCSS*: Ø W – 3a Ø W–4

• •

• Organization CCSS: Ø W – 3a Ø W – 3c Ø W – 3e Ø W–4



• •

Elaboration/ Details CCSS: Ø W – 3b Ø W – 3d

Language



• •

CCSS: Ø L–1 Ø L–2 •

4 3 2 (Above Grade Level) (At Grade Level) (Approaching Grade Level) • Responds to most parts of the • Responds skillfully to all parts of • Responds to all parts of the prompt the prompt prompt • Might engage or orient the • Purposefully engages and orients • Engages and orients the reader reader by establishing a the reader by skillfully establishing by establishing a context and context and introducing a vivid context and introducing introducing characters and/or a characters and/or a narrator characters and/or a narrator narrator Organizes a well-structured event • Organizes a clear event • Organizes an event sequence • sequence that unfolds logically and sequence that unfolds logically that unfolds naturally but may naturally and naturally not be logical Skillfully connects a variety of • Use a variety of transition • Uses transition words, phrases, • transitional words, phrases, and words, phrases, and clauses to and/or clauses to convey clauses to manage the sequence of convey sequence and signal sequence events shifts • Provide a conclusion that • Provides a conclusion that is • Provides a conclusion that clearly follows from the narrated connected to the narrated follows and reflects on the narrated experiences or events experiences or events experiences or events Creatively uses narrative • Uses narrative techniques, • Uses some limited narrative • techniques, such as dialogue, such as dialogue, pacing, and techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop description, to develop pacing, and description, to experiences, events, and/or experiences, events, and/or develop experiences, events, characters characters and/or characters • Use precise words and phrases, • Attempts to use concrete • Sophisticated use of precise words relevant descriptive details, words or phrases, descriptive and phrases, relevant descriptive and sensory language to details, and sensory language details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events convey rich experiences and events Uses purposeful and varied sentence • Uses correct and varied sentence • Uses some repetitive yet correct • structures structures sentence structure Demonstrates creativity and • Demonstrates grade level • Demonstrates some grade level • flexibility when using conventions appropriate conventions; errors appropriate conventions, but (grammar, punctuation, capitalization, are minor and do not obscure errors obscure meaning and spelling) enhance meaning meaning Utilizes precise and sophisticated • Utilizes strong and grade-level • Utilizes vague or basic word • word choice appropriate word choice choice *CCSS – Common Core State Standards alignment (“W” = Writing strand; “L”= Language strand)

Adapted from Elk Grove Unified School District

1 (Below Grade Level) Responds to some or no parts of the prompt Fails to engage or orient the reader by establishing a context and does not introduce characters and/or a narrator Event sequence unfolds unnaturally and/or illogically Uses few to no transition words, phrases, and/or clauses to convey sequence Provides no conclusion or one that is not connected to the narrated experiences or events Uses few or no narrative techniques

Fails to use concrete words or sensory details. Descriptive details, if present, are not concrete. Does not demonstrate sentence mastery Demonstrates limited understanding of grade level appropriate conventions, and errors interfere with the meaning Utilizes incorrect and/or simplistic word choice

CA Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Alignment NOTES: In the left criterion boxes of the rubric, the CCSS-aligned standards have been identified. As a resource for teachers, below are the standards for the current grade (5th) as well as the preceding and subsequent grade. Since the rubric score of “4” represents “above grade level” work, the 6th grade standards were referenced. The letter abbreviations are as follows: Strand

Writing

CCSS = Common Core State Standards

W = Writing

L=Language

5th

6th

7th

3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. c. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events. d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

4. Produce clear and coherent writing (including multi-paragraph texts) in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

4. Produce clear and coherent writing (including multi-paragraph texts) in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Language

Adapted from Elk Grove Unified School District