National School Nutrition Policy

National School Nutrition Policy

National School Nutrition Policy Ministry of Health and Social Development Ministry of Education SEYCHELLES AUGUST 2008 Helping to build a healthier...

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National School Nutrition Policy

Ministry of Health and Social Development Ministry of Education SEYCHELLES AUGUST 2008

Helping to build a healthier nation

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION............................................................................................... 4 1.1 What is the Policy About? ............................................................................................................4 1.2 Goals and Objectives....................................................................................................................4

2.0 RATIONALE FOR A SCHOOL NUTRITION POLICY................................................ 5 2.1 Why increase efforts to promote nutrition...................................................................................5 2.2 Why Focus Efforts Through Schools? ............................................................................................6

3.0 CURRENT SCHOOL NUTRITION ENVIRONMENT ................................................ 8 3.1 Schools in Seychelles ....................................................................................................................8 3.2 Nutrition in the Curriculum ..........................................................................................................8 3.3 School Meals Programme.............................................................................................................8 3.4 Tuck Shops ...................................................................................................................................9 3.5 Fundraising Activities ...................................................................................................................9 3.6 Packed Snacks and Lunches From Home ......................................................................................9

4.0 POLICY FRAMEWORK .....................................................................................10 4.1 Nutrition Education.................................................................................................................... 10 4.2 Food Provision ........................................................................................................................... 10 4.2.1.1 Guidelines for Tuck Shops .................................................................................................... 11 4.2.1.2 Foods of High Nutritional Value (FHNV) ............................................................................... 12 4.2.1.3 Foods of Moderate Nutritional Value (FMNV) ...................................................................... 13 4.2.1.4 Foods of Low Nutritional Value (FLNV) ................................................................................. 13 4.2.1.5 Drinking Water ..................................................................................................................... 14 4.2.2.1 Nutrient Standards for School Meals.................................................................................... 15 4.2.2.2 Menu Planning by Food Group ............................................................................................. 16 4.2.2.3 Reducing the Fat Content of Meals....................................................................................... 20 4.2.2.4 Portion Sizes......................................................................................................................... 21 4.2.3.1 Children with Diabetes ......................................................................................................... 22

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4.2.3.2 Children Suffering From Food Allergies ................................................................................ 22 4.2.3.3 Nutritional Needs of Exceptional Children............................................................................ 22 4.2.5.1 Children’s Day ...................................................................................................................... 23 4.2.5.2 Birthdays and Other Classroom Parties ................................................................................ 23 4.2.5.3 Foods Prepared in Class for Instructional Purposes .............................................................. 23 4.2.5.4 Field Trips and Other School Events ..................................................................................... 23 4.2.5.5 Outside Vendors................................................................................................................... 23 4.3 Psychosocial Environment.......................................................................................................... 25

5.0 COORDINATION AND MONITORING ...............................................................26 5.1 The National School Nutrition Committee.................................................................................. 26 5.2 School Nutrition Action Groups.................................................................................................. 27 5.3 Evaluation Tool .......................................................................................................................... 28

6.0 IMPLEMENTATION .........................................................................................28 6.1 Implementation Date ................................................................................................................. 28 6.2 School Nutrition Award.............................................................................................................. 28 6.3 Violations of Policy..................................................................................................................... 29

APPENDIX A – SEYCHELLES DIETARY GUIDELINES..................................................30 APPENDIX B – EVALUATION TOOL ........................................................................32 APPENDIX C – LEASE AGREEMENT ........................................................................41

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1.0 Introduction 1.1 What is the Policy About? A National School Nutrition Policy represents efforts to utilize schools as sites for improving the nutritional well-being of all school children. It can provide a framework for implementing nutrition strategies which would ensure that students receive nutrition education messages that are reinforced throughout the whole of the school environment. The school environment is known to powerfully influence students’ attitudes, preferences and behaviours and as such can promote and positively support healthy eating. The policy will be used to coordinate all aspects of school nutrition including the curriculum, the school tuck shop, provision of school meals, and training of school personnel, establishing linkages with families and school personnel as well as evaluation. The policy will have a very wide reach, targeting not only students but also teachers, school personnel, families and other community members, all of which are directly or indirectly part of the school community. 1.2 Goals and Objectives 1.2.1 Main Goal To improve the nutritional well-being of school children in Seychelles through a school environment conducive to healthy eating. a) b) c) d) e)

1.2.2 Objectives To implement nutrition education from crèche through to secondary schools as part of a sequential comprehensive school curriculum; To harmonize the school’s food provision and environment with nutrition education in the curriculum; To build the capacity of staff involved in nutrition education and provision in the principles of healthy eating; To involve the Parent’s Teachers Association and the community in supporting and reinforcing nutrition education and To provide a tool to ensure the school’s compliance to promoting healthy eating.

1.2.3 Outcomes a) Integration of nutrition education that is in line with the Seychelles Dietary Guidelines in a sequential and comprehensive school curriculum;

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b) Improved school’s food provision and environment that is harmonized with nutrition education in the curriculum; c) Staff involved in nutrition education and provision trained on the principles of healthy eating; d) Nutrition education supported and reinforced by the Parent’s Teachers Association and the community; e) Tool to ensure the school’s compliance to promoting healthy eating; f) Increase in nutrition-related activities at school level; g) Reduction in diet-related problems amongst school children (dental caries, obesity…). h) Advertisement/ promotion of food or drink in accordance with the Seychelles Dietary Guidelines. Given the significant impact that a school nutrition policy will have at the school, community and individual level, it is proposed that all schools in Seychelles abide to this policy.

2.0 RATIONALE FOR A SCHOOL NUTRITION POLICY 2.1 Why increase efforts to promote nutrition Healthy eating pattern in childhood is vital in promoting health; growth, development and helping children attain their full educational potential. Diet is also a key in preventing both numerous short-term and long-term diet related diseases in child and adulthood. Diet is a known risk factor for the development of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) including coronary heart diseases, stroke and cancer all of which have their origins in early life and childhood. Presently, 75% of all mortality and morbidity in Seychelles are accounted for by NCDs, and approximately 37% of all deaths are due to cardiovascular diseases. The two main risk factors for the development of these diseases include sedentary lifestyles and poor eating habits characterized by diets high in saturated fats and sugars and low in fruits and vegetables. Such lifestyles easily lead to the development of risk factors which include overweight and obesity which in turn increase the likelihood of conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Risk factors for NCDs in the Seychelles population have more than doubled in the last ten years in Seychelles. According to the latest Seychelles Heart Study, 63.5% of adults are overweight, 40% are hypertensive and 14% are categorized as diabetic. Of particular concern now is the increasing prevalence of childhood fatness and obesity. The NCD surveillance data amongst school children confirms that overweight and obesity have increased over the past decades. Presently, 13.0% of girls and 10.2% of boys are classified as overweight whilst 8.0% of girls and 6.1% of boys are obese. In terms of obesity, this National School Nutrition Policy- August, 2008

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represents a doubling in prevalence over the last nine years. As in adults, girls tend to be more overweight than boys. A lot of research now indicates that risk factors found in childhood are potentially indicative of adult NCDs, indicating the importance of targeting prevention efforts in children. Overweight children are twice as likely as normal weight children to be obese as adults and childhood obesity increases the risks of early diabetes, raised blood pressure and cholesterol levels; all which can cause NCDs in early adulthood. In fact, surveillance data indicate that Seychellois children who are obese also have elevated blood pressure which means that they will enter adulthood as hypertensives. Adequate nutrition is also necessary for children to become fit and productive adults, capable of fulfilling their responsibilities in life. Although we do not have statistics confirming the rate of undernutrition in our children, a few cases of both micro- and macronutrient deficiencies have been detected. These have been shown to affect school aptitudes, time for school enrolment, concentration and attentiveness in early childhood. Children with a history of severe undernourishment perform less well on tests of IQ and specific factual knowledge than children in matched comparison groups. Undernourishment also impairs the ability to concentrate, learn and attend school regularly. A child who is malnourished and subsequently suffering from poor health cannot adequately take advantage of instructional and learning materials. Thus, good nutrition is needed to strengthen the learning potential of children, to enable them to learn effectively and maximize investments in education. Good health and nutrition are needed for concentration, regular school attendance and optimum class performance. Studies in different countries show that the academic performance and mental ability of pupils with good nutritional status are significantly higher than those of pupils with poor nutritional status. Poor dietary choices including over-consumption of poor nutrient dense foods can also lead to the development of other conditions such as iron deficiency anaemia and dental caries. Anaemia carries implications for both mental and physical performance all of which impinge greatly on school performance. High intakes of sugary foods and drinks can contribute hugely to dental caries and obesity. 2.2 Why Focus Efforts Through Schools? Schools provide the most effective way to reach large portions of the population, including young people, school personnel, families and community members. It is a perfect setting where students can be reached at influential stages in their lives, during childhood and adolescence when lifelong nutritional patterns are formed. Schools

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offer more effective, efficient and equal opportunities than any other setting to promote health and healthy eating. They reach young people at a critical age of development at which lifestyles, including eating patterns, are developed, tested and adapted in schools. Through social interactions between students, teachers, parents and others, schools provide excellent opportunities because eating habits are formed early in life. Furthermore, schools also provide a setting to introduce nutrition information and technologies to the community and can lead the community in advocating policies and services that promote good nutrition. No other setting than schools offer these opportunities. 2.2.1 Nutrition interventions in schools can improve health and well being Evidence for many years has supported that well managed nutrition education programmes can, at relatively low cost, bring about behaviour changes that contribute to improve nutritional well being. Studies in the United States have documented that carefully designed and implemented comprehensive health education curricula can prevent certain adverse behaviours, including dietary patterns that cause disease. Students in behaviourly-based health and nutrition education programmes have shown significant favourable changes in blood cholesterol, blood pressure and body fat. Thus, a focus on behaviour is considered a key determinant in the success of nutrition education programmes. 2.2.2 Schools can provide interventions to improve nutrition in ways that are highly cost effective Cost effective interventions in schools can prevent or greatly reduce health problems and consequences of malnutrition and foster the positive effects of nutrition. Compared to various public health approaches, school health programmes that provide safe and lowcost health service interventions, such as screening and health education, are shown by research to be one of the most cost– effective investments a nation can make to improve health. Good nutrition education also serves as a means to inform families and other community members about ways to promote nutritional wellbeing and prevent diet related disorders. For instance, educating children about good eating habits has the potential to enhance the nutrition and health status of their younger siblings whom they may care for as well as of other family members that learn concomitantly from their children. Schools can be the centre for community enhancement projects that include programmes to improve the health and nutritional status of the community. The establishment of school canteens offering healthy food choices and practicing good food safety is a way to demonstrate how to improve facilities in communities. Partnerships

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between schools, organizations and businesses can benefit both the school and the community, if the partnership is mutually beneficial.

3.0 CURRENT SCHOOL NUTRITION ENVIRONMENT 3.1 Schools in Seychelles Seychelles has established a comprehensive and co-educational system of schooling including further education through polytechnic and other training institutions. School is compulsory for children between the age of six and sixteen. Primary and secondary education is compulsory. There are 25 district primary schools with a total of 12402 pupils and 13 regional secondary schools (with the exception of a relatively small school on the island of Silhouette) with a total of 7852 students. These figures include private schools. 3.2 Nutrition in the Curriculum The relationship between good nutrition and children’s ability to learn is well recognised by the Ministry of Education. In addition to programmes and support services, nutrition education is incorporated in the PSE curriculum. The Personal and Social Education is a core subject of the National Curriculum from Crèche to Secondary five. It contains the fundamental elements of values, moral, citizenship, life skills, family life, and health and careers education. Nutrition education is incorporated in the health component of PSE and also appears as a cross-curricular subject. Since 2003, nutrition education has also been addressed as part of the pupil welfare component of the School Improvement Programme and six schools have adopted a whole school approach to addressing nutrition and healthy lifestyle related issues. However, challenges are being encountered in the area of implementation of the programme. Since PSE is a non examinable subject, PSE periods are used to teach other academic subjects. 3.3 School Meals Programme The school meals programme has been in existence as far back as the early sixties. At that time, most schools were owned and run by the Roman Catholic Mission and school meals were provided by the Catholic Relief Services (CRS). Meals included maize, bulgur wheat, milk and occasionally fish and lentils. In the late seventies, all schools were transferred to the state which then took over the school meals programme and brought about changes in the quality of meals. To date, 4000 students benefit from the school meals programme. School meals are prepared at five different centres. The Victoria School Meal Centre provides meals for schools in

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northern, eastern, central and southern region. The Anse Boileau School Meal Centre provides meals to schools of the western Region. The Grand Anse Praslin School Meal Centre provides meals for all schools on Praslin whereas for La Digue and Silhouette, meals are prepared at school level. The meal centres prepare a weekly menu and as much as possible try to provide rice or other starchy carbohydrates, fish or meat and vegetables on a daily basis. Meal types often depend on the availability of products on the market. School meals are found to be more popular amongst primary school students than secondary school students. School meals were provided free until 90’s when parents were asked to contribute towards the meal. However school meals remain free for student with difficult socioeconomic background. 3.4 Tuck Shops Although school tuck shops exist to provide students and staff with a range of nourishing and affordable foods on the school premises, this is not always the case. In addition, tuck shops make it possible to control student movements in and out of school premises during break and lunch time. To date, 39 tuck shops exist in most schools. Schools with larger population have more than one tuck shop. Tuck shops are leased out to private owners upon successful application to run such facilities. Owners have to abide to certain rules and conditions stipulated in their lease agreement. Although food guidelines from the Department of Health have been made available to the tuck shop owners, these are not included within the lease agreement and as such make it problematic to control the quality of snacks sold in the tuck shops. Unavailability of certain products on the market sometimes influences the quality of snacks sold in the tuck shops. Monitoring in some instances is overlooked or far between. 3.5 Fundraising Activities In order to raise funds for their respective schools, it is not uncommon for schools to organize sale of food. In such instances, foods of various nutritional values are sold as no guidelines or protocols exist in relation to these activities. Likewise no guidelines or protocols exist for controlling advertising and marketing of foods in schools. 3.6 Packed Snacks and Lunches From Home A number of students take packed snacks and lunches to school. This is more common in primary schools. To date, no surveys have been conducted to determine the number of students carrying

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packed snacks and/or lunches, although observations indicate that the nutritional quality of some of these foods is sometimes poor.

4.0 POLICY FRAMEWORK 4.1 Nutrition Education 4.1.1 Curriculum The content and messages of nutrition education within the school curriculum should reflect the principles of healthy eating based ideally on the current Seychelles Dietary Guidelines (SDG) – See Appendix A. All schools should ensure nutrition education is incorporated and taught within the curriculum either through the Personal and Social Education or other subjects. Resources which are culturally- and age-sensitive should be developed and made available for use to all schools by the Nutrition Unit in collaboration with the Curriculum Development Unit. Nutrition Education within the school curriculum should be reviewed periodically, to ensure that messages are relevant and consistent with national dietary guidelines and further development in nutrition. 4.1.2 Extra Curricular Activities To widen the remit of nutrition at the school level, all schools should include nutrition or food related activities in at least one of the extra curricular activities. This could include the initiation and maintenance of a school vegetable garden, cooking classes or other healthy eating activities, all of which should take into account the contents of section 4.2.5.3. 4.1.3. Information, Education and Communication (IEC) All nutrition education IEC materials developed for schools need to be in line with the Seychelles Dietary Guidelines. Other materials produced at international level used locally, should be relevant and in line with the local guidelines. Effort needs to be taken to ensure that all materials have also integrated messages that target attitude as well as behaviour change. 4.2 Food Provision 4.2.1 Tuck Shops Many Seychellois children do not eat breakfast every day, meaning that the high fat, high sugar snacks that most of them eat midmorning are often the first food they eat each day. This makes it all the more important that the snacks children choose for their morning break are healthy and that the school tuck shop sells healthier choices. Healthier choices will supply children with a good mix of foods that will provide sufficient amount of nutrients to satisfy their nutritional requirements (see table 1). Having healthy tuck shops on school premises will also provide a good reason for

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encouraging children to buy their snacks in the tuck shops rather than at shops on the way to school. However, healthier snacks taken from home should not be discouraged as they can also be a useful way of ensuring that children choose the right options. Within the healthy tuck shop context the following issues should be considered: Awareness: Children should be made aware of the importance of making good food choices through relevant nutrition education, classroom activities and IEC materials. Access and availability: Tuck shops should be efficient at providing healthy snacks to the entire school. To improve accessibility and availability of healthier choices, tuck shop (s) in each school should be run by the same owner. All tuck shops should have the opportunity to provide their service within set opening times. Schools with large number of children should make additional food outlets available so that children would have adequate time to purchase and consume their snacks during the allocated time. To control the accessibility and quality of snacks available, a maximum of two tuck shops per school is allowed. Affordability: Appropriate pricing guidelines should be set by the Ministry of Education and other relevant partners to ensure that foods offered in the tuck shops are affordable. Pricing/Labeling of foods: Tuck shop owners should ensure that the names of food items as well as the prices are clearly visible for the benefit of those purchasing foods. 4.2.1.1 Guidelines for Tuck Shops Based on their contents of nutrients, snacks have been classified into the following three groups: Foods of High Nutritional Value (FHNV), Foods of Moderate Nutritional Value (FMNV) and Foods of Low Nutritional Value (FLNV). The following guidelines have then been set to ensure greater provision of healthier snacks and reduced availability of less favourable choices in the school tuck shops:  



Unlimited number of FHNV can be offered daily. Not more than two FMNV should be offered daily. In the case of schools with more than one tuck shop, each tuck shop should offer not more than one FMNV daily. No FLNV should be offered to students on school premises or during school activities.

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All snacks should be purchased from licensed food suppliers. On the other hand, tuckshop owners preparing their own supplies of snacks should ensure that they hold a manufacturing license. 4.2.1.2 Foods of High Nutritional Value (FHNV) These snacks are rich in nutrients and they contribute significantly towards the nutritional requirements of children.             

        

Fresh seasonal fruits Vegetables (vegetable sticks or vegetables in sandwich fillings) Baked fruit cakes (e.g. banana/ carrot/ pumpkin/ pawpaw/ dried fruit) Fruit tarts Vegetable quiches (can add a protein source e.g. fish, meat) Vegetable pizzas (can add a protein source) Baked meat balls and fish balls Baked samoosas Plain wholemeal biscuits Boiled eggs Crackers with marmite, peanut butter or cheese fillings Pancakes (preferably with savoury fillings e.g. cheese, tuna) Brown bread/roll, white bread/roll/ chapatti with the following fillings:  Cheese or cheese spread  Meat  Meat products (grilled bacon, frankfurter and burger; ham)  Canned fish (oil removed if using those canned in oil)  Egg (boiled, omelet or scrambled)  Peanut butter  Baked beans  Marmite/Bovril/Vegemite  Jam Ice cake or ice pop made with 100% pure fruit juice, low-fat milk or flavoured low-fat milk Yoghurts and yoghurt drinks Nuts Dried fruits e.g. raisins, prunes 100% pure fruit juices (Home-made or Liquifruit) Plain milk {non-fat or semi-skimmed (e.g. Slimilk, Dano Light)} Low-fat flavoured milk (including Milo, Ovaltine, Bournvita) Milkshakes made with low-fat milk and fruits Coconut water

The fat content of these snacks should be kept minimal (see section 6.2.2.3). When fat or oil is an ingredient in the preparation of any of these snacks, olive oil, sunflower oil or margarine should be used as National School Nutrition Policy- August, 2008

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they are healthier. Palm oil (Turkey brand) should not be used at all for any snack preparation. Although mayonnaise can be used in very small amounts, only low-fat mayonnaise is allowed. Efforts should also be taken to avoid excessive use of sugar or sugary products in snacks. The content of fruit in baked cakes should form at least 20% of the final ingredient for it to be classified as FHNV. 4.2.1.3 Foods of Moderate Nutritional Value (FMNV) These snacks provide a good mix of nutrients. However, they are quite high in fat and/or sugar and should be taken in moderate amounts.               

Local chips (potato, cassava, banana, taro (‘lerouy’), sweet potato) ‘Feyte’ ‘Tourt’ Popcorn (popped in limited oil and salt) Samoosas (fried) Chilli cakes (made with lentils) Banana fritters Pudding (containing dried fruits) Danish (containing dried fruits) Paté (vegetable and protein filling) Sausage rolls Fried fish rolls and meat rolls Fried chicken Fried fish balls and meat balls Ice-cream

4.2.1.4 Foods of Low Nutritional Value (FLNV) These foods offer little in terms of protein, vitamins or minerals and lots of calories from sugar and/ or fat.           

Lollies Mints Lollipop Candies Chewing gum Jellies Ice cake or ice pop (not made with pure fruit juice, milk or flavoured milk) Spudz Double cheese curl Sponsor Nik Naks

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                        

Amigo Twisties Ringo snacks ‘Bouldou’ ‘Nouga’ Donuts Swiss rolls Napolitaine ‘Moutay’ Croissant Sponge cakes ‘Lapat sek’ Danish (without dried fruits) Chilli cakes (without lentils) Sweet biscuits Chocolates Chocolate paste Chocobars ‘Moulouk’ ‘Kravat’ ‘Konfi tanmaren (tanmaren dan pake)’ Carbonated beverages such as lemonade (Seybrew, Waterloo) Cordials (e.g. Hyacinth juice, squash, ribena) High energy drinks (e.g. Lucozade, Energade) Fruit drinks (e.g. Sunkiss’d)

4.2.1.5 Drinking Water Children need access to adequate amounts of fluids within the school day. Good quality tap drinking water which is in line with the Drinking Water regulation should be accessible on the schools’ premises. Drinking water, which is free and fresh, should be provided in drinking cups within the dining room. In addition, chilled bottled water should be sold in the tuck-shops. Every child should be encouraged to take a bottle of water to school. 4.2.2 School Meals Healthy school meals can provide children with a third of their daily nutritional requirements. Without nutrient standards and portion size guidelines, it is impossible for caterers to provide healthy meals on a daily basis. Simply improving the quality of school meals is not adequate; children should be encouraged to participate in school meal programmes through the use of marketing-style incentives and promotions. These include using healthy school meals as examples in class; educating parents about the value of healthy meals; involving students and parents in planning meals; and having teachers, administrators, and parents eat in the dining room National School Nutrition Policy- August, 2008

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and speak favourably about the healthy meals available there. Students should also be given adequate time and space to eat meals in a pleasant and safe environment. Healthy and appealing meals should be available in the dining rooms. 4.2.2.1 Nutrient Standards for School Meals The Nutrient Standards for School Meals (Table 1) set out to ensure the provision of a meal that provides largely a third of a child's daily nutritional needs. These standards, which are derived from the Dietary Reference Values Report (1991), provide figures for the recommended nutrient content of an average school lunch provided for children over one school week. The child's daily nutritional needs are expressed in terms of:   

dietary reference value (DRV) (or daily requirement) reference nutrient intake (RNI) (estimated amount of a nutrient that will meet the needs of most of the population) estimated average requirement (EAR) (in the tables EAR is used for energy to show the average requirement for energy for boys and girls).

Table 1: Nutrient standards for school meals Creche

Primary

Secondary

Energy

30% of EAR 489kcal Mean of girl and boy

557kcal

670kcal

Fat

Not more than 35% of 19g total energy

22g

26g

Saturated Not more than 10% of 5g Fatty Acids total energy

6g

7g

Carbohydrates

Not less than 50% of 65g total energy

74g

89g

Non-milk extrinsic Sugars1

Not more than 10% of 13g total energy

15g

18g

Fibre/ non- Not less than 30% of 5g starch calculated reference polysaccha value -rides

5g

5g

Protein

Not less than 15% of 18g total energy

21g

25g

Iron

Not less than 30% of 2mg RNI

3mg

4mg

Calcium

Not less than 30% of 135mg RNI

165mg

300mg

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Vitamin A Not less than 30% of 120µg (retinol RNI equivalent)

150µg

195µg

Folic acid

Not less than 30% of 30µg RNI

45µg

60µg

Vitamin C

Not less than 30% of 9mg RNI

9mg

12mg

Sodium

Not more than 30% of 210mg RNI

360mg

480mg

Fruit and vegetables

1/3 of 5 portions per day 1 portion

1 portion

2 portions

1

These are added sugars rather than the sugar that is integrally present in the food (e.g. table sugar, honey, sugar in fruit juice and soft drinks)

In Table 1 the energy and nutrient requirements for children aged 4-18 years are presented as average values for males and females in three age groups. It should be noted that current recommendations of energy intakes are based on children achieving a balance between energy intake and energy output allowing for growth and development. It is clear that children who are physically inactive will require less energy to meet physiological requirements and that excess energy will be a major contributor to the development of excess body weight. Nutrient standards can be achieved through menu planning (considers the composition of recipes used, the cooking and serving process) and appropriate portion sizes. 4.2.2.2 Menu Planning by Food Group Foods are classified into the following five food groups according to the nutrients that they contain:     

rice, bread, cereals, pasta and tubers fruit and vegetables milk and milk products fish, meat and alternatives foods containing fat, foods containing sugar

Foods in each group provide a similar range of nutrients. In order to meet the nutrient standards, in other words provide enough of the important nutrients and fibre without too much fat and sugar, the proportion of the overall diet coming from each of the five food groups needs to be considered. A third of total food intake should be made up of rice, bread, cereals, pasta and tubers.

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A further third should be made up from fruit and vegetables with the aim of consuming at least five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables each day. Fish, meat and alternatives as well as milk and milk products need to be eaten in moderate amounts as they provide essential nutrients in concentrated amounts. Foods containing fat, foods containing sugar should make up a relatively small proportion of the total food and drink consumed. Because meals usually contain foods from more than one of the five food groups, school caterers should have the ability to adapt their recipes so that the food items or ingredients in meals fit in with the proportions suggested in Table 2. Caterers should vary the range of foods from each food group made available throughout the week to ensure that children’s nutritional requirements are met.

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Table 2: Menu planning by food group Food Group

Guidance

Rationale

Rice, bread cereals, pasta and tubers

Every school lunch should Starchy foods provide contain at least one portion energy, fibre, vitamins and of food from this group. minerals. Portions should be enough to satisfy young appetites.

Potatoes

If possible, all potato products should be oven baked rather than fried. Non- fried alternatives to chips, e.g. mashed, boiled and baked potatoes should be available and actively promoted.

Limiting fried and high fat options help to reduce the total amount of fat in the menu. Providing fried foods more than twice a week is likely to exceed the nutrient standard for total fat.

Potato chips, roast and croquettes can be served a maximum of once a week: Fruit and vegetables

Every school lunch should contain at least one portion of food from this group. Although lentils feature in this food group, it should always be served together with another form of fruit/vegetables. Vegetables or fruits should be served in an appealing and easy to eat way for example as part of a dish or in the form of a salad/ chutney. As much as possible vegetables should be served free of added oil or fat including salad dressings.

National School Nutrition Policy- August, 2008

Fresh, frozen or canned fruit and vegetables provide vitamins, minerals and fibre and nutritionists recommend five portions of fruit and vegetables a day, although the portion sizes for children are smaller than that for adults. Habitually low consumption of fruit and vegetables remains one of the most damaging features of the Seychellois diet.

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Meat, fish and alternatives,

Every school lunch should Fish, meat and contain at least one portion alternatives such as eggs, of food from this group. peas, beans and lentils are major sources of protein and iron. Oil-rich fish contain valuable, protective fatty acids that are deficient in the diet and their use should be encouraged. Fish should be presented Frying of fish and meat should be limited to not in a form that children will more than twice a week. eat. Caterers should take steps to reduce the fat content of their meat dishes as much as possible by removing visible fats off all meats or by using lean meat.

This will help to improve the quality of meat used in recipes whilst reducing the overall fat intake. Overall, meals should provide no more than 35% total energy from fat, therefore inclusion of high fat dishes should be limited.

Processed meat products are likely to be high in fat Processed meat or fish products, i.e. frankfurters, and therefore steps should sausages, beef burgers, fish be taken to avoid adding burgers, meat balls and fish additional fat and to balls should be grilled at all remove fat already present in the product when times. preparing them.

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Foods The use of foods from this containing fat, group should be limited. foods There should be no active containing promotion or advertising of sugar full fat crisps, fatty and sugary foods within the dining room.

Foods from this category are consumed in excess by children, providing excess fat, sugar and salt in the diet.

Drinks

The promotion of chilled bottled water as well as the adequate provision of freely available drinking water is considered very important.

To achieve the nutrient standard for sugar and for the protection of dental health, sugary, carbonated (fizzy) drinks should not form part of the school meal.

Cooking fats and oils

Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, spreads and oils should be used.

This will contribute to a reduction in the fat intake. As part of a healthy diet, it is also important to reduce the amount of saturated fats eaten, by replacing them with unsaturated fats.

Palm oil (e.g. Turkey brand), ghee, coconut milk/oil or any other saturated oil should not be used to prepare school meals.

Oils utilised for frying should Heated and re-used oils often contain high levels of not be re-used on more chemicals that have the than two occasions. potential to cause cancer.

4.2.2.3 Reducing the Fat Content of Meals Whilst the choice of food items or ingredients is very important, healthier cooking methods and preparation techniques must be used to reduce the fat content of meals. Easy ways to cut down on fat in food preparation include:       

routinely grilling, steaming, stir-frying or oven baking rather than frying trimming visible fat from meat before cooking removing the skin and fat from poultry before cooking adding less oil skimming fat from the surfaces of sauces before serving preparing lower fat salad dressings using a thin batter for fish

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using only a small amount of oil to prevent bulk quantities of food items (e.g. pasta) from sticking.

4.2.2.4 Portion Sizes Portion size guidelines are necessary to assist caterers in planning meals that meet the nutrient standards as well as to satisfy young appetites. Guidance on portion sizes is provided in Table 3. In many cases, the portion sizes of certain foods will be substantially different from current practice. Smaller portions of starchy food (rice, potatoes and pasta) and larger portions of fruits and vegetables will be required to meet the Nutrient Standards. Table 3: Recommended portion sizes Recommended Portion Size (g) for: Food Group Rice, bread, cereals, pasta and tubers Fruit and vegetables

Food Item

Rice (cooked weight) Pasta (cooked weight) ‘Gro manze’ Mashed or boiled potato Chips or roast potato Bread: sliced or roll Cooked vegetables excluding green leafy vegetables Cooked green leafy vegetables Cooked green fruits (chutney) Raw vegetables or mixed salad Fish, Fish (raw without bones) meat and Battered fish without bones alternaPoultry (raw without bones) tives Red meat (raw without bones) Egg Sausages (raw weight) Burger Lentils Milk and Milk (in dishes) milk Cheese (in dishes) products

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Crèche

Primary

Secondary

90 90 90 90 70 45 40

120 120 140 140 100 65 60

180 180 190 190 150 100 80

½ cup

¾ cup

1 cupful

40

60

80

40

60

80

50 60 50 50

60 80 60 60

80 120 80 80

1 60 50 ½ cup 150 30

1½ 80 60 ¾ cup 200 45

2 120 80 1 cupful 200 45

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4.2.3 Children Requiring Special Diets Although this policy is targeting all school children, particular exceptions should be made for children requiring special diets. 4.2.3.1 Children with Diabetes Because the diet of people suffering from diabetes is based on the principles of healthy eating, children with diabetes can eat the same school meal provided to the other children. However, these diabetic children should have a meal plan, which has been prepared especially for them by a Dietitian/Nutritionist to guide them on their portion sizes and snacks. 4.2.3.2 Children Suffering From Food Allergies The most common food allergens include milk, wheat, peanuts, fish, eggs and shellfish). Children suffering from food allergies and medical conditions (excluding diabetes) requiring medicallyprescribed special dietary requirements need to know the exact ingredients in their food, because even a tiny amount of particular food could affect them. Parents should try as much as possible to accommodate their children’s special dietary requirements by providing them with their lunch and snacks. In all cases, the schools should be informed about the medical conditions. 4.2.3.3 Nutritional Needs of Exceptional Children The nutritional needs and eating capacity of exceptional children are not always the same as those of the ordinary children. It is important that all institutions accommodating these children have a policy for delivering, in partnership with parents, carers and nutritionists, medically prescribed diets. Furthermore, anyone involved in caring for and providing school meals to these children should be trained to ensure that the most appropriate meal and assistance is given. These eating difficulties should not be a barrier to enjoyment and participation in meals and food choice or to learning about healthy eating. Thus, school meals provided to these exceptional children should comply with their special needs. No additional charge should be passed on to parents. 4.2.4 Fundraising Activities through Sale of Foods Food fundraisers are great opportunities for schools to show their commitment to healthy living and meet their financial needs. Fundraising activities should involve selling only FHNV in order to encourage children to maintain good eating habits. Healthy fundraising activities send positive health messages and reinforce nutrition lessons taught in the classroom. The selling of FLNV might send the message that the priority of the school is about making

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money only. Schools must ensure that foods sold during the fundraising activities can only be of high nutritional value. 4.2.5 Classroom Snacks and Parties Classroom parties such as birthdays and children’s day provide the opportunity for parental involvement in the education of their children, which are also beneficial for students, parents and teachers. 4.2.5.1 Children’s Day No exception to the policy is being made for Children’s Day and only foods of high nutritional value will be served to children for the occasion. 4.2.5.2 Birthdays and Other Classroom Parties Such parties should be scheduled after lunch break and preferably after school so that they do not replace a nutritious lunch, however foods provided should be sourced from the list of high nutritional value foods. Similarly, parties held during lunch time should also serve foods of only high nutritional value. 4.2.5.3 Foods Prepared in Class for Instructional Purposes Foods prepared in class for instructional purposes should be in line with healthy eating and food safety regulations and as much as possible FHNV should be chosen. 4.2.5.4 Field Trips and Other School Events Foods provided to children during these school events (even if they are conducted outside the school premises) should be of high nutritional value. In the case of sporting events, high energy drinks (e.g. lemonade, Lucozade, glucose…) can be given to children competing in sports activities to provide them with additional energy. Parents also need to be sensitise to the need to provide their children with adequate nourishment for such activities. 4.2.5.5 Outside Vendors Efforts to create a health-conducive environment should also include food vendors that may be present on or near the school property, who provide an important source of food for students. Schools should strive to gain corporation with the vendors to offer nutritious food choices to encourage the school’s health promotion efforts.

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4.2.6 Food Safety It is important that environmental conditions in schools ensure a safe food supply. Such conditions are supported by sufficient treated water, safe means of water disposal, safe foods and ingredients, adequate food contact surfaces, good personal hygiene, cleanliness, tidiness and adequate ventilation. Rules and regulations for food safety are needed to minimize the risk of contamination and food-borne infection. Applying rules for safe food preparation is also essential for students, teachers and service providers. a.

Awareness of the importance of basic food hygiene is an important aspect in food handling. Arrangements should be in place to promote hand washing prior to the consumption of meals and snacks or even when sharing foods.

b.

Leftover food should not be stored and served to the students.

c.

Schools should be encouraged to purchase foods from reliable licensed sources complying with national food regulations. Transportation of foods to the schools should be done through safe and hygienic conditions.

d.

Schools should comply to the recommendations set by regulatory bodies and adopt a code of hygienic practices at primary stages of food production based on the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) concept (Ref. Hygienic Practice For Food Premises).

e.

All food service personnel (including tuck shop owners) should have adequate training in safe food handling and medical certificate of fitness valid for six months. In addition to this a written list of all personnel who qualify for assisting in food provision should be available at school level. Schools should ensure that personnel involved in domestic duties specifically cleaning of WC and gardens do not assist in food provision at school.

f.

Tuck shops should meet the following basic requirements: Stores should have:  Fly mesh at the window  Less than 10mm gap at the foot of the door Retail areas should have:  Warm cabinet for snacks

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      

Cooler/ fridge for drinks and snacks Adequate worktop with smooth and impervious finishing Smooth and impervious floor finishing Smooth and impervious wall finishing Wash hand basin with sanitizer and hand drying facilities Treated water supply Hood and extractor fan above cooking units

Staff should be:  Medically examined and hold onsite certificate of fitness  In possession of 3 sets of complete uniform (clean T-shirt, apron, hair covers) Equipment:  Easy to clean  Include tongs to handle food  Include food containers with tight lids where applicable Solid/liquid waste management:  Proper bins with movable lids  Provision of bin liners where appropriate 4.3 Psychosocial Environment 4.3.1 Teacher Role Model / Peer Reinforcement The school environment is a powerful influence on the student’s attitudes, performances and behaviours. Classroom lessons alone might not be enough to effect lasting changes in student’s eating behaviours. As well as availability of a healthy variety of foods, children also need to be influenced by role models around them. The influence of school goes beyond the classroom and includes normative nutrition messages from both peers and adults. In that respect, teachers and other school personnel have a major role in shaping the eating habits of children by also consuming FHNV. Furthermore, school personnel should not use food to reward or punish children. 4.3.2 Training of School Personnel To allow for the effective implementation of the school nutrition policy, it is vital that all school personnel are trained in the principles of healthy eating. Such training must provide basic knowledge of nutrition combined with instructional techniques and strategies designed to promote healthy eating habits. All school catering and dining room supervisory staff should receive appropriate training to ensure effective management of the school tuck shops and the school dining room. All teachers being trained at

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the NIE should receive appropriate training in basic nutrition, all in line with the SDG. Personnel responsible for nutrition education through the PSE curriculum should also be continually trained to effectively deliver the nutrition education as planned.

4.3.3 Family and Community Involvement Schools and communities have a shared responsibility to provide children access to high quality foods and positive nutrition experiences that will have a lifelong impact on their health and education. Family and community involvement will be vital in supporting and reinforcing nutrition education in the schools. a.

Parents opting to provide their children with snacks/meals to take to school on a normal school day or during school events must ensure that foods provided are of high nutritional value.

b.

Families must be invited to attend exhibitions for student nutrition projects or health fairs. They can also be encouraged to observe meal times at the school and be provided with school meal menus.

c.

School personnel must collaborate with relevant ministries, organizations and community groups to facilitate nutritionrelated placements and projects for children.

d.

The school must involve parents/community in the nutrition education activities, evaluation of food services and implementation of the policy.

5.0 COORDINATION AND MONITORING Although adopting a school nutrition policy is just one step towards a healthy school environment, the key to real improvement is the day-to-day implementation of the whole policy. To ensure that the policy is implemented successfully, schools will need to be regularly guided, monitored and evaluated through various multi-sectoral bodies which would include a National School Nutrition Committee and School Nutrition Action Groups at school level. 5.1 The National School Nutrition Committee It is recommended that a National School Nutrition Committee be established to provide leadership in the implementation of the policy. The Committee should be multisectoral in nature and should ideally be represented by:

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1. Ministry of Education a. Quality Assurance Unit b. Parent Educators Council c. Schools Directorate d. School Meals Centre 2. Ministry of Health and Social Development a. School Health Programme b. Nutrition Unit c. Unit for the Prevention and Control of Cardiovascular Diseases d. Food Control Unit e. Dental Section 3. Seychelles Licensing Authority 4. NATCOF 5. SenPa Responsibilities of the National School Nutrition Committee include:  Aggressively enforce the policy;  Develop policy indicators to diligently monitor the schools’ adherence to the policy;  Evaluate and act upon the results of the evaluation tool administered at school level;  Coordinate training and ensure that resources are made available to all schools;  Periodically review the policy in light of development and changes in schools;  Revise the lease agreement for tuck shop owners (see Appendix B) so that it complies to the policy;  Submit reports to relevant authorities;  Source out funding for the School Nutrition Award;  Identify and reward the school that is best at implementing the policy with the School Nutrition Award on a yearly basis;  Review the corrective action plan periodically;  When violations of this policy are noted, advise and recommend corrective actions to the respective authority;  Meet at least once every school term. 5.2 School Nutrition Action Groups At the school level, there is a need to periodically evaluate the progress of policy implementation. Responsibility for compliance should ideally lie with the school community itself and as such each school should set up its School Nutrition Action Group which would need to meet at least twice termly. Representatives of the School Nutrition Action Group should be as follows: 1. Teacher 2. Student

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3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Parent Tuck shop owner Dining staff School Health Nurse Dental Therapist District Environmental Health Officer

Responsibilities of the School Nutrition Action Group include:  Set up targets to improve the progress of policy implementation;  Review processes of implementation;  Discuss the school’s compliance to the policy;  Administer the evaluation tool at least twice termly;  Regularly report key findings to the National School Nutrition Committee;  Meet at least twice every school term. 5.3 Evaluation Tool A short questionnaire has been designed to assist with the monitoring of the policy (see Appendix B). The results obtained from this tool will be used both at school and national level to determine how well each school is implementing its school nutrition policy. In addition, this tool will provide some basis for further improvement and partly assist the National School Nutrition Committee to identify which school deserves the yearly School Nutrition Award. The questionnaire will need to be administered monthly in the presence of at least four members of the School Nutrition Action Group. On-site compliance monitoring will also be conducted by members of the National School Nutrition Committee as an external assessment to complement the findings obtained from this evaluation.

6.0 IMPLEMENTATION 6.1 Implementation Date By January 2009, all public and private schools should adopt this policy. 6.2 School Nutrition Award A mechanism for rewarding schools that are correctly implementing the policy has been instituted. Each year, based on the total number of points that each school scores in their evaluation tool and on-site compliance monitoring by members of the National

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School Nutrition Committee, the school achieving the highest score will be rewarded the School Nutrition Award. 6.3 Violations of Policy At school level, the SNAG has the responsibility in ensuring that their respective schools are abiding to the rules of the policy as set. However the National Committee has the mandate to inform and advise the Ministry of Education of those schools whose activities are not in line with the policy. The Ministry of Education will then be responsible in taking further necessary actions to remedy the situation.

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APPENDIX A – SEYCHELLES DIETARY GUIDELINES

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APPENDIX B – EVALUATION TOOL NAME OF SCHOOL -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------NUMBER OF STUDENTS-------------------------------------------------------------------------------DATE OF EVALUATION -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Signature of personnel collecting the data Name 1.

Signature

Date

2. 3. 4. PART A – PROVISION OF FOODS IN THE TUCK SHOP 1. How many tuck shops does the school have? -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------If more than one, state whether they are run by the same owner ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------2. How many selling points are available during break time--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3. Does the school have any vendors just outside its compound? ----------------------If yes, how many? -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Nutritional Quality of Foods Provided 4. Indicate with a tick () the foods being sold in the tuck shop on the day itself. Add in the price for each of the items ticked. Category 1



Price per unit

1. Baked beans 2. Baked fruit cake (e.g. banana/ carrot/ pumpkin/ pawpaw/ dried fruit) 3. Baked meat/ fish ball 4. Baked samoosa 5. Bottled Water 6. Brown bread/ roll, white bread/ roll with the following fillings:  Canned fish (oil removed if using those canned in oil)  Smoked fish  Cheese or cheese spread  Egg (boiled, omelet or scrambled)  Marmite  Peanut butter  Meat  Meat products (grilled bacon, frankfurter, burger; ham, salami…) 7. Coconut water 8. Crackers with marmite, peanut butter or cheese fillings 9. Dried fruits 10. Flavoured milk (Milo, Ovaltine, Bournvita) 11. Fresh seasonal fruits 12. Fruit tart 13. Ice cake or ice pop made with pure fruit juice, milk or flavoured milk 14. Imported fruits 15. Milk shakes made with low fat milk and fruits 16. Pancakes 17. Plain milk {non-fat or semi-skimmed (e.g. Slimilk)} 18. Plain wholemeal biscuits 19. Pure fruit juices (Home-made or Liquifruit) 20. Unsalted nuts 21. Vegetable pizza (can add a protein source) 22. Vegetable quiche (can add a protein source) 23. Vegetables (vegetable sticks or vegetables in sandwich fillings) 24. Yoghurt Category 2 25. Banana fritters 26. Chilli cakes (made with lentils) 27. Chocobar 28. Danish (containing dried fruits)

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29. ‘Feyte’ 30. Fish/ meat roll 31. Fried chicken 32. Fried fish/ meat ball 33. Ice-cream (not chocolate coated) 34. Local chips (cassava, banana, taro (‘lerouy’), sweet potato) 35. Pate (vegetable and protein filling) 36. Popcorn (popped in limited oil and salt) 37. Pudding (containing dried fruits) 38. Salted nuts 39. Samoosa (fried) 40. Sausage roll 41. Sandwich with jam filling Category 3 42. ‘Bouldou’ 43. ‘Kravat’ 44. ‘Lapat sek’ 45. ‘Moulouk’ 46. ‘Moutay’ 47. ‘Nouga’ 48. ‘Tourt’ 49. Amigo 50. Candy 51. Carbonated beverages such as lemonade (Seybrew, Waterloo) 52. Chewing gum 53. Chilli cake (without lentils) 54. Chocolate 55. Sandwich with chocolate paste 56. Cordials (Hyacinth juice, squash, ribena) 57. Croissant 58. Danish (without dried fruits) 59. Donut 60. Double cheese curl 61. Fried potato chips 62. Fruit drinks (Sunkiss’d) 63. High energy drinks e.g. Lucozade, Energade 64. Ice cake or ice pop (not made with pure fruit juice, milk or flavoured milk)

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65. Jelly 66. Lollies 67. Lollipop 68. Mints 69. Napolitaine 70. Nik Knacks 71. Ringo snacks 72. Sponge cake 73. Sponsor 74. Spudz 75. Sweet biscuits 76. Swiss roll 77. Twisties Category 4 (Any other foods not listed above)

5. From the choices below, indicate () the types of oil/ fat that are being used to prepare foods sold in the tuck shop? a. Palm oil (e.g. Turkey oil) b. Sunflower oil c. Olive oil d. margarine e. butter f. other (specify) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------6. How are the foods sold labeled? a. Foods being sold have their names indicated b. The main ingredients used are stated c. Both the names and main ingredients are stated d. Foods are not labeled at all

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Appearance 7. How would you rate the presentation of the foods being sold in the tuck shop? a. very appealing b. not too appealing c. totally unappealing 8. How would you rate the freshness of the foods being sold in the tuck shop? a. Excellent b. Satisfactory c. Unsatisfactory PART B - PROVISION OF SCHOOL MEALS 9. What proportion of students chooses school meals daily? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------10. How much time is allocated per group for lunch in the dining hall? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------11. How many school personnel assist with the provision of school meals? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------12. Are students provided with drinking water in the dining room? --------------------13. Are parents informed of the school meals’ menus? -----------------------------------If yes, state how? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Delivery of foods 14. Are the foods delivered on time (both school meals and tuck shop)? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Queuing 15. Are there any queuing difficulties during break and lunch time (for both school meals and tuck shop)? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------If yes, what plans does the school have to resolve such difficulties?-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Drinking Water 16. List the drinking water facilities that are available for students’ use at the school. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Tuck Shop 17. Does the tuck shop have a store? --------------------------------------------------------If yes, does it have: a. Fly mesh at the window? ----------------------------------------------------------b. A less than 10mm gap at the foot of the door? --------------------------------18. Does the retail area have the following? a. Warm cabinet for snacks ----------------------------------------------------------b. Cooler/ fridge for soft drinks and snacks ---------------------------------------c. Worktop with smooth and impervious finishing --------------------------------d. Smooth and impervious floor finishing ------------------------------------------e. Smooth and impervious wall finishing -------------------------------------------f. Treated water supply ---------------------------------------------------------------g. Hood and extractor fan above cooking units -----------------------------------19. When last was the staff working in the tuck shop medically examined? ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------20. How many sets of uniform (including head covers) do staff working in the tuck shop have? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------21. Are tongues used to handle food? -------------------------------------------------------22. Do food containers contain tight lids? --------------------------------------------------23. How many bins with removable lids are there in the tuck shop? -------------------24. Are bin liners used? ------------------------------------------------------------------------Fundraising activities 25. How many fund raising activities have you had in the past 2 weeks? -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------26. List the type of foods that were on sale to students during these fundraising activities. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------27. Were parents advised on the type of foods to be provided during these fundraising activities? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------If yes, how? -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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PART C – NUTRITION EDUCATION Awareness 28. How has the school targeted students in improving nutrition education in the past 2 weeks? List down all such activities in the space provided below. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------29. How has the school targeted parents in improving nutrition education in the past 2 weeks? List down all such activities in the space provided below. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------30. In the space below, list all sensitization or training sessions that have been carried out to improve the teacher’s or school personnel’s knowledge on nutrition in the past 2 weeks. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------31. Is there a food and nutrition extracurricular activity on offer for students? If yes, provide details: -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------32. Does the school have a vegetable garden? --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------If yes, who is involved in maintaining the garden? ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------33. How does the school utilize the products obtained from the garden? -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------34. If sold, who do they sell them to? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------35. Does the school have adequate and appropriate facilities to demonstrate food preparation for educational purposes? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------36. Where does the school obtain its food and nutrition resources? a. Nutrition Unit, Department of Health b. Ministry of Education c. Internet or school’s own resources d. Others (please specify) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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37. Has the school produced or disseminated any nutrition education materials in the past 2 weeks? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------If yes, list them in the space provided below. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------PART D – MONITORING AND COORDINATION School Nutrition Action Group (SNAG) 38. Has the school made any changes to the composition of the SNAG in the past 2 weeks?------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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APPENDIX C – LEASE AGREEMENT This agreement made on this …………………………… day of……………………………. between The Headteacher of ………………………………………………….. School acting for and on behalf of the School, herein referred to as the ‘’School’’ of the one part. and …….……………………………………...of………………………………………….. herein referred to as the ‘’Manager’’ of the other part. Coherent the school has on its premises a tuck-shop for the purposes of selling nutritious drinks and snacks that are in line with the National School Nutrition Policy, to the students of the school and the school is willing, subject to the conditions herein contained, to allow the Manager to manage the tuck-shop on its behalf and the Manager has accepted to do so. In pursuance of the above the school and the Manager have agreed as follows: 1. This agreement does not constitute a lease of the tuck-shop and does not seek to create between the parties a landlord/tenant relationship for the purposes of any law of Seychelles. 2. The Manager shall manage the tuck-shop and for this purpose shall be solely responsible at all times to stock the tuck-shop with an acceptable variety and quantity of nutritious drinks and snacks so as to adequately satisfy the demands and nutritional needs of the students and teachers of the school. 3. The Manager shall ensure that the drinks and snacks exposed for sale or sold at the tuck-shop meet the minimum applicable standards set by the Ministry of Health, Seychelles. 4. The Manager shall ensure that the tuck-shop is at all time clean and hygienic. 5. The Manager shall be responsible for all charges relating to water and electricity used in connection with the management of the tuck-shop. 6. Subject to the directive of the Head-teacher of the school or, in her absence her designated representative, the Manager shall ensure that the tuck-shop is always open during school breaks on school days or during other times or day when the school is holding special functions on the premises of the school as the Head-teacher or in her absence her designated representative might notify the manager. 7. The price at which drinks and snacks are sold at the tuck-shop shall be reasonable so as to afford the Manager a reasonable return, and if the Head-teacher or in her absence her deputy is of the opinion that the Manager is charging an excessive price for drinks or snacks may require the Manager to reduce the prices accordingly, unless the prices have been agreed before the Manager and the Head-teacher.

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8. The Head-teacher or such other person as the Head-teacher may designate may at all reasonable times inspect the tuck-shop for the purpose of ensuring compliance with this agreement. 9. This agreement shall initially be for a trial period of three (3) months starting on ………………………. and where the school is satisfied with the management of the tuck-shop during the trial period, the school may, subject to clause (10) extend this agreement for a further period as the parties may agree in unity. 10. The school may at any time after giving the period of notice in writing specified herein, terminate this agreement: a) During the trial period a notice of 7 days b) During a period of agreement after the trial period, a notice of 15 days 11. Where a notice of termination has been given under clause (10) the Manager shall not later than the last day on which the notice ends: a) Remove from the tuck-shop all stock of drinks and snacks belonging to the Manager. b) Clean the tuck-shop and put it in a reasonable state of repair. c) Remove from the tuck-shop and the school premises all rubbish. d) Settle all remaining debts with the school. 12. The manager must notify the school in writing at least three (3) months in advance if he/she wants to crease operation. 13. Not withstanding the termination to this agreement, the Manager shall remain liable to perform all obligations which the Manager is require under this agreement to perform.

…………………………………… …………………………… Date: …………………………….. HEADTEACHER Or and on behalf of the School

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Date……………………….. THE MANAGER

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