power, privilege, & oppression - Scripps College

power, privilege, & oppression - Scripps College

POWER, PRIVILEGE, & OPPRESSION facilitated by Antoinette Myers & Yuka Ogino AGENDA • • • • • • • • • Introductions Vocabulary Breakthrough: • Power...

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POWER, PRIVILEGE, & OPPRESSION facilitated by Antoinette Myers & Yuka Ogino

AGENDA • • • • • • • • •

Introductions Vocabulary Breakthrough: • Power, Privilege, and Oppression BREAK Salient Identities/Social Identity Wheels Cycle of Oppression BREAK What Can You Do For Scripps? Discussion/Debrief Evaluations & Closing

INTRODUCTIONS



Fill out your name tag. Please include your pronouns! •

Example: Jordan Genderbread (she/her/hers, they/them/theirs)



Meet Antoinette! Meet each other!

LEARNING OUTCOMES •









Participants will have had an opportunity to discuss openly topics of race, class, ability, religious oppression, and power/privilege in a staff-only space. Participants will learn specific vocabulary used on campuses and within academia to describe a multitude of everyday life experiences and perspectives. Participants will be educated on microaggressions in order to reduce and attempt to eliminate the racist, classist, sexist, heterosexist, ableist, and privileged attitudes on our campus (from the Strategic Plan). Participants will be able to engage in meaningful conversations with their colleagues around multiple topics and learn about multiple perspectives in a brave space. Anything else? What are you hoping to do here?

GROUND RULES/BRAVE SPACE •

The Vegas Rule: •



Learning leaves and the names/stories stay here. •



Share the air •





Challenge yourself to be respectful of all each other's feelings, perspectives, abilities, and identities (and your own) Remember it’s not just the intent that matters, but also the impact





Be the expert of your experience, use "i" statements Be okay with silence Leave space for processing and after-processing, both inside and outside of the space (aka take care of yourself) Reserve the right to change your mind Is there anything you’d like to add?

PART ONE: ENHANCING OUR VOCABULARY

MATCHING GAME 1. 2.

Power Privilege

3.

Oppression

4.

Race

5.

Ethnicity

6.

Identity

7.

Gender

8.

Sexual Orientation

9.

Class

a.

b. c.

d. e.

f. g. h. i.

A social identity used interchangeably with biological sex in a system that presumes if one has male characteristics, one is male, and if one has female characteristics, one is female. The system of ordering a society in which people are divided into sets based on perceived social or economic status. A system that maintains advantage and disadvantage based on social group memberships and operates, intentionally and unintentionally, on individual, institutional, and cultural levels. One’s natural preference in sexual and/or romantic partners. A category that describes membership to a group based on real or presumed common ancestry, shared languages and/or religious beliefs, cultural heritage and group history. The sense of self, providing sameness and continuity in personality over time; the condition of being oneself and not another. Unearned access to resources only readily available to some people as a result of their advantaged social group membership. A socio-historical category used to divide people into populations or groups based on physical appearance, such as skin color, eye color, hair color, etc. The ability to decide who will access to resources; the capacity to direct or influence the behavior of others, oneself, and/or the course of events.

Group _____

a.

1.

Power

b.

2.

Privilege

c.

3.

Oppression

4.

Race

5.

Ethnicity

6.

7.

8.

9.

Identity Gender Sexual Orientation Class

d. e.

f. g. h. i.

A social identity used interchangeably with biological sex in a system that presumes if one has male characteristics, one is male, and if one has female characteristics, one is female. The system of ordering a society in which people are divided into sets based on perceived social or economic status. A system that maintains advantage and disadvantage based on social group memberships and operates, intentionally and unintentionally, on individual, institutional, and cultural levels. One’s natural preference in sexual and/or romantic partners. A category that describes membership to a group based on real or presumed common ancestry, shared languages and/or religious beliefs, cultural heritage and group history. The sense of self, providing sameness and continuity in personality over time; the condition of being oneself and not another. Unearned access to resources only readily available to some people as a result of their advantaged social group membership. A socio-historical category used to divide people into populations or groups based on physical appearance, such as skin color, eye color, hair color, etc. The ability to decide who will access to resources; the capacity to direct or influence the behavior of others, oneself, and/or the course of events.

PART TWO: BREAKING IT ALL THE WAY DOWN

ON POWER Power in defense of freedom is greater than power in behalf of tyranny and oppression, because power, real power, comes from our conviction which produces action, uncompromising action. –Malcolm X

UNDERSTANDING POWER •

Social group: A group of people who share a range of physical, cultural, or social characteristics within one of the social identity categories.













Examples of social identity categories: Sex: Female, male, intersex Class: Owning class, working class, poor, middle class Sexual orientation Lesbian, gay, heterosexual, bisexual Physical, developmental, and psychological ability Able-bodied, disabled, mental illness Race Black, White, [email protected], Native American, Asian, biracial, multiracial























Religion Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu Age Elders, young people, adults Gender Women, Men, genderqueer, transgender Ethnicity Irish, Dominican, German





FOCUSING INWARDS: ON SALIENT IDENTITIES Take a few moments to think about your own identities. Which social groups do you belong to? Salient identities are the identities that come into play in different situations. Reflect on the following questions to yourself: Which of your social group memberships were easiest to identify? Which of your social group memberships were most difficult to identify? What questions are raised for your about your social group memberships? In your group: Talk about how this worksheet might have enabled you to think about yourself in new ways.

DYNAMICS OF SOCIAL GROUPS •

Social statuses: • Within each social identity category, some people have greater access to social power and privilege based on membership in their social group. • Often, this group is called the advantaged group. • We call group who access to social power is limited or denied, the targeted group. • When you hear students or colleagues use the following terms in official paperwork or even in community conversation: • Advantaged: agent, dominant, oppressor, privileged • Targeted: target, subordinate, oppressed, disadvantaged



Social groups are afforded different status in the United States based on multiple historical, political, and social factors. • This affects the abilities of people in different groups to access resources • Most of these differences and identities are socially constructed Social construction: taken for granted assumptions about the world, knowledge, and ourselves assumed to be universal rather than historically and culturally specific ideas created through social processes and interactions.

TALKING ABOUT POWER AT SCRIPPS •

What does it mean to have power at Scripps? •





When you hear that others feel as though they are “second-class citizens”, what do you think that means? If you are feeling unempowered at Scripps, why might that be? If your colleague feels unempowered, how can you support them? What does a balance of power look like on campus?

BALANCING POWER Using racial justice as an example of balancing power: Racial Justice ≠ diversity Diversity = variety Racial Justice ≠ Equality Equality = sameness Racial Justice = equity Equity = fairness, justice People get what they need

On Privilege “Privilege exists when one group has something of value that is denied to others simply because of the groups they belong to, rather than because of anything they’ve done or failed to do. Access to privilege doesn’t determine one’s outcomes, but it is definitely an asset that makes it more likely that whatever talent, ability, and aspirations a person with privilege has will result in something positive for them.” –Peggy McIntosh





UNDERSTANDING PRIVILEGE What does it mean to have privilege? It is defined as “unearned access to resources (social power) only readily available to some people as a result of their advantaged social group membership”. Determining who has privilege or disadvantage is complex because cultural, social, and historical changes affect which groups are privileged and which groups are not. Some may pass as members of an advantaged group: For example, some people may change their names to protect themselves from discrimination. Some may be given privileged because they are assumed to be members of an advantaged group. For example: a bisexual person in a heterosexual relationship may be assumed to be heterosexual and thus treated differently. •











Privilege Article Read + Discuss

TALKING ABOUT PRIVILEGE AT SCRIPPS •



When talking about privilege, most folks feel uncomfortable. Having privilege is not inherently a bad thing, but it is how you utilize it and how others are impacted by it, that you must vigilantly attend to. What does privilege look like at Scripps? Can you think of examples of the following types of privilege? •













Class privilege White privilege Heterosexual privilege Able-bodied privilege Religious privilege Citizenship privilege

Name one action that can be done to provide access to those at Scripps who may not have these privileges.

PART THREE: DOING THE SELF WORK

“All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression.” –Thomas Jefferson

UNDERSTANDING OPPRESSION • A system that maintains advantage and disadvantage based on social group memberships, and operates, intentionally and unintentionally, on individual, institutional, and cultural levels. • Individual: attitudes and actions that reflect prejudice against a social group (unintentional and intentional). • Institution: policies, laws, rules, norms, and customs enacted by organizations and social institutions that disadvantage some social groups and advantage other social groups (intentional and unintentional). • Societal/cultural: social norms, roles, rituals, language, music, and art that reflect and reinforce the belief that one social group is superior to another (intentional and unintentional).

Matrix

WALKING THROUGH RACISM: AN EXAMPLE •

What does Interpersonal Racism mean? What are some examples of this type of racism? • Interpersonal Racism is when an individual shows negative ideas or actions towards another race or culture not their own. All types of people have these attitudes, but these attitudes are most obvious in the White dominated society we live in.



What does Internalized Racism mean? What are some examples of this type of racism? • Internalized Racism is when, either knowing it or not, someone has negative ideas about themselves and their race or culture. These negative images come from racist ideas and images put out in society claiming that White people are superior. Basically, this is someone who feels that their race or culture is bad or at least not as good as the White culture and race.



What do you think Institutional Racism means? What are some examples of this type of racism? • Institutional Racism is the laws and practices that institutions create in order to benefit White people at the expense of people of color. The outcomes of these policies and practices always have negative effects on people of color. Institutional Racism is different from interpersonal or internalized racism because it does not just affect one person; it affects large groups of people at once. The flipside of Institutional Racism is White Privilege, the fact that White people have social advantages in things like getting jobs, getting into college, and running government and businesses.

UNDERSTANDING CLASSISM: AN EXAMPLE Levels of Classism Individual Classism: • A middle-class person calls secondhand clothes “tacky” • Holds a prejudice that the reason people are poor is because they are lazy or stupid; • Assumes everyone can either afford or feel comfortable going to an expensive restaurant • Believes a certain kind of work is beneath him or her. Institutional Classism: • A hospital keeps a medicaid patient for fewer days than a privately insured patient with the same condition because the amount paid to the hospital is less • Schools in poor neighborhoods have fewer resources and larger student-teacher ratios than more affluent neighborhoods because money for schools is based on local property taxes • Colleges give preference to children of alumni, thus making it harder for first-generation college applicants to get in • A college reserves the most convenient parking spaces for faculty, even though they usually work more flexible hours than support staff. Cultural Classism: • A newspaper runs pictures and a prominent article on a “highsociety” wedding while not listing or highlighting a working-class couple’s wedding • TV shows and movies that portray poor and working-class people as stupid buffoons (Homer Simpson) or as reactionary bigots (Archie Bunker).

THE CYCLE OF OPPRESSION

“Women are bad at math and science” Stereotype: “women are bad at math and science” Prejudice: dismissing, or “not taking women seriously” Discrimination: not hiring women for certain jobs Institutionalization: Women make up 24% of the STEM workforce, versus men making up 76% - Office of Science and Technology, White House Internalization: 66% of 4th grade girls say they like math and science. But only 18% of all college engineering majors are female https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XP3cyRRAfX0

MICROAGGRESSIONS: WHAT ARE THEY?

Watch video here

DISCUSS

What are some microaggressions that you may have overheard in the workplace?

How might you react or intervene when you hear a microaggression being directed to someone?

break

PART FOUR: APPLYING KNOWLEDGE TO OUR LIVED REALITIES

WHAT CAN YOU DO FOR SCRIPPS? •

Think about your departments and divisions, and the ways that these may systems may manifest: •





in the office with colleagues with/around students

Think of some actions: •

Examples: •







Petitions New policies Updated forms Themed staff meetings & discussion sessions

PART FIVE: RESOURCES

SCORE - Offers workshops and trainings on social justice topics, diversity, and inclusivity - Programming - Network of social justice educators [email protected]

CONSORTIUM CENTERS •









OFFICE OF BLACK STUDENT AFFAIRS [email protected]/[email protected] STUDENT AFFAIRS ASIAN/ASIAN AMERICAN RESOURCE CENTER QUEER RESOURCE CENTER STUDENT DISABILITY RESOURCES CENTER

EVALUATIONS & CLOSING Please take a few moments to tell us what you think! Be honest!

THANK YOU! Without you, this wouldn’t be possible! Thank you for openness, warmth, enthusiasm, and participation! May we continue to forward in community!