richmond city sheriff's office - City of Richmond

richmond city sheriff's office - City of Richmond

RICHMOND CITY SHERIFF’S OFFICE Annual Report January 1December 31, 2015 Richmond City Justice Center C.T. Woody, Jr. Sheriff Richmond City Sherif...

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RICHMOND CITY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Annual Report January 1December 31, 2015

Richmond City Justice Center

C.T. Woody, Jr. Sheriff

Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Table of Contents

Dear Citizens of Richmond…………………………………………………………………………………… 2 In the Spotlight………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4 CNN…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4 CBS 6 News Story…………………………………………………………………………………….. 4 REAL Success Story………………………………………………………………………………….. 5 Richmond Times Dispatch Public Square…………………………………………………………… 5 Staff Appreciation Picnic…………………………………………………………………………….. 6 Helping Those in Need……………………………………………………………………………….. 6 RCJC Awards and Recognition……………………………………………………………………………… 7

Internal Program Department……………………………………………………………………………….. 8 Partnership with the Department of Corrections………………………………………………….. 8 Program Graduation…………………………………………………………………………………. 8 Recovery & Transitional Houses…………………………………………………………………… 9 Inaugural Motherhood Tea………………………………………………………………………….. 9 Library Services……………………………………………………………………………………… 10 Administration……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Completing the Transition………………………………………………………………………….. 11 Intake Department…………………………………………………………………………………… 11 Community Custody…………………………………………………………………………………. 12 The Cannon Creek Project………………………………………………………………………….. 12 Training Department………………………………………………………………………………………… 13 By the Numbers—Finance and Human Resources……………………………………………………… Finance & Accounting…………………………………………………………………………… Human Resources & Recruitment……………………………………………………………….. Population Stabilization…………………………………………………………………………….

14 14 15 16

Audits and Inspections……………………………………………………………………………………… 17 Department of Corrections Three Year Audit & Life, Health & Safety Audit………………… 17 LIDS Audit………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17 Training Academy Recertification…………………………………………………………………. 18 United States Department of Justice Services……………………………………………………… 18 United States Department of Justice, United States Marshal Services…………………………… 18 1

Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Dear Citizens of Richmond: 2015 marked the first full year of operations for the Richmond City Justice Center (RCJC). With a new facility came new responsibilities, standards, and opportunities. At the beginning of the year, I issued a challenge to “Raise the Bar” and to deliver on our promise of operational excellence by introducing three specific and achievable goals to our team. The first goal was the full transition into the Richmond City Justice Center, including the successful relocation of the Intake Department, the Magistrates Office, and the Richmond Police Departments Warrant division. The second goal was instituting the procurement process for a new Jail Management System (JMS). The third and final goal I named was preparing the office for the Virginia Law Enforcement Professional Standards (VLEPSC) accreditation in time for our mock assessment with VLEPSC in the summer of 2016.

Sheriff C.T. Woody, Jr.

I am proud to report that all three of these goals were completed. When the architects designed what we see now as the RCJC, part of the vision was to make the building absolutely secure from the inside so that the common ascetics typically seen in jails, i.e. barbed wire, fencing, etc., were no longer required, giving the building more of an office park look and feel. As such, the Justice Center boasts several meeting and training room spaces, which provide many opportunities for us to open our doors to key stakeholders and public safety partners who require meeting space for their gatherings. Our facility can easily accommodate large group requests for major meetings and training events. Some of the notable groups we have hosted include:  The Virginia Law Enforcement Accreditation Coalition’s (VALEAC) quarterly meeting;  The City’s Evidence Based Decision Making (EBDM) policy group;  More than fifty guests for the “Community Based Alternatives to School Discipline” conference, which

included prominent judges from around the country, and;  The NAACP Branch meeting.

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

With 2015 now in our rear view, it is time to look towards 2016 and the future. We now have a world class, one stop facility for the complete processing of residents! I am looking forward to all we will accomplish this year, and every year going forward. Our mission continues to be rehabilitating current and future residents of our facility, so they may leave with an experience that was constructive enough to get them on the right track, but not so good as to make them want to come back.

Sincerely,

Sheriff C. T. Woody, Jr.

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

In The Spot Light CNN CNN’s This is Life with Lisa Ling conducted extensive filming and interviews of the RCJC and our Internal Program Department’s Recovering from Everyday Addictive Lifestyles (REAL) Program in late March. Our team assisted them throughout their weeklong stay as they spotlighted the fatherhood and behavioral modification aspects of the REAL Program, while focusing on two residents’ journey and their participation in the Father/Daughter Dance. The episode aired on October 21, 2015. The report garnered local and national media attention, and accurately depicted residents’ striving toward positive change in their lives. A watch party was hosted in the RCJC auditorium. In attendance were local and state public officials, public safety officers, community members, the families of the featured residents, and other residents participating in the REAL program. We would like to thank Lisa Ling and CNN, who gave us the opportunity to show case the accomplishments of our residents, and how internal programs like REAL prepare those who are incarcerated for a full, productive life once they leave the Justice Center.

Sheriff C.T. Woody , Jr. and CNN’s Lisa Ling

CBS 6 News Story CBS 6 featured the RCSO Programs Department in a story, "I Just Can't Get Enough”, which highlighted the REAL Program, and Program Volunteers. The story focused on ‘repeat offenders’ who return to jail. This feature story recently garnered the news organization an Emmy Award for Overall Excellence in the category for Current and Community Affairs. It chronicles one female offender who broke this cycle and continues to volunteer at the RCJC. 4

Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

REAL Success Story In addition to CNN’s Lisa Ling reporting about the REAL program, comedian and talk show host Steve Harvey featured one of our residents interviewed in Lings report “Fatherless Towns”. Aziz Scott, his wife Tyia, and their daughter De’Andra flew out to Chicago, Illinois where they were featured on The Steve Harvey Show along with Lisa Ling. During the taping, Mr. Harvey presented Mr. Scott with a $5,000 check to assist him with transitioning back into the community. From Left: Tyia Scott, De’Andra Scott, Aziz Scott, Lisa Ling, Steve Harvey

Mr. Scott has spent 30 of his 53 years in the jail system. As a remarkably successful graduate from our REAL program, he continues to make strides in his rehabilitation and his life. REAL Program Director Sarah Scarbrough remains in contact with Mr. Scott and the RCSO is proud of his accomplishments. Richmond Times Dispatch (RTD) Public Square

On May 18th, Richmond City Commonwealth’s Attorney Mike Herring, Superintendent of Richmond Public Schools Dr. Dana Bedden, and Deputy Chief of the Richmond City Police Department Eric English joined Sheriff Woody in participating in the Richmond Times Dispatch Public Square discussion on “Are We Creating Too Many Felons.” We each brought a differing perspective to the conversation based on the current challenges we each face in our respective areas. Yet, It was clear we agreed the cycle of continually ‘locking up’ non-violent offenders on felony charges, and simply hoping they somehow re-integrate back into society and our communities, was not a realistic solution to the problem. We remain committed to continued discussions on this and other public safety concerns, and finding long-term strategies that work.

Sheriff C.T. Woody, Jr. Participates in RTD Public Square Forum

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Staff Picnic A highlight midway through the year was recognition of our correctional personnel. During National Correctional Officers week in May, we held the first annual RCSO Staff Picnic. The event provided an opportunity to thank the RCSO Deputies and support personnel for their service. Sheriff Woody, and members of his executive team, prepared and served lunch to more than 300 employees.

The annual observance of correctional officers is an opportunity to reflect on the sacrifices made by our personnel to keep us safe in the jail and courtroom environments. The RCJC is one of Virginia’s largest jails and employs more than 400 correctional officers. RCSO Executives Prepare to Serve Employees

Helping Those in Need

During the holiday season, Sgt. Brandy L. Thornton led the effort for the Richmond City Sheriff’s Office in collecting donations to help those who are less fortunate have a fulfilling holiday. Toys were donated via a basketball tournament between Sheriff’s deputies. The tournament, arranged by Sgt. Thornton, collected 215 toys. All toys were donated to Mercy House, a recovery house for women and their children, which is operated by New Life for Youth.

Sheriff C.T. Woody, Jr. and Sgt. Brandy L. Thornton

Additionally, the St. Paul’s Baptist Church collected and donated over 2,000 gifts to families of incarcerated loved ones at RCJC who are currently participating in one of the provided rehabilitative programs. The gifts were collected and distributed at a Winter Wonderland Christmas Party held at St. Paul’s. Sheriff C.T. Woody, Jr., Executive Staff, and Residents of Mercy House

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

RCJC Awards and Recognition National recognition continues to pour in for the extraordinary design, construction, and use of the Justice Center. In 2015 there were several national and state awards presented to the City and Sheriff’s Office.

 National Award of Merit in the Federal, State, County, Municipal category from the Design Build

institute of American (DBIA);  LEED Gold Certification from the US Green Building Council (USGBC);  2015 Public Sector Impact Award from the Richmond Real Estate Group (RREG);  Spotlighted Facility of the Month in Correctional News Magazine, July/August 2015, and;  2015 Spirit of Family and Fatherhood Partnership Award from the Richmond Family and Fatherhood Initiative

The August 2015 Issue of Correctional News Magazine featuring the RCJC

2015 Gold Certification, awarded by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

2nd Annual Richmond Regional-Virginia Family and Fatherhood Symposium Spirit of Family and Fatherhood Partnership Award In honor of the partnership the Richmond City Health Department’s Richmond Family and Fatherhood Initiative (RFFI) has with the Internal Program’s Department, Sheriff Woody and Dr. Sarah Scarbrough were presented with the 2015 Spirit of Family and Fatherhood Partnership Award. This award is given to individuals and organizations that model strategic and innovative partnerships in the advancement of responsible fatherhood and healthy family programs. The Richmond Family and Fatherhood Initiative is an organization dedicated to empowering both mothers and fathers with the tools they need to be effective, positive role models in their children’s lives. RFFI continues to work with residents of the RCJC, providing fatherhood and motherhood classes and assisting in the coordination of annual events, such as the Motherhood Tea and the Father/Daughter Dance. 7

Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Internal Program Department Partnership with Department of Corrections In an effort to assist with the state’s re-entry initiatives for violent offenders, which helps prepare incarcerated offenders to return to their communities, we collaborated with the Virginia Department of Corrections (DOC) to participate in their Virginia Serious And Violent Offender Re-entry (VASAVOR) program. This program allows DOC offenders who are near their release date, and who have a home plan in Richmond, to serve the last 30 to 45 days of their sentence in the RCJC. During their time at the RCJC, they have the opportunity to participate in the REAL Program and work with their VASAVOR case manager until their release. The goal is to help these individuals begin the reclamation process before returning to the community. Program initiatives include:     

Identifying services and resources residents will need in the community once they are released; Preparation for job interviews; Receiving in-depth physical and mental health examinations; Preparation of a health plan, and; Arranging housing options.

Program Graduation A resident holds a copy of the 2015 REAL Program Graduation Ceremony

One of the highlights of this busy and fast-moving year were the many successes we continued to experience in our programming area for residents. In March, we celebrated the first graduation for the REAL Program and New Beginnings to Fatherhood, which included the men who participated in the Father/Daughter Dance. The Richmond Family and Fatherhood Initiative conducted the Fatherhood class, which focused on reversing old behaviors by teaching and demonstrating positive parenting skills. These men also participated in the Father/Daughter Dance. Additionally, we hosted other ceremonies throughout the year that recognized those graduating from the REAL Program, Kitchen Workers of the Month, and those completing college courses or their GED. 2015 REAL Program Graduation Ceremony

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Recovery and Transitional Houses

Another focus area for the department is re-entry planning, which addresses all aspects of the re-entry process. A major component of returning to the community after incarceration is housing. Many of our residents are homeless or go back to the environment that contributed to their incarceration. Through a partnership with the Community Foundation of Central Virginia and Homeward, a new housing scholarship fund was developed in order to secure housing for released offenders. Monies in the fund assist in the first few months of housing expenses for released offenders who do not have any post-release housing options.

First Scholarship recipient, Carlos Jackson, signing lease forms.

Carlos opening the door to his apartment for the first time.

Fun Facts!  More than 900 Residents were 2015 REAL participants;  There were 31 male graduates of the REAL program;  2 college scholarships were awarded;  7 female Residents participated in RCJC’s ‘Motherhood Tea’;  12 male Residents participated in the annual Father/ Daughter Dance, and;  250 Residents attended educational classes.

Inaugural Motherhood Tea Event During the holiday season this year, seven women from our REAL Program were selected to participate in the RCJC’s first annual ‘Motherhood Tea’ event. Sponsored by the Richmond Family and Fatherhood Initiative (RFFI), celebrate! RVA, and the Richmond City Sheriff’s Office, this event allowed our female residents the opportunity to spend a few hours with their children. Some of the children even got to celebrate their birthday’s with their mom’s during the event!

Prior to the tea, the women were required to participate in a 28 hour comprehensive motherhood evidence based class provided by RFFI. Classes worked to educate and give clarity on not only their journey through motherhood, but their journey through life.

Female REAL program members taking part in RCJC’s first annual ‘Motherhood Tea’.

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Library Services In 2015, the RCJC law library processed 6,481 requests, an increase in the number of requests by 12% from 2014. These requests included applications for notary services, leisure library services, law library services, or law library attendance for research purposes.

While the jail population declined in 2015, the significant increase in requests processed is likely due to:  Library staff have become more streamlined and efficient in the handling of requests, having settled

into the new facility and its routine;  More and more residents are learning that they can use the law library in person to conduct their own research and are choosing to take advantage of this, and;  More residents have learned to make good use of the resources available in the law library and are returning on a regular basis to take advantage of them.

Library Services Requests

6,481 

Requests for law library services = 4,059 (97% men, 3% women)



Requests for leisure library services = 2,014 (89% men, 11% women)



Requests for notary services = 408

(95% men, 5% women)

Residents explore books available to them in the RCJC Law Library

RCJC Law Library

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Administration Completing the Transition Building a state-of-the-art equipped facility was a huge accomplishment, but when the dust settled, there was still work to be done! Transitioning fully from the old building to the new took a few additional months; however, we are happy to report that our team has completed all aspects of department transitions. I am also happy to report that, for the first time in my memory, we have our payroll team located alongside us in the same building. Intake Department Our Intake Department, previously known as “Booking,” “Lock Up,” or “Detention” has received a substantial upgrade from its former home at the Public Safety Building. No longer in closed quarters, our Open Intake Area is located on the first floor of the RCJC, where our facility has 24,300 square feet of space to book, release, or transfer offenders. This area is comprised of Pre-Booking, In-Take, Resident Property, and Transfer & Release. Additionally, the RCJC boasts a secure and fully enclosed 12,600 square foot vehicle sally port, where all offenders are brought into custody of the Sheriff’s Office.

Previous Booking Area in Public Safety Building

Current ‘Open Intake’ Area of RCJC

The open booking concept provides the opportunity for committed persons to sit in an open, well lit, and secure area while they work through the booking process. The Intake area also affords staff ample single and group holding cells for persons that present enhanced security concerns. This is, in effect, an introduction to the Direct Supervision Operational Model, which exists in all housing areas of the RCJC. Persons here receive comprehensive medical and classification screenings. If not released during this early phase, offenders receive a housing assignment to one of the many housing units in the RCJC.

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Community Custody The Community Custody building is the only remaining structure of the old jail facility. It was the Female Housing Unit (FHU) and the most modern of the buildings at the old site. During the construction project, it underwent renovation to accommodate male and female offenders who serve weekend and community service time, as well as those who are in the work detail and work release programs. In addition to housing renovations, there is additional office space for RCJC staff. A breezeway connects the building to the main facility.

On average, approximately 480 individuals serve time in the Weekend Program each year. The Home Electronic Incarceration (HEI) and Community Services Programs process and monitor about 450 non-violent offenders. In addition to these programs, our Community Custody team is responsible for representing the RCSO at community events and engaging with our senior citizens in the area.

Renovated Community Custody Pod Area

The Cannon Creek Project The Cannon Creek Project is a pilot program which helps incarcerated men learn a trade and develop interpersonal communication and life skills in order to better prepare them for the work force upon their release from jail. The project is facilitated through a partnership between the Richmond City Sheriff’s Office Work Force Program and City of Richmond’s Department of Parks and Recreation. Since 2013, a 4-10 person work detail, which is supervised by Sgt. Herbert Allmon and Instructor John Harris, provides landscaping services and removes blight and debris in the Richmond-Henrico Turnpike area of town, now known as Cannon Creek. Participant’s of Cannon Creek redress an area of a curb in the City of Richmond

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Training Department Since opening the doors of the Justice Center, we have completed three Basic Recruit Academy Classes. For the first time in many years, the RCSO men and women were able to graduate in their own facility. Previous graduation ceremonies were held at the Richmond Police Academy. This year, we added more than sixty new certified Deputies to our ranks. The officers graduated in three separate ceremonies throughout the course of the year.

st

 1 Basic Training Academy Graduation

February 20, 2015 – 23 Graduates nd Basic Training Academy Graduation April 24th, 2015 – 24 Graduates rd  3 Basic Training Academy Graduation November 20, 2015 – 20 Graduates 2

The second floor of RCJC houses three training rooms that open to an expansive auditorium which allow for graduations, mass meetings, and celebrations. The total combined square footage for the auditorium space is 3,200 square feet.  Training Room #1 = 840 sq. feet  Training Room #2 = 1520 sq. feet  Training Room #3 = 840 sq. feet

A variety of certification and training programs are ongoing throughout the year. Our staff conducts a majority of Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) required training. Some major highlights include:  187 personnel completed First Aid/AED/CPR and Universal Precaution Training;  135 personnel completed 2-year In Service training, and;  358 personnel attended annual firearms training.

Additionally, training staff certified or recertified employees in:    

Defensive Tactics Driving Firearms VCIN (VA Criminal Information Network)

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

By The Numbers – Finance and Human Resources The RCSO Finance Team worked throughout the year to construct our state and city budget requests and to ensure both reflected our funding priorities for the upcoming fiscal year. The Department initiated discussions on funding for a new software application to replace our aging jail management system (JMS), and the necessity to ensure fully funded inmate medical expenses. As always, we presented strong advocacy for employee salary increases. With help from the lobbying efforts of the Virginia Sheriff’s Association (VSA), the Governor and General Assembly included modest salary increases in the FY2016 approved budget.

Finance and Accounting  FY16 State Budget - $15.8 million

The majority of these monies are reimbursable dollars to the City of Richmond for employee salaries.  Across-the-board percentage-based salary increases of 2% approved by the 2015 General

Assembly provided in the base salaries in the first paycheck of September 2015.

 Effective September 1, 2015, an increase in individual salaries for Deputy Sheriffs whose

salaries are $30,427 or less; to a base, entry-level salary of $31,009.

 The current budget does not reflect the Aid-to-Localities reduction nor does it include the

per diems the department should receive as Revenues.

 Due to our ADP (Average Daily Population) being reduced, one Emergency Correctional

position was cut.

 FY16/17 City Budget - $34 million  The budget reflects a $1.1 Million reduction in personnel.  The Department began the year with 465 approved positions (404 sworn positions and 61

non-sworn positions) allocated by the State.

 Compensation Board and 14 approved additional positions allocated by the City.

The Department did not receive any additional positions in the FY16 budget. The majority (approximately 87%) of these positions are Correctional positions, while the remaining percentage represents our civilian support positions. Our Accounts Payable Team continued their superb work of ensuring that we process and pay our invoices in a timely manner. They also received 100% compliance on all of the processes for the Inmate Commissary accounts and Civil Process payments. Our Budget Department’s recommendations on cost saving measures for fleet vehicles and inmate pharmacy cost oversight proved beneficial to our bottom line. 14

Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Human Resources and Recruitment This year, the Human Resources Department:  Developed a soft skill-training curriculum to be offered at various RCSO work locations. The

offerings included:  Effective Workplace Communication  Time Management  Diversity in the Workplace  Stress Management  Is Perception Reality?  Created internal education and training opportunities for employees:  Developed skill training for employees while offering educational opportunities on-site.  Established partnerships with schools and colleges to create opportunities for employee

educational advancement.  Developed internal training opportunities for DCJS approval in order to enhance the opportunity for employees to earn continuing education hours on-site.  Developed a Leadership Learning Curriculum for the RCSO Deputy Academy, which was approved by the RCSO Training Department for facilitation by Human Resources Subject Matter Experts.  Strengthened RCSO Recruitment Division:  Enhanced the pre-recruitment process by establishing working relationships with

multi-state agencies, which maximized the ability to attain critical background information on perspective employees.  Reduced the turnaround time for receiving applicant history and verifiable credentials.  Diversified RCSO recruitment panel in order to enhance the interview process.

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Population Stabilization Our goal at the RCJC during the last four years was to decrease the overall jail offender population to levels that are manageable based on the rated capacity of the facility. The offender population at RCJC for CY2015 averaged 1078 inmates each day. This is a significant milestone for the office, RCSO staff and employees, as well as the City Administration, who advocated for alternative sentencing programs, as well as all of the public safety stakeholders who worked with us to realize this decrease in population.

This is the lowest Average Daily Population (ADP) the Jail and the RCJC have experienced in decades and surely during my ten-year tenure. The downward trend is a compilation of many factors over the past decade that confirm we are on the right track with the Alternatives to Incarceration Programs, re-entry programs at the RCJC, and credit to our close working relationship with the Department of Corrections and its ability to expedite the movement of state sentenced offenders. Also contributing to the decrease in population is a dedicated staff of men and women in the RCSO who work with our stakeholders to ensure our focus remains on our long-term goals and strategies.

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Audits and Inspections Department of Corrections Three Year Audit & Life, Health & Safety Audit One of our most rewarding accomplishments to date is an outstanding Department of Corrections (DOC) compliance audit conducted in February and a Life, Health and Safety Inspection conducted in November.

In February, less than six months after the transition to the Richmond City Justice Center, the Richmond City Sheriff’s Office reached an overall 80% percent passing rate with only two standards not meeting compliance with the three year audit.

Life, Health & Safety Standards 43

Non-Compliant 1

Minor Standards 85

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As required by the DOC, a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) was developed by the RCSO and submitted to the Department of Corrections Board for reconsideration of standards that were found not in compliance. After the Department of Corrections Board reviewed the CAP and conducted a return visit to the RCJC, a 100% percent compliance rating was achieved by the RCSO. In November 2015, the Department of Corrections performed an unannounced Life, Health, and Safety Inspection. The auditors found the RCSO to be in 100% compliance for all 43 standards. Congratulations go out to our outstanding department teams for having reached such an achievement.

Life, Health & Safety Standards 43

Non-Compliant 0

LIDS Audit The Virginia Compensation Board Auditor conducted an annual audit of Local Inmate Data System (LIDS). LIDS is the state’s computerized data collection and financial reimbursement system for jails. Our Records Department received an Exceptional rating for the tenth straight year. This is always an important audit because it determines the financial outcomes of inmate reimbursement funds from the State to the City. Auditors review and verify electronic data and stored files. We made available to the auditing team, more than 37,500 booking records for CY14 to sample and confirm data.

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Richmond City Sheriff’s Office - 2015 Annual Report

Training Academy Recertification The Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) conducted its Training Academy Recertification audit in early June. Once again, the RCSO team was successful in attaining a 100% compliance of its academy standards. The Academy is audited every three years to ensure quality compliance.

The certification of our training department allows us to provide course offerings in the following areas:     

Basic Jailor Basic Jailor In-Service Court Security/Civil Process Entry-Level Court Security/Civil Process In-Service Instructor Certification/Recertification

The Department of Criminal Justice Services compliance standards cover the following: Compliance Standard Administration Standards Personnel Standards Facility Standards Instructional Standards

Compliance Rating 100% 100% 100% 100%

U.S Department of Justice Criminal Justice Services The United States Department of Justice Criminal Justice Services for the Prevention of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency (DCJS) conducted two (2) site visits in 2015. The first site visit was conducted in October 2015. The auditor toured the John Marshall Courts Building and Oliver Hill Courts Building. The audit revealed the RCSO was in compliance with all regulations concerning juveniles. Another audit was conducted in November 2015. A site visit of our Intake Area was conducted to ensure compliance with the Juvenile Justice Compliance Standards. The audit revealed no problems in the area and the RCSO was in compliance with all regulations concerning juveniles. U.S Department of Justice, United States Marshal’s Services In October 2015, the United States Department of Justice, the United States Marshal’s Service, entered into the RCJC to conduct a site visit to ensure the agency was in keeping with the standards of the federal government in holding Federal Inmates/Residents. The inspection revealed the agency was in compliance with the federal government standards in holding Federal Inmates/Residents.

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