Shelf Life - Masterton Library

Shelf Life - Masterton Library

Shelf Life Issue 27, Here-turi-kōkā August 2017 Shelf Life Masterton District Library CONTENTS Cover art - Houses...

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Shelf Life

Issue 27, Here-turi-kōkā August 2017

Shelf Life

Masterton District Library

CONTENTS

Cover art - Houses............................................ 2 Are we losing the art of reading?..................... 3 Getting to know your library staff..................... 4 Art treasures in the basement....................... 5 Art we walk past........................................... 6

Cover art Houses makings from my student days Rach Raphael 

English to Māori crossword............................ 8

Made as a series of precious objects to be cradled in the hand

Make your own playdough & non-toxic paint... 8



Meet Libby...................................................... 9 Reasons why art is good for kids &the world... 10

these miniature houses evoke a series of thoughts that almost touchdown within my mind

From the archives - William Newland............ 12



The Last Post at Tinui.................................. 13

fragility - life - fear - opening doors - courage - the sacred - new beginnings - and how we form the life we live

Great art books for tamariki........................ 14 Crossword answers ...................................... 15 What’s on at the library this month.............. 16 Contact us: Masterton District Library 54 Queen Street Masterton PO Box 444, Masterton 5810 P: (06) 370 6253 F: (06) 377 1195 [email protected] www.library.mstn.govt.nz

Follow us: Facebook: Masterton District Library Twitter: @mstnlib Instagram: mstnlib

Compiled by Helena Nimmo, Masterton District Library [email protected]

Like us on Facebook for the latest Library news, events, and some random fun stuff. Page 2 | Here-turi-kōkā August 2017

 As I take the time to revisit and cradle them nine years after their making, their physicality reconnects me with a sense of my younger self, and of the homes she has created and inhabited in the years since then.

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From your library... are we losing the art of reading? “Reading well is one of the great pleasures that solitude can afford you” – Harold Bloom Andy Miller wrote in The Guardian of the traditional pleasures of reading being more complex than just enjoyment. They involve patience, solitude and contemplation. Therefore the books that are most at risk from our attention and integrity deficits are those that require a bit of effort.” In a brilliant essay in New Zealand’s Metro, the writer Eleanor Catton, winner of 2013 Man Booker prize for The Luminaries – a remarkable and groundbreaking novel defines the incompatibility of art and the shopping cart. Reading at Lamp Light by Delphin Enjolras (1857 –1945).

“Consumerism,” she writes, “requiring its products to be both endlessly desirable and endlessly disposable, cannot make sense of art, which is neither.”

Reading Orpheu 2 ‘We all know how to read, do we know how to read artfully?’ is a question raised in the Art of Reading Course by Professor Timothy (1954) - José Almada Spurgin. He talks about reading to revel in the literary experience. Negreiros (18931970) (detail). For most of us reading is the escape we need from the busy lives we lead and we do not always have the opportunity Detail of The Garden to read with patience, solitude and contemplation. Do we get the most out of the time we invest in of Earthly Delights (1515) by Hieronymus reading? It has been suggested that many of us could become more skillful at reading, retention and Bosch (1450-1516) understanding.

Children reading (1916) by Pekka Halonen (1865 - 1933).

I used to feel that having chosen a book and invested time in reading some of it I should read the whole book. I now stop reading a Girl Reading at a Table (1934) by book when it no longer serves a purpose for me. There are so many books out there and I Pablos Picasso (1881 – 1973). only have so much time. Whether that means that I am reading artfully or not I am not certain but I certainly enjoy the solitude and contemplation of reading and revel in the literary experience no matter what it is I am reading. – Sandy Green, Library Manager

Here-turi-kōkā August 2017 | Page 3

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Masterton District Library

Getting to know your library staff... Helena Nimmo Where were you born? Timaru, but I grew up in Ōtautahi (Christchurch). What was your favourite book from childhood? The BFG by Roald Dahl. Not my favourite, but possibly the most memorable for its impact was Under The Mountain by Maurice Gee. What is your position at Masterton Library? Team librarian and new editor of this here magazine you’re holding in your hand. Have you had any previous, non-librarian, jobs? Dishwasher, “tea lady”, administrator, website stuff... What are you reading at the moment? The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver. I enjoy books set in Latin America, maybe because it’s the home of the magic realism genre – fiction “characterized by the matter-of-fact inclusion of fantastic or mythical elements into seemingly realistic fiction”*. Magic realism authors include Gabriele Garcia Marquez (100 Years of Solitude), Laura Esquivel (Like Water for Chocolate), Kurt Vonnegut (Slaughterhouse Five), Angela Carter (Black Venus) and Toni Morrison (Beloved). One of my all-time favourite series of books is Louis de Berniers’ Latin American trilogy that begins with The War of Don Emmanual’s Nether Parts. Name a book you haven’t read but know you should: Michael King’s History of New Zealand. If you had one magazine subscription it would be for... Well I was going to say Mana but I’ve just found out that it’s not being published anymore! If you were stranded on a desert island, what one book would you want with you? The Anatomy of Melancholy by Robert Burton. Printed in 1621 it has been described as one of the most unusual and messiest books in the English language. It is a huge and [apparently] entertaining book about what we would now call depression. Samuel Johnson said it was the only book “that ever took him out of bed two hours sooner than he wished to rise”. It could also double as a pillow and would probably keep a fire burning for a night. * https://www.britannica.com/art/magic-realism Page 4 | Here-turi-kōkā August 2017

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Art treasure in the library basement

We have a special collection of art books that is located in the basement beneath your feet when you are in the library. There is an interesting history attached to this collection. When the Wairarapa Polytechnic was established in Masterton one of their star courses related to the Fine Arts. They had a good collection of books and over the years, when the Masterton District Library had a contract to operate the Polytech Library, many of the specialised art books that were no longer required in our collection, made their way to the, by then, quite extensive Polytech collection. This arrangement continued when the Wairarapa Polytech was taken over by UCOL and we continued to operate their library until they changed the way that library services were provided a few years back. It had always been agreed and understood that if the Polytech Library was ever disestablished that those items had been provided and maintained by this community, and that they should remain here in Masterton. That is exactly what happened. Here in Queen Street we sadly do not have the space to have these books on the main floor, but they are accessible on request to borrowers who would like to browse them and they are available to browse on our online catalogue 24 hours a day! The items are listed as belonging to the Art Stack collection and at the time of writing there are 967 of them. Some items are duplicated and are suitable for small class sets or groups wishing to work together. All of the books are available for loan. Ask a staff member to show you how to exclusively browse the items online. A wide range of subjects are covered including art history, art movements and periods, specific artists, techniques across a wide range of materials and genres, fibre arts, film, photography and more. If we believe an item can be said to relate to the wider definition of ‘art’ in any way, then it has a place here. We would very much like to see this collection get wider use. Do please ask Library staff if you would like to further information or a chance to visit the basement and see the books ‘in person’ . – Customer Services Librarian Christine Hawker Here-turi-kōkā August 2017 | Page 5

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Art we walk past

Masterton War Memorial Stadium and Pools plaque by Esther Belliss (1926-2002) The plaque was designed by Tinui artist Esther Belliss in the 1960s. At some point Belliss moved to Australia where she became a recognised sculptor whose particular emphasis was on sculptures of horses (she was also a keen equestrian). She left a bequest to her local regional arts centre for the provision of an prize for children from the community, which has been awarded annually since 2008. Above left: the plaque today, located just south of the recreation centre on Dixon Street as you look towards New World. Above right: the plaque in the 1960s. Photograph by Tony Teal. Wairarapa Archives. Right: Esther Belliss. Photograph by John Hodges.

Page 6 | Here-turi-kōkā August 2017



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Lest We Forget by E Mervyn Taylor, War Memorial Stadium Hall of Memories, Dixon St Commissioned by the Masterton Council Lest We Forget (above left) was designed between 1960 and 1961 by E Mervyn Taylor in the years before his death. Another mural by the artist, Early Setters (above right), is obscured by a wall in the building that was the old post office on the corner of Queen Street and Lincoln Road. E Mervyn Taylor (1906-64) is now recognised as one of New Zealand’s most significant Pākehā artists. He is best remembered for his wood engravings, many of which appeared in the iconic School Journals of the 1940s, and for which he is internationally recognised. He also produced linocuts, watercolours and murals and believed that art should be accessible to everyday New Zealanders.

Garden of Delights by Paul Dibble on corner of Queen and Smith Streets Commissioned by Moore Wilson’s, this is a part of a series of "seated figures" dating back to 1998. Next time you’re going past it’s worth stopping to have a proper look. She’s exquisite. Here-turi-kōkā August 2017 | Page 7

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Masterton District Library

English to Māori crossword Whakapae | Across 1. house (5) 3. green (8) 6. blue (9) 7. carving (8) 8. brown (6) 10. yellow (8) 12. colour (3) 13. orange (6)

Whakararo | Down 1. purple (11) 2. weaving (7) 4. film (7) 5. art (3) 8. picture (7) 9. black 6) 10. spiral (4) 11. eye (5) Answers on page 15.

Make your own non-toxic edible paint $ Mix together 4 tablespoons each of cornflour and boiling water. The mixture will thicken quickly to a paste. Make your own playdough$ For 1 batch of coloured playdough $ $ $ $ $

3 cups plain flour 2 tbsp cornflour 1 cup salt 1 cup cold water with 2 tsp liquid natural foodcolouring 2 tsp vegetable oil

Put all the ingredients in a large bowl and combine with a spoon. When it forms a dough, tip it out onto board and knead it with your hands until it takes on the look and consistency of playdough. Store in an airtight bag for up to a week. Page 8 | Here-turi-kōkā August 2017

Gradually whisk in enough boiling water to achieve a consistency similar to double cream. Divide between shallow bowls and add a few drops of liquid natural food colouring to each to make a bright colour. Allow to cool. Put a large wipe-clean mat on the floor or on a table that you can sit at with your baby on your knew and take a large sheet of paper to the mat. Put an old vest on your baby, or take his top off, put the bowls down down together or one at a time, and let him make splashy art with this hands. $from Baby Play for Every Day, published by Dorling Kindersley

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Did you know the library has thousands of ebooks and audiobooks? Libby is a new app that makes it easy to borrow ebooks, instantly, anywhere, for free, using any device. Art e-books on ePukapuka Art Before Breakfast For aspiring artists who want to draw and paint but just can’t seem to find time in the day, Danny Gregory offers 5 to 10–minute exercises for every skill level that fit into any schedule. Art - beginners guide In a whirlwind tour spanning from prehistory up to the present day and beyond, Laurie Schneider Adams explores how art, and our views on it, have evolved.

Creative Block by Danielle Krysa A blockbuster of a book chockfull of solutions for overcoming all manner of artistic impediments. The Art of Urban Sketching A comprehensive guide and showcase of location drawings by artists around the world who draw the cities where they live and travel.

Love, by Wellington artist Mica Still*. © Mica Still. * http://www.micastill.com/ Here-turi-kōkā August 2017 | Page 9

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Ten Reasons Why Art is Good for Kids & the World Text by American artist and coordinator of the 2008 Guiness World Record for the World’s Largest Pavement Art, Mark Lewis Wagner*. Images by Scottish artist David Shrigley** 1) Art Generates a Love of Learning & Creativity Art develops a willingness to explore what has not existed before. Art teaches risk taking, learning from one’s mistakes, and being open to other possibilities. Kids who are creative are curious and passionate about knowing more. 2) Art Develops the Whole Brain Art strengthens focus and increases attention, develops hand-eye coordination, requires practice and strategic thinking, and involves interacting with the material world through different tools and art mediums. 3) Art Prepares Kids for the Future Creative, open-minded people are highly desired in all career paths. Art and creative education increases the future quality of the local and global community. Being creative is a lifelong skill and can be used in everyday situations. 4) Art Teaches Problem Solving Making art teaches that there is more than one solution to the same problem. Art challenges our beliefs and encourages open-ended thinking that creates an environment of questions rather than answers. * http://www.marklewiswagner.com/ ** http://davidshrigley.com/ Page 10 | Here-turi-kōkā August 2017

5) Art Supports Emotional Intelligence

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Art supports the expression of complex feelings that help kids feel better about themselves and helps them understand others by “seeing” what they have expressed and created. Art supports personal meaning in life, discovering joy in one’s own self, often being surprised, and then eliciting it in others. 6) Art Builds Community Art reaches across racial stereotypes, religious barriers, and socioeconomical levels and prejudices. Seeing other culture’s creative expression allows everyone to be more connected and less isolated “see how we are all related.” Art creates a sense of belonging. 7) Art Improves Holistic Health Art builds self-esteem, increases motivation and student attendance, improves grades and communications, nurtures teamwork, and strengthens our relationship to the environment. 8) Art is Big Business At the core of the multi-billion dollar film and video game industry are artists creating images and stories. Every commercial product is artistically designed, from chairs to cars, space stations to iPods. And a Picasso painting just sold for 106 million dollars. 9) Art Awakens the Senses Art opens the heart and mind to possibilities and fuels the imagination. Art is a process of learning to create ourselves and experience the world in new ways. Art supports the bigger picture view of life: beauty, symbols, spirituality, storytelling. It also helps us step out of time allowing one to be present in the moment. Art keeps the magic alive. 10) Art is Eternal Creativity and self-expression has always been essential to our humanity. Our earliest creative expressions were recorded in petroglyphs, cave paintings, and ancient sculptures. One of the first things kids do is draw, paint, and use their imaginations to play.

Here-turi-kōkā August 2017 | Page 11

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From the archive - William Newland Wairarapa has long a proud history of potters. In recent years ceramic artists Jim Grieg, Paul Melser, Janet Green, Sam Ludden and Kirsty Gardiner have all been well-known for their works. But perhaps the best-known of all internationally was the Masterton-born William Newland, famed as a leading exponent of Picassoinfluenced tin-glaze ceramics in England in the 1950s and 1960s. Newlands was born in Masterton, the son of a sheep drover and grandson of a glue maker who gave his name to the Wellington suburb Newlands. He left school by the age of 13 and became a drover then shared a butchery in Lansdowne with his brother Tom, while also taking night classes in art. He served overseas in World War II and spent three years as a prisoner of war in Italy and Germany, where he again studied painting. After the war he attended the Chelsea School of Art, intending to return to New Zealand to become an art teacher, but during teacher training he discovered clay and turned his attention to ceramics. Newland was interested in Mediterranean culture and in Pablo Picasso’s experiments in ceramics. He and his wife Margaret Hine produced works that were popular commercial pieces for restaurants, often with religious or mythological themes. He was a passionate advocate for the role art played in children’s education, Margeret Hine and William Newlands in 1952. saying he thought clay played an important part in developing “tactile knowing”. Newland’s style became unfashionable in the 1970s and a lot of his commercial work has been lost, but interest in this genre has increased again in recent years. Margaret Newland died in 1987 and William in 1998. Their two children are both artists – Sally a painter and Jeremy a potter. – Gareth Winter, Wairarapa Archive Bull by William Newland. Page 12 | Here-turi-kōkā August 2017

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The Last Post Artwork reflecting on the Gallipoli story and the first ANZAC service at Tinui in 1916 is currently on display in the children’s area at the library. The works, done in collaboration with writer and illustrator Michelle O’Connell, are by students from Tinui, Douglas Park, Fernridge and Lakeview schools.

Here-turi-kōkā August 2017 | Page 13

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Masterton District Library

Great art books for tamariki The Art Book for Children From Raphael to Richter, a fun and informative guide to 30 great artists and their most famous works, designed for both parent and child to enjoy together. 701.1 REN The New Zealand Art Activity Book Activities which encourage children to see, think and draw like an artist, designed by leading New Zealand contemporary artists. PAR 793.01 LLO

Let’s Get Art Follow four children as they look at different artworks in a gallery and try to work out what contemporary art is and what it means. A great introduction for children and adults alike. 709.93 IRW

Page 14 | Here-turi-kōkā August 2017

Art Workshops for Children A guide to eleven children’s art workshops by one of the world’s most innovative facilitators and best-selling bookmakers. 372.52

Māori Art for Kids This collection of 15 projects offers children aged 7 and over a range of unique Māori art experiences. 745.5 NOA Get Into Art Animals Accomplished artists, along with some of their famous pieces and techniques are presented, then followed up with an art project reminiscent of each artist's work or genre. Perfect for active young artists of all abilities. 704.943 BRO

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Answers | Whakautu

Be part of building the great marble race An after school activity When? 3.30pm - 4.30pm Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays Term 3 attend any or all days. Where? The old Magie B’s building, 9 Church Street Masterton What do I Bring? a signed permission slip from your caregiver. What will I do? Have fun Be Creative Solve problems, Be part of a team, have an opportunity to work with others and learn new skills.

Across | Whakapae 1. whare 3. kakariki 6. kikorangi 7. whakairo 8. parauri 10. kowhai 12. tae 13. karaka

Down | Whakararo 1. waiporoporo 2. raranga 4. kiriata 5. toi 8. pikitia 9. pango 10. koru 11. whatu

Get your registration Form online www.library.mstn.govt.nz or from the Masterton District Library. Here-turi-kōkā August 2017 | Page 15

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Masterton District Library

What’s on in the library this month... MakerCrate Drop-in Sessions Monday, Tuesday and Friday afternoons 3-5pm during term time. Come along and get hands on with our Maker technology! Learn 3D design, 3D printing and how to create laser cut works. Stepping Up: Microsoft Word (registration required) Monday 14 August 9:30am at the Wairarapa Archive. Apart from the Microsoft Word essentials, learn how to create professional business letters, design and make your own letterhead, reports, flyers and posters. Device Advice Every Monday at 11am. Sit with each other and our staff experts and get the tutoring you need to get the most out of your device!

Seniors Celebrate - Spotlight On Tuesday 22 August, 2pm. Stepping Up: Internet Safety & Security (registration required) Monday 28 August 9:30am at the Wairarapa Archive. Looks at internet safety and security. Anti virus, spam and malware issues. Free security software, Netsafe websites. Steps for keeping children safe online. BookEnds Book Club Monday 28 August, 1pm. Members choose their own titles to discuss on the fourth Monday of each month. “Last Thursday” Book Club Thursday 31 August 7pm. Members read the same book and meet to discuss it and exchange views.

Lego Group (registration required) Monday 14 August 3.30pm. What can you build with Lego? Come show us at the Masterton Library Lego Group! Story-Go-Round Pre-School Programme Every Wednesday during term time, 10.30 11.30am. Fun with stories, singing and crafts. Puanga Kohanga Te Reo Pre-School Programme Every Thursday during term time 10.30 - 11.30am This programme is delivered in te reo Māori but is open to all. Sit, Knit and Yarn (knitting & craft group) Every Friday 10.00am - 12.00pm Stepping Up: Introduction to Spreadsheets (registration required) Monday 21 August 9:30am at the Wairarapa Archive. Learn how to use Microsoft Excel to create a simple spreadsheet. Page 16 | Here-turi-kōkā August 2017

Street art in Segovia, Spain, 2010. Photograph by Joy Monteath.