STEPhEN LUBy

STEPhEN LUBy

Stephen Luby is Professor of Medicine with the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine; Deputy Director for Research at the Center for...

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Stephen Luby is Professor of Medicine with the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine; Deputy Director for Research at the Center for Global Health Innovation; Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. Prior to his current appointment, Dr. Luby served for eight years at the International Center for Diarrheal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), where he directed the Centre for Communicable Diseases. Dr. Luby was seconded from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and was the Country Director for CDC in Bangladesh. Dr. Luby studied philosophy and earned a Bachelor of Arts summa cum laude from Creighton University in 1981. Dr. Luby earned his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas in 1986 and completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Rochester-Strong Memorial Hospital. He studied epidemiology and public health in the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) and the Preventive Medicine Residency of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Stephen Luby Professor Stanford University USA

Dr. Luby’s career has included an EIS assignment to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control 1990-91; work with the CDC Malaria Branch in 1992; from 1993-98 Dr. Luby directed the Epidemiology Unit of the Community Health Sciences Department at the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan; and from 1998-2004 worked as a Medical Epidemiologist in the Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases Branch of the CDC in Atlanta exploring causes and prevention of diarrheal disease in settings where diarrhea is a leading cause of childhood death. Dr. Luby’s research has addressed a number of public health issues. During his time in Bangladesh he lead a research group that explored the epidemiology of Nipah virus including detailed studies of villager’s perspective on and response to the outbreaks and studies of virus circulation in its bat reservoir and spillover into domestic animals and humans. He has published over 200 scientific manuscripts.