Strong union, caring schools: a place for everyone

Strong union, caring schools: a place for everyone

Members’ Guide to the BC Teachers’ Federation The Guide consists of five parts: PART 1 BCTF Priorities, Services, and Organization PART 2 The const...

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Members’ Guide to the BC Teachers’ Federation The Guide consists of five parts: PART 1

BCTF Priorities, Services, and Organization

PART 2

The constitution and by-laws of the organization.

PART 3

A compilation of the BCTF’s policies and procedures, in the form of motions passed from 1953 to June 2017 by the Annual General Meeting and by meetings of the Representative Assembly, the Executive Committee and the former (until 1965) Consultative Committee.

PART 4

Information about the Federation, covering such topics as the teachers’ pension plan and BCTF history.

PART 5

BCTF Simplified Rules of Order and RA and AGM Rules of Order.

2017–18

Goals of the BCTF 1.

To help ensure that public schools provide for the continued intellectual, physical, social, and emotional growth and development of each individual.

2.

To promote the establishment and continued development in every school of sound learning and teaching conditions, including the provision of adequate support services.

3.

To work toward the integration of social and educational services that contribute to the welfare and development of students.

4.

To encourage full public participation in determining the overall objectives of education at the provincial, district, and school level.

5.

To create public awareness of problems in society that hinder student growth and development and to stimulate the search for solutions.

6.

To strive to eliminate from the school system discrimination on the basis of sex, race, religion, age, handicaps, economic status, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, number of dependents, or pregnancy.

7.

To promote professional growth of teachers through the continuous development of preservice, internship, and in-service education.

8.

To establish a code of ethics and professional conduct, criteria of qualification, and criteria and procedures for the assessment of professional competence, and to ensure that teachers are effectively subject to the judgment of their peers in these matters, with guarantee of due process.

9.

To ensure, through the development of democratic processes, professional autonomy for teachers and protection from capricious or malicious action, unjust regulations, and the abuse of authority.

10.

To maintain for teachers a level of status and economic standing appropriate to the responsibility of the profession.

11.

To work co-operatively with other groups and agencies to transform the public schools to make them more relevant and effective in preparing students for their futures.

12.

To promote a working and learning environment in the public schools of British Columbia that is free from violence.

13.

To support the right of all students, regardless of age, to free basic education as defined by the current K–12 programs.

14.

To promote the well-being of members through working conditions that nurture ongoing health and vitality.

Policy 11.01

PART 3 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Table of Contents Section

Page

1.

Aboriginal Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

2.

Annual General Meeting. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

3.

Bargaining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

4.

Boards of School Trustees, School Districts, and BC School Trustees Association. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

36

5.

CLC/BC Federation of Labour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

6.

Canadian Teachers’ Federation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

39

7.

Certification and Teachers’ Council. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

8.

Education Finance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

9.

Education Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

10.

Finance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

11.

Goals of the BCTF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

12.

Health and Welfare of Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

13.

Health, Welfare, and Safety of Teachers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

14.

Independent Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

15.

Induction Ceremonies, Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

16.

International Solidarity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

17.

Labour Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

18.

Leaves of Absence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

19.

Legal Services/Contract Enforcement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

20.

Membership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

21.

Ministry of Children and Family Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

22.

Ministry of Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

25.

Organization of the BCTF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

26.

Pensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

27.

Political Action. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

28.

Post-Secondary Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121

29.

Privatization and Commercialization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121

30.

Professional Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

31.

Professional Ethics, Rights, and Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

32.

Professional Relations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

33.

Provincial Specialist Associations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132

34.

Public Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

i

Section

Page

35.

Public Relations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

36.

Publications of the BCTF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

37.

Research. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

38.

Retired Teachers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

39.

School Buildings, Grounds, and Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

40.

Sexual Harassment/Harassment—General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

41.

Social Justice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

42.

Social Responsibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

44.

Strike/Lockouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

45.

Supervision and Reporting on Members. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152

46.

Teacher Competence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153

47.

Teacher Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153

48.

Teacher Exchange. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155

49.

Teachers Teaching on Call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156

50.

Teacher Tenure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157

51.

Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158

52.

Unemployed/Underemployed Teachers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160

53.

Violence Prevention. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160

ii

PART 1 BCTF Priorities, Services, and Organization Priority for 2017–18 (as set by the 2017 Annual General Meeting) That the following be the 2017–18 Leadership Priority: The universal right to education is affirmed in international law and is a value held passionately by teachers worldwide. For that right to be upheld in children’s lives, they must have access to fully funded quality public schools which are the heart of every community. Strong and caring relationships between teachers and students are essential for learning, and for fostering an engaged citizenry in a socially just democracy. 1. To help create the conditions for those relationships to thrive, the Federation will engage and support members in: a. furthering equity and inclusion within our union, schools, and communities. b. developing and fostering a deeper understanding of Aboriginal ways of knowing, history, and culture. c. achieving significantly increased funding for public education. d. securing appropriate resources and time to implement changes in curriculum, assessment, reporting, and teacher mentoring. e. ensuring that the restored collective agreement language is respected and fully funded. 2. Preparing for the 2019 round of bargaining by identifying improvements in our collective agreement. (17 AGM, p. 7)

Priorité pour 2017–18 (adoptées à l’Assemblée générale annuelle de 2017) Que la priorité de leadership 2017-18 soit telle qu’énoncée ci-après: Le droit universel à l'éducation est affirmé dans le droit international et il est une valeur soutenue avec passion par les enseignants du monde entier. Pour maintenir ce droit dans la vie des enfants, ils doivent avoir accès à des écoles publiques de qualité financées de manière adéquate, qui sont le cœur de chaque communauté. Des relations solides et bienveillantes entre enseignants et élèves sont essentielles pour l'apprentissage et pour favoriser une citoyenneté engagée dans une démocratie socialement juste. 1. Pour aider à créer les conditions pour que ces relations prospèrent, la Fédération va impliquer et soutenir les membres pour: a. Favoriser l'équité et l'inclusion au sein de notre syndicat, de nos écoles et de nos communautés. b. Développer et favoriser une compréhension plus approfondie des modes d’apprentissage, de l’histoire et de la culture autochtones. c. Obtenir un financement considérablement accru pour l'éducation publique. d. Assurer les ressources appropriées et le temps nécessaire pour mettre en œuvre des changements dans le curriculum, l'évaluation, les systèmes de bulletins et le mentorat des enseignants. e. Veiller à ce que le langage restauré de la convention collective soit respecté et entièrement financé. 2. Préparer la ronde de négociations de 2019 en identifiant les améliorations à apporter à notre convention collective.

Objectifs de la FECB 1. Par son concours assurer dans les écoles publiques un milieu suscitant chez tous une croissance continue sur les plans intellectuels, physiques, sociaux et affectifs et favorisant le développement de chaque élève. 2. Encourager l’implantation et le perfectionnement continu dans chaque école de conditions propices d’apprentissage et d’enseignement, y compris la mise en place de services de soutien adéquats. 3. Travailler à l’intégration des services socio-éducatifs qui contribuent au bien-être et au développement des enfants. 4. Encourager une massive participation générale lors de la détermination des objectifs généraux d’enseignement aux divers paliers : province, conseil scolaire et école. 5. Sensibiliser le public aux problèmes sociaux qui constituent un handicap à la croissance et au développement des élèves et stimuler la recherche de solutions. 6. S’efforcer d’éliminer du système scolaire les formes de discrimination fondées sur le sexe, la race, la religion, l’âge, les handicaps, le statut économique, l’état civil, l’orientation sexuelle, le nombre de personnes à charge ou la grossesse. 7. Encourager la croissance professionnelle des enseignants par le perfectionnement continu de la formation préalable, de l’internat d’enseignement et de la formation en poste. 8. Établir un code de déontologie, ainsi que des critères en matière de qualification professionnelle et des critères et méthodes permettant d’évaluer la compétence professionnelle et veiller à ce que les enseignants soient soumis au jugement de leurs collègues dans ces questions et puissent disposer de recours. 9. Garantir par l’institution de procédés démocratiques l’autonomie professionnelle des enseignants et leur protection contre toute action arbitraire ou malveillante, contre des règlements injustifiés ou l’abus d’autorité. 10. Maintenir pour les enseignants un niveau et un statut économiques conformes à la responsabilité de leur profession. 11. S’efforcer, en collaboration avec d’autres groupes et agences, de transformer les écoles publiques pour leur donner une pertinence accrue et les rendre plus efficaces dans la préparation des élèves pour l’avenir. 12. Encourager, au sein des écoles publiques de la ColombieBritannique, la formation d’un environnement de travail et d’apprentissage à l’abri de toute violence. 13. Garantir à l’ensemble des élèves, indépendamment de leur âge, le droit au libre accès à une formation de base, suivant la définition donnée par les programmes courants, de la maternelle jusqu’à la douzième année. (see Policy 11.01 for English)

Code de déontologie Le code de déontologie formule, pour tous les membres de la Fédération des enseignant(e)s de la C.-B. (FECB), des règles générales destinées à maintenir des normes élevées en matière de conduite professionnelle et de service envers les élèves, les collègues et le syndicat. Les membres sont priés de communiquer avec les responsables syndicaux locaux ou avec le personnel de la FECB approprié pour obtenir des conseils sur la manière de procéder avec des questions liées au code de déontologie de la FECB. 1. Les membres s’adressent aux élèves et se comportent avec eux avec respect et dignité. Ils traitent avec eux de manière judicieuse, en prenant toujours en considération leurs droits et en ménageant leurs sentiments. 2. Les membres respectent le caractère confidentiel de l’information concernant les élèves et ne peuvent divulguer de renseignements qu’à des personnes ou à des agences autorisées qui s’occupent directement du bien-être de ces derniers. Les membres respectent les dispositions juridiques pour signaler des situations concernant la protection de l’enfance. 3. Une relation privilégiée existe entre les membres et les élèves. Les membres se gardent d’en tirer profit à des fins matérielles, idéologiques ou autres.

1

4. Les membres s’engagent à réexaminer volontiers avec leurs collègues, les élèves et leurs parents/tuteurs ou tutrices, la qualité des services fournis et les pratiques employées dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions. 5. Les membres s’engagent à mentionner toute critique concernant la performance pédagogique et le travail qui y est associé d’un ou d’une collègue à cette personne en privé. Si le membre croit que la question n’a pas été réglée, il peut, après avoir informé par écrit en privé son collègue de son intention de le faire, adresser ses critiques confidentiellement aux personnes compétentes qui peuvent lui donner des conseils et de l’aide. * Il ne sera pas considéré comme une infraction au code de déontologie pour un membre de respecter les dispositions juridiques ou les exigences officielles du protocole lorsqu’il/elle signale des situations concernant la protection de l’enfance. 6. Les membres reconnaissent l’autorité et les responsabilités de la FECB et de ses syndicats locaux et s’acquittent des devoirs qui leur incombent en tant que membres du syndicat.

2

7. Les membres obéissent aux dispositions de la convention collective. 8. Les membres agissent de manière à ne pas porter détriment aux moyens de pression au travail ou à toute autre stratégie de leur syndicat. 9. Les membres s’engagent à ne pas poser leur candidature à un poste qui a été déclaré en litige par la Fédération, et à ne pas accepter un tel poste. 10 .Les membres, individuellement aussi bien qu’en tant qu’adhérent(e)s à un groupe professionnel, s’engagent à ne pas faire de démarches non autorisées auprès d’organismes extérieurs au nom de la Fédération ou de ses syndicats locaux. * Voir la procédure 31.B.12 du Guide des membres de la

3

Governance of the BCTF The BCTF is a democratically structured organization and the governance chart identifies the groups or bodies related to governance. Members—Members of the BCTF ultimately determine the decisions and directions of the BCTF in two very important ways: 1. Members through locals elect delegates to the BCTF Annual General Meeting. The AGM makes key decisions for the organization and elects the Executive Committee. 2. Members through locals elect Local Representatives which make up the Representative Assembly. The RA has key decision making responsibilities. Locals—Locals have the responsibility for acting on behalf of members regarding local matters. Members in locals elect their local president and executive which guide the affairs of the local. Annual General Meeting—The Annual General Meeting is comprised of delegates and Local Representatives elected by members through locals, and the 11 members of the Executive Committee. There are approximately 670 voting delegates at an Annual General Meeting. The AGM elects the Executive Committee, determines the fee, approves any changes to the by-laws, establishes priorities for the next year and makes the significant policy decisions of the Federation.

and spell out what each level of decision making is authorized to do. The by-laws of the BCTF have to be followed by all bodies of the organization, including the AGM. Only the AGM can amend the bylaws, and only then with a 75% majority of delegates voting in favour. The by-laws are found in Part 2 of this guide and spell out in more detail the role of each of the decision making bodies. Representative Assembly—The Representative Assembly meets three times a year and has the specific responsibilities of approving a budget and electing the Judicial Council and Committee of Ombudspersons. The RA also makes policy and procedure decisions for the Federation. Executive Committee—The Executive Committee of the BCTF is elected by the AGM and consists of 11 members. Three of them serve in a full-time capacity: the President, First Vice-President ,and Second Vice-President. The Executive Committee has overall responsibility for the running of the Federation. It meets monthly with additional meetings as necessary. The Executive Committee is the employer of BCTF staff and determines what work will be done in any given year. The Executive Committee also has responsibility for the creation and appointment of any advisory committees or task forces. President—The President of the Federation has responsibility for overall supervision of the affairs of the organization in between meetings of the Executive Committee.

Constitution and by-laws—The constitution and by-laws establish the rules by which the organization is run. The by-laws establish the division of responsibilities among the major decision making bodies

Executive Committee 2017–18 President Glen Hansman O: 604-871-2153 [email protected] First Vice-President Teri Mooring O: 604-871-2159 [email protected]

C: 604-340-1923

Rae Figursky S: 604-296-6865 [email protected]

4

C: 250-808-9343

Shawn Gough O: 250-949-8888 [email protected]

C: 250-902-9500

C: 604-910-7779

Second Vice-President Clint Johnston O: 604-871-2152 C: 604-340-3317 [email protected] Members-at-Large Rory Brown O: 604-873-5570 [email protected]

Carole Gordon S: 250-870-5114 [email protected]

Carolyn Pena O: 604-988-3224 [email protected] Jody Polukoshko S: 604-713-4978 C: 604-992-0911 [email protected]

C: 604-831-2299

Robin Tosczak S: 250-479-4014 [email protected]

C: 250-686-6537

C: 604-240-0314

Kip Wood S: 250-753-8211 [email protected]

C: 250-618-1348

Staff organization The Federation employs about 140 people to develop and deliver the programs and services that are determined by the decision-making bodies of the organization. There are three groups of staff: administrative, support, and excluded. Administrative staff are primarily former teachers who were active in the organization and hired to carry out major program development and service. Support staff comprise the largest component of staff and perform a wide range of tasks including support to administrative staff and officers and technical and logistical support to a number of programs and initiatives. These two groups of staff are organized into two separate unions; the administrative staff which are affiliated to Unifor Local 464 and the support staff which are members of the Teachers’ Federation Employees’ Union. There are five excluded staff who undertake management oversight and human resources functions.

The staff are organized into six divisions and a legal department that are shown on the staff organization chart. Each division has a Director and a specific set of responsibilities with regard to programs and services that are carried out through the division. The staff listing by division identifies some of the major responsibilities in each division. The Executive Director by virtue of the by-laws has overall responsibility for the conduct and organization of staff and for the overall assignment of work. The Executive Director is responsible directly to the Executive Committee and on a day-to-day basis consults with the president.

5

BCTF Staff/ Membres du personnel de la FECB Executive Director/Directrice générale Moira Mackenzie; [email protected]

O: 604-871-2156 C: 778-836-2283

Executive Office Director/Directrice du secrétariat de l’exécutif Yancy Ochoa; [email protected]

O: 604-871-2154

Director of Human Resources/Directrice des Ressources humaines Julie Wenji; [email protected]

O: 604-871-2203

General Counsel/Avocat général Diane MacDonald; [email protected]

O: 604-871-1815

Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer/Trésorier et directeur des services financiers Delwin Yung; [email protected]

O: 604-871-2271

Administrative Staff Contacts/Personnel cadre Responsibilities

Phone Numbers (604 Area Code)

Director

O: 871-1872; C: 340-1992

Teacher Magazine Editor/Internal Communications Outreach/Parents/Political Action Media Relations Officer

O: 871-1877; C: 754-1629 O: 871-1883; C: 349-5038 O: 871-1881; C: 340-1959

Director Central Okanagan, Gold Trail, Kamloops Thompson, Nicola Valley, North Okanagan-Shuswap, Okanagan Skaha, Princeton, Revelstoke, SEPF, South Okanagan, Similkameen, Vernon Central Coast, Cowichan, Greater Victoria, Gulf Islands, Lake Cowichan, Saanich, Sooke Abbotsford, Bulkley Valley, Chilliwack, Haida Gwaii, Kitimat, Nisga’a, Prince Rupert, Stikine, Terrace Delta, Fraser-Cascade, Langley, Maple Ridge, Mission, New Westminster, Surrey Burnaby, Coquitlam, North Vancouver, Richmond, Vancouver Elementary, Vancouver Secondary, West Vancouver Collective Agreement Administration/Implementation/ Negotiation Support Burns Lake, Cariboo-Chilcotin, Fort Nelson, Nechako, Peace River North, Peace River South, Prince George, Quesnel, Sea to Sky Arrow Lakes, Boundary, Cranbrook, Creston Valley, Fernie, Golden, Kimberley, Kootenay Columbia, Nelson, Windermere

O: 871-1843; C: 340-2699 O: 871-1887; C: 340-2652

Communications and Campaigns Division Nancy Knickerbocker; [email protected] Susan Croll; [email protected] Jack MacDermot; [email protected] Rich Overgaard; [email protected] Field Service Division Kelly Shields; [email protected] Arabella Devlin; [email protected]

Susan Fonseca; [email protected] Starleigh Grass; [email protected] Chris Harris; [email protected] Patrick Henry; [email protected] Ritchie Kendrick; [email protected] Charley King; [email protected] Debbie Morran; [email protected]

Daniel Storms; [email protected]

O: 871-1819; C: 340-2245 O: 871-1839; C: 340-2833 O: 871-1833; C: 340-2191 O: 871-1840; C: 340-2172 O: 871-1838; C: 340-2321 O: 871-1812; C: 340-3023 O: 871-1836; C: 340-1985

Alberni, Campbell River, Comox, Mount Arrowsmith, Nanaimo, Powell River, Sunshine Coast, Vancouver Island North, Vancouver Island West

O: 871-1841; C: 340-2177

Director Pensions and Group Benefits WCB Advocacy/BCTF Advantage Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator Health and Wellness Health and Safety Officer

O: 871-1957; C: 340-3367 O: 871-1949; C: 340-2840 O: 871-1890 O: 871-1935 O: 871-1925 O: 871-1891

Income Security Division Michael Kimmis; [email protected] Victor Choy; [email protected] Diane Irvine; [email protected] Sarb Lalli; [email protected] Allan Lee; [email protected] Mike Wisla; [email protected]

6

Legal Services Department Gretchen Brown; [email protected] Kerri Fisher; [email protected] Stephanie Quelch; [email protected] Robyn Trask; [email protected]

Staff Lawyer Staff Lawyer Staff Lawyer Staff Lawyer

O: 871-1912 O: 871-1905 O: 871-1907 O: 871-1909

Director/Teachers Council/Deans of Education Internal Relations Co-ordinator/Peer Support Services French Programs and Services/New Teachers/BCTF on Campus/TQS Member Training/TTOC Curriculum and Education Policy/Ministry Liaison/ PSA Council Social Justice Co-ordinator Social Justice Co-ordinator Aboriginal Education PIAC/Program for Quality Teaching

O: 871-1800; C: 340-2323 O: 871-1803 O: 871-1809

Director

O: 871-2255; C: 340-3228

Professional and Social Issues Division Christine Stewart; [email protected] Michelle Davies; [email protected] Lucie Ferrari; [email protected] Jenny Garrels; [email protected] Janice Neden; [email protected] Todd Patrick; [email protected] Barb Ryeburn; [email protected] Gail Stromquist; [email protected] tba

O: 871-1871 O: 871-1845 O: 871-1850 O: 871-1821 O: 871-1854 O: 871-1849

Research and Technology Division Larry Kuehn; [email protected]

Department Fax Numbers/ Numéros de télécopieur par départements Accounting/Facilities/Purchasing/Treasurer

604-871-2293

Communications/Campaigns/Graphics

604-871-2289

Executive Offices

604-871-2290

Field Service

604-871-2291

Information Services/Information Technology/Research

604-871-2294

Health and Wellness

604-871-2296

Human Resources

604-871-2297

Income Security

604-871-2287

Legal Services

604-871-2288

Member Records

604-871-2285

Production

604-871-2292

Professional and Social Issues

604-871-2286

Retired Teachers

604-871-2265

Internet services BCTF website The BCTF website (www.bctf.ca), redesigned in 2014, provides members with a wealth of information about member services, professional and social justice issues, professional development events and programs, and classroom resources. The website includes the Federation’s publications, such as the Teacher Magazine, research reports, and the Social Justice Newsletter, Teaching to Diversity subsite, and specialized databases, such as the video resources database and the Global Classroom. The website features a slider and news items highlighting new content and issues, and a Twitter feed. MYBCTF member portal MyBCTF (www.bctf.ca/mybctf) is a secure web portal for BCTF members only. Within the portal members can register for BCTF events, update their personal contact information, access content targeted to members, including bargaining updates, and participate

in online discussion forums. Members login to the portal using their BCTF member ID and a password they create. The online member portal help guide (www.bctf.ca/portalhelp.aspx) provides sign-up instructions and FAQs. Members needing assistance can call the portal help line, 604-871-2119 or toll free 1-800-663-9163 (local 2119), or email [email protected] TeachBC The BCTF’s TeachBC website, teachbc.bctf.ca, enables BC teachers to submit and share resources relevant to the K–12 BC curriculum. Teachers also have the opportunity to access educational research in BC and share their own research. Social media The Federation is using social media―Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Pinterest―to communicate with members. Links are on www.bctf.ca. Our social media web page includes BCTF blogs, link to member discussion forums in the portal, and BCTF’s social media guidelines. See www.bctf.ca/SocialMedia.aspx.

7

Email lists BCTF email lists keep members and the Federation in touch with each other about a wide variety of issues and interests. Members may join or leave email lists from our mailing list page (www.bctf.ca/lists-public). Members, who have provided the BCTF with their email addresses, receive BCTF News and eblasts from the BCTF about important issues and events.

8

Website hosting services Locals and Provincial Specialist Associations may host their websites on the BCTF web server at no cost. Contact [email protected] to request an account and detailed procedures. For further information about the BCTF’s Internet Services, email [email protected]

2016–17 Local Fees and Release Time

Local

Members As of Sep 30, 2016 (excluding TTOCs) Actual

FTE

Release Time

Local Fees “Regular”

Abbotsford Alberni Arrow Lakes Boundary

1,140 233 36 87

1,035 219 33 81

$400 $515 $406 $450

Bulkley Valley Burnaby Burns Lake Campbell River

122 1,678

112 1,493

323

298

.64% .75% $500 $450

Cariboo-Chilcotin

315

289

$450

Central Coast Central Okanagan

26 1,315

23 1,246

Chilliwack

767

Comox

TTOC

Pres

Other Officers

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Vice-President – 100% PD chairperson – 12.5% none as needed

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

,as needed first and second Vice-President – 100% as needed

100.0

Vice-President and PD chairperson – 20%

$500 $460

.5% .4% .556% 2.75% daily rate .64% .56% 1% .6% of salary $2 per day Max $200 1.25% .60%

716

$530

1.6% daily

100.0

451

402

0.7%

.7%

100.0

Coquitlam

2,012

1.811

$560

.25% of daily salary

100.0

Cowichan Cranbrook

437 220

427 198

$485 0.8265%

.6% .83

100.0 100.0

Creston Valley Delta

93 1048

84 955

0.80% $430

100.0 100.0

Fernie

123

113

$500

Fort Nelson Fraser-Cascade Gold Trail Golden Gulf Islands Haida Gwaii Kamloops Thompson

45 103 85 56 122 46 854

44 97 85 49 106 41 782

$500 0.6% $400 $400 0.8% $536 $493

.80% .25% of actual salary Per diem 1/200 x annual fee $2/Day .6% .65% 0.80% .8% .59% $2.10 /day

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Kimberley

64

61

$400

.50%

100.0

as needed as needed as needed none as needed none First Vice-President – 100%, PD chairperson –30% as needed

Kitimat

66

62

1% of Salary

100.0

as needed

Kootenay Columbia

234

223

1% of Salary $500

.5%

100.0

as needed

32 1,273

27 1,138

$480 0.64%

.6% .64%

100.0 100.0

Maple Ridge

905

826

0.71%

Mission Mount Arrowsmith Nanaimo

360 265 796

326 247 733

0.875% 0.75% 0.88%

.875%

as needed First Vice-President – 100%, Second VicePresident as needed First Vice-President and bargaining chairperson – 100% as needed Vice-President – 50%, others as needed First Vice-President – 100%, Second VicePresident – 40%,2 Pro–D Co-chairs 20%

Nechako Nelson New Westminster Nicola Valley

184 198 438 117

182 183 379 111

0.0075% 0.8% 0.8% $400

.0075% .8% .25% 2% max $25 per month

Lake Cowichan Langley

.71% of salary

.76%

100.0 100.0

100.0

100.0 100.0 100.0 70.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

First Vice-President,50% Second VicePresident -60% ,PD chairperson – 50% and H&S Chair – 20% Vice-President –100%, PD chairperson – 20% Vice-President – 50%, PD chairperson up to 20% First Vice-President and grievance officer – 100%, second vice-president – 60%, PD chairperson – 40%, Vice-President – 50% Vice-President -0.139%; as needed as needed First Vice-President – 100%, PD chairperson – 10% as needed

as needed as needed

9

Local

Members As of Sep 30, 2016 (excluding TTOCs) Actual

Nisga’a North OkanaganShuswap North Vancouver

FTE

Release Time

Local Fees “Regular”

TTOC

Pres

Other Officers

38 375

38 340

$500 0.7%

0.36% 4%

100.0 100.0

as needed as needed

1,000

869

0.80%

.80%

100.0

Okanagan Skaha Peace River North Peace River South

347 358 202

326 337 188

0.73% 0.70% $500

100.0 100.0 100.0

Powell River Prince George

126 811

113 758

$500 $460

100.0 100.0

PD chairperson – 20% First Vice-President – 100%

Prince Rupert

160

152

0.80%

Princeton Quesnel

33 215

31 200

100.0 100.0

as needed as needed

Revelstoke Richmond Saanich

69 1261 463

62 1161 398

0.60% $585 + $50 Levy 0.88% $400 0.60%

.73% .60% $3/day worked .6% $2.30 per day 1.25% of wages .6% 1%

First Vice-President – 100%, Second VicePresident – 60%, PD Chair – 40% PD chairperson – 20%, others as needed Vice-President – 20% as needed

.88% .55% .60%

100.0 100.0 100.0

First and Second Vice-President – 100% as needed

Sea to Sky SEPF Sooke South OkanaganSimilkameen Stikine Sunshine Coast Surrey

303 430 605 145

264 385 533 135

.80% 550 .75% 0.7%

.45% $1 per day .47% .7%

100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

PD chairperson – 20% First Vice-President – 60%, Vice-President –40% as needed

18 221 4513

18 197 3969

$600 0.0065% 0.62%

60 .65% 0.62%

100.0 100.0 100.0

Terrace Vancouver Elementary Vancouver Island North Vancouver Island West Vancouver Secondary Vernon

221 1977

209 1789

$600 0.85%

$45/1 day .68

100.0 100.0

84

79

0.69%

.69%

100.0

none PD chairperson – 0.143%, First and Second Vice-President, two grievance officers, health and safety officer, professional issues officer – 100% as needed First, Second, and Third Vice-President – 100%, Adult Ed President – 33% as needed

35

31

$600

600 prorated

100.0

none

1242

1168

0.83%

100.0

First and Second Vice-President – 100%

520

476

$465

83% of salary .5%

100.0

Victoria

1170

1057

0.081%

.081%

100.0

West Vancouver

475

417

$576

Windermere

71

67

$400

PD chairperson – 20%, Bargaining chair 10% First Vice-President and Second VicePresident – 60%, PD chairperson – 0.286%, contact chair – 20% and Secretary Treasurer – 14.3% Vice-President – 40%, PD chairperson – 12.5%, as needed

10

.55% of gross 400 prorated

100.0

100.0 100.0

PART 2 Constitution and By-laws

BCTF Constitution Name The name of the society is the British Columbia Teachers' Federation.

Purposes The purposes of the Society are: 1. To foster and promote the cause of education in British Columbia. 2. To raise the status of the teaching profession in British Columbia. 3. To promote the welfare of the teachers of British Columbia. 4. To provide for the enlargement of the scope of the purposes of the Federation by permitting an alliance or affiliation to be made between the Federation and any other organization having purposes similar to the Federation. 5. To organize and administer a Salary Indemnity Fund among its members. 6. To organize and administer a Benevolent Fund among its members. 7. To organize and administer such other services and programs as the Annual General Meeting may from time to time order. 8. To finance and administer programs to encourage the employment of teachers in numbers consistent with staffing ratios developed by the profession. 9. To finance and administer programs to foster effective teaching and appropriate learning conditions as approved by the profession. 10. To regulate relations between employers and employees through collective bargaining in British Columbia. 11. To create and charter locals of the Federation. 12. To continue to develop and offer programs of professional development for teachers. 13. To safeguard teachers’ pensions and act as joint trust plan member partner with respect to teacher pension funds. 14. To continue to develop programs of social justice, and to provide international assistance to educational organizations. 15. To promote the attainment of the purposes of the Federation by participation in educational, social, co-operative, electoral, political, economic, bargaining or other activity authorized pursuant to the by-laws of the Federation.

1.1(b) Persons other than those referred to in by-law 1.1(a) may, on application, be granted active membership in the federation in accordance with policies established by the Representative Assembly and may be granted membership in such local as is determined appropriate by the Executive Committee. 1.1(c) Exclusions: Those positions that create a conflict of interest such as Members of the Legislative Assembly, officials and employees of the Ministry of Education, employees of the British Columbia Public School Employers' Association, employees of the British Columbia School Trustees Association, employees of the British Columbia School Superintendents' Association, employees of the Principals' and Vice-Principals' Association, district superintendents of schools, superintendents of schools, assistant superintendents of schools, and administrative officers shall not be eligible for active membership in the Federation. (13 AGM. p. 6) 1.1(d) Active members shall be the voting members of the Federation and, subject to By-laws 1.7 and 3.7, shall be entitled to hold office and to vote on all matters as provided by these by-laws. (10 AGM, p.2) (17 AGM, p. 8)

1.1(e) Should the immediate Past-President of the BCTF or of a local cease to be an active member of the BCTF, they shall be considered an active member for the purpose of serving as PastPresident until their term of office as Past-President, of no more than one year, has been completed. 1.2 Associate membership may be granted by the Executive Committee on application and on payment of a fee, pursuant to Bylaw 4, according to the scale of fees then in force. Associate membership shall be granted only to persons not eligible for active membership who hold a teaching certificate acceptable to the Executive Committee or occupy an educational or teaching position acceptable to the Executive Committee. Associate members shall not be entitled to vote or to hold office. 1.3 Honorary associate membership without fee may be granted by the Executive Committee to honor distinguished service by persons who have ceased to be active members. Honorary associate members shall not be entitled to vote or to hold office. 1.4 Honorary membership may be conferred by resolution of the Annual General Meeting or of the Representative Assembly on any person, not a teacher, whom the federation wishes to honor. Honorary members shall not be entitled to vote or to hold office. 1.5 Honorary life membership: An Annual General Meeting may confer on any member honorary life membership in the federation. Honorary life members shall, while holding positions as teachers in the public schools of British Columbia, be accorded equivalent status, without payment of fee, to active membership. 1.6 Affiliate membership may be granted by the Executive Committee on application and payment of a fee, pursuant to By-law 4. Persons appointed as administrative officers in a school district shall be eligible, upon application and payment of fees and levies in accordance with By-law 8.5, for Affiliate Administrative Membership which shall entitle the member to participate in the Salary Indemnity Plan, established pursuant to By-law 8.7, for up to one year and such other benefit plans as the Annual General Meeting may determine, provided that the application is made within 30 days of that person's first appointment as an administrative officer. Affiliate members shall not be entitled to vote or to hold office. (13 AGM, p. 6)

This society is a member-funded society. It is funded primarily by its members to carry on activities for the benefit of its members. On its liquidation or dissolution, this society may distribute its money and other property to its members. (17 AGM, p. 7)

By-laws By-law No. 1 — Membership 1.1(a) All teachers employed in a school district in the province of British Columbia shall be eligible to be active members of the federation and of a local in that school district.

1.7 Members not in good standing shall be those active members who fail to pay fees or levies as prescribed in these Bylaws. Members not in good standing shall not be entitled to vote or to seek or hold office, or to receive benefits of membership and shall be subject to recovery of fees pursuant to By-law 4.4. 1.8 An active member who is granted an unpaid leave of absence by the school district in which the member is employed is, unless employed by another school district or excluded by By-law 1.1.c, entitled to remain a member of the Federation without payment of fee for the period of such leave of absence. (13 AGM, p. 6) 1.9 Subject only to By-law 1.8, (a) where no membership fees are paid to the federation by an active member for a period of six school months, active 11

membership in the Federation shall be deemed for all purposes to have terminated; and (b) where no membership fees are paid to a local for a period of six school months by an active member who is a member of that local, active membership in that local shall be deemed for all purposes to have terminated.

By-law No. 2 — Voting 2.1 At all general meetings of any local of the Federation, voting rights shall be governed by the provisions of By-law 1 and Bylaw 3.7. (10 AGM, p. 2) 2.2 Voting at any general and representative assembly meetings of the Federation is through a delegated system of voting. The election of delegates to any general meeting of the Federation, and of Local Representatives, shall be at a general meeting of the local or of the sub-local, as provided for in By-law 8.2. Notice of such meeting shall be given to every member of the local entitled to vote, in accordance with the by-laws of the local; in the absence of such provision notice shall be given to each member at their place of residence or business address not less than seven days before the meeting. (17 AGM, p. 8)) 2.3 No local shall include in its by-laws any provision denying the right to vote at any general meeting to any member entitled under By-law 1 to vote.

By-law No. 3 — Locals 3.1 The Executive Committee shall have the power to create locals. Each local shall adopt a constitution and by-laws to govern its operations. No clause in the constitution and by-laws of any local shall be inconsistent with the constitution and by-laws of the federation. Failure to observe the terms of this by-law may render a local liable to sanctions contained in By-law 6.12. 3.2 Locals of the federation shall be entitled to full autonomy in the conduct of collective bargaining and negotiations with employers. 3.3 A local may make provision for the formation of sub-locals. To qualify as a sub-local for the purpose of By-laws 8 and 9 (representation at general meetings) each sub-local must be approved by resolution of the Executive Committee of the federation. For the purpose of By-law 6 (representation at the Representative Assembly), a sub-local approved by resolution of the Executive Committee of the federation shall be considered a local. 3.4 If two or more school districts amalgamate, the locals in those districts shall be supported by the BCTF as the locals determine the governance structures that best meet the needs of their members. 3.5 No person shall be a member of a local who is not a member of the federation. 3.6 All active members of the Federation employed in the British Columbia public school system shall be members of the local or, if appropriate, locals organized in the school district by which they are employed. Where more than one local exists in any school district, membership in the appropriate local or locals shall depend on the duties assigned by the employing school district. (10 AGM, p. 3) 3.7 Active members working in more than one local shall choose the local in which they shall be permitted to vote and hold office. (10 AGM, p. 3) 3.8 Only active members shall be entitled to vote or to hold office in locals.

By-law No. 4 — Fees and Levies 4.1 Each active, affiliate and associate member of the federation shall pay an annual fee. The annual fee shall consist of: (a) an amount set by the Annual General Meeting of the federation, payable to the federation; (b) for those members who are members of locals, an amount set by a general meeting of each local, payable to the local. 4.2 The membership year for active members shall be from July 1 and shall end on June 30 next following. For active members, the fee is due and payable in installments at the end of each month, proportionate to the period of employment of the member during the membership year. Active members shall execute authorizations for 12

payroll deduction of fees and levies. Active members are deemed to be in good standing upon execution of the said authorization. For associate members, the membership year shall be the 12 months following the date of application for associate membership accompanied by payment of fees at the rate currently in force, except for associate members who are uncertificated teacher replacements, in which case the membership year and method of payment of fees and levies shall be the same as for active members. 4.3 For expenses in connection with the obtaining of the objectives of the federation, any general meeting may make a levy upon the active membership of the federation. In the event that the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund, established by the federation, has a balance of less than $5,000,000.00, the Representative Assembly may make a levy upon the active membership of the federation of an amount necessary to immediately restore the balance in that fund to the sum of $5,000,000.00. Any levy made on the membership pursuant to this by-law shall be paid by each active member on or before a date to be determined by the general meeting or Executive Committee, and any member who fails to comply with this requirement shall not be in good standing until such levy is paid. Notwithstanding anything contained in these by-laws, no levy on the membership of the federation shall be made for the purpose of financing political parties and/or election campaigns of political parties. 4.4 The membership fee established by a local includes, and shall be deemed in all cases to include, the fees and levies of the federation. The annual fee and any levy of the federation or any levy of a local of the federation are debts due to the federation or the local, as the case may be, and may be collected with costs of suit in the name of the federation or the local, as the case may be, in any court of appropriate jurisdiction.

By-law No. 5 — Executive Committee 5.1(a) There shall be an Executive Committee, which shall consist of a President, First Vice-President, Second Vice-President, an Immediate Past President (when applicable), and nine Members-atLarge, elected in such a manner as to ensure that at least three Member-at-Large vacancies are filled at each AGM. One Member-atLarge position shall be designated to be held by a racialized member and one shall be designated to be held by an Aboriginal member. The designated positions shall have the same term and role as the nondesignated positions. The Executive Committee positions are elected by the Annual General Meeting and shall take office on the following July 1. Each member of the Executive Committee shall be a member in good standing entitled to vote, in accordance with By-law 1.1. An Executive Committee member may be removed from office under the provisions of By-law 1.7 or By-law 7. (17 AGM, p. 22) 5.1(b) Notwithstanding the foregoing, each member-at-large shall be elected for a term of two years. If for any reason a memberat-large leaves the position after only one year, a successor shall be elected to fill the unexpired portion of the two-year term. 5.1(c) The Immediate Past-President serves in a one-year, supernumerary position on the Executive Committee. In the event that a President shall be elected to an additional year of office, the Executive Committee position of immediate Past-President shall be vacated . (17 AGM, p. 21) 5.1(d) All members of the Executive Committee shall be eligible for re-election subject to the equity criteria established in Bylaw 5.1(a). (17 AGM, p. 22) 5.1(e) The Member-at-Large position designated to be held by an Aboriginal member is open only to the election of a member who identifies as being Aboriginal. 5.1(f) The Member-at-Large position designated to be held by a racialized member is open to the election of a member who identifies as racialized, including those members who identify as being Aboriginal. 5.2 The Executive Committee shall meet at the call of the President. The President shall call a meeting of the Executive Committee on demand of a majority of its members. 5.3 Subject to By-laws 6, 8, 9 and 14, the Executive Committee shall exercise all the powers of the Federation, the direction and supervision of the business and the conduct of the affairs of the Federation.

5.4(a) All nominations for positions on the Executive Committee shall be in writing. The nomination shall be by resolution of a general meeting of a local, or shall bear the signatures of at least ten active members of the Federation in good standing, and shall include the acceptance of the nominee. A person who has been nominated for a position may withdraw from nomination for that position at any time by notice in writing. (b) The Representative Assembly shall appoint a Nominating Committee, whose duty it shall be to ensure that at least one nomination is received for each position on the Executive Committee that will become vacant at the next Annual General Meeting. (c) All nominations shall be delivered to the chairperson of the Nominating Committee, in person or through the offices of the Federation. (d) Candidates for the Executive Committee who intend to run for positions with equity criteria shall confirm that they meet the equity criteria by self-identification on the nomination form provided to the Nominating Chairperson. During the election process a candidate can drop down to run for an equity position for which they have self-identified on the nomination form, or drop down to the remaining positions without equity criteria. (17 AGM, p. 22) (e) Nominations may be officially received up to January 31, or the close of proceedings of the winter Representative Assembly, whichever is later. No further nominations may be officially received until the opening of the Annual General Meeting. If January 31 falls on a Sunday, nominations must be received by close of business on the next business day. (f) Information with respect to candidates, in accordance with procedures established therefor by the Representative Assembly, shall be published in respect of all persons standing in nomination as of the close of further nominations in sub-paragraph (d). Such publication shall accompany the Notice of Meeting provided for in By-law 8.1, or the notice to members of Special Resolutions. (g) At the Annual General Meeting, nominations may be delivered to the chairperson of the Nominating Committee and announced to the meeting in accordance with the Standing Rules of Order of the Annual General Meeting. At the Annual General Meeting, a withdrawal from candidacy is effective if stated by the person nominated to the assembly at any session. 5.5 If any member of the Executive Committee shall resign from office, or without reasonable excuse be absent from three consecutive meetings of the Executive Committee, or be suspended or expelled from the federation, the Executive Committee shall declare the office vacated. Whenever a vacancy shall occur in the Executive Committee, the vacancy shall be filled by appointment by the Representative Assembly until June 30 next following the next Annual General Meeting. If the term of office of the member creating the vacancy would expire on June 30 following and the vacancy arises after the Annual General Meeting has adjourned, no appointment shall be made to fill the unexpired term of office. 5.6 The Executive Committee may appoint advisory committees and create sections or departments to carry on the activities necessary for the attainment of the objects of the federation. The powers and duties of advisory committees, sections or departments shall be such as may from time to time be prescribed or approved by the Executive Committee. No action shall be taken by any advisory committee, section or department without the authorization of the Executive Committee. 5.7 The Executive Committee shall have the power to appoint, fix the remuneration of, and dismiss the Executive Director. The Executive Director shall be responsible to, and take direction from, the Executive Committee. In consultation with the President, the Executive Director shall carry out the duties assigned to them; and without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Executive Director shall assign the duties and direct the activities of all employees of the Federation; shall have charge of the archives of the Federation; shall designate as confidential and preserve the confidentiality of files containing information about individual members; shall cause to have prepared and preserved a record of all meetings of the Federation, the Executive Committee, and the Representative Assembly.

5.8 The Executive Committee shall have the power to appoint, dismiss and, subject to the terms of any applicable contract or collective agreement, set the remuneration and working conditions of all employees engaged to perform the duties of the Federation including employees within administrative, support, and excluded staff of the Federation. (15 AGM, p. 3) For purposes of this by-law, the Executive Committee may determine by resolution whether any employee is within the administrative staff, support staff, or excluded staff of the Federation. The Executive Committee may, by resolution, delegate to the Executive Director the power to appoint, dismiss, and subject to the terms of any applicable contract or collective agreement, set the remuneration and working conditions of employees engaged to perform the duties of the support staff of the Federation, or specified classes thereof, provided always that the exercise of such delegated power by the Executive Director shall be reviewed by the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee may, by resolutions, delegate to the executive director the power to appoint, dismiss and, subject to the terms of any applicable contract or collective agreement, fix the remuneration and working conditions of employees engaged to perform the duties of the non-administrative staff of the federation, or specified classes thereof, provided always that the exercise of such delegated power by the executive director shall be reviewed by the Executive Committee. (15 AGM, pp 3–4) The Executive Committee is empowered to enter into contracts in respect of remuneration and conditions of employment with excluded staff, as well as with groups representing employees of the Federation, and for this purpose is empowered to enter into individual contracts and collective agreements with trade unions duly certified to represent such employees pursuant to provincial labour statutes. (15 AGM, p. 4) 5.9 The Executive Committee shall nominate one or more Canadian chartered banks, or any branch or branches thereof, and/or a credit union incorporated under the Credit Union Act to be the bankers of the federation, and shall from time to time by resolution designate signing officers for banking purposes, who shall include the treasurer or, in their absence, a person designated by the Executive Committee and at least one of: the President and VicePresidents. 5.10 The Executive Committee may appoint external investment managers to invest and re-invest any monies of the Federation. 5.11 The treasurer, or, in their absence, a person designated by the Executive Committee, and at least one of the President and Vice-Presidents jointly are authorized and empowered on behalf of the federation to invest and re-invest any monies of the federation not invested in accordance with By-law 5.10, except that the treasurer alone, or, in their absence, a person designated by the Executive Committee, is empowered to invest and re-invest any surplus operating funds of the federation. 5.12 All investments shall be in accordance with policies and investment objectives approved by the Executive Committee. Investments shall be in securities in which trustees are authorized by law to invest. (12 AGM, p. 10) 5.13 Deleted (approved March 17-20, 2012) 5.14(a) Provincial Specialist Associations: The Executive Committee may give approval at any time to the organization, within the federation, of provincial associations of persons with special educational interest, provided that no clause of the constitution and by-laws of any such specialist association conflicts with the constitution and by-laws of the federation and provided that membership in any such specialist association be voluntary and open to any member of the federation. 5.14(b) Except as expressly provided in By-law 5.14(c), a Provincial Specialist Association shall not operate or maintain a bank account nor invest funds in any form of investments whatsoever. All funds received by a Provincial Specialist Association, except those received as a result of a conference sponsored by the Provincial Specialist Association, shall be placed on deposit with the federation. 5.14(c) The President of a Provincial Specialist Association approved by the federation in accordance with By-law 5.14(a) may nominate and appoint a branch of a Canadian chartered bank or a branch of a credit union, incorporated under the Credit Union Act of 13

British Columbia, to be the banker of the Provincial Specialist Association for the sole purpose of operating a conference bank account. Such a conference bank account shall be operated in accordance with the policies and procedures approved by the Executive Committee of the federation. 5.15 The Executive Committee shall have prepared and shall adopt annually for the W.R. Long Memorial International Solidarity Fund a statement of anticipated revenues, expenditures and fund balance for the forthcoming year. Expenditures in excess of the budget so adopted shall only be made by a resolution assented to by a majority of at least two-thirds of the Executive Committee. 5.16 The Executive Committee shall have prepared and shall adopt annually for the Salary Indemnity Fund a statement of anticipated revenues and expenditures, and a statement of proposed capital expenditure. No expenditures in excess of the budget so adopted shall be made except in accordance with By-law 5.17 except for those expenditures made with respect to member claims against the fund. 5.17 When a budget has been established in accordance with by-law 6.10, the Executive Committee may authorize expenditure in excess of the program or capital budget only by a resolution assented to by a majority of at least two-thirds of the Executive Committee. 5.18 Borrowing Powers: The Executive Committee shall have power to borrow from any person or persons any sum or sums of money and for that purpose shall be entitled to charge the assets of the Federation by way of mortgage, lien, debenture, or otherwise, provided that such power shall not be exercised except if it be assented to by at least two-thirds of the Executive Committee. (15 AGM, p. 4) (16 AGM, p. 4)

5.19 The Executive Committee shall be empowered to grant legal aid to any member. The Executive Committee may by policy delegate to General Counsel or a specified member of the administrative staff the power, subject to review by the Executive Committee, to grant or refuse legal aid to members pursuant to policies adopted by the Federation in respect of legal aid. An active member dissatisfied with the decision of General Counsel and/or designated administrative staff member may, within 60 days of the receipt of the decision, appeal that decision to the Executive Committee by notifying General Counsel of such appeal in writing. The decision of the Executive Committee in respect of a request for legal aid shall be final and binding and, notwithstanding any other provision in these by-laws, there shall be no appeal of a decision of the Executive Committee to the Representative Assembly, the Annual General Meeting, or the Judicial Council in respect of a member's request for legal aid. (12 AGM, pp. 11–12) (15 AGM, p. 4)

5.20 Except by majority vote of the Annual General Meeting, no member of the Executive Committee shall receive remuneration for services as a member of the Executive Committee, but nothing herein shall preclude the federation from reimbursing members of the Executive Committee for expenses incurred in the business of the Federation.

By-law No. 6 — Representative Assembly 6.1 The Representative Assembly shall consist of the Local Representatives, the Local Presidents and the members of the Executive Committee, but any decision at a meeting of the Representative Assembly shall be by vote of the Local Representatives only. The Representative Assembly may, either at its own discretion or at the request of the Executive Committee, advise the Executive Committee on any question affecting Federation policy. It may authorize or prohibit any proposal of the Executive Committee for action which is deemed to be contrary to, or beyond the scope of, Federation policy. To these ends, the Representative Assembly will adopt procedures to enable Local Representatives to have access to documentation provided to members of the Executive Committee. 6.2 The Annual General Meeting may, from time to time upon recommendation of the Executive Committee or the Representative Assembly, fix the number of Local Representatives and the number of voting cards to which each local is entitled.

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6.3 All Local Representatives shall be elected on or before June 30 of each year and shall take office on July 1 following. Each local shall, in accordance with By-law 2, elect a Local Representative or Representatives in such number as prescribed by the Annual General Meeting. 6.4 Each Local Representative must be a member in good standing of the Federation, entitled to vote, and a member of the local by which they are elected. 6.5 Should any local fail to elect the required number of Local Representatives, the Executive Committee shall have the power to appoint Local Representatives from that local. Appointed Local Representatives shall be qualified in the same manner as prescribed in By-law 6.4. 6.6 Should an elected or appointed Local Representative cease to be eligible to hold office, they shall, ipso facto, cease to be a member of the Representative Assembly and their successor shall be elected in accordance with these by-laws. 6.7 Should an elected or appointed Local Representative be unable to attend a meeting of the Representative Assembly through illness or other unavoidable cause, the President or another authorized agent of the local that they represent may appoint a substitute, who shall have the same qualifications prescribed in Bylaw 6.4, to represent that Local Representative, provided that the President or other authorized agent of the local informs the executive director of the name of such appointee. At the meeting of the Representative Assembly attended, such a substitute shall have the same duties and powers as those of a regular Local Representative. In the event that a Local Representative or substitute cannot remain in attendance throughout the course of a meeting of the Representative Assembly, they may designate another Local Representative (or substitute, appointed pursuant to this by-law) from the same local who shall have the same duties and powers as those of a regular Local Representative, during such an absence. (11 AGM, p. 26)

6.8 In the exercise of all powers assigned to it by these bylaws, the Representative Assembly shall be subject to a review, if demanded, of a general meeting of the Federation. Such a review shall be initiated only by the Executive Committee or through the Executive Committee upon written request of at least five locals, following adoption of resolutions to that effect passed by general meetings of those locals, provided always that notice of such review shall accompany the notice of meeting provided for in By-law 8.1. 6.9 The Representative Assembly shall meet at the call of the President. The President shall call a special meeting of the Representative Assembly upon demand in writing of at least 20% of the Local Representatives. 6.10 The Executive Committee shall have prepared annually for the general operating fund, a statement of anticipated revenues, expenditures and cash flow, a statement of proposed capital expenditures and program budget statements for all BCTF programs for the forthcoming year. The Representative Assembly shall consider such statements and with such amendments as it deems necessary shall adopt a budget for the general operating fund for the forthcoming year. No expenditures in excess of the budget so adopted shall be made except in accordance with By-law 5.17, or in accordance with subsequent budget amendments that may be made by resolution of the Representative Assembly. 6.11 Deleted (filed and registered June 4, 2003) 6.12 Notwithstanding anything contained in these by-laws, the Representative Assembly shall have the power to reprimand or suspend any local of the Federation which, in the opinion of the Representative Assembly, has been guilty of conduct harmful or prejudicial to the interests or objects of the Federation, provided, however, that such local shall have the right to appeal from the decision of the Representative Assembly to the next general meeting (either annual or special), which may confirm, reverse or modify such decision. 6.13 The Representative Assembly shall undertake further duties as may from time to time be assigned to it by a general meeting of the Federation.

By-law No. 7 — Judicial Council 7.1 There shall be a Judicial Council which shall, except as provided by By-law 7.8, have the jurisdiction to consider and deal with complaints against members in respect of allegations that the member has: (a) breached the Code of Ethics, or (b) engaged in conduct harmful or prejudicial to the interests of the Federation. 7.2 The Judicial Council shall be composed of a chairperson, who shall be elected by the Representative Assembly, and an additional 18 members who shall be elected by the Representative Assembly. All members of the Judicial Council shall be active members of the Federation entitled to vote, and must receive a majority of the votes cast by the Representative Assembly. When a Judicial Council member resigns from or otherwise leaves the Judicial Council, the member's appointment to the Judicial Council may continue solely for the purpose of completing ongoing proceedings. 7.3 The chairperson of the Judicial Council may constitute panels to consider complaints, consisting of no fewer than three other members of the Judicial Council. Such panels may be designated as Screening Panels, Hearing Panels, or Appeal Panels. The Judicial Council may, subject only to the direction of the Annual General Meeting, establish rules and procedures for considering complaints, provided that all such rules and procedures comply with the principles of natural justice and the duty of fairness. Should a member of a panel be unable to continue, the work of the panel on a particular matter may continue to completion at the discretion of the Judicial Council chairperson. 7.4 The Screening Panel may dismiss a complaint or determine the process by which a complaint may be resolved in accordance with Federation policy and procedure. 7.5 Where a complaint is referred to a Hearing Panel, and after the panel has considered the matter in accordance with its rules and procedures, the panel shall be empowered to: (a) dismiss the complaint; or (b) where the member who is the subject of the complaint has been found in breach of the Code of Ethics or to have engaged in conduct harmful or prejudicial to the Federation's interests impose fines, levies, and other remedial or disciplinary measures commensurate with the gravity of the breach found by the Hearing Panel and in accordance with the Federation's policies and procedures. 7.6 A member found in breach by a Hearing Panel may, within 30 days of notification of the decision, appeal to an Appeal Panel by notifying the chairperson of the Judicial Council in writing of such appeal. The appeal may be with respect to the finding of breach, and/or with respect to the penalty imposed. The Appeal Panel may confirm, reverse, or modify the decision of the Hearing Panel, or may refer the complaint back to a Hearing Panel for reconsideration in accordance with the Appeal Panel's findings. 7.7 The decision of an Appeal Panel shall be final and binding and notwithstanding any other provision in these by-laws, there shall be no appeal of the decision of an Appeal Panel to the Representative Assembly or to an Annual General Meeting. 7.8 Except as provided in By-law 7.1, and in accordance with the local's Constitution and By-laws, the executive committee of a local shall have the jurisdiction to consider a complaint that a member of that local has breached the local's constitution, by-laws or procedures or has acted in a manner harmful and prejudicial to the interests of the local, provided that the same alleged breach has not been pursued at the provincial level. The executive committee of the local shall consider the complaint in accordance with the principles of natural justice and the duty of fairness, and after such consideration it may: (a) dismiss the complaint, or (b) where such a breach by the member who is the subject of the complaint is found: i. determine appropriate publication of the finding of the breach; ii. suspend the right of the member to hold office in the local and/or to receive specified benefits of membership in the local for a period not exceeding two years; or

iii. impose a combination of the foregoing commensurate with the gravity of the breach. (16 AGM, p. 4) 7.9 A member found in breach pursuant to By-law 7.8 by the executive committee of a local shall, within 30 days of being notified of the decisions, have the right to appeal to an Appeal Panel of the Judicial Council by notifying the chairperson of the Judicial Council and the President of the local in writing of such appeal. The Appeal Panel shall consider the appeal in the same manner as if it were an appeal from a Hearing Panel pursuant to By-law 7.6. 7.10 A levy imposed by the Judicial Council shall be a debt due to the Federation and may be collected with costs of the suit in the name of the Federation in any court of competent jurisdiction. (16 AGM, p. 4)

(See also By-law 16—Discipline)

By-law No. 8 — Annual General Meeting 8.1 (a) The Annual General meeting of the Federation shall be held during the month of March or April at a date, time, and place to be fixed by the Executive Committee. (b) Notice of the date, time, and place of every Annual General Meeting, the text of every special resolution, and where to access the audited financial statements shall be sent by email to every active member in good standing who has provided the Federation with an email address. (c) Notice of the date, time, and place of every Annual General Meeting, and the text of every special resolution, shall be available to every active member in good standing through the secured member portal on the BCTF website in the three weeks prior to the Annual General Meeting. (d) The audited financial statements of the Federation, including the Salary Indemnity Fund, shall be available to every active member in good standing through the secured member portal on the BCTF website in the three weeks prior to the Annual General Meeting. (12 AGM, p. 11) (17 AGM, p. 8)

8.2 The voting body of an Annual General Meeting or Special General Meeting shall consist of the Local Representatives, the members of the Executive Committee, and delegates from each local elected in accordance with By-law 2. Except as set out below, each local shall have the right to representation at the meeting in the proportion of one voting delegate for each 0.2%, or fraction thereof, of the total voting membership of the Federation as of December 1 who are voting members of the local. When a local includes one or more sublocals, each sublocal shall have the right to representation at the meeting in the proportion of one voting delegate for each 0.2% or fraction thereof, of the total voting members of the Federation who are voting members of the sublocal, without prejudice to the rights of representation of the members of the local who are not members of the sublocal. Each local's delegate count for the Annual General Meeting will be made available no later than the last school day of December. (14 AGM, p. 4) 8.3 Delegates or Local Representatives from a local may designate either a delegate from the same local or a Local Representative from the same local to hold and exercise the voting rights of the voting card or cards assigned to them provided that the Annual General Meeting may by resolution limit the number of voting cards that may be held and voted by a delegate or Local Representative, and provided further that locals may, by resolution of a general meeting, establish rules regulating such transfers of voting cards. 8.4 The Annual General Meeting shall, in accordance with Bylaw 5, elect the members of the Executive Committee and shall adopt policies and procedures for the attainment of the objects of the Federation. The Annual General Meeting may amend, alter, delete or replace existing Annual General Meeting, Representative Assembly, or Executive Committee policy or procedure statements. 8.5 The Annual General Meeting shall set fees and may allocate any part thereof to special funds pursuant to the objects of the Federation. 8.6 The business of the Annual General Meeting shall include: (a) Receipt of reports. (b) Receipt of financial statements. (c) Nomination and election of officers. (d) Appointment of auditors. 15

(e) Setting of fees and allocation of any part thereof to special funds operated pursuant to the objects of the Federation. (f) Adoption of policies and prescription of procedures for the attainment of the objects of the Federation. (g) Such other business as may properly be brought before the Annual General Meeting. 8.7 The Annual General Meeting may create regulations (the "Salary Indemnity Plan") providing for short-term and long-term benefits from a Salary Indemnity Fund for members who are absent from work as a result of illness or accident. The Salary Indemnity Fund shall be created from member contributions that are separate and distinct from fees for the normal operation of the Federation, and the fund shall be segregated from Federation funds and shall be used solely for the provision of benefits and for the expenses incurred in the administration of the fund. The fund shall be invested pursuant to By-law 5. Financial statements and actuarial certificates disclosing particulars of the operation of the fund shall be filed annually with the superintendent of financial institutions, and no amendment to this by-law or to the Salary Indemnity Fund investment authorization set out in By-law 5 shall take effect without the approval of the superintendent of financial institutions.

By-law No. 9 — Special General Meeting A Special General Meeting shall be held: (a) on the decision of the Executive Committee, or (b) at the call of the Executive Committee when directed by the Representative Assembly, or (c) Within 60 days of the Executive Committee receiving a written request from at least five locals representing not less than 10% of the voting members of the Federation, following adoption of resolutions to that effect passed by general meetings of those locals, a Special General Meeting will be held. Notice of the date, time, and place of the Special General Meeting, together with all matters to be proposed at such meeting, shall be provided to every active member in good standing as prescribed in By-law 8.1(b) and (c). Notice of the time and place of every Special General Meeting, together with notification of all matters to be proposed at such meeting shall be sent to every member entitled to vote as prescribed by the Society Act or by publication in the BCTF Newsletter/Teacher. (17 AGM, p. 8)

By-law No. 10 — Powers of the President The President shall be the presiding officer of the Federation, and shall also be a member, ex officio, of all committees and sections appointed by the Executive Committee. They shall have general supervision of all matters and affairs of the Federation. In the absence of or disability of the President, their duties shall be performed by the First Vice-President, or in turn, in their absence or disability, by the Second Vice-President.

By-law No. 11 — Duties of the Treasurer 11.1 The Treasurer shall hold office at the pleasure of the Executive Committee. They shall sign and execute all instruments pertaining to the responsibilities as Treasurer in the name of the Federation as authorized to do so by the Executive Committee. 11.2 They shall be the legal custodian of the property of the Federation. 11.3 They shall have the care and custody of all monies of the Federation, whether as membership fees or otherwise, and shall deposit the same in such credit unions and banks as shall be designated by the Executive Committee, and shall disburse and dispose of the same in accordance with budgets approved in Bylaws 5.15, 5.16, 5.17, 6.10 or as directed by the Executive Committee or Representative Assembly and in accordance with criteria approved by either the Annual General Meeting, Representative Assembly, or the Executive Committee and the purposes and by-laws of the BCTF. 11.4 They shall keep or cause to be kept a proper set of books of account of the Federation and shall exhibit the same to the Executive Committee or to the Representative Assembly when required.

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11.5 They shall submit to the Annual General Meeting financial statements prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Society Act. 11.6 They shall be required, when requested by the Executive Committee, to execute a bond for the faithful discharge of their duties in such sum as the Executive Committee may require, the premiums of such bond to be paid from the funds of the Federation.

By-law No. 12 — Quorum A quorum of the Executive Committee or the Representative Assembly shall be a majority of the members thereof. A quorum of a general meeting of the Federation shall be 20% of those persons entitled to vote.

By-law No. 13 — Seal The seal shall be kept in the custody of the Treasurer and shall not be affixed except by the authority of a resolution of the Executive Committee and in the presence of such officers as may be prescribed in and by such resolution, or (if no officers are prescribed by the resolution) in the presence of the Treasurer and the President or one of the Vice-Presidents.

By-law No. 14 — Referendum The Executive Committee may at its discretion, and shall when directed by a general meeting or the Representative Assembly submit to the voting members any questions affecting the interests of the Federation. The Representative Assembly shall determine the referendum voting procedures. No action shall be taken by the Executive Committee or Representative Assembly except as authorized by a majority of those voting.

By-law No. 15 — Financial Year The financial year shall commence on July 1 of each year, provided that the Representative Assembly may, by three-quarters majority of Local Representatives voting, determine another date for the commencement of the financial year.

By-law No. 16 — Discipline The Federation shall prepare and adopt a Code of Ethics to govern the professional conduct of its members, which code shall be binding on every active member of the Federation. The Code of Ethics may be amended only at an Annual or Special General Meeting by special resolution passed by a three-quarters majority and in accordance with the provisions of the Society Act. Complaints of an alleged breach by an active member of the Code of Ethics or of conduct harmful or prejudicial to the interests of the Federation may be submitted by any active member having a legitimate interest in the complaint and not having available a more appropriate recourse. The right to file a complaint shall expire six months after the complainant knows of or can reasonably be expected to know of the events upon which the complaint is based. Complaints shall be directed to the chairperson of the Judicial Council and/or designated administrative staff. (12 AGM p. 11)

By-law No. 17 — Special Funds The Federation, through a general meeting, may create a Salary Indemnity Fund, a Benevolent Fund or any other fund designed to promote the general welfare of the members. The regulations governing the operation and administration of such funds shall be determined by the Executive Committee, except that the regulations providing for the Salary Indemnity Plan shall be established and amended in accordance with By-law 8.7.

By-law No. 18 — Examination of Books and Records All books, documents and other records shall be kept in the office of the Federation. With the exception of those books, documents or records containing information confidential to members or former members, these books, records and documents may be examined by any member upon their giving to the executive director due notice in writing to that effect. Nothing hereinbefore contained shall prevent the examination by a

member of books, documents and records concerning that member, that have been designated by the executive director under By-law 5.7 as confidential.

By-law No. 19 — Rules of Order All meetings of the Federation and its locals shall be governed by rules of order adopted at an Annual General Meeting. Locals are empowered to adopt additional rules not inconsistent with those adopted by the Annual General Meeting.

By-law No. 20 — Amendments to the Constitution and By-Laws Only the Annual or Special General Meeting can amend the Constitution, the By-laws, the Salary Indemnity Plan Regulations, and the Code of Ethics and only if a 75% majority of the delegates vote in favour of the amendment(s). (17 AGM, p. 8)

By-law No. 21 — President, First Vice-President, and Second Vice-President 22.1 That the President, First Vice-President, and Second Vice-President be relieved of their teaching duties for the duration of their terms of office. 22.2 That during their term of office the President be paid 130% of the salary they would have received had they been teaching. 22.3 That during their term of office, the First Vice-President and Second Vice-President be paid 120% of the salary they would have received had they been teaching. 22.4 That the President, First Vice-President, and Second Vice-President receive benefits equal to those they would have received had they been teaching.

By-law No. 22 — Auditor The Society must have an auditor.

By-law No. 23 — Requirements for changing auditor At an annual general meeting, a resolution appointing an auditor, other than the incumbent auditor, must not be proposed unless (a) the incumbent auditor has declined reappointment, or (b) at least 14 days’ written notice of the proposed resolution has been given to (i) all persons entitled to receive notice of the meeting, and (ii) the incumbent auditor.

(b) the auditor’s report, as defined in section 1 of the Societies Act, on those financial statements.

By-law No. 27 — Providing financial statements and auditor’s report to security holder The Society, on request of a person holding a bond, debenture, note or other evidence of debt obligation, whether secured or unsecured, of the Society, must send to the person a copy of the Society’s latest financial statements and a copy of the auditor’s report, as defined in section 1 of the Societies Act, on those financial statements.

By-law No. 28 — Societies Act Where the Constitution or the by-laws of the Federation are inconsistent with the Societies Act, the provisions of the Societies Act prevail. (17 AGM, p. 8)

By-law No. 29 — (Former Constitution Provision) The operations of the Federation are to be carried on throughout the Province of British Columbia but chiefly in its office located in Vancouver.

By-law No. 30 — Charter British Columbia Teachers' Federation CHARTER BE IT KNOWN that on this ___ day of _____ ,19__, the Executive Committee of British Columbia Teachers' Federation has granted to the _________________ (name of local) this charter as local No. __ of the Federation in respect of (description of members to be included in the local, for example, "teachers employed by School District No. __ and such other members of the Federation as are determined by the Executive Committee") by virtue of which the local has and shall have full authority to determine local matters and administer the affairs of the local in accordance with the provision of the constitutions and bylaws of the Federation and the local. Dated at ________________, British Columbia this __ day of _____________, 19__. ____________________________ President

By-law No. 24 — Comparative financial statements The financial statement of the Society must be prepared as comparative financial statements relating separately to (a) the period determined under section 35(2) of the Societies Act, and (b) the preceding period, if any, in relation to which financial statements for the Society were prepared.

Seal ____________________________ Executive Director

By-law No. 25 — Exception to requirement for comparative financial statements Despite Reporting Society Provision 3, the financial statements of the Society may deal with only the period determined under section 35(2) of the Societies Act if the reason for doing so is set out in the financial statements.

By-law No. 26 — Providing financial statements and auditor’s report to auditor and members At least 10 days before the date of each annual general meeting, the Society must send to the auditor and to each member a copy of (a) the financial statements that are to be presented at the meeting, and

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Part 3 Policies and Procedures Foreword This part of the booklet is a compilation of policy and procedure motions passed from 1953 to the current year by Annual General Meetings, the Representative Assembly, the Executive Committee and the former Consultative Committee. Reference to minute pages is restricted to the original and most recent reference for each statement, unless an Annual General Meeting statement has been acted upon by another body later. In such cases, three references appear: 1. the original, 2. the most recent AGM, and 3. the most recent reference by the other body. Abbreviations used in the references are as follows: AGM means Annual General Meeting; RA means Representative Assembly; Ex means Executive Committee; Cons means Consultative Committee. (The latter committee ceased to function in 1965.)

Definitions of “Policies” and “Procedures” The notation “reviewed” in a reference means that the Executive Committee has examined the statement and decided that it is worth retaining. The statements appear in two categories, “policies” and “procedures.” Policy statements are statements of objectives the BCTF wants to attain or retain, and/or beliefs expressed by the BCTF on any matter. They deal with matters over which the BCTF does not have complete control (a government, university, school board or other organization is involved). Procedure statements are statements of practice adopted or regulations established by the BCTF to handle business over which it does have complete control. In each section or sub-section any statements of policy appear first. The statements of procedure follow. To further distinguish the two kinds of statements, the last digit in the numbers of policy statements is odd; that of numbers of procedure statements is even.

Organization of Part 3 Each year staff examine every motion in every set of minutes of the Executive Committee, the Representative Assembly and the Annual General Meeting, to decide which of those motions will be included in the next year’s compilation of policies and procedures and, if so, where. Procedural motions, instruction or action motions, and motions of approval in principle are not included in the book.

Purposes of Part 3 This compilation of policies and procedures has two purposes: 1. To serve as a ready reference on BCTF policies and procedures, and 2. To establish a point of reference from which future resolutions can flow. Locals are encouraged to submit resolutions at any time of the year to the appropriate BCTF committees, rather than to wait for the fall months to submit resolutions for the AGM. The committees can usually take action on the resolutions within a short time. Resolutions intended for the AGM must be submitted to the BCTF office by December 15. (See Section 2.C for detailed 18

information on resolutions.) If possible, resolutions should refer to specific statements in this booklet. Resolutions should ask “That statement (number) be amended to read..." or "That statement (number) be deleted.” Additional BCTF procedures are contained in the Federation’s by-laws, printed as Part 1 of this booklet.

How BCTF Policies are Formulated The Annual General Meeting is the sovereign policy-making authority within the Federation. This does not mean that the AGM is a policy-making body. Actually it is a policy-approving body, deciding for or against issues after debating resolutions referred to it by locals or recommendations submitted by committees. The Federation's committees are appointed by the Executive Committee and are responsible to it. The Executive Committee and Representative Assembly may submit recommendations to the AGM for policy determination. The AGM may adopt, reject or amend any recommendation or resolution placed before it. The AGM is therefore essentially a policy-approving or determining body rather than a policy-initiating one. The AGM is made up of voting delegates elected by locals in the ratio of one delegate for each 0.2 per cent, or fraction thereof, of the total active membership of the BCTF who are members of the local. In this way the active members control the policies of their organization. If any policy adopted through a resolution were traced back to its source, its origin would probably be in the mind of an individual member, who concluded, as a result of experience or of reflection on problems confronting members, that BCTF policy was lacking or deficient on a particular issue. The member would have raised the matter for debate at a local meeting and the local, in turn, would have passed a resolution for reference to an AGM. Similarly, an individual member serving on a BCTF committee is often the source of a particular recommendation passed by the committee for reference to an AGM. Every individual member can therefore initiate policy. The BCTF by-laws give broad powers in certain specified areas to the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee generally exercises “all the powers of the Federation, the direction and supervision of business and the conduct of the affairs of the Federation.” These powers are exercised, however, subject to the action of a general meeting of the Federation. Should a general meeting believe that the Executive Committee has in any way abused its authority, it may censure the executive, countermand its decisions, or amend the by-laws to limit or remove any powers of the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee is also subject to the advice and direction of the Representative Assembly. The latter has specific responsibility assigned to it (Statement 25.B.08), including the right to authorize or prohibit any action proposed by the Executive Committee that is beyond the scope of, or contrary to, BCTF policy. The executive director and the other staff officers have no powers in policy determination. They may and do suggest policy and offer advice on policy matters, but may not move or second resolutions and have no vote. They do not determine policy; they carry out the policies adopted by the Annual General Meeting, the Representative Assembly and the Executive Committee.

BCTF Privacy Policy The British Columbia Teachers’ Federation (BCTF) is committed to protecting the privacy and confidentiality of its members’ personal information. The BCTF is committed to complying with the British Columbia Personal Information Protection Act, S.B.C. 2003, c. 63 (PIPA). This includes managing the collection, use, disclosure, storage, and

ultimate disposition of its members’ personal information in ways that safeguard the privacy of its members. Definitions Personal Information means information about an individual. It does not include aggregate information which cannot be associated with a specific individual, and it does not include the name, title, business address, business email address, or business telephone number of an individual. Examples of personal information include home address and phone number, social insurance number, and medical information of an individual. Privacy Officer―means the staff person designated responsibility for ensuring that the BCTF complies with this policy and PIPA. Personal information collected The BCTF collects personal information to fulfill its obligations to members and in the course of providing a variety of services. The types of information collected include:  your name  home address and telephone number  social insurance number  birth date  gender  home email address. Additional information may be collected to administer the collective agreement, to fulfill the BCTF’s duty of representation to you, or to provide you with specific services. Purposes for collection, use, and disclosure The BCTF collects, uses, and discloses personal information for the purposes of fulfilling our obligations to you as set out in the BCTF Members’ Guide, to provide specific services as required, and to fulfill its role as the bargaining agent representing members. The purposes for which the BCTF collects, uses, and discloses personal information include, for example:  to identify you  to communicate with you  to confirm your eligibility for services  to comply with various professional legal and regulatory requirements  to provide services related to the Salary Indemnity Plan, legal services, grievances, Workers’ Compensation Board (WorkSafe BC) advocacy, Teacher Regulation Branch advocacy, and pension plan advocacy and assistance  to provide Provincial Specialist Association memberships and associated services  to conduct research.

Access requests must be submitted by completing the BCTF Access Request Form. You may request a form by sending an email to the BCTF Privacy Officer and returning the form by mail to the BCTF, 100 – 550 West 6th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4P2, Attention Privacy Officer. In certain situations, further to privacy legislation, the BCTF may not be able to provide access to certain personal information that it holds about an individual. Examples of where it may not provide access include, but are not limited to, situations where:  the provision may reveal personal information about another individual.  the information is subject to solicitor-client privilege.  the information was collected in relation to an investigation or a contravention of a federal or provincial law.  the provision could reasonably be expected to threaten the health or safety of an individual. If access cannot be provided, the BCTF will notify the individual making the request, in writing, of the reasons for the refusal. Where access has been provided and where the information is demonstrated to be inaccurate or incomplete, the BCTF will amend the information as required. Questions or concerns regarding BCTF’s privacy procedures An individual may direct their general questions regarding privacy at the BCTF, as well as any questions or concerns regarding BCTF’s compliance with this policy, by mail to the BCTF at 100 – 550 West 6th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4P2, Attention Privacy Officer. The BCTF will investigate any complaints received in writing. If a complaint is found to be justified, the BCTF will take appropriate measures to resolve the complaint including, if necessary, amending its policies and procedures. An individual will be informed in writing of the outcome of the investigation regarding their complaint. (June 09 Ex, pp. 10–13) (Jan 17 Ex, Appendix 1)

BCTF Conflict of Interest Policy for Members The BCTF has adopted a detailed Conflict of Interest policy and procedure which applies to all members. It is included in the Members’ Guide as Procedure 20.G.02.

Protection of personal information The BCTF is committed to protecting your personal information from unauthorized use or disclosure. Its commitment means that:  it will use your personal information only for the purposes it has identified.  it will not disclose your personal information without your permission unless it is required or authorized by law to do so.  it will employ appropriate security measures to ensure only authorized individuals have access to your personal information  it will keep your personal information only as long as is reasonably necessary  it will destroy your information using a confidential and secure method when your personal information is no longer required Individual access Individuals have the right to request access to their personal information under the control of the BCTF. The Privacy Officer will assist them with their access requests. 19

1.

Aboriginal Education

POLICIES 1.A.01—That the BCTF acknowledge the right and the ability of Aboriginal people: 1. to define problems of Aboriginal students within the public school 2. to take leadership initiatives in arriving at solutions to these problems and that the BCTF pursue with the Aboriginal people strategies for co-operative efforts to improve educational opportunities in our public schools for Aboriginal students. (Feb 89, Ex, p. 19)

all levels and that the ministry provide adequate funding for development, distribution and implementation. (78 AGM, p. 38) 1.A.25—That curriculum and learning resources that are relevant to and respectful of Aboriginal culture and its diversity are included as integral parts of the curriculum and Integrated Resource Packages, not as add-ons marginal to the regular program. (76 AGM, p. 52)

1.A.27—That learning resources related to the culture of the Aboriginal Peoples in the region where the school is located be used in classrooms, and that ministry funding should be available to support the development of these learning resources where they do not already exist. (76 AGM, p. 52) (17 AGM, p. 25)

1.A.03—That the BCTF believes that an educational system that forces Aboriginal students to assimilate to majority cultural attitudes and patterns is a form of racism. (99 AGM, p. 28)

1.A.29—That the BCTF encourage every member to undertake at least one Aboriginal education activity annually. (06 AGM, p. 26)

1.A.05—That the BCTF recognizes that Aboriginal communities have the primary responsibility for defining what constitutes success for Aboriginal students in the public schools. (99 AGM, p. 28)

1.A.31—That the BCTF express opposition to the regional cutbacks in funding that supports local Aboriginal Education Initiatives. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 21)

1.A.09—That locals should ensure that local education agreements not involve dual systems of supervision and evaluation.

1.A.33—That the BCTF, with other partners, develop, maintain and make accessible to teachers a database of existing learning resources and locally developed curriculum for all grade levels to support the inclusion of Aboriginal content throughout the curriculum.

(Feb 92 Ex, p. 14)

1.A.13—1. That the BCTF recognizes the importance of teachers of Aboriginal ancestry working in the school system, both for programs that are targeted to Aboriginal students and programs that serve all students. 2. That the BCTF actively support an employment equity program for the public schools with the aim of achieving a teaching force that is reflective of the ethnic diversity of BC public schools. 3. That the employment equity program for Aboriginal teachers include the following elements: a. Goals for achieving employment equity, including goals for having Aboriginal teachers in programs throughout the system, as well as in programs supported by targeted Aboriginal education funding. b. Workshops for teachers and school districts to explain employment equity programs and how they work. c. A baseline database of teachers in BC public schools who self-identify as Aboriginal. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 18) d. Employment equity pilot projects in districts where the BCTF local and the school board agree to undertake a project. e. A program with targets and actions to increase the number of Aboriginal people who seek and achieve teacher training and qualifications. f. Research to identify systemic impediments to employment equity, including hiring policies, employment practices and workplace climate. g. Support networks which include a mentoring program for beginning Aboriginal teachers. h. An annual report on and monitoring of progress toward meeting the employment equity goals. (Jan 00 Ex, p. 16) 1.A.17—That the school and community should recognize the successes of Aboriginal students. (75 AGM, p. 33) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

1.A.19—That the BCTF urge the Ministry of Education to facilitate development of district plans and services to support Aboriginal students, particularly at the points of transition where students experience difficulties. (73 AGM, p. 23) (Reviewed Dec 77 Ex, p. 12)

1.A.21—That counselling and Aboriginal support workers should be available in all schools with Aboriginal students to provide assistance to Aboriginal students experiencing difficulty. (76 AGM, p. 51)

1.A.23—That curriculum and learning resources that are relevant to and respectful of Aboriginal culture be available for use at

20

(Feb. 99 Ex, p. 18-22)

1.A.35—That Aboriginal history and culture content be increased in all subjects, with special emphasis on social studies, and that the Ministry of Education fund workshops for teachers and be made available to support this additional content. (Feb. 99 Ex, p. 18–22)

1.A.37—That the history and background to treaty processes should be incorporated into social studies at different levels, including the information from history, provisions of the Canadian Constitution relevant to Aboriginal inherent rights to self-government, the definition of Aboriginal rights through court decisions, and the BC Treaty Process. (Feb. 99 Ex, p. 18-22) 1.A.39—That a mandatory First Peoples course be part of the graduation program. (Aug 17 Ex, p. 8) 1.A.41—That local Aboriginal communities have input into the (Feb. 99 Ex, p. 18–22) allocation of targeted funding. (Aug 17 Ex, p. 8)

1.A.43—That the BCTF encourage locals to participate in the development of Aboriginal Enhancement Agreements. (Sept. 04 Ex, p. 10)

1.A.45—That the BCTF encourage and support the local members’ involvement in the development, implementation and assessment of Aboriginal Education Enhancement Agreements at the local level. (June 05 RA, p. 14) 1.A.47—That the BCTF encourage all universities and colleges to accept BC First Nations Studies 12 and English First Peoples 12 as acceptable for Grade 12 course credits for admission and advertise that recognition in their catalogues. (Feb. 99 Ex, p. 22) (Feb 12 Ex, p. 6)

1.A.49—1. That the BCTF encourage the faculties of education and the Teachers’ Council to ensure that during teacher training, all teachers take at least one course on Aboriginal history, cultures and education. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 18) 2. That the BCTF continue to encourage faculties of education teacher education programs to integrate Aboriginal history, cultures and education issues into all seminars and courses. (Feb. 00 Ex, p. 4)

1.A.51—That the BCTF urge all partners in the enhancement agreement process to shift the focus of enhancement agreements from the current goals of the accountability agenda that emphasize

inappropriate testing and ranking to a focus on the learning needs of Aboriginal students. (06 AGM, p. 27) 1.A.53—That the BCTF urge the government to encourage districts to include all partners in the enhancement agreement process, including teachers and support workers, to help design authentic goals for enhancing education for Aboriginal children. (06 AGM, p. 34)

1.A.55—That the BCTF urge all school districts to invite the Local President or their designate to represent teachers at the Enhancement Agreement Partners’ table. (06 AGM, p. 34) 1.A.57—That the BCTF urge the government to provide inservice from additional new funding sources with non-target dollars to help teachers work together to effectively implement Enhancement Agreements that are child centred, do not focus on standardized student assessment or other accountability driven measures, and seek to produce positive outcomes for Aboriginal students.

1.A.04—That the BCTF AGM, Representative Assemblies, provincial conferences, and zone meetings commence with a recognition of whose Aboriginal territory they are on. (AGM 03, p. 36) (10 AGM, p. 8) 1.A.06—That the BCTF work with the Deans of Education of BC universities to develop and put in place plans, programs and incentives for the recruiting, attracting, supporting and training of Aboriginal and minorities people to join the teaching profession. (06 AGM, p. 19)

1.A.08—That locals encourage and work with support staff unions and their school boards to examine the composition of their teaching, support, administrative, and managerial staff to ensure the equitable presence, inclusion, and representation of Aboriginal and minorities in all sectors of the educational system. (06 AGM, p. 26)

(March 06 Ex, p. 3)

1.A.10—That whenever possible, the BCTF include Aboriginal education in BCTF conferences, Federation Leadership Institutes, and other training initiatives. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 21)

1.A.59—That the BCTF urge the provincial government to fully fund the Native Education College. (June 07 RA, p. 9)

1.A.12—That locals be encouraged to include Aboriginal education representatives in their local processes and structures.

1.A.61—That local Pro D committees and provincial PSAs be requested and encouraged to include Aboriginal education workshop offerings in Pro D events and conferences to assist teachers in developing Aboriginal cultural literacy. (Dec. 06 Ex, p. 6) 1.A.63—That the BCTF encourage the ministry to consult with Aboriginal teachers through the locals, regarding local Education Agreements and Enhancement Agreements. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 9) 1.A.65―That the BCTF encourage members of the Aboriginal Education Partners Group (AEPG) to lobby the ministry to report on expenditures from “targeted funding,” and that the BCTF encourage the AEPG to add targeted funding as a standing item on its agenda. (09 AGM, p. 8)

1.A.67―That the BCTF urge faculties of education in British Columbia to require that all preservice teachers receive mandatory education in Aboriginal peoples’ history as founding nations and training in antiracism as it relates to Aboriginal students. (09 AGM, p. 8) 1.A.69―That the BCTF call upon all school districts to stop promoting stereotypical representation of Aboriginal people through the use of sports mascots. (Jan 10 RA, p. 10) 1.A.71―That the BCTF encourage all schools and school districts to commence events with a recognition of whose traditional Aboriginal territory they are on. (10 AGM, p. 8) 1.A.73―That locals be encouraged to commence meetings and events with a recognition of whose Aboriginal territory they are on. (10 AGM, p. 8) PROCEDURES 1.A.02—That the goals of the BCTF in Aboriginal education be to improve the success of Aboriginal students in the public schools and to build a new relationship with Aboriginal students and communities, and that these be pursued through: 1. working with Aboriginal organizations and other groups in the public schools to define success and appropriate indicators of success. 2. building awareness and commitment of teachers to practices that will improve the success of Aboriginal students. 3. identifying and supporting practices that help achieve success for Aboriginal students; 4. working to make schools inclusive of and for Aboriginal students, parents, teachers and support workers. 5. building positive relationships of teachers and schools with Aboriginal communities. (99 AGM, p. 28)

(Aug. 03 Ex, p. 4)

1.A.14—That locals be encouraged to work toward developing a plan for recruiting, supporting, and retaining Aboriginal teachers in union leadership positions. (05 AGM, p. 41) 1.A.16—1. That the BCTF should work with appropriate education and Aboriginal organizations to create a program to encourage Aboriginal people to enter teacher training. 2. That the faculties of education should develop programs that encourage Aboriginal support workers to train as teachers. 3. That each local work with its board of school trustees and Aboriginal communities to develop a district plan for recruiting, retaining and supporting Aboriginal teachers. 4. That the BCTF work with the Aboriginal Educators’ Association (PSA) to develop a program of support for Aboriginal teachers who are new to teaching. (Feb. 99 Ex, p. 18) 1.A.20—Employment Equity for Aboriginal Teachers 1. Overall goal That the teaching population in each school district be proportionate to the ratio of Aboriginal students in the district. 2. Objectives a. That every local develop a strategic plan to achieve Employment Equity for Aboriginal teachers, which includes: i. work with members to develop awareness and member support. ii. the creation of local joint union/district policy on Employment Equity for Aboriginal teachers. iii. elements to address retention as well as hiring of Aboriginal teachers. b. That each district seek dispensation from the Human Rights Tribunal to allow for preferential hiring of Aboriginal teachers. c. That each local identify a subcommittee or task force to implement the plan. 3. Role of the Federation a. To support locals in their work to develop an employment equity strategy. b. To provide local leadership with a suggested strategy to plan and implement an Employment Equity Program for Aboriginal teachers in their district. The plan will include goals, timetables, and measures of success. 4. Assumptions We support an Employment Equity Program for attraction and retention of Aboriginal teachers. The BCTF has a letter of understanding attached to the collective agreement and policy supporting Employment Equity for Aboriginal teachers. (Nov. 07 RA, p. 6)

1.A.22—That the BCTF develop a plan to encourage teachers of Aboriginal ancestry to recognize and report on bullying that stems from systemic discrimination. (Dec 07 Ex, p. 3) 21

1.A.24—That the Federation work with the BCSTA and BCPSEA to facilitate self-identification of Aboriginal teachers on application forms. (Dec 07 Ex, p. 4) 1.A.26—That the Federation endorse the following principles regarding the impact of the proliferation of testing on Aboriginal children. Professional Statement As Aboriginal teachers:  we believe the misuse and overuse of standardized testing further discriminates against Aboriginal children and reinforces negative stereotypes.  we believe paper and pen testing does not acknowledge the gifts of our children.  we believe this is a colonial tool that perpetuates negative feelings and undermines our children’s ability to learn.  we believe there is a problem and more testing will not address our children’s needs.  we believe our children are entitled to equal access to and appropriate support for their successful high school completion.  we believe we need to focus on strategies and solutions to help Aboriginal children. (08 AGM, p. 9) 1.A.28—That the Federation develop and promote materials to recruit Aboriginal students to the teaching profession and that the Federation lobby the BCSTA and school boards to do the same. (Dec 08 Ex, p. 7) 1.A.30—That the BCTF train Aboriginal teachers in rural areas to facilitate the Aboriginal parent workshops, and include added training sessions to update those who are already trained. (Dec 08 Ex, p. 7) 1.A.32—That the Federation encourage locals, school boards, and Aboriginal communities to work together to develop workshops on Aboriginal educational issues for all teachers. (Dec 08 Ex, p. 8) 1.A.34—That the Federation actively implement procedures 1.A.06 and 1.A.16 by seeking out interested school districts to develop a locally-based teacher education program for Aboriginal employees wanting to become teachers. (Dec 08 Ex, p. 8) 1.A.36—That the Federation encourage that the locals ensure that their Local Contact for Aboriginal Education (LCAE) be a member of the local executive committee. (Apr 09 Ex, p. 14) 1.A.38—That information be provided to locals that would assist them in the local development and implementation of the employment equity programs for Aboriginal educators including the establishment of locally developed timelines. (Apr 09 Ex, p. 14) 1.A.40―That the BCTF develop and provide a workshop for members that addresses myths and stereotypes of Aboriginal people, and updating the employment equity workshop. (Jan 10 Ex, p. 12)

1.A.42―That the Federation find ways to meet the demands of workshop requests for Aboriginal Education, Employment Equity for Aboriginal teachers, and Enhancement Agreement workshops by providing sessions to recruit and train Aboriginal teachers as workshop facilitators. (Jan 10 Ex, p. 12) 1.A.44―That the BCTF encourage school districts to allocate space in the schools for Aboriginal students, parents, staff, and community members. (Feb 12 Ex, p. 6) 1.A.46―Traditional Aboriginal territories That the BCTF: 1. encourage teachers to recognize and incorporate environmental issues with respect to the impact on Aboriginal traditional territories, culture, and way of life, into their teaching. 2. lobby the Ministry of Education to recognize the importance of incorporating local environmental issues and their 22

impact on traditional Aboriginal territories into the existing curriculum at all grade levels. (May 12 RA, p. 11) 1.A.48―That the BCTF routinely give a gift of thanks and appreciation to Aboriginal elders and invited guests who attend BCTF events in appreciation of their welcoming us onto their traditional territories. (Oct 15 Ex, p. 7) n―Statement of Principles and Concerns That the Federation adopt the following statement which encompasses principles for incorporating Aboriginal ways of knowing in the curriculum and concerns that need to be addressed: 1. The following list of principles must be followed to ensure this endeavour is successful: a. Recommendations and Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission must guide the spirit of all educational initiatives. b. Recognition of intergenerational issues related to residential school experiences and other forms of colonization must to be central to the curriculum. c. Teaching history from an Aboriginal perspective is an essential component of the curriculum. d. Teaching history must link the legacy of colonial injustice to contemporary intergenerational impacts by including the living component. e. Teachers must be supported by the Ministry of Education when dealing with systemic racism and other forms of discrimination. f. Educational leadership, in all areas, must include authentic Aboriginal voices. g. Initiatives must be built over time with trusted partners in Aboriginal education. h. Adequate in-service funding must be provided to enable teachers to work with Aboriginal content in all curricular areas. i. Teachers must be supported by the Ministry of Education and school districts in seeking appropriate resources and workshops. Efforts to identify teacher-led, teacher-created resources and workshops must be made, and those identified made widely available. j. In-service must include teacher-led and created practices and resources. k. Local knowledge and connections must be developed to support classroom teaching. l. Living links must be part of the process of infusion, including Elders and artists in the classroom, and current issues in struggles of Aboriginal people in BC. m. Adequate funding must be provided to enable teachers’ access to Elders, speakers, and cultural workers to provide authenticity and in classrooms and visits to local Aboriginal communities. n. Elders, spokespersons, and local First Nations community members must be fairly compensated for their contributions. o. Protocols built around acknowledgment of traditional territories must be part of the process. p. Success must be measured by the strength of the local relationships formed and the respect students develop for Aboriginal issues. 2. The following list of concerns must be addressed to ensure this endeavour is successful: a. Recognition that Aboriginal people have been silenced and left out of Canada’s history; it must be acknowledged that this absence has contributed to the oppression of Canada’s Aboriginal people. b. Recognition of the obligation for a nation-to-nation relationship guided by the spirit and intent of the original treaty relationship. c. Recognition of the historic and current forms of systemic racism experienced by Aboriginal people in schools and the obligation of school systems to address this. d. Recognition of Canada’s attempted genocide of Aboriginal people. e. Any desire to bring redress must come from recognizing the role of colonization in the dispossession of Indigenous land and resources. An authentic education must first recognize this and build

support for the many and varied struggles of Aboriginal people to achieve social justice. (Apr 16 Ex, pp. 9–10)

2.

Annual General Meeting

Note: The standing rules of order of the Annual General Meeting are found in Part 5 of this book.

A. General PROCEDURES 2.A.02—That the Annual General Meeting annually approve a statement of priority objectives for the BCTF for the following year. (May 78 RA, p. 15)

2.A.04—That following consultation with the Representative Assembly, the Executive Committee recommend the priorities for the following year to the AGM. (86 AGM, p. 7) 2.A.06—That the Executive Committee annually, in its leadership report, submit recommendations for policies, programs, and actions to the AGM. (86 AGM, p. 8) 2.A.08—1. That the Executive Committee recommend to each Annual General Meeting the names of active members to serve on the Resolutions Committee, to act as scrutineers and to act as tellers. The Executive Committee shall also recommend to each Annual General Meeting the names of active members or honorary associate members to act as chairpersons. Individuals recommended as chairpersons shall not be seeking Executive Committee office. (74 AGM, p. 20) (00 AGM, p. 14)

2. That members be eligible to serve on only one AGM committee at a time: i.e., Resolutions Committee, AGM Nominating Chairperson/Tellers, and as a scrutineer. (Nov. 98 Ex, p. 20) 2.A.10—That the members of the Resolutions Committee for the Annual General Meeting shall not, by virtue of their membership on the Resolutions Committee, lose any of their normal rights to participate in AGM debates. (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19) (Feb 12 Ex, p. 8)

2.A.12—1. That the reports and recommendations of all Executive-appointed committees and task forces be submitted to the AGM only through the report of the Executive Committee. 2. That all recommendations of the Executive Committee to the AGM be accompanied by supporting statements. 3. That, in the event that the Executive Committee does not endorse, or substantially changes, any of the recommendations from a BCTF committee or task force, the Executive Committee shall, upon the request of the committee or the task force, make an annotation in the report of the Executive Committee to the Annual General Meeting. (74 AGM, p. 20) (Oct 78 Ex, p. 8)

2.A.14—Distribution of documents at the AGM That the following conditions apply to the distribution of printed materials to Annual General Meeting delegates: 1. That the Federation continue to reduce the amount of paper used at the AGM and encourage locals, members, committees, and others to consider alternates to distributing hard copies of materials for delegates. 2. That BCTF committees, task forces, and PSAs be authorized to distribute print materials to AGM delegates within the meeting room only after approval by the full-time table officers, Executive Committee, Representative Assembly, or the Annual General Meeting. 3. That all materials distributed to delegates clearly identify the originator(s). 4. That the AGM meeting kits and additional Federation documents for distribution to delegates be signed off by the executive director.

5.That AGM scrutineers hand out official AGM documents and materials only. 6. That all materials distributed at the AGM be consistent with the Federation’s social justice principles. 7. That, in general, material intended for AGM delegates from groups or individuals outside of the BCTF be made available outside the meeting room only unless approved by the executive director in advance of the meeting. (Nov 76 Ex, p. 8) (Feb 11 Ex, p. 11)

2.A.16—That when the Representative Assembly or the Executive Committee wants to distribute a report supplementary to the one contained in Reports and Resolutions, the report be distributed either at the beginning of the AGM or at least one session prior to the one in which the report will be discussed. (74 AGM, p. 37) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 14)

2.A.18—That the Executive Director prepare a report to the Annual General Meeting, and that the delegates be provided with the opportunity to ask questions of the report. (77 AGM, p. 5) (17 AGM, p. 40)

2.A.20—Guidelines for display space at the AGM and RA: 1. There shall be no commercial displays other than those directly related to the BCTF Advantage program. Non-profit groups who have been granted display space may offer resources for teachers for sale and conduct fundraising through the sale of merchandise and/or raffle tickets. 2. Display space will be offered to: a. BCTF groups, such as PSAs, committees, programs, and locals. b. outside groups with which the BCTF has an organizational relationship, other unions, groups related to education, and/or community groups consistent with BCTF social justice values. (Dec 09 Ex, p. 23) (Feb 11 Ex, p. 11)

2.A.22—That the Retired Teachers’ Association be informed, as soon as the AGM agenda has been proposed, when pensions matters will be discussed. (Feb. 97 Ex, p. 2) (86 AGM, p. 8)

2.A.26―1. Prior to pension matters being considered, the meeting shall move into a special committee of the whole with delegates, staff, representatives of honorary associate members and others, as appropriate, present. 2. The number of honorary associate member representatives shall be determined on the same basis as local delegates. 3. During the special committee proceedings, the honorary associate member representatives shall be governed by all applicable rules contained in section 11 of the BCTF Standing Rules of Order of the AGM as if they were a local of the Federation. 4. The delegates and honorary associate member representatives shall consider the recommendations and resolutions placed before the meeting in the special committee of the whole. 5. All recommendations and resolutions that were considered in the special committee of the whole proceedings must be considered out of committee by active members. (07 AGM, p. 7) (10 AGM, p. 3) 2.A.28—That Honorary Life Members be granted voice at BCTF Annual General Meetings. (94 AGM) 2.A.34—That during the opening session of the Annual General Meeting, the chairpersons conduct an orientation session with delegates that includes: 1. appropriate conduct of delegates on the floor of the AGM, especially regarding noise levels when speakers or delegates are engaged in addressing the assembly either from the podium or from the floor. 2. appropriate rules of conduct for delegates between and amongst each other while attending an AGM. 23

3. information on the role of media at the AGM and the interaction of the media with delegates. 4. briefing on appropriate rules of procedure including the recording of negative votes and the role and process on in-committee discussions/decisions. 5. information on other matters as appropriate. (Apr 03 Ex, p. 11)

2.A.38—That any publication or documents distributed at Annual General Meetings or Representative Assemblies will be consistent with anti-discriminatory social justice policies of the BCTF. (May 04 RA, p. 12)

2.A.40—That the BCTF cover TTOC costs for a local to send delegate(s) and local representative(s) to the BCTF AGM when the following condition has been met: The local has attempted to negotiate with the board that the employer cover the costs of TTOCs for local delegate(s) and local representative(s) attendance at the AGM when the board has implemented a spring break different from that set by the provincial calendar. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 11) 2.A.42—That all BCTF Annual General and Representative Assembly meetings have: 1. at least one microphone that is easily accessible to people with disabilities. 2. a system in place that allows people with disabilities to speak without having to make their way to a microphone. (Jan 09 RA, p. 9)

2.A.44—That agenda topics that are not required to be scheduled at specific times be varied year-to-year in so far as possible. (Oct 09 Ex, p. 4)

B. Nomination of Executive Members Note: See also Part 5, section 12 of the AGM’s Standing Rules of Order. 2.B.02—1. That a picture of the candidate, and a statement including qualifications, service, and policy statements for all candidates standing in nomination as of the final date for nomination prior to the Annual General Meeting, be published in the Teacher/BCTF newsletter. Such statements are subject to uniform length restrictions and deadline as determined by the editor of the Teacher/BCTF newsletter. Such publication will be provided to members prior to the Annual General Meeting, in the issue of the newsletter setting out the Notice of Annual General Meeting and/or notice of Special Resolutions to members. 2. That BCTF publications not indicate the source of any nomination. 3. That pictures and policy statements of, and biographical data on all candidates nominated from the floor on the first day of the AGM be posted for the information of the delegates. (June 64 Ex, p. 11) (98 AGM, p. 8)

2.B.04—That a BCTF provincial task force or committee, the Provincial Specialist Association Council, or any PSA shall not, as a group, recommend or endorse any candidate for any BCTF Executive Committee position. Members wishing to endorse a candidate or candidates should be identified as individuals only or, subject to local policies, by positions or offices held in a local, but not by any Federation position or office. (89 AGM, p. 51) (98 AGM, p.8)

2.B.06—That Federation resources, including any Federation email list, should not be used to support individual candidates or groups of candidates seeking Federation office with the exception of allowing the posting of the address of a website containing Executive Committee candidate’s election information to the presidents’ email list. (Feb. 01 Ex, p. 27) (May 09 RA, p. 4)

2.B.08—With the published agenda for the Annual General Meeting shall be included the names and pictures of candidates as follows: 24

1. Subject to paragraph b (below), all candidates who stood in nomination as of the final date for nominations prior to the Annual General Meeting pursuant to By-law 5.4(e). 2. If by the close of business on the Friday, two weeks prior to the commencement of the Annual General Meeting, a candidate has formally withdrawn from nomination, the name and photograph of that individual shall not be included. (Oct 90 Ex, p. 9) (98 AGM, p. 8)

2.B.10―That the Federation’s social media tools not be used to promote any individual’s candidacy. (Dec 13 Ex, p. 6) 2.B.12―Campaign conduct That, in the conduct of their campaigns, candidates for BCTF elected office: 1. uphold the principles of the Commitment to Solidarity. 2. be guided by the BCTF harassment policies and procedures for members at BCTF-sponsored meetings and events. 3. refrain from seeking an external platform to malign the Federation or undermine collective strategies of the BCTF. 4. strive to focus on issues, strategies and actions, and to avoid disparaging other candidates on a personal basis. (Nov 14 RA, p. 11–12)

2.B.14―Campaign brochures and paraphernalia That at the BCTF AGM, campaign brochures and paraphernalia (i.e., party favours) for Executive Committee elections be limited to the following items: 1. Buttons indicating the name of a candidate(s) running for an Executive Committee position; and 2. A Special Edition of Teacher to be provided for each AGM delegate on the convention floor with each candidate offered the same amount of space in the publication to articulate a platform and provide links to their own personal campaign materials, web pages, and/or social media accounts. (15 AGM, p. 10) 2.B.16―Special issue of the Teacher That the following apply to the special issue of the Teacher magazine, to be distributed to AGM delegates as per Procedure 2.B.14 of the Members’ Guide to the BCTF: 1. The content be limited to a statement and photo from each candidate for election to the Executive Committee who has declared their candidacy by the deadline specified in By-law 5.4.d. 2. The statements be limited to 300 words, followed by up to three links to additional information online. 3. Candidates may supply a photo or choose to use the photo published in the regular issue of the Teacher. 4. The deadline for receipt of the photo and statement by the BCTF shall be no later than two full weeks before start of the AGM, with the details and date sent to candidates in advance. 5. As per Procedure 2.B.02.3, any candidates nominated from the floor on the first day of the AGM shall have their photo, statement, and biographical information posted for the meeting, however will not be included in the special issue of the Teacher for AGM delegates. 6. This special issue will be in addition to the publication of candidate’s statements, bios, and photos in the Teacher magazine sent to all members, as required by per By-law 5.4.e and Procedure 2.B.02. (Nov 15 RA, p. 6)

C. Resolutions 2.C.02—1. That locals be encouraged to consider submitting recommendations to the Executive Committee or resolutions to the Representative Assembly as an alternative to sending resolutions to the AGM. Locals are encouraged do so throughout the year, whenever issues arise. In the case of recommendations submitted to the Executive Committee, the local will be advised of the outcome of the Executive Committee’s deliberations, including referral to an advisory committee. 2. That locals be encouraged to use their resolutions to the AGM for matters that cannot be addressed by the process outlined above, for emergent issues, or for matters that can only be dealt with

by an AGM, such as revisions to by-laws or policies and procedures previously adopted by an AGM. 3. That, notwithstanding any of the above, locals shall have the right, in their sole discretion, to submit any matter by resolution directly to the AGM, without having first submitted it to the Executive Committee or Representative Assembly for consideration. 4. That chairpersons of BCTF advisory committees be encouraged to make regular use of the Federation’s publications to give the membership advance information concerning activities and problems in their areas of jurisdiction, to the end that delegates to the AGM will be better prepared to deal effectively with the issues placed before them. (Mar 77 Ex, p. 11)

3.

Bargaining

A.

Basic Principles

POLICIES 3.A.01—That the BCTF call on the provincial government to restore to local school boards the traditional fiscal and budgetary autonomy of employers to enter into fair collective agreements and the means to honor such contracts or awards. (85 AGM, p. 6)

(May 11 RA, p. 13)

(95 AGM, p.25)

2.C.04—1. That to be acceptable for consideration by the AGM, a resolution must be published in Reports and Resolutions, or be a “late” resolution. (see AGM Standing Rules 6.C) 2. That to be acceptable for publication in Reports and Resolutions, a resolution must meet the following criteria: a. It is sponsored by: i. a general meeting of a local or sublocal. ii. a local delegate assembly acting for the local in submitting the resolution. iii. an individual member or group of members, provided that the resolution was first moved and considered at a local general meeting and failed to receive the endorsement of the meeting.

3.A.03—That the government ensure that public sector K-12 and adult education bargaining structures be based on: 1. a respect for the role of trustees and local community decision making. 2. an ability to conclude an agreement. 3. bargaining styles that contribute to the achievement of a negotiated settlement. 4. sufficient resources to meet bargaining outcomes.

(15 AGM, p. 10)

b. The process outlined in part (1) above be completed by December 15. c. i. The resolution(s) are submitted to the AGM Coordinator or the Director of the Communications/Campaigns Division on or before December 15. ii. That where a local submits a resolution to the AGM which, in the opinion of the BCTF general counsel, is unconstitutional or exceeds the powers of the AGM, the BCTF general counsel provide advice and the local be permitted to submit an amended resolution before January 25. (00 AGM, p. 14)

(Dec. 96 Ex, p. 7)

3.A.07—That in the event government should establish a commission to review existing provincial bargaining structures for K12 bargaining, the BCTF be guided by the following principles in making any submission to such a commission: 1. Honour full, free collective bargaining, with a preference for local bargaining. 2. Respect for the role of trustees and local community decision-making. 3. An ability to conclude an agreement. 4. Bargaining styles that contribute to a negotiated settlement. 5 Sufficient resources to meet bargaining outcomes. 6. Employer structures that are publicly accountable. (Jan/Feb. 03 RA, pp. 16-17)

(Jan 12 Ex, p. 3)

d. Resolutions may be submitted electronically, through the mail, or by hand. (09 AGM, p. 6) e. It does not call for reaffirmation of present policies or procedures. f. It is submitted with a supporting statement containing evidence and argument in support of the resolution. g. The supporting material does not appear in a series of clauses introduced by “whereas.” h. That adoption of a resolution by the AGM does not imply adoption of any supporting material. (76 AGM, pp. 6–7, 54) (89 AGM, p. 24)

2.C.06—That the Executive Committee review resolutions from locals being forwarded to the AGM, and provide advice, as appropriate, with that advice being indicated in the Reports and Resolutions booklet. (Jan 06 Ex, p. 4) (Apr 10 Ex, p. 8)

2.C.08—That in preparation for the Annual General Meeting, a meeting of the Resolutions Committee and chairpersons be convened as soon as possible after the deadline for submission of local resolutions to the AGM has passed to review the resolutions and consider any advice to locals, as appropriate, with regard to possible wording changes, combining of like resolutions from more than one local, and other advice that would facilitate the business of the AGM. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 13) (Jan 10 Ex, p. 16)

PROCEDURES 3.A.02—The BCTF opposes all forms of wage controls, essential service designation by government and other legislative interference with negotiated agreements, as being contrary to the principle of free collective bargaining. (76 AGM, p. 47) (00 AGM, p. 7)

3.A.04—That the BCTF and its locals not negotiate with the employer to place any terms and conditions of employment into board policy. (Sept. 02 Ex, p. 5) 3.A.06—That the BCTF and its locals: 1. not negotiate with the employer to place any stripped terms and conditions of employment into board policy. 2. continue to emphasize to employers and others the importance of full and free collective bargaining rights for teachers regardless of board policies that relate to working and learning conditions. 3. may provide comment on proposed board policies/procedures. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 16) 3.A.08—That when the BCTF is negotiating with BCPSEA about an issue that negatively impacts on a specific local or locals that the local(s) be consulted before any agreements are made between the provincial bodies. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 4)

B.

Objectives

2.C.10—That locals be encouraged to: 1. review with new LRs the governing structures of the BCTF. 2. divert resolutions from the AGM agenda to the Executive Committee or Representative Assembly, as per Policy 2.C.02.

POLICIES 3.B.03—That the BCTF is strongly opposed to the use of any form of merit rating to determine members’ salaries. (86 AGM)

(May 11 Ex, p. 6)

3.B.05—That all teachers be entitled to at least five noninstructional days within the school year calendar to undertake yearend duties such as completing final reports and forms, record keeping, book inventory, filing, planning, class loading, closing classrooms, moving classrooms and contacts with parents; and that

3. connect with other locals sponsoring similar resolutions in order to collaborate on wording. 4. hold delegation meetings in advance of the AGM for orientation and discussion of AGM business. (Oct 09 Ex, p. 3)

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the BCTF lobby the government and Ministry of Education to provide these days. (Jan 97 RA, p. 10) 3.B.07—Teachers Teaching on Call 1. That the BCTF and its locals work to secure contract language that provides for seniority-based TTOC call-out procedures that take into account areas of expertise. (07 AGM, p. 23) 2. That the following principles guide provincial language on callout for TTOCs: a. Based on seniority. b. That the size of the callout list ensures that all TTOCs receive enough work. c. To use seniority earned by TTOCs to move into contract positions through post and fill. (Apr 17 Ex, p. 6) 3.B.13―That non-discrimination clauses in teachers’ collective agreements be amended to include specific protection for members who identify as transgender or who otherwise do not conform to normative gender expectations. (Nov 09 RA, p. 12)

C.

Provincial Government Matters

POLICIES Note: See section on Bargaining and Professional Rights policies.

D.

Disputes

PROCEDURES 3.D.02—That the following dispute procedure statements apply: 1. The Executive Committee may, on receipt of a written request of a local, declare in dispute any district in which: a. the school board repudiates any agreement affecting terms and conditions of employment, or unilaterally withdraws any substantial benefits enjoyed by members. b. the school board terminates any agreement affecting terms and conditions of employment, and refuses to negotiate in good faith for the revision or renewal of such agreement. c. the school board refuses to enter into negotiations for contract provisions that provide for due process and fair personnel practices for members. d. the school board takes any other action that substantially prejudices the rights or tenure of members. e. the members formally agree to participate in a program of job action authorized by the BCTF Executive Committee. 2. The Executive Committee is authorized to place a school district in dispute on receipt of a written request for the local which indicates that the following conditions have been met: a. Other forms of actions have been considered by the local, and information is provided as to why they were not taken or why they were unsuccessful. b. The members of the local have decided to request the indispute status after being informed of the ramifications and limitations of in-dispute tactics. c. The decision has been voted on by a general meeting or Representative Assembly of local members and has received their support. 3. The Executive Committee is authorized to place individual positions in dispute on receipt of a written request from the local which indicates that the following conditions have been met: a. Other forms of actions have been considered by the local executive committee or its representative assembly and information is provided as to why they were not taken or why they were unsuccessful. b. The members of the local, its executive committee, or its representative assembly have decided to request the in-dispute status after being informed of the ramifications and limitations of indispute tactics. c. The decision has been made by a general meeting or representative assembly. 4. Notwithstanding the foregoing procedures, the Executive Committee may in exceptional circumstances, place individual positions or a district in dispute. 26

5. Normally, at the time the Executive Committee places a position(s) or school district in dispute, it will approve a statement that clearly outlines the reasons for the in-dispute designation and state or implies resolution expectations. 6. When a district is placed in dispute, no transfer should be sought or accepted. 7. When a position(s) or school district is placed in dispute, the Federation support will include legal and political assistance but will not guarantee salary. The Federation will: a. inform the district superintendent and school board of the in-dispute status and what it means. b. establish a system for ensuring that dispute-related inquiries are answered consistently, and that the questions/inquiries are analyzed and summaries prepared, as appropriate. c. advertise the dispute within the Federation, in the local media, and in major BC dailies. d. inform other Canadian teacher unions of the dispute. (Nov 10 RA, p.9)

e. help ensure that dispute resolution is actively and creatively pursued. f. provide field assistance to maximize effectiveness of the dispute status. 8. The in-dispute status will normally be lifted by the Executive Committee on the request of the local executive committee. In exceptional circumstances, the Executive Committee may take the position that dispute-resolution criteria have been met, and lift the dispute. Before doing so, it will determine the local’s views on the matter and will, in any event, advise the local of its decision. When the dispute is lifted, the Federation will contact the district superintendent and school board to inform them and will advertise the fact that the in-dispute status has been lifted. (Nov 81 RA, pp. 10-11) (May 86 RA, pp. 6-8)

3.D.04—1. That the in-dispute tactic will normally be used to create pressure to resolve rights-related rather than bargaining disputes, and will normally be used to place individual positions rather than school districts in dispute. 2. That, in consultation with the local(s) affected, the Executive Committee be empowered to authorize the use of the indispute tactic. 3. It shall be a violation of article 9 of the BCTF Code of Ethics for a member to apply for or accept a position in a district that has been placed in dispute. For the purposes of this statement, ‘’teacher’’ shall mean any person who, at the time of application for a position or acceptance of a position, is a BCTF member, or who becomes or will become a BCTF member upon appointment to a position. An indispute strategy is deemed to be a “collective strategy” under the BCTF Code of Ethics. (86 AGM, p. 33) (06 AGM, p. 21)

3.D.06—That any position arising in a school district during any unresolved district-wide dispute be considered to have arisen from the dispute. (May 77 RA, p. 26)

E.

Negotiations—BCTF Role

POLICIES 3.E.01—That the differential between the salaries of teachers and administrative allowances, should be much smaller. (87 AGM, p. 17) (97 AGM, p. 15)

3.E.03—That the salary for a part-time teacher should be in direct proportion to that fraction of the full-time duties inclusive of preparation time. (Oct 80 RA, pp. 10–11) PROCEDURES 3.E.02—That the BCTF continue to support the principle of local bargaining and oppose provincial bargaining. (92 AGM, p. 46) 3.E.04—That the BCTF staff and provincial bargaining coordinators devise and carry out a co-ordinated program of field service that includes advice and assistance in case preparation and in the use of bargaining tactics at the local and regional levels. (May 70 RA, pp. 6-7)

(75 AGM, p. 8)

3.E.06—That the officers and staff co-ordinate the objectives set for learning conditions, working conditions and salaries, and the efforts of personnel who are working toward accomplishment of these objectives. (May 70 RA, p. 8) (75 AGM p. 8)

3.E.08—That members should be informed of the contents of an Agreement-in-Committee prior to any public release of such information. (May 99 RA, p. 13)

F.

Negotiations—Local Role

POLICIES 3.F.01—That all boards of school trustees should be required by law to indemnify fully all BCTF members for accidents that may occur during the discharge of their duties. (Jan 75 RA, p. 9) PROCEDURES 3.F.02—That locals negotiate local matters on the basis of objectives set locally, after a review of the advice from the provincial Bargaining Conference. (75 AGM, p. 8) (97 AGM, p. 15)

3.F.06—Agreements-in-Committee 1. That Field Service staff members should be fully informed of the terms of any proposed local matters agreement-in-committee well in advance of its approval so that they may meet, discuss with and advise the local on the wisdom of the proposal and its impact, if any, on other locals. (May 97 RA, p. 11) 2. That no agreement should be concluded without receiving this advice. 3. That an opportunity should be given to staff or political officers to present any major concerns to the local. (Feb 83 RA, p. 4) 3.F.08—That locals be encouraged to co-operate with Aboriginal and school districts in the negotiation and implementation of Aboriginal Enhancement Agreements, including monitoring to avoid potential conflict with the provincial collective agreement. (Feb. 99 Ex, p. 22)

3.F.10—That the BCTF request of government that all school boards be required to indemnify fully all BCTF members for accidents that may occur during the discharge of their duties. (May 97 RA, p. 11)

3.F.12—Sign-off and Ratification Process 1. Local Matters Agreements reached by the local parties with respect to “local matters” as identified in Appendix II of the Split of Issues are not subject to ratification by the Federation. 2. Other Matters a. Agreements reached by the local parties with respect to “local options” as identified in Appendix I of the Split of Issues (Provincial Matters) shall be subject to ratification by the provincial parties. b. The agreement of a full-time table officer, either of the cochief negotiators and the Director of the Collective Agreement and Protective Services Division shall constitute ratification on behalf of the Federation with respect to agreements reached by the local parties pursuant to paragraph (i) above. This group may refer any issue to the Executive Committee for advice and/or decision. (Apr. 01 Ex, p. 2)

3.F.14―That locals may produce their agreements in a format suitable to their needs except that such format should not pose any obstacles in a grievance/arbitration situation. (Sept 08 Ex, p. 8) 3.F.16―That the BCTF provide support to locals to undertake actions to encourage their trustees to support local bargaining. (May 10 RA, p. 14)

3.F.18―That locals be encouraged and supported to make presentations to their boards regarding the importance of local bargaining and a renegotiated split of issues. (Oct 10 Ex, p. 14)

G.

Provincial Bargaining Structures

PROCEDURES 3.G.02—Bargaining Conference 1. That the Executive Committee schedule a provincial Bargaining Conference of significant duration to adequately deal with the purposes of the conference prior to the commencement of each round of bargaining. (May 99 RA, p. 11) 2. That the purpose of the Bargaining Conference be to approve: a. objectives for the provincial table. b. a broad strategic framework for the upcoming round of bargaining, provincially and locally. (Nov 16 RA, p. 7) 3. That the delegates to the Bargaining Conference be: a. i. members of the Executive Committee. ii. members of the Bargaining Team (exclusive of staff). (May 99 RA, p. 11) (Nov. 00 RA, p. 9)

iii.   

local delegations consisting of: local president or designate local bargaining chairperson or designate further local delegates elected by the local on the basis of one further delegate per 250 members (FTE) or portion thereof in excess of the first 400 members. b. That the delegates in i.–ii. have one vote each and no such delegate shall have more than one vote. c. That the local delegations be entitled to the total number of votes equal to: i. the number of delegates (exclusive of LRs) to which the local would be entitled at the AGM; plus, ii. the number of Local Representatives to which the local would be entitled at the Representative Assembly. (Jan 97 RA, p. 6) (May 97 RA, p. 10)

d. That all members of the WLC/Bargaining Advisory Committee be invited to attend and that each of the following advisory committees be invited to send up to two representatives with voice but no vote: i. Committee for Action on Social Justicen ii. Teachers Teaching on Call Advisory Committee iii. Provincial Specialist Association Council iv. Professional Issues Advisory Committee v. Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee vi. Health and Safety Advisory Committee vii. Income Security Committee viii. Pensions Committee ix. French Programs and Services Advisory Committee x. Adult Education Advisory Committee. (Jan 10 RA, p. 10) e. That the agenda be organized to prioritize advice, updates, and reports from advisory committees and the Executive Committee, to be followed by the setting of objectives. (Jan/Feb. 03 RA, p. 8) (Nov 16 RA, p. 7)

4. a. That input and advice from members on objectives and strategies occur through locals, PSAs, and advisory committees prior to the Executive Committee's making recommendations on those matters to the Bargaining Conference. b. That members through locals, PSAs, and advisory committees have an opportunity to discuss and consider the Executive Committee's recommendations on objectives and strategies prior to the Bargaining Conference. (Nov. 96 Ex, p. 1) c. That groups represented in 3.d be requested to prepare and circulate briefs in support of bargaining objectives. 5. That the Executive Committee be authorized to convene additional Bargaining Conferences, as it determines necessary, at critical junctures in the bargaining process. (May 99 Ex, p. 13) 3.G.06—Bargaining Team 1. That the Provincial Bargaining Team consist of:

27

a. a full-time table officer of the BCTF, one other member of the Executive Committee, and four active members of the BCTF, all appointed by the Executive Committee. b. a chief negotiator appointed by the Executive Committee (upon recommendation of the bargaining team) from the above six members of the team. c. the President of the BCTF as an ex officio member. d. one member of the BCTF staff with voice but no vote. (Aug 12 RA, p. 3)

2. That the following be the terms of reference for the Bargaining Team: a. To assist in the planning of the Bargaining Conference. b. To recommend to the Executive Committee the approval of the package to be presented at the table. c. To negotiate. d. To determine and implement appropriate table tactics consistent with the Federation’s overall bargaining strategy. e. To recommend an agreement-in-committee to the executive. f. To recommend to the Executive Committee, the breaking off of negotiations, job actions, mediation, arbitration, or other processes to achieve a collective agreement. (Nov. 96 RA, pp. 15-16) g. To recommend a chief negotiator to the Executive Committee. (Aug 12 RA, p. 3) 3. That teacher members of the Bargaining Team be seconded by the Executive Committee on a full-time basis when appropriate. (Nov. 96 Ex, p. 6) 4. That the Bargaining Team choose a chairperson to chair meetings of the team. 5. That an orientation be provided for Bargaining Team members regarding: a. workplace protocols, including: i. the roles and responsibilities of support and administrative staff in the operations of the BCTF. ii. the relationship of the team and individual members of the team to the FTTOs and the Executive Committee. b. the relationship of the team and individual members of the team with members. 6. That an opportunity for team building be provided soon after the appointment of the full team. 7. That visits to locals by Bargaining Team members be approved by the FTTOs. 8. That the Bargaining Team be dismissed at an appropriate time following ratification of an agreement-in-committee.

4. recommending objectives and strategies to the Bargaining Conference. 5. receiving objectives and strategies approved by the Bargaining Conference and approving emergent objectives. 6. approving the package. 7. approving, after consultation with the Bargaining Team, the breaking off of negotiations, mediation, arbitration, or other processes to achieve a collective bargaining agreement. 8. recommending job actions or ratification to members. 9. recommending voting procedures to the RA for job actions and ratification. 10. maintaining the link between the Federation and members. 11. approving internal and external communications strategies. 12. developing processes for dealing with bargaining and contract issues which arise after the collective agreement has been ratified; (Nov. 96 RA, p. 16) 13. that during the time that negotiations are underway, the EC make every effort to ensure that the duties undertaken by the fulltime table officers assigned to the team be primarily related to bargaining. (May 99 Ex, p. 13) 3.G.10—Locals That locals assume primary responsibility for: 1. electing delegates to the Bargaining Conference. 2. soliciting input from members of the local with regard to bargaining objectives. 3. providing information and support materials to the Bargaining Team, including surveys of members, for case building, as requested. (May 99 RA, p. 12) 4. bargaining a local matters agreement. 5. providing advice as requested. 6. contract administration at the local level. 7. facilitating information meetings on bargaining, visits of Federation officers and other representatives, and the distribution of Federation-approved materials. 8. organizing provincially authorized votes and job actions. (Nov. 96 RA, pp. 16-17)

3.G.12—Representative Assembly That the Representative Assembly continue to determine the voting procedures pursuant to the Labour Relations Code Regulations to be used when the organization undertakes job action or ratification votes. (Nov. 96 RA, p. 17) (June 01 RA, p. 11)

(Nov. 96 Ex, p. 2)

9. That the Bargaining Team, where feasible, verify with locals provincial information used in negotiations. 10. That the Bargaining Team involve members with specialized experience or expertise to provide information at the table. (May 99 Ex, p. 14) 11. That the BCTF hold negotiations training sessions annually in the fall of each year to facilitate the development of local bargaining teams. (Jan 09 RA, p. 9) 12. That negotiations training sessions be held to facilitate the development of local bargaining teams. (Aug 12 Ex, p.11) (May 13 RA, p. 18)

13. a. That members of the provincial bargaining team not communicate publically on bargaining issues unless requested to do so by the Federation. b. That members of the provincial bargaining team, while seconded on a full-time basis, not have teaching responsibilities or hold any other BCTF or local leadership roles, with the exception of the full-time table officer and Executive Committee member appointed to the team who will continue with their provincial responsibilities. (Aug 12 Ex, p.11) 3.G.08—Executive Committee That the Executive Committee have primary responsibility for the overall conduct and co-ordination of bargaining including: 1. appointing and replacing, as necessary, teacher members of the Bargaining Team. 2. maintaining ongoing liaison with the Bargaining Team. 3. setting the Bargaining Conference .

3.G.14—Miscellaneous 1. That bargaining be a component of summer conferences and, in particular, that the summer conference prior to each new round of bargaining hold discussions and provide training on the objective-setting process and related matters. 2. That while the Federation is engaged in bargaining, bargaining matters be a primary focus of Federation zonal council meetings, and a matter of discussion at other zone meetings. 3. That, as part of the overall bargaining process, the Federation use all-member surveys, as appropriate. (May 99 Ex, p. 13–15)

H.

Mid-Contract Modification Process

PROCEDURES 3.H.02—Modification, exclusive of grievance settlements, includes 1. any amendment to the collective agreement which alters an existing term and condition through addition, omission, or correction. 2. any agreement to waive the provisions of the agreement for the term of the agreement or another specified period. 3. any variation to an established existing term and condition of employment which provides an exception to the rule. 4. letters or Memoranda of Understanding dealing with procedural or interpretive issues relating to the collective agreement. (Oct. 98 Ex, p. 7-10) 3.H.04—Modifications to Local Matters

28

1. Locals must seek Field Service advice prior to making any modifications. 2. Locals may authorize modifications using their own procedures. (Oct 98 Ex, p. 7-10) (Jan 10 Ex, p. 14)

3.H.06—Modification to Provincial Matters—Central Provision(s) Negotiated by Provincial Parties 1. Modification is by the provincial parties. 2. Proposed modification(s) shall be circulated to locals for advice. 3. Dependent upon the nature of the mid-contract modification, ratification shall be by one of the following, as determined by the Executive Committee: a. By the Executive Committee. b. By a vote of the general membership of the BCTF. 4. Where appropriate, ratification in instances of 3.a. or 3.b. shall include a vote by a general meeting in a local or locals directly affected by the change. 5. Amendments shall be framed in a letter of understanding signed by the president. (Oct. 98 Ex, p. 7–10) 3.H.08—Modification of Provincial Matters Multiple Standard in Terms and Conditions Provision of the Collective Agreement (for the term of the 2006–11 agreement) 1. Locals intending to open a specific provision(s) of the local agreement will inform the Field Service Division (FSD) staff person assigned to work with the local of the nature of the proposed modification(s). 2. FSD staff shall provide advice concerning the proposed modification(s) including; reference to any Collective Bargaining Handbook model language on the subject matter for negotiation as well as the impact of the proposed modification(s), if any, on other locals. 3. Locals will seek advice from FSD staff on proposed contract language before tabling at the local level. 4. The local will keep FSD staff informed as to the progress of negotiations. 5. Prior to any written or oral agreement in committee FSD staff will have an opportunity to advise the local as appropriate, and when necessary, consult with an FTTO. 6. Agreements in committee shall be submitted to the BCTF as a Letter of Understanding, signed by the local president or designate, for the signature of a full-time table officer. 7. If the Full-Time Table Officer withholds their signature from the Letter of Understanding, the local may appeal that decision to the BCTF Executive Committee, in open session, as follows: a. Appeals must be supported by the local executive. b. Appeals must be in writing setting out the reasons for the appeal and must be forwarded to the director of FSD within thirty (30) days of the local becoming aware of the full-time table officers’ decision. c. Any and all documentation in support of the appeal must be received by the director of FSD two (2) weeks in advance of the Executive Committee meeting at which the appeal is to be heard. (Sept 10 Ex, p. 11)

d. A member or members authorized by the local executive may appear to present the appeal to the Executive Committee. e. The BCTF will pay the travel and accommodation expenses of one (1) representative of the local. f. The full-time table officer(s) and Federation staff shall be given an opportunity to outline the basis of the decision not to sign the Letter of Understanding. g. The Executive Committee will have an opportunity to ask questions of the local, the FTTO(s) and Federation staff. (Oct. 98 Ex, p. 7–10) (Jan 07 Ex, p. 14)

3.H.10—That locals be encouraged to negotiate, as a midcontract modification, a clause to support green lateral exchange/transfer between districts. (Nov. 07 RA, p. 3)

I.

Working and Learning Conditions

Goals and Principles POLICIES 3.I.01—That the BCTF foster effective teaching and learning conditions throughout the province. Those conditions should provide: 1. For each student: a. The guidance and assistance of a qualified professional teaching staff. b. Access to varied and suitable learning materials. c. A physical environment suited and equipped for the learning planned in that environment. d. A learning environment that encourages active involvement and provides a wide range of first-hand experiences. 2. For each teacher: a. The opportunity and time to fulfill their role as a professional educator. b. Time to plan and organize; time to work with colleagues; time to work with parents; time for career development; time to think. c. Protection from excessive and extraneous demands upon their time and professional skills. d. Adequate space suitable for planning, preparation, marking, conducting interviews and meeting with students, parents, associated professionals, paraprofessionals and colleagues. e. The autonomy to spend a portion of the school’s budget for materials and supplies according to their professional judgment. f. Recognition of the principle of equalizing the load of staff members in the school. 3. For both students and teachers: a. Limitations should be established on class size to improve educational situations. b. Essential class space, texts, equipment and minimum materials and supplies should be provided before the start of any course. (69 AGM, pp. 19–20) (Reviewed Jan 80 Ex, p– 6)

3.I.03—Teachers should not perform duties which rightfully (Nov. 06 RA, p. 4) belong to members of another bargaining unit. (Feb. 07 RA, p. 8)

3.I.05—That the school is a basic educational unit. A desirable situation exists when each school has: 1. an adequate number of highly qualified teaching and support staff. 2. an adequate amount of instructional space that may be flexibly organized to accommodate various sized instructional groups. 3. an adequate budget for instructional materials and supplies, with autonomy for the professional staff of the school in the spending of a significant portion of that budget. 4. a well-equipped library or resource centre. (75 AGM, pp. 13–14) (May 75 RA, p. 18)

3.I.07—A desirable class size and teacher assignment situation exists when: 1. a class does not exceed 15 pupils. 2. a special class does not exceed 10 students. 3. there are no special limitations or extensions associated with courses within the secondary teacher’s assignment, and the average daily student load does not exceed 120. 4. the teacher’s weekly instructional assignment does not extend beyond 20 hours. (69 AGM, pp. 20–21) (79 AGM, p. 6)

3.I.09—That class size in kindergarten and years 1, 2, and 3 should be the lowest of any level in the K to Grade 12 continuum. (Oct 75 Ex, p. 25)

3.I.11—That provision should be made for all elementary and secondary schools to have teacher-counsellors. (Oct 75 Ex, pp. 23–24)

3.I.15—That the equipment and facilities used in business education skill courses should adequately reflect those in the business community. (June 79 Ex, p. 10) 29

3.I.17—That the BCTF continue to lobby the provincial government to establish, in legislation, firm class-size and composition limits and learning specialist teacher/student ratios and caseloads at all grade levels. (07 AGM, p. 18) 3.I.19—That the BCTF lobby the provincial government to provide funding to school districts to reinstate staffing ratios and caseloads for specialist teachers so that services that support student learning can be regained. (07 AGM, p. 18) PROCEDURES 3.I.02—That the BCTF take action to ensure the professional nature of teachers’ tasks by: 1. educating and supporting teachers in refusing to perform tasks more appropriately assigned to school secretaries, office staff, janitorial, maintenance, or transportation staff. 2. including this issue in BCTF research, publications, and campaigns related to professional autonomy. 3. working with CUPE and other affected unions to raise awareness among the public, trustees, and teachers of the amount of clerical and custodial work teachers do, and its detrimental effect on the quality of education. 4. working with CUPE and other affected unions to end the performance by teachers and students of tasks more appropriately assigned to school secretaries, office staff, janitorial, maintenance, or transportation staff. (Nov. 06 RA, p. 4)

J. Declaration Conditions

of

Teaching

and

Learning

POLICIES 3.J.01—Declaration of Teaching and Learning Conditions Preamble: A school system that will foster the growth and development of every individual, to the end that they will become a self-reliant, selfdisciplined, socially and environmentally responsible member of a democratic, pluralistic society, requires appropriate teaching and learning conditions. The Declaration of Teaching and Learning Conditions sets out the teaching and learning provisions that teachers believe will ensure an education system of the highest quality and responsibility. 1. Rights and responsibilities of the local association 1.1 It is the responsibility of the local to ensure that discussion of the declaration takes place. 1.2 It is the responsibility of the local to make an annual presentation to the school board and the public to report on the teaching and learning conditions in the district. 1.3 It is the right and responsibility of the local to participate in any school board established committees whose mandate affects the working and learning conditions of members. All bargaining unit members on such committees shall be appointed by the local. 1.4 It is the right and responsibility of the local to defend and improve the collective agreement. 2. Rights and responsibilities of members and staff (see also Members’ Guide Policy 31.B.02, the BCTF Code of Ethics) 2.1 The staff of a public school has the right and responsibility to ensure a school environment for staff and students that follow participatory democratic practices. (see BCTF Members’ Guide Sections 3.O—Staff Committees, 9.A.03, 31.A.04, 31.A.O2 (5), 30.A.01) 2.2 The staff of a public school have the right and responsibility to provide input to the local for the local budget presentation to the school board. 2.3 It is the right and responsibility of a school staff to advocate for improved teaching and learning conditions. 2.4 A school staff has the right to participate in decisions regarding the allocation of learning resources in the school. 3.

30

Rights and responsibilities of members

3.1 The member has the right to belong to a union that will act on their behalf in negotiating all terms and conditions of their employment and representing them with the employer. 3.2 The member has the right to work in a workplace free from harassment, sexual harassment and free from discrimination on the basis of race, colour, ancestry, place of origin, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, marital status, disability, or family status. 3.3 The member has the right to due process in the pursuit of teaching or learning concerns associated with their assignment. (see BCTF Members’ Guide Policy 50.A.01) 3.4 The member has the responsibility of assessing the quality of the learning conditions provided for the students in their care. (see BCTF Members’ Guide Policy 30.A.15) 3.5 The member has the right and responsibility to participate in decision making regarding the policies and practices in their workplace. 3.6 The member has the right to have employer-provided training in areas that are required for them to perform their duties. 3.7 The member has the responsibility to maintain a standard of practice that reflects current knowledge and research, and the right to choose professional development activities appropriate to their professional inquiries and responsibilities. (see BCTF Members’ Guide Policy 31.A) 3.8 The member has the right to determine methods of instruction, use of technology, planning and presentation of materials and the appropriate assessment and evaluation instruments and strategies. 3.9 The classroom teacher, in collaboration with the schoolbased team and/or other specialist teachers assigned to provide support services to students, shall have the right to determine the placement of, resources for, and support services necessary to the needs of students with special needs and/or diverse learning and other students in the class. (see also Policy 9.A.21 (4)) 3.10 The member has the right and responsibility to report to their local and the BCTF, any conditions that, in their judgment, are detrimental to the welfare, health or safety of students and staff. It is expected that a member will report such conditions to the school staff representative and/or principal, as per local policy and pertinent legislation, prior to reporting them to the local or the BCTF. 3.11 The member has the right to spend a portion of the budget for instructional materials and supplies according to their professional judgment. 3.12 The member shall have the right and responsibility to provide input for the local budget presentations to the school boards. 3.13 Members who are new to the profession, new to the school district, in new assignments and members who work as teachers teaching on call have the right to expect support from the local and the school board in adjusting socially and professionally to the culture of the staff and district in which they are employed. 3.14 The member has the right and responsibility to inform parents of changes in teaching and learning conditions, and the effects on the education of students. 4. Rights and responsibilities of students 4.1 The BCTF recognizes and supports the following rights and responsibilities of students: 4.1.1 The right to enjoy freedom of speech, due process and freedom from any form of abuse, discrimination or harassment and the responsibility to be aware and considerate of the rights of others. 4.1.2 The right to enjoy equal access to free public school education, up to and including grade 12 graduation, regardless of age or disability. This education should include free access to learning materials and to a wide range of curriculum offerings, and the responsibility to utilize available learning resources and take advantage of opportunities for growth and development. 4.1.3 The right to physical environments that are hygienic, safe, conducive to learning and free from barriers to persons with disabilities, and the responsibility to refrain from practices that endanger the safety of others. 4.1.4 The right and responsibility to retain their ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritage and to be made aware of the ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritage of others.

4.1.5 The right and responsibility to participate in decisions in accord with the growth of maturity of the student, both as an individual and as part of the group. 4.1.6 The right to participate, without financial barrier in all courses, programs, activities and clubs sponsored by the school. 4.1.7 The right to a teacher teaching on call when any teacher providing support service to the student is absent (including an administrative officer who may be called away to fulfill administrative duties). The preceding sections set out the rights and responsibilities for BCTF members, local unions, and for students. The sections that follow set out the best provisions for class size, support services materials, resources, facilities and measures to ensure the health and safety of students and staff members. 5. Professional teaching staff formula minimum allocations 5.1 That the following be a Basic Staffing Formula: a. for the first 80 students, one teacher for each 10 students or fraction thereof. b. for each 15 students or fraction thereof over 80, one additional teacher. c. for the purposes of this formula, school teaching staff shall include classroom teachers, teacher-librarians, teachers delivering preparation time, counsellors, learning assistance teachers, and other specialist teachers. 5.2 For purposes of this formula, those teachers employed under special program approvals, with the exception of learning assistance teachers, shall not be included. For example, teaching staff for students with developmental disabilities, or students who are impaired in sight, hearing, or speech shall be in addition to the numbers provided by this formula. 6. Schools with greater educational needs—supplementary staffing 6.1 For schools with greater educational needs additional teachers shall be provided. Factors indicative of greater education needs include: a. the socio-economic status. b. language spoken in the home. c. culture of the families whose children attend the school. d. the presence of students with special learning and/or diverse needs. e. availability of community resources, particularly in small districts. f. social pressures affecting students in rural and urban centres. g. geography. Each school should develop a school/community profile which includes information about the factors mentioned above, to assist in determining the educational needs of the school. The purpose of the supplementary staff is to permit reduced class sizes, a more intensive program of learning assistance and remedial instruction, and increased contact by the school staff with ministry of human resources personnel, public health officials, social workers, home and school workers, and auxiliary professional personnel. 6.2 Additional teachers shall be provided to schools that: 1. are located in the lowest quartile of the BC population on statistical measures of socio-economic status. 2. include a high proportion where language spoken in the home is not English or French or where significant cultural differences exist. 3. include a number of students with special and/or diverse learning needs due to a physical, mental, behavioural or emotional disability or with health issues. 4. are located in the communities where the problems associated with small enrolment require additional programs. 5. are located in environments where the social conditions require additional school programs. Such staffing shall be determined by a school staff after consultation with parents, administrators, auxiliary professional personnel and, wherever possible, the students. This process might involve the use of school profiles, weighting formulas and needs assessments.

6.3 In staffing such schools, the formulas outlined in article 7 shall be supplemented as follows: Elementary and secondary schools  for 60 to 105 students—one teacher.  for over 105 students—one teacher for each additional 100 students or major fraction thereof. For purposes of this formula, those teachers assigned as a result of special education funding shall not be included. For example, teachers for students with developmental disabilities or impairment in sight, hearing or speech shall be in addition to the numbers provided by this formula. 6.4 That a 1.0 FTE resource teacher be provided to schools on a pro-rated basis for every eight students with a ministry special education designation. (Nov 09 RA, p. 12) 7. Class size, teacher workload and specialized services 7.1 Subject to the conditions in article 6.3, minimum criteria shall be observed as set out in subsections 7.2 to 7.10 inclusive. 7.2 Maximum sizes for regularly scheduled classes shall be: Kindergarten 15 students Multi-graded Primary class 15 students Primary single grade class (Grades 1-3) 20 students Intermediate classes of 2 grades 22 students Intermediate classes of 3 grades 17 students Intermediate classes of 4 grades 15 students Special class (including ESL) less than10 students All second language courses and Secondary Humanities classes (English & Socials) 23 students Any other class (4-12) 25 students Any other split class (4-12) 22 students Shops and laboratories 20 students “Regularly scheduled classes” include alternate programs, online learning, distance education, and adult education classes and/or caseloads. The equivalence shall be determined through analysis of the particular circumstances by the teacher and the union. 7.3 The purpose of inclusion of students with special needs into regular classes is to provide a positive educational experience for students with special needs and the other students in the class. Classes shall be smaller than the sizes stated in 7.2 when they include a high proportion of students with learning disabilities, diverse learning, behavioural, emotional or health needs, or with a broad range of student ages, grade levels, or achievement levels. 7.4 Students shall not be segregated or organized into classes by sex or gender identity unless there is a bona fide educational reason to do so. (17 AGM, p. 40) 7.5 That time for planning and collaboration must be included in the weekly instructional time as follows:  Instructional time 72%  Preparation time 16%  Collaboration time 12% (includes time to plan with colleagues, research time, observation time, and assessment/evaluation time). (see BCTF Members’ Guide Policies 49.11, 51.05, 51.07) 7.5.1 Instructional assignment shall be defined as time during the regular timetable week devoted to teaching courses and lessons and shall include time assigned to supervise curricular activities, including study periods. 7.6 That minimum professional staffing for school libraries or Learning Commons shall be: Students TeacherLibrarians 200 or fewer 0.6 201 – 400 1.0 401 – 750 1.5 751 – 1000 2.0 Over 1000 2.5 Plus 0.5 teacher-librarians for each full 400 students above 1,000. Library support staff shall not be used to reduce or replace Teacher-Librarian staffing. The allocation of library support staff shall not exceed the staffing allocation for teacher-librarians. Support staff shall be under the direct supervision of the teacher-librarian. 31

7.7 An adequate number of teacher-counsellors, special education resource teachers, learning assistance teachers, speechlanguage pathologists, psychometricians, teacher-psychologists, and special education assistants shall be provided to meet the needs of all students in elementary and secondary schools. In order to ensure that adequate resources are allocated to a school, the caseload for a learning support teacher shall be based on the following weighting formula: - Category A (Physically dependent) and Category B (Deaf/blind)—4 points - Category C (Moderate to profound intellectual disability), Category D (Physical Disability/Chronic Health Impairment), Category E (Visual impairment), Category F (Deaf or hard of hearing), Category G (Autism spectrum disorder), or Category H (Intensive behaviour interventions/Serious mental illness)—3 points - Category K (Mild intellectual disability), Category Q (Learning disability), or Category R (Moderate behaviour support/Mental illness)—2 points - Category P (Gifted)—0.5 points - Students with no designation but who are seen for ongoing support—2 points - Students presently being assessed and/or in the referral and assessment process—1 point Special case load and/or class composition consideration shall be given for students who exhibit multiple-category needs. The total caseload for any one (1) full-time equivalent nonenrolling teacher for the school year shall not exceed a headcount of thirty (30) students or a weighting of thirty-three (33) points, as per weighting formula above. For those learning specialist teachers who are also enrolling teachers or have other teaching roles, their caseload should be reduced according to the percentage that they are teaching. For example, if a learning specialist teacher is teaching two courses out of a seven-course teaching load, the caseload should be reduced by 28%. 7.8 Qualified teacher-counsellors shall be provided at a minimum of one teacher-counsellor for each 250 students. 7.9 No member shall be required to perform school supervision duties. 7.10 Each member shall be entitled to a teacher teaching on call as a replacement when the member is absent for any reason. 8. Space, facilities and resources 8.1 Classrooms and other space provided shall be sufficiently flexible to allow the staff choices in the organization of classes and groupings and in the application of effective instructional techniques. 8.2 Appropriate space and facilities should be provided to support all the programs offered in the school. 8.3 The size of a room in a school shall be based on a functional plan rather than on a rigid square footage formula, but a minimum classroom size and configuration should be 84 square metres (900 square feet). 8.3.1 Minimum instructional space at the elementary level shall be provided as follows:  4.4 square metres (47 square feet) per student in small schools enrolling up to 50 students; and  250 square metres (2,700 square feet) plus 3 square metres (33 square feet) per student in schools enrolling 51 or more students. 8.4 Library or resource centre space or learning commons space for existing schools shall be: • Up to 100 students—168 square metres (1800 square feet) • 101 or more students—168 square metres (1800 square feet plus .3 square metres (3 square feet) for each student above 100. 8.5 Library resource centre or learning commons space for new schools, major renovations or library additions to existing schools or learning commons shall be:  per studallent .8 square metres (9 square feet). 8.6 All physical library space shall be dedicated and permanent, but flexible enough to accommodate a range of uses including but not limited to teaching space, collaborative working space, and quiet reading and working space. 8.7 Libraries shall be provided: 8.7.1 Ample, up-to-date and good condition print materials to reflect Canadian and global society and to support instruction and 32

student interest and needs through inquiry and voluntary unleveled free reading selection. 8.7.2 Electronic (digital) capacity, including sufficient outlets and devices and access to a broad spectrum of digital materials and tools free from imposed filtering. 8.8 Fully equipped gymnasium, playgrounds, sports fields and outdoor environmental study areas shall be provided. 8.9 Separate changing, lavatory and shower facilities for boys and girls shall be provided to facilitate integrated physical education and sports programs. 8.10 Lavatory facilities for classes including kindergarten, primary or disabled students shall be provided within the classroom or the building in which the classroom is located. 8.11 Adequate space with ventilation and privacy shall be available in all schools for learning specialist and for itinerant staff. 8.12 Accessibility shall be provided around, into and within the school structure for students and members with disabilities and impairments. 8.13 Each school shall have a staffroom of at least 84 square metres, equipped with kitchen facilities, adult washrooms and shower facilities. 8.14 Each member shall have a workspace with access to personal storage, appropriate teaching and professional resources and appropriate technology provided by the district. 9. Health and safety 9.1 All students and staff in public schools and programs have the right to be in schools or programs free from bullying, violence, discrimination, and harassment. 9.2 Classes shall be conducted only in seismically sound facilities that are well-ventilated, clean and where temperature, lighting, humidity, sound level, and other physical conditions are hygienic, safe and conducive to effective learning. 9.3 The number of students in a laboratory, shop or other specialized classroom shall not exceed the number for which the facilities were originally designed. 9.4 All teachers new to assignments, including teachers on call shall receive safety training. Teachers teaching on call will be provided with a practical written guide outlining routine and emergency procedures followed at the school and will be briefed by the employer on all health and safety risks presented by their assignment. 9.5 In any classroom where students with special needs are integrated, appropriate additional safety measures shall be available, and teachers teaching on call will be advised of such measures. 9.6 Students new to a school will not be in attendance until a background check has ascertained that the student poses no risk of violence or until a plan has been written and communicated to all staff and adequate resources and training are in place to eliminate or minimize the risk of violence. 9.7 Districts will have a system to track incidents of violence and/or threats of violence committed by students and parents/guardians, and this history will be communicated to all staff who are likely to have contact with the student and/or parent/guardian. (05 AGM, p. 41) 9.8 Staff, including teachers on call will be apprised of any risk of violence from parents/guardians of students with whom they come into contact. A written plan, including training, shall be in place to eliminate or reduce the risk of violence and communicated to all staff, including teachers teaching on call. (see BCTF Members’ Guide Policies 49.13 and 53.A.29-33) 9.9 Staff will be advised of medical conditions which may affect learning or the health and safety of any students in the school. 9.10 Members will have the appropriate ergonomic conditions. 9.11 Working alone procedures shall be in place for members.when working in isolation, visiting the homes of students, or similar situations. 9.12 Districts shall have an emergency response plan for incidents of catastrophe or violence. (05 AGM pp. 18–24) (14 AGM, pp. 13–15)

K.

General

POLICIES 3.K.01—That innovative schools and practices should be encouraged in order to develop better learning conditions. (69 Ex. p. 21) (Reviewed Dec 78 Ex, p. 16)

3.K.03—That greater emphasis should be given to elementary schools in terms of educational planning and financial assistance. (69 AGM, p. 21) (Reviewed Dec 78 Ex, p. 16)

3.K.07—That the School Act and Regulations be amended to contain health and safety standards for schools that meet or exceed the Workers Compensation Act and Occupational Health and Safety Regulation and that classes shall not be conducted where these conditions are not met. (78 AGM, p. 36) (May 12 Ex, p. 1)

3.K.09—That school districts respect members’ or students’ choices regarding patriotic exercises. (Nov 10 RA, p. 9) (June 82 RA, p. 12)

PROCEDURES 3.K.04—1. That the organizational structure of the BCTF and its locals be modified to reflect a broadened scope of bargaining. 2. That the BCTF encourage locals to establish collective bargaining committees that are representative of major committees including agreements, learning conditions, professional development, status of women, and teachers teaching on call. (81 AGM, p. 13) (93 AGM, p. 3)

3.K.08—With regard to statutory class-size violations, health and safety violations, or other statutory violations, locals be advised to emphasize to employers that no local or member will agree to violate any of the statutory requirements. (Sept. 02 Ex, p. 4) (May 10 Ex, p. 1)

3.K.20―That no local or BCTF member make recommendations to reduce the overall member FTE in a school district’s budget. (11 AGM, p. 19)

L.

Schools With Greater Educational Needs

POLICIES 3.L.01—That the BCTF endorse the following guidelines for staffing schools with greater educational needs: 1. School boards should adopt staffing policies based on the unique needs of each school as indicated by socio-economic status, language spoken in the home, and the culture of the families in the community served by the school. 2. Compensatory features should be provided for staff of greater needs schools, such as lighter teaching loads, smaller classes, extra equipment, additional specialist assistance (including health care and diagnosis and learning disorders), auxiliary personnel, translation services and in-service training. 3. Time should be allocated specifically for joint planning by all staff members for all programs necessary to meet the special needs of all students in greater needs schools. (May 76 Ex, pp. 24–25)

3.L.03—That the federal and provincial governments should provide increased funding to school boards to ensure improved educational opportunities for students who come from homes where English is not spoken. (77 AGM, p. 18) 3.L.05—That the BCTF lobby the Ministry of Education to remove the five-year funding cap for ESL and ESD students. (08 AGM, p. 22)

3.L.07—That the BCTF and its locals lobby boards to provide free in-service training during instructional hours with release time and TTOC coverage for teachers in the areas of ESL/LAC and/or Special Needs. (Nov 08 RA, p. 13)

M.

School Day and Year

POLICIES 3.M.01—1. Maximum compulsory attendance by students and regular classroom teachers should not exceed 25 hours per calendar week. 2. A regular classroom teacher should not be required to offer more than 20 hours of instruction per calendar week. 3. The number of compulsory attendance days per week should not exceed five. 4. The number of compulsory attendance days per school year for students and teachers should not exceed 190. 5. There should be one week each month with only four compulsory attendance days. 6 A vacation period of five school days should be provided, commencing on the last Monday in March. (Mar 78 Ex, p. 10) 7. The afternoon session of kindergarten should be of two hours’ duration. (May 71 RA, pp. 13-14) (75 AGM, p. 93)

8. No student should be required to be absent from their home for more than eight hours a day as a result of the school timetable, shifts, extended days or bus schedules. (May 71 RA, pp. 13-14) (Reviewed Mar 78 Ex, p. 10)

9. The Ministry of Education should provide more time for elementary teachers to conclude year-end administrative procedures and to prepare for next year. (Sept 74 Ex, p. 7) (Reviewed Dec 78 Ex, p. 16)

10. Each school district should be allowed to hold a track meet on an instructional day. (Reviewed Mar 79 Ex, p. 9) (Jan 10 RA, p. 10)

3.M.05—That when November 11 falls on a Saturday or Sunday, the Monday following November 11 should be declared a statutory holiday. (Jan 73 Ex, p. 7) (Dec 94 Ex, p.9)

3.M.07—That the School Act be amended to grant Kindergarten teachers up to 20 school days for home/school orientation at the beginning of the school year. (79 AGM, p. 7) (11 AGM, p. 19)

3.M.09—1. That in schools where parent-teacher interviews are mandated, teachers be provided with one non-instructional day for each set of class interviews they are required to conduct. (June 06 RA, p. 11)

2. That these days should be used at the discretion of each school in the district for parent-teacher interviews. 3. That these days should be in addition to the present five non-instructional days approved by the Ministry of Education. (79 AGM, p. 8)

3.M.11—1. Voluntary programs and activities include all those that are beyond the provincially prescribed and locally determined curricula of the school. 2. All extra-curricular activities are voluntary and are outside the regular duty of the member. 3. Advertisements and application forms for teaching vacancies and/or transfers shall not include reference to voluntary activities and programs. 4. Involvement or non-involvement of a member in voluntary activities is outside the scope of a report on the work of the member. (82 AGM, p. 27)

3.M.13—That there is no need for holding summer pre-opening day staff meetings that involve the entire staff. (Jan 81 RA, p. 5)

3.M.15—That the Ministry of Education declare a provincial school holiday on the third Monday of February each year to be designated Heritage Day and the start of multiculturalism week in schools. (Feb 82 RA, p. 17) (Nov 10 RA, p. 9)

3.M.17—That the BCTF oppose the loss of non-instructional (Sept 82 RA, p. 2) days. 3.M.19—Extended Day 33

That the implementation of extended days be conditional upon the following: 1. An extended day not be imposed as a precondition to getting a new school built or a renovation. 2. Extensive consultation with the local, school staff, parents, and the community. 3. Consideration of the educational implications of an extended day with respect to student learning, course offerings, and school programs. 4. Compliance with all terms of collective agreements or, in the absence of contract language, the agreement of the local. 5. Contract provisions providing protection with respect to hours of work, instructional time, preparation time, assignment of staff in the school, and related issues. 6. Voluntary participation by teachers with transfer provisions for those unwilling to participate in an extended day. 7. Protection against split shifts, an annual review, and approval by the local. 8. Provision of adequate staffing, funding, and resources to provide for increased costs related to maintenance and supervision. 9. Limitation of extended day classes to students in Grades 10-12. (Nov. 97 RA, p. 6) 3.M.21—That the BCTF oppose school calendar changes that are driven primarily by education underfunding. (Jan/Feb. RA 03 p. 18)

3.M.23—That the BCTF and locals consider any proposals on school calendar changes on the basis of: 1. whether learning and teaching is enhanced. 2. the impact on childhood and family life. 3. the impact on working parents. 4. the long-term implications for teachers’ salaries and hours of work. 5. whether other members and support staff lose pay and/or work. 6. the impact on professional development and professional development days. 7. the impact on other public services in the communiy such as policing. 8. the health and safety of both staff and students. 9. the language in the collective agreement. (Jan/Feb 03 RA p. 18)

3.M.25—That locals call upon school boards to ensure that any discussion of school calendar changes involves the broadest community input and is representative of the community, including people from all socio-economic backgrounds. (Jan/Feb 03 RA p. 18) 3.M.27—That the BCTF request school boards to work with union locals to find solutions to the problems of schools on the semester system where teachers have no scheduled regular preparation time for an entire semester. (07 AGM, p. 13) 3.M.29—That the Federation request that the ministry schedule January provincial exams so semesters are of equal length in the standard school calendar. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 1)

N. School Staffing, Teacher Aides, Auxiliaries and Volunteers POLICIES 3.N.01—That auxiliary school personnel are those adults who serve, in a paid capacity, to assist the teaching and administrative staff in the performance of duties. This assistance shall be under the direction and supervision of the teaching and/or administrative staff. “Direction’’ means teaching and learning activities will be designed, initiated, and evaluated by teachers; ‘’supervision’’ means the activity will be carried out in such a place and manner that the teacher can readily conduct ongoing evaluation. Auxiliary school personnel include such persons as teacher aides, school aides, library aides, supervision aides, lab assistants, markers, and child care workers; excluded are school secretaries and janitorial, maintenance and transportation staff. (75 AGM, pp. 73-74) 34

(76 AGM, p. 97)

3.N.03—That auxiliary school personnel may be used effectively to perform: 1. routine clerical duties, such as checking student attendance, distributing supplies and books, collecting and recording money, marking workbooks and exercises that may be checked by use of an answer key, recording marks as directed; 2. general housekeeping, such as maintaining bulletin boards, setting up equipment; 3. preparing teacher aids, such as charts, flash cards, transparencies, stencils, tapes, and pictures; 4. supervising in school buildings, on playgrounds, in study halls, and on field trips; 5. preparing and maintaining science and shop supplies and equipment; 6. supervising students and performing clerical duties in the library. (75 AGM, p. 74) (Reviewed Jan 80 Ex, p. 6)

3.N.05—That auxiliary school personnel may be used effectively to perform, on a one-to-one or group basis, such instruction-related tasks as listening to students read and conducting drills. Auxiliary school personnel who have training in a specific area may be used as resource persons to demonstrate such skills or talents. In all instances such functions must be performed under the direction and supervision of a teacher; in no instance shall auxiliary school personnel assume diagnostic, prescriptive or evaluative responsibilities; nor shall auxiliary school personnel independently initiate learning activities. (75 AGM, p. 74) (76 AGM, p. 97)

3.N.07—That auxiliary school personnel shall not: 1. infringe in any way upon the responsibilities of a teacher. 2. assume any instructional responsibilities in the absence of a teacher. 3. tutor or instruct on a one-to-one or group basis. 4. provide any form of direct or independent remedial instruction. (75 AGM, p. 74) (Reviewed Jan 80 Ex, p. 6)

3.N.09—That, notwithstanding any other statements in this section, auxiliary school personnel shall not be used as alternatives for: 1. lowering of the student/teacher ratio. 2. qualified professional personnel, including librarians, counsellors, and teachers teaching on call. 3. adequate secretarial services. 4. adequate equipment. (75 AGM, pp. 74-75) (Reviewed Jan 80 Ex, p. 6)

3.N.11—That auxiliary school personnel assisting in a classroom situation must do so under the direction and supervision of a qualified classroom teacher. Auxiliaries whose tasks are of a general supportive nature and who are not working under the direction and supervision of an individual teacher shall be under the direction and supervision of the school staff. (75 AGM, p. 75) (76 AGM, p. 97)

3.N.13—That, when discussions are held or decisions are made with respect to students that arise from the work of associated professionals, the teacher(s) of those students must be involved. (75 AGM, p. 75) (Reviewed Jan 80 Ex, p. 6)

3.N.15—That district staffing requirements for professional teachers and, where appropriate, requirements for associated professionals and auxiliary school personnel be a matter of negotiation between the local and the school board. (75 AGM, p. 76) (Reviewed Jan 80 Ex, p. 6)

3.N.17—That conditions governing the selection, assignment, evaluation, and dismissal of auxiliary school personnel be a matter of negotiation among locals and school boards and employees’ associations or unions. (75 AGM, p. 76) (Oct 80 RA, p. 4)

(79 AGM, pp. 8–9, 37–39)

3.N.19—That appropriate pre-service and in-service training programs for auxiliary school personnel and the teachers with whom they work should be a matter for negotiation. (Oct 80 RA, p. 4) (97 AGM p. 45)

3.N.06—That the BCTF use every opportunity to create member and public awareness of the difference between the Student-Educator Ratio and actual class size figures. (79 AGM, p. 8) (97 AGM, p. 45)

3.N.21—That auxiliary school personnel should be hired as an addition to the allowable numbers of teachers rather than as alternatives to teachers. (Feb 76 Ex, pp. 4-5) 3.N.23—Volunteer participation in schools should be encouraged and should be related to educational programs where volunteers can bring their special talents to schools. As a general rule, volunteers should be used on a by-need, special occasion basis in the co-curricular and voluntary activities of the school. Teachers will respect the provisions of any collective agreements between boards and non-teaching employees regarding the use of volunteers in the schools. In the absence of any such provisions in collective agreements teachers shall be guided by the following principles: 1. Policies regarding the use of volunteers should be developed at the district level and with agreement from the school board, the local and non-teaching employee unions. 2. Implementation of policies on use of volunteers should be monitored by a committee with representatives from the school board, the local(s) and non-teaching employee unions. 3 Districts should develop through such monitoring committees mechanisms for: a. ensuring school adherence to policies. b. resolving conflicts that may arise between teaching or nonteaching staff and volunteers. 4. Volunteer participation in schools should complement the work of paid teaching and non-teaching staff and should not substitute for it. 5. Volunteers should not be used in schools to replace teachers, teacher aides or other school personnel who have been laid off or had their hours of work cut. 6 Volunteer participation in schools should not be a substitute for adequate staffing by professional and non-teaching support personnel. (May 86 RA, pp. 15, 16) PROCEDURES 3.N.02—That the BCTF support innovative or research projects in school staff when the following criteria are met: 1. The local and the BCTF are consulted, and the approval of the local is obtained with regard to the form of participation of its members. 2. Whenever feasible, experimental-control group situations are established. 3. Appropriate selection and training procedures are established for any auxiliary school personnel involved. 4. A well-defined evaluation process is part of the program. 5. The duration of the program is clearly specified. 6. Provided that it is not contrary to existing BCTF policy. (75 AGM, p. 76) (Reviewed Jan 80 Ex, p. 6)

7. Participation of members and students be entirely voluntary, and that clear opt-out procedures be identified for any potential research. (Jan 10 Ex, p. 2) 3.N.04—That the BCTF: 1. reject the assumption that declines in student population need be accompanied by declines in teaching staff. 2. maintain that the prime consideration for staffing of schools be that of student needs. 3. resist layoffs of teachers until such time as all the educational needs of students are met. 4. oppose any increase in student/teacher ratio. 5. insist that local school boards replace any staff lost through retirements, resignations and terminations until such time as all the educational needs of students are met. 6. offer to work with the BCSTA and local school boards to obtain adequate financial support for education.

3.N.08—That the BCTF encourage teacher locals to hold liaison meetings on a regular basis with locals of CUPE and other unions that represent teaching assistants and other non-teaching personnel in their district. (Oct 95 Ex, p. 4)

O.

Staff Committees

PROCEDURES 3.O.02—1. Purposes That the purposes of staff committees are: a. to promote democratic decision-making in schools. b. to ensure greater commitment to decisions. c. to enhance professionalism and the quality of education. 2. Role and Responsibility Principles governing the role and responsibility of staff committees: a. are based on principles of participatory democracy, professional practise and collegiality. b. are consistent with the terms of local collective agreements and Federation policy. c. provide an opportunity for every staff member to be directly involved in shaping the educational policies and practices of the schools. d. provide teachers with the authority and autonomy to reflect on their practice, share and analyze this reflection with colleagues and apply the results of this analysis to the practical, day-to-day decision and policy making at the school level. e. provide a forum for collegial problem-solving on matters of resource allocation, education policy and professional practice within the school. 3. Scope of Function That the function of staff committees are consistent with the local collective agreement, local policy and BCTF policy. That the function of staff committees be to review and make recommendations on any matters of staff concern which may include but shall not be limited to the following. a. Review each teacher's assignment under the following headings: i. Adequate physical requirements. ii. Suitable class size and composition. iii. Suitable instructional assignment. iv. An adequate supply of learning materials. v. An adequate auxiliary staff. vi. Time to plan, to organize and to work with individual students, with colleagues, and with parents. vii. Student evaluation (reporting on student progress). b. Assess the teaching and learning conditions within the school and make recommendations for improvement in the total teaching situation. c. Assess the need within their schools for, and the appropriate utilization of resource persons from other government ministries. (95 AGM, p. 18) d. Study and make recommendations on: i. school regulations, policies and routines. ii. school educational policy. iii. non-instructional days. iv. school curriculum planning and evaluation. v. school timetable and organization. vi. school staffing including utilization of teaching staff and auxiliary staff. vii. professional development. viii. staff development. (Nov 09 RA, p. 12) e. Establish structures that promote effective communication and co-operation between staff and the school’s parent advisory committee.

35

f. Receive representations from members of the community, students and/or committees of students in such a manner as may be agreed to by the committee. g. Have access to and review all school level budget and financial information. h. Ensure that all staff are provided with the relevant information to assist the staff in making educationally sound decisions. i. Explore any other matters of concern to members of the school staff. j. Have input into defining the in-school role, function and tasks of the school's administrator(s). (95 AGM, p. 16) 3.O.04—1. That the decisions made by a school staff may be made by consensus of the whole staff, by majority vote, or by delegation to any staff committee or group authorized by the school staff to make decisions on its behalf; however such practices shall not serve to limit the right of teachers to involvement in the decision making process. 2. That the school staff should not concede to administrative officers the right to reject democratically determined decisions of staff. 3. That decisions made by the staff, or by any group authorized by the staff to make decisions, shall be open to review and revision by the school staff. (06 AGM, p. 17) 3.O.06—Local Support for Staff Committees 1. That policies and guidelines with respect to staff committees shall be consistent with the terms of the local collective agreement and with BCTF policy. 2. That where the collective agreement is silent on the matter, the locals develop policies on staff committees with respect to the following: a. size and composition of school staff committees. b. relationship between staff committees and other school based committees, non-teaching personnel, parent advisory council, and student council. c. guidelines for the framing of staff committee constitutions that include: i. voting and election procedures, including election of a chair. ii. scheduling meetings. iii. development of the agenda. iv. reporting and circulation of minutes. v. conduct of meetings. vi. decision making process. vii. role of the staff representative. (90 AGM, pp. 65-67) (97 AGM, p. 45)

3.O.08—That BCTF members invite all unionized non-teaching staff in our schools to attend and participate, without voting rights on contractual matters, in staff committee meetings, where appropriate. (June 06 RA, p. 11)

P.

Desirable Criteria for School Libraries

POLICIES 3.P.01—Every public school student in British Columbia is entitled to meaningful and substantive library services. The school library or learning resources centre provides a dynamic environment made up of a vital mix of people, materials, equipment, furnishings, and space, and this centre is responsive to the individual and curricular needs of all students and staff of the school. While the classroom is the core of the learning situation, the success of the educational process relies on an adaptable and enriching library program. To meet each school’s particular needs, there should be a clearly enunciated library philosophy and program plan designed by the librarian(s) in consultation with the staff and other resource personnel, taking into account the needs of the individual student, the curriculum, the school, and the community. The most vital part of any library is the personnel responsible for its operation. It is imperative that the librarian be trained in the fields of librarianship and education, and that the services of such a person 36

be available to every school on a continuous basis for the whole school day. The librarian as an educational leader should be a positive force, facilitating the interaction between people and resources within the school and the community. Trained supportive clerical and technical staff are also essential to an operative library program. The library collection, both print and nonprint, must reflect the needs of the curriculum as well as the personal interests of individual students. The library collection must be kept relevant and current and the resources must be sufficiently extensive to support all aspects of the educational program. The process of selection should reflect high quality materials in the most appropriate format. The library budget must also reflect these needs and goals. Adequate time and a wide variety of selection aids are two necessary adjuncts to selection. Provision for teachers and students to be involved in the selection process is essential to the development of a usable collection. School staffs must be involved in planning the design and furnishings of the library facility for present and future needs. The space must be extensive enough to meet the objectives of the school's teaching and learning programs and processes, and to provide for the individual needs of students. All teachers and administrators within the school system must be made familiar with the philosophy and goals of school librarianship. PROCEDURES 3.P.02—When a teacher librarian’s services are not available, in the library, teachers shall not assume the duties of that teacher librarian or utilize the services of a volunteer or any other person to do the work of the teacher librarian. (05 AGM, p. 47)

4. Boards of School Trustees, School Districts, and BC School Trustees Association POLICIES 4.01—That the BCTF favour joint meetings of BCTF and BCSTA officers and/or committees, when an exchange of information or of points of view is desirable. (54 AGM, p. 21) (Reviewed Jan 76 Ex, p.23)

4.03—Amalgamation―District Reorganization Reorganization, sharing of services, or amalgamation of any school district must: 1. ensure that the community or communities involved have the opportunity for thorough discussion and input prior to any final decisions. 2. provide for the development of a better learning environment with superior opportunities for students in the district(s) concerned. There must be no “averaging down” for the standard of education in the district(s) concerned. 3. ensure that decisions are based on sound educational principles and that financial and administrative considerations are secondary to educational concerns. 4. guarantee that collective agreement provisions covering both teaching and non-teaching personnel be respected and that no employee lose any rights or benefits. Any outstanding grievances must be resolved prior to any reorganization or amalgamation. 5. ensure that any districts affected by reorganization or amalgamation receive adequate additional provincial funding to facilitate changes during the transition period. 6. ensure that a fair and equitable governance structure be guaranteed. 7. take into consideration demographic trends and geographic factors. 8. provide a reasonable transition period for the parties to resolve outstanding issues. (Jan 26/95 Ex, p. 2-3) 4.05—Bill 34—School Amendment Act, 2001

That the BCTF opposes those features of Bill 34 that grant further powers to the minister and the cabinet to appoint special advisors and replace school boards. May 02 RA, p. 17) 4.07—That the BCTF oppose the provisions of Bill 34 that enable school boards to incorporate limited liability companies. (May 02 RA, p. 17)

4.09—That the BCTF supports maintaining elected local school boards to be responsible for the K-12 public education system as essential to maintaining a democratic society and locally responsive public education system. (May 02 RA, p. 17) 4.11—That the BCTF opposes any plans to introduce regional, appointed boards with responsibilities for broad areas of service outside of K-12 public education. (May 02 RA, p. 17) 4.13—That the BCTF call on the provincial government to consult broadly with communities and organizations before making any decisions on changing the governance of K-12 public education. (Oct. 05 Ex, p. 4)

4.15—1. That the BCTF supports locally elected school boards to be responsible for the K-12 public education system and opposes any plans to introduce regional boards. 2. That the BCTF is opposed to any initiatives to introduce school-based budgeting or other forms of school-based management that conflict with the democratic nature of public schools being governed by locally elected school boards. 3. That the BCTF oppose the government plan for the “repurposing” of school boards. (06 AGM, p. 9) 4.17—That the BCTF and its locals oppose government’s proposals to institute “school centred leadership” in schools and “shared business systems” in districts and seek the co-operation of school support staff unions in this opposition. (06 AGM, p. 9) 4.19—That the BCTF and its locals work with trustees, parents, and supportive partner groups to convince the government to: 1. rescind its plans to pilot or make mandatory “shared business systems” and “school centred leadership.” 2. uphold elected trustees’ rights to determine levels of funding and staffing at schools. 3. halt its plans to give districts the right to contract in or out services such as contract enforcement, professional development, and support services. (06 AGM, p. 9) 4.21—That the BCTF raise concerns with the ministry’s school district auditing process to address in particular: 1. the lack of consistency between districts depending on audit teams 2. the clarity and transparency of the audit process and the implementation of a consistent process 3. transparency of audit reports and recommendations 4. a shift toward the purpose of the audit process being to support, guide, and clarify ministry expectations and away from the primary purpose being to penalize districts and claw back of funding 5. the absence of district accountability for federal revenues 6. the frequency of audit. (May 08 Ex, p. 15) PROCEDURES 4.02—That the BCTF work with locals and members to ensure that the boards of school trustees are able to continue to exercise their democratic, elected responsibilities and obligations to the community without interference from outside agencies such as BCPSEA or the Teacher Regulation Branch. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 18) (Nov 16 Ex, p. 7)

4.04—That should any trustee or school board be penalized as a result of their commitment to maintain stability in the public school system and the continued employment of teachers, the Federation will offer its assistance and support. (Nov. 03 Ex, p. 6)

5.

CLC/BC Federation of Labour

POLICIES 5.01—That the following constitute a BCTF Statement on the Labour Movement: The BCTF is a “union of professionals.” We are a union because we collectively represent our members in bargaining and enforcing a collective agreement that determines the terms and conditions of our employment. As professionals we have broad latitude to exercise our expertise and autonomy in our working lives. As working people who work for a salary set through bargaining, we share a common experience with other trade unionists in both the public and the private sector. We not only share common experiences, we have common values and often common goals about the type of society we collectively hope to achieve. It is only right that we should be part of the organized labour movement in this province and this country. That means affiliation with the BC Federation of Labour and the Canadian Labour Congress. Through these affiliations, we are also able to join and participate in local labour councils. The labour movement has always had a credo which the BCTF strongly endorses: what we desire for ourselves, we desire for all. The Federation’s affiliation with the BC Federation of Labour/CLC is based in the belief that the labour movement must take a leadership role in building a just, equitable, and sustainable world. It is the collective strength of working people, working together through the labour movement under the leadership of the BCFed and the CLC, that will move us closer towards realizing economic improvement and social progress in this country. Through participation in the BC Federation of Labour and the Canadian Labour Congress, the BCTF is guided by the following: 1. working towards economic improvement and social progress for all citizens of BC and Canada. 2. working to ensure that the labour movement always represents the collective best interests of all working people through its policies and public advocacy. 3. seeking ways and means for the labour movement to enhance its collective strength by acting collectively and in solidarity with the interests of all of its members. 4. advocating for structures and processes in the labour movement that will enhance broad participation of trade unionists. 5. developing strategies within the BCTF that enhance greater awareness and participation of BCTF locals and members in the work of the labour movement. 6. seeking the support of working people to strengthen the public education system. (06 AGM, p. 25) 5.03—That the BCTF encourage all locals to affiliate with an appropriate Labour Council and elect delegates to the BC Federation of Labour convention and take steps to regularly include costs for the bi-annual BC Federation of Labour convention in local budgets. (Apr 03 Ex, p. 11) (Dec 14 Ex, p. 10)

5.05—That the BCTF urge the Government of Canada to support following international Labour Organization Conventions: 1. The Right to Organize and Collective Bargaining Convention, 1949 (#98). 2. The Labour Relations (Public Service) Convention, 1978 (#151). 3. The Collective Bargaining Convention, 1981 (#154). 5.07—That the BCTF work with other teacher and education worker unions to organize an education caucus at conventions of the CLC. (Sept. 08 Ex, p. 6) PROCEDURES 5.06—Affiliation The financial costs of labour affiliation be as follows: 1. That the BCTF cover the full cost of fees for affiliation to the Canadian Labour Congress. 2. That the BCTF cover the full cost of fees for affiliation of all locals to the BC Federation of Labour. 3. That the BCTF cover the full cost of fees for affiliation to local labour councils for those locals that decide to affiliate to their labour council. (06 AGM, p. 32) 4. That, where the labour council has been dissolved by the CLC and a community-based labour organization remains in place, 37

the Federation will continue to pay the cost equivalent to the local’s labour council affiliation fees, to a community-based labour organization on the condition that: a. the community labour organization has a broad base of union participation beyond the BCTF local, a structure for financial accountability, and formal decision-making procedures in place. b. the local has decided through a vote of a general meeting or staff representative assembly to join the community-based labour organization rather than the replacement structures put in place by the CLC. c. the local provides ongoing reports of the activities and viability of the community labour organization. d. the grant is reviewed on an annual basis. (12 AGM p. 13)

1. Resolutions from locals will be submitted directly to the BC Federation of Labour, with a copy to the BCTF. (June 06 RA, p. 8) 2. Resolutions from the BCTF will be approved by an AGM, RA or Executive Committee meeting and circulated to locals in advance of the BCFed convention. (Jan 04 Ex, pp. 15-16)

5.08—That the BCTF representatives to the BC Federation of Labour Executive Council be the President, First Vice-President, and one member elected by the Representative Assembly.

(May 16 Ex, p. 10)

(May 06 Ex, p. 1) (Dec 14 Ex, p. 10–11)

5.10—1. That the member elected by the Representative Assembly to serve on the BCFed Executive Council: a. be elected annually at the Spring Representative Assembly to serve for the subsequent school year, July 1 to June 30. b. be an active member of the BCTF for the year to be served. c. be nominated by at least 10 active members of the BCTF. 2. Submit their nomination and a curriculum vitae by noon on the first day of the RA at which the election is to be held. (May 06 Ex, p. 1)

3. The Federation will cover the cost of the BCTF rep to the BCFed Executive Council, elected by the Representative Assembly, to attend the BC Federation of Labour convention, regional conferences, and BCTF Representative Assemblies, and, if not already a delegate from their local, to the AGM in a non-voting capacity. (Jan 16 RA, p. 7) (Jan 17 RA, pp. 13–14)

5.12—That the BCTF President serve as Vice-President of the BC Federation of Labour. (May 03 Ex, p. 3) (May 06 Ex, p. 6)

5.14—1. That a BC Federation of Labour report be provided at all meetings of the Executive Committee and the Representative Assembly and at the Annual General Meeting. 2. That the Executive Committee provide input and advice to the president on issues and matters being considered by the BCFed. (May 03 Ex, p. 3)

5.16—That locals or members seeking to have issues raised at the meetings of Officers or the Executive Council of the BC Federation of Labour should forward such matters to the BCTF Executive Committee. (May 03 Ex, p. 3) 5.18—That bilateral meetings between the full-time table officers of the BC Federation of Labour and the BCTF occur on a regular basis. (May 03 Ex, p. 3) 5.20—1. That a BCTF caucus consisting of all BCTF delegates be convened by the Executive Committee prior to the opening of each BC. Federation of Labour convention. 2. That the Executive Committee appoint one of the three BCTF representatives to the BC Federation of Labour Executive Council, as the caucus chairperson, prior to the convention. 3. That BCTF delegates be encouraged to attend BC Federation of Labour equity caucus meetings at convention, where possible. (June 13 Ex, p. 22) (May 16 Ex, p. 10)

5.22—That BCTF delegates selected by locals to attend the annual convention of the BC Federation of Labour be elected by a general meeting of the local. (May 03 RA, p. 15) 5.24—BCFed Conventions That the following be the procedure for forwarding resolutions from the BCTF to the BC Federation of Labour convention: 38

(May 04 RA, p. 9)

3. That the table officers provide an overview of important labour issues at the pre-convention caucus meeting. 4. That the BCTF communicate directly with elected delegates from locals regarding information on the convention and caucus meetings. 5. That a list of all BCTF convention delegates be provided to BCTF delegates at the pre-convention caucus meeting. (Jan 04 Ex, pp. 15-16) 5.26―BCFed convention delegates That, if a local does not elect a full delegation to the BC Federation of Labour convention, the vacant spot on their delegation will revert to the BCTF for redistribution as follows: 1. Locals will endeavour to elect their delegates by October 30 and, after doing so, will notify the BCTF of any unfilled spots in their delegation. 2. The Federation will redistribute the unfilled spots to: a. BCTF Executive Committee members not already elected as part of their local delegation. b. locals that have indicated their ability to send additional delegates to attend all or part of the convention. 3. Unfilled spots will not be redistributed to other unions. (Nov 16 RA, pp. 5–6)

4. Notwithstanding Procedure 5.22, spots redistributed to a local may be filled by decision of the local executive committee or staff rep assembly. 5. The cost of sending additional local delegates will be in accordance with Procedures 5.28, 5.30, and 5.32. (Nov 14 RA, p. 3) 5.28—That locals assume the full cost of sending locally elected delegates to the BC Federation of Labour Convention and that the BCTF assist with this cost by undertaking the following: 1. scheduling of a training or other Federation event immediately prior to or following the BC Federation of Labour convention so that travel costs for at least one person from each local to attend the BC Federation of Labour convention would be covered. 2. establishing a BCTF convention subsidy fund that would enable locals from different regions of the province to apply for travel assistance intended to equalize delegate costs for locals. (Jan 06 Ex, pp. 7-8)

5.30—That the BCTF Convention Travel Subsidy grant to assist locals with travel costs to the BC Federation of Labour Convention be provided to locals to the amount of the claim allowed by the BCFed. (Oct. 06 Ex, p. 7) 5.32—That locals be reimbursed travel costs to the BCFed convention to the amount of the claim allowed by the BCFed. (Oct. 06 Ex, p. 7)

5.36—That the BCTF disseminate information from and provide links to the BC Federation of Labour on the home page of the BCTF web site, in Teacher magazine and elsewhere as appropriate, and that, in particular, access to the British Columbia Unionized Products and Services Directory and to the Federation of Labour’s “Current Disputes” list be made readily available to BCTF. (07 AGM, p. 7) 5.38―CLC Conventions That the following procedures be used to select and support BCTF delegates to the CLC convention: 1. That the two organizational delegates to the convention be the president and the first vice-president of the BCTF and in the event of either being unable to attend, the Second Vice-President, and that all costs be covered by the Federation. 2. That all other delegates be selected by a general meeting of their local, including other members of the Executive Committee wishing to attend.

3. That locals may send up to their designated delegate entitlement and assume the full cost of sending any locally elected delegates. 4. That the Federation cover the full costs of delegate attendance for any member of the Executive Committee elected by their local to attend and for the BCTF representative to the BC Federation of Labour Executive Council if elected by their local to attend. (Dec 13 Ex, p. 6) 5. That the Federation subsidize local attendance at CLC conventions on the following basis: a. When the convention is in Toronto or Montreal, the Federation will cover the most economical transportation costs plus $500 for up to one delegate from each local. b. When the convention is in Vancouver, the Federation will cover the most economical transportation costs for up to one delegate from each local. (Members of the Executive Committee elected by a local are additional to this one delegate per local entitlement.) 6. That the president convene meetings of a caucus of BCTF delegates at CLC conventions as appropriate. 7. That the following be the procedure for forwarding resolutions from the BCTF to the Canadian Labour Congress convention: a. Resolutions from locals will be submitted directly to the CLC, with a copy to the BCTF. b. Resolutions from the BCTF will be approved by the AGM, RA, or Executive Committee meeting and circulated to locals in advance of the CLC convention. (Aug.08 Ex, p. 7) 8. That BCTF delegates be encouraged to attend Canadian Labour Congress equity caucus meetings at convention, where applicable. (May 16 Ex, p. 10) 5.40―That the BCTF work with the CLC to create a national teachers’ organization within the Canadian Labour Congress. (Nov 08 Ex, p. 9)

5.42―BCFed Standing Committees 1. That the Executive Committee use the following process prior to submitting the names of nominees to the BC Federation of Labour Standing Committees: a. The following BCTF advisory committees will be requested to nominate a member of the advisory committee and an alternate and the EC will select: i. the Professional Issues Advisory Committee to nominate a member for the Education Committee. ii. the Committee for Action on Social Justice to nominate a member for the Women’s Rights Committee, a member for the Human Rights Committee and a member for the Community and Social Action Committee. iii. the Health and Safety Advisory Committee to nominate a member for the Occupational Health and Safety Committee. b. The position of nominee to the BC Federation of Labour Political Action Committee will be the Second Vice-President or designate. (May 16 Ex, p. 10) c. That, should a Federation representative to a BCFed of Labour Standing Committee who has been nominated by a Federation advisory committee cease to be a member of that advisory committee, the position will be deemed vacant and the process in a. above will be followed. 2. That Federation representatives to BC Federation of Labour standing committees be eligible to serve up to three two-year terms. 3. That Federation representatives to BC Federation of Labour Standing Committees consult with and report back to: a. the Federation advisory committee of which they are a member. b. the full-time table officers, in the case of the representative to the BC Federation of Labour Political Action Committee. (Nov 09 Ex, p. 1)

5.44―That locals be encouraged to appoint or elect members to specifically be responsible for attending local Labour Council meetings, where applicable, in order to further the goals described in Policy 5.01. (June 13 Ex, p. 14)

6. Canadian Teachers’ Federation PROCEDURES 6.02―CTF Board of Directors―selection That the BCTF representatives to the Canadian Teachers' Federation Board of Directors be: 1. one of the full-time table officers, for the year in which they will serve, selected annually at the April Executive Committee meeting as the voting director. 2. the Executive Director as the non-voting director, and that 3.the Executive Director's attendance at the CTF AGM also be in a non-voting capacity. (Apr 16 Ex, p. 10) (August 16 Ex, p. 13)

6.04―That the BCTF representatives to the CTF Board of Directors: 1. be guided by BCTF policy in representing the Federation. 2. seek direction from the BCTF Executive Committee in advance of board meetings where necessary. 3. report to the BCTF Executive Committee following each meeting of the CTF Board of Directors. (Apr 16 Ex, p. 11) 6.06―That the work of the CTF and opportunities for member engagement be regularly featured in BCTF communications to members. (Apr16 Ex, p. 11) 6.08―CTF committees That the procedure for recruiting BCTF members for nomination to CTF committees shall be as follows: 1. That any active BCTF member in good standing be eligible for nomination. 2. That, where possible, vacancies on committees be publicized to all BCTF members. 3. That applicants submit a BCTF curriculum vitae form. 4. That, where advisable and on recommendation of the Executive Director, BCTF staff members be considered for nomination to CTF committees. 5. That a committee of the President or First Vice-President, at least one CTF Director, and the Executive Director or designate shall recommend nominees to the BCTF Executive Committee for nomination to the CTF Nominating Committee. (Apr 16 Ex, pp. 11–12) 6.10―That the BCTF President be a member of the CTF delegation to the World Congress of Education International. (Apr 16 Ex, p. 12)

6.12―That, when BCTF members attend Canadian Teachers’ Federation meetings the CTF expense rates and procedures prevail and, as such, the BCTF will not provide additional reimbursement. (Apr 16 Ex, p. 12)

6.14―Statement of Principle That the following statement of principle guide the BCTF affiliation with the Canadian Teachers’ Federation: 1. The BCTF recognizes the value of a national teachers’ organization that advocates for the teaching profession, strong and stable publicly funded public schools and the rights and well-being of all teachers and students. 2. To that end, the BCTF will actively participate in the Canadian Teachers’ Federation and, through the CTF, strengthen alliances and solidarity with teachers and teacher organizations across the country. 3. The BCTF commits to bringing the experience, concerns, and values of the BC teachers to its work within the CTF and to sharing the concerns, experiences and values of teachers in other jurisdictions with BCTF members. (Apr 16 Ex, p. 13)

39

6.16―That the BCTF delegates to the CTF AGM, as calculated by the CTF constitution, and alternates be selected annually as follows: 1. Six members of the Representative Assembly (LRs or LPs) as delegates and up to two alternates, elected at the Winter RA. 2. The balance of the representatives be members of the Executive Committee selected at the second April Executive Committee meeting, with Executive Committee and EC-elect eligible for selection. (May 16 RA, pp. 15–16) (Nov 16 RA, p. 4)

6.18―That a report on the work of the Canadian Teachers’ Federation and BCTF participation in the CTF be provided to at least one Representative Assembly each year and to every BCTF Annual General Meeting. (June 16 Ex, p. 24) 6.20―That the Federation sponsor the attendance of the BCTF President, First Vice-President, and Second Vice-President at the Canadian Forum on Public Education held by the Canadian Teachers’ Federation in advance of the CTF AGM each year. (May 17 Ex, p. 6)

7. Certification and Teachers Council POLICIES 7.A.03—That the Teacher Regulation Branch should: 1. be fully funded by the province. 2. not require an annual fee for certificate holders. 3. not be further expanded in its scope. 4. establish and maintain a policy of openness and accessibility in its operations and procedures. 5. ensure that its policies and procedures do not require boards to report minor disciplinary matters. 6. ensure that its policies and procedures do not require public reporting of minor disciplinary matters. 7. ensure due process in discipline procedures for certificate holders through adherence to UNESCO’s five equitable safeguards (as adopted on October 5, 1966 by the UNESCO-ILO Special Intergovernmental Conference on the Status of Teachers), as follows: i. the right to be informed in writing of the allegations and the grounds for them. ii. the right to full access to the evidence in the case. iii. the right to defend oneself and to be defended by a representative of one’s choice, adequate time being given to the teacher for the preparation of a defense. iv. the right to be informed in writing of the decisions reached and the reasons for them. v. the right to appeal to competent authorities or bodies. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 17) (16 AGM, p. 40)

7.A.05—That the Teacher Regulation Branch ensures that BCTF members requested to attend a meeting concerning possible discipline be informed of their right to representation. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 17) (June 15 Ex, p. 14)

7.A.07—That the Teachers’ Council require faculties of education to include training in occupational health and safety as part of all teacher education programs in the province. (01 AGM, p. 12) (12 AGM, p. 12)

7.A.17―Statement of principle The BCTF is committed to the teaching profession, the public interest, and public education. Teachers have a necessary role on the Teachers’ Council and bring the experience, expertise, and teacher voice to decision-making at the council. To ensure this commitment to the teaching profession, the public interest, and public education, the BCTF must take action to protect the role of the Federation as the voice of the profession and oppose all attempts by the Teachers’ Council, or the BC government, 40

to create competing alternate structures that would undermine public education and diminish the profession. (10 AGM, p. 28) (12 AGM, p. 12)

PROCEDURES 7.A.02—That the BCTF sponsor meetings of those councillors who are BCTF members, to enable these councillors to: 1. discuss directions for the council. 2. review relevant BCTF policies and procedures. 3. develop advice to the BCTF on council matters. 4. prepare reports to Federation bodies. (Oct. 97 Ex., p. 6) (Dec 11 Ex, p. 17)

7.A.04—That a report summarizing activities of the Teachers’ Council and the Teacher Regulation Branch be presented at every AGM and at least one RA per year. (12 AGM, p. 12) (16 AGM, p. 39)

7.A.10—That the statutory mandate of the Teachers’ Council be limited to: 1. establishing requirements for issuing teachers’ certificates. 2. approving teacher education programs for pre-service teachers. (10 AGM, p. 20) (12 AGM, p. 12)

7.A.12—That the BCTF oppose any increase in certification fee for BCTF members. (June 90 RA, p. 18) (12 AGM, p. 12)

7.A.14—That the annual practice fee be waived annually for members in receipt of Salary Indemnity benefits. (June 90 RA, p. 18) (Jan 12 RA, p. 9)

7.A.16—Zonal Endorsation Grants and Council Election Grants 1. That in seeking endorsation to become the BCTFendorsed candidate in a council zone: a. the nominee from each local may, upon application to the BCTF, be reimbursed at current BCTF rates, for any necessary release time, travel, meal and accommodation expenses incurred in attending the endorsation meeting in each local in the zone. b. approval for reimbursement of expenses shall be by a fulltime table officer and the staff person responsible for the Teachers Council. 2. That if a council election is necessary in any zone, the BCTF-endorsed candidate may apply for funding as follows: a. grants shall be available to a maximum of $3,000 per council zone to cover mailings, design, and printing of a campaign brochure and/or letter, release time, travel costs, etc. b. costs of mailing/distribution to council members in the zone, within the maximum grant, will be covered provided that these costs have been minimized, where possible, through use of school district courier or mailing services. c. prior approval should be sought by the candidate or their designate by providing the Federation with an outline of planned activities and related costs. d. approval shall be by a full-time table officer and the staff person responsible for the Teachers Council. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 18) (Dec 11 Ex, p. 18)

7.A.18—Zonal Selection of BCTF-Endorsed Candidates 1. Eligibility Only active BCTF members are eligible for BCTF endorsation as candidates in Teachers Council elections. 2. Local Nominees a. Each local has the right to select one nominee. b. Each local nominee must be endorsed by either an executive meeting, a delegate assembly, or a general meeting. c. Each local nominee must undertake to abide by the endorsation process. 3. Zonal Endorsation a. A BCTF staff person will serve as the zone co-ordinator for the endorsation process. The zone co-ordinator's duties shall include those of returning officer. b. Voting to determine the zone's BCTF-endorsed candidate shall be by secret ballot at an executive committee meeting, staff rep assembly, or general meeting. Each local will cast the number of

votes equal to its total Representative Assembly vote allocation and may choose to split its votes between candidates. (June 00 Ex, p. 28)

c. In the event that only one person seeks nomination for BCTF endorsation in a zone, a ballot must be held in each local in the zone and the nominee may apply for BCTF funding if the nominee chooses to attend the local meetings. d. A curriculum vitae form shall be completed by each local nominee, and the completed form will be forwarded to all locals in the zone by the zone co-ordinator. Nominees will have the opportunity to speak and answer questions at local venues, and after a review of the curriculum vitae/speeches, a secret ballot will take place. e. The local president of each local shall report ballot results to the zone co-ordinator. The nominee who receives the plurality of the votes shall be declared the BCTF-endorsed candidate for that zone. f. The zone co-ordinator shall report the total ballot results to each local and each candidate without reference to local counts. g. Each local shall publicize the endorsed candidate's name among its members. h. The BCTF shall publicize, among its members, the names of all BCTF-endorsed candidates. (Oct. 06 Ex, p.3) 4. Criteria for seeking BCTF endorsement That any member seeking to become the BCTF-endorsed candidate in any council zone be requested to confirm that they are prepared to: a. regularly communicate with locals in their zones. b. attend BCTF-sponsored meetings of elected councillors. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 11) (Dec 11 Ex, p. 18)

7.A.20—That, on condition that the information is used solely for the purpose of promoting the election of a BCTF-endorsed candidate to the Teachers Council, a local shall, upon request in writing, be provided with member name, address, and telephone lists and/or labels free of charge for all active members who are also members of the Teachers Council in the zone. (May 97 Ex, p. 2) (Dec 11 Ex, p. 18)

8.

Education Finance

Basic Principles That the education finance system be based on these principles: 1. The system of public education finance must provide adequate funds to meet the educational needs of the province's students. 2. The education finance system needs to provide for equality of educational opportunity for all students. 3. The system of education finance must allow school boards to support innovation and improvements and promote high levels of local interest and involvement in public schooling. 4. Any education funding and taxation system must acknowledge the benefits of a quality public school system to all residents of the province and to the nation as a whole. (93 AGM, p. 10)

5. That education-business partnerships should not be established to compensate for inadequate funding of education. (95 AGM p. 4)

POLICIES 8.A.01—Provincial Funding System Policy 1. That provincial public school education resource levels be determined jointly by school boards and the province as follows: a. The provincial government is responsible for determining the provincial mandate for public school education. b. The provincial government should review and revise the mandate each year in consultation with the BCTF, BCSTA, CUPE, and BCCPAC. c. Local school boards are responsible for assessing the educational needs of the students in their districts in relation to the mandate. d. Local school boards are responsible for determining budgets to meet the needs of their students and for notifying the

provincial government of what those needs are and the budget to meet them. e. The province must consider provisional budgets from school boards before making a final determination of the provincial allocation to school boards for delivering the mandate. f. Local school boards must have the authority to set local school district supplementary budgets over and above the provincially determined allocation. 2. That provincial funding of the mandate consider the following in determining allocations for individual districts: a. Equal education opportunity requires additional instructional services for students with special needs. b. Costs will vary depending on climate, size of district, geography, size and age of schools, staff qualification and experience, and composition of the students. c. Any newly mandated provincial programs require appropriate funding. d. Rapid enrolment growth has cost implications. e. Costs of in-service, curriculum development and implementation, especially during a period of educational change should be adequately covered. f. Employees in the public school system have full collective bargaining rights. 3. That the annual increase in the cost of providing the provincial mandate be no less than an agreed upon and understood index (such as annual growth of the GPP), but must also be based on provisional budgets submitted by school boards. 4. That local school trustees have the same authority to raise funds as municipal or provincial politicians and similarly be accountable for their decisions. Taxpayer referendums should not be used to fund schools. 5. That rules governing budget timelines, growth indices, school system mandate, and local taxation authority for education funding purposes be set out in provincial legislation, and that such regulations acknowledge school boards' need to plan annual budgets in advance, respect the need to do multi-year planning, and allow for local budget setting stability and predictability. 6. That the fiscal framework continue to be used to enhance public accountability by setting out school district program allocations to meet the mandate and indicating school board program expenditures. 7. That fiscal framework formulas continue to be revised to reflect actual program cost experiences. 8. That costs of school-level and school-board-level administration be limited to ensure that public school resources are focused on teaching and learning. 9. That education finance systems must co-ordinate the allocation of revenue with the governance of schools to produce high levels of local interest, maximum awareness of local educational needs and equality of educational opportunity. 10. That the BCTF urge the provincial government to provide adequate funding for earthquake/disaster preparation in BC’s public schools. 11. That all school supplies, furniture, and equipment should be exempt from the Provincial Social Services Tax (sales tax) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST). 12. That school boards should be allowed to plan on the basis of five-year projections and assemble land for school site purposes prior to actual need. Municipal, industrial and residential development planners should be required to give adequate notice so that school facilities can be provided as soon as needed. 13. That the BCTF investigate the feasibility of regionalization of such services as purchase and distribution of supplies. 14. That the provincial government should expand the application of the property tax to include all currently exempt property, including church and government property. 15. That should any local have imposed on it a local system of school decision-making, the Federation would expect any school board or local to uphold the following guidelines: a. That the BCTF oppose school-based budgeting programs which include decisions on staffing and working conditions. b. That all decisions at the school level comply with all contractual obligations and be consistent with the policies of the BCTF and the local. 41

c. That all matters related to salary, benefits, working conditions, personnel practice and tenure be subject to negotiations between the board and appropriate employee associations/unions, and be ultra vire school-based decision-making. d. That all allocation devices (such as per student per teacher, per class, per room, per square meter, etc.) be subject to annual review, negotiation and agreement between the board and the local e. That decision-making procedures at the school level include provision for: i. effective staff involvement particularly of those affected by the decision. ii. full disclosure of pertinent information to all participants in the decision-making process. iii. a clear definition of the decision-making process including participants and points of time at which decisions must be made. iv. adequate time and support to carry out the process. Appropriate parental and community involvement. f. That any imposed school-based budgeting system should include provisions for a regular evaluation of the system at both the district and school levels. (Nov. 97 RA, p. 4) g. That the operation of any school-based budgeting system not impinge on the primary responsibility of the school staff to provide a quality educational program and equal opportunity for each student. 16. That at this time locals be encouraged to oppose the implementation of school-based budgeting. 8.A.03—1. That the current system of targeted funding should be maintained, and that this be made clear to government. 2. That any alternatives to targeted funding embrace the following five principles: a. Total transparency b. Agreed-on best practise c. Assessment and identification d. Identification leads to resources e. Accountability for district, school and classroom support. (May 97 Ex. p. 13)

8.A.07—1. The provincial government should increase its financial support to public education to reflect the fact that: a. the system is underfunded to achieve the current expectations; b. the proposed changes will require more resources than current levels; c. the transition to a proposed new system will require additional, special resources; d. substantial additional resources are required for gender equity, multicultural education, race relations, Aboriginal education, second language education, English as a Second Language and special education. 2. School boards should not be required to fund the cost of a new provincial mandate through further increases of local taxes on home-owners. All classes of non-residential property should be returned to local school board jurisdiction for purposes of raising local property tax revenue. 3. The Ministry of Education should provide adequate resources, facilities, personnel, and funding for in-service to enable effective mainstreaming of special needs students and integrating of ESL students into the classroom. (90 AGM, pp. 26-32) 8.A.09—That the BCTF demand that the government fully fund the provincial collective agreement, inclusive of all provisions of previous local agreements. (99 AGM, p. 19) 8.A.11—That funding for all students identified as having special needs should be provided to school districts by the provincial government. (June 00 Ex, p. 14) 8.A.13—That the BCTF call on the minister of education to provide targeted funding for all high incidence students with special needs, at the actual incident rate, on the same basis as are low incident students. (Feb. 06 Ex, p. 13)

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8.A.15—That students who are not yet meeting expectations as determined by classroom assessment receive fully and publicly funded: 1. prompt intervention. 2. additional daily support within the school day that meets the specific needs of the student. 3. direct instruction by a teacher(s). (Feb. 06 Ex, p. 14) (May 16 Ex, p. 10)

8.A.17—That the BCTF is opposed to any school district Kindergarten program options which are not universally available to the community and fully funded by the Ministry of Education. (June 00 Ex, p. 14)

8.A.19—That the BCTF is opposed to education funding legislation that caps or limits the number of enrolled students who will be funded by the ministry. (May 02 RA, p. 17) 8.A.21—That the Federation work with other education partner groups to develop common strategies for: 1. lobbying government to fully fund all collective bargaining outcomes. 2. securing adequate funds for a quality public education system in BC. (Aug. 02 Ex, p. 16) 8.A.27—That the BCTF and locals urge school boards to: 1. Foster support for full funding of a strong and stable public education system through community dialogue, lobbying, and coalition work. 2. Build needs budgets in active consultation with teachers, students, parents, support staff, and the community. 3. Submit needs budgets that reflect the real costs of education of all students. (03 AGM, p. 12) 8.A.29—Provincial Taxation/Revenue Raising Policy 1. That local school boards have authority to tax residential property to raise funds for local supplementary budgets. 2. That property tax rates be levied against all property which is assessed at its actual market value as determined in yearly assessments. 3. That a basic uniform tax rate be levied against all residential and non-residential property for purposes of raising a portion of the fiscal framework. 4. That the portion of the fiscal framework paid by residential property taxpayers be no more than ten per cent each year. 5. That the supplementary budgets of school boards be funded by a tax on residential and non-residential property equalised in such a manner that the poorest districts are not unduly penalised. 6. That devices such as a flat tax, a poll tax or a minimum tax not be used. 7. That a homeowner grant system be retained. 8. That any exemption device or grant such as the homeowner grant should be adjusted annually to allow for inflation. 9. That the funding of capital costs for schools be provincial responsibility. 10. That tax notices continue to be set out allowing homeowners to determine the gross and net amount of school tax levied against the property. 8.A.33—That targetted funding for youth and family counsellors and other school-based programs be continued on a permanent basis through the continuation of the Social Equity Funds program carried out by the Ministry of Children and Family Development. (Nov. 03 RA, p. 19)

8.A.35—Federal Education Finance Policy 1. That the federal government has a responsibility in the support of public education. 2. That the provincial and federal governments in their agreements to allocate tax revenues, should give prime consideration to the provincial responsibility for financing elementary and secondary education 3. That federal money should be available to provinces for post secondary education in the form of fiscal transfers that will not

interfere with provincial priorities and provincial constitutional autonomy in education. 4. That the federal government should provide to the appropriate provincial ministry of education sufficient funds to provide for at least one year's instruction to school-age immigrant children in one of the official languages of Canada. 5. That the federal government should ensure that there is adequate funding to facilitate its initiatives affecting education. 6. That the federal government should assume a greater responsibility for financing post-secondary education. (Feb 10 Ex, p. 4)

8.A.37—That the BCTF urge the federal government to support the inclusion of schools in the same exemption from GST purchases of goods and services now granted to municipalities. (Sept. 04 Ex, p. 12)

8.A.41—That the BCTF lobby the provincial government to increase basic funding for adult students. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 3) 8.A.43—1. That the BCTF demand that the Ministry of Education reverse its decision to eliminate the .5 base funding for each secondary student in Grades 10, 11, and 12. 2. That the BCTF work with other education stakeholders to get the Ministry of Education to reverse its decision to cut funding for secondary students. 3. That locals be encouraged to work with trustees and other local stakeholders to call on the Ministry of Education to reverse its decision to cut funding for secondary students. 4. That locals be encouraged to lobby their MLAs to support the call for reversing the Ministry of Education decision to cut funding for secondary students. (Nov 07 RA, p. 11) 8.A.45—That the BCTF lobby the provincial government to ensure the provision of necessary funding and staffing for exploration programs at middle school sites. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 12) 8.A.47—That the BCTF: 1. oppose recent provincial government cuts to university funding. 2. request that the provincial government provide adequate and stable funding for university programs in our province. 3. support “fight back” campaigns to oppose cuts to funding for university programs in BC. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 4) 8.A.51—1. That the BCTF adopt the following policy: a. The BCTF believes that all K–12 educational programs should be provided to all students at no cost. b. A student should be able to have a clear path to graduation, free of fees. c. The provincial government must fully fund the public education system. d. The provincial government should withdraw funding from private schools, and apply that funding to public education. 2. That the BCTF, along with locals, the BCSTA, school districts, BCCPAC, and DPACs, jointly lobby government to completely fund public education, including those amounts previously raised through charging fees. (08 AGM, p. 34) 8.A.55—That costs incurred by taxpayers for university or vocational training for their dependants should be deductible for income tax purposes. (57 AGM, p. 36) (Reviewed Dec. 78 Ex, pp. 16-17)

8.A.59—That the BCTF lobby the Ministry of Education to change its capital funding definition of a “classroom” to include rooms used for programs that support student learning, such as ESL rooms, learning assistance rooms, computer rooms, art rooms, music rooms, etc. (Nov 08 RA, p. 3) 8.A.61—That the Federation support the restoration of provincial government funding to post-secondary institutions in order to adequately fund faculty associate positions on a full-time basis. (Jan 09 Ex, p. 6)

8.A.63—That the BCTF lobby the Ministry of Education to provide adequate funding and support for students with learning needs who do not meet criteria for ministry designation and students with speech and language difficulties. (Jan 09 Ex, p. 15) PROCEDURES 8.A.02—1. That the BCTF oppose any legislation that depends exclusively on the average dollar expenditure throughout the province as a factor for the calculation of grants to school boards. 2. That the BCTF continue to study education finance and that it continue its efforts to improve the present system of education finance in this province. 3. That the BCTF continue to strive for co-operative action with the BCSTA and other organizations to achieve improved provincial funding of elementary and secondary education. 4. That the BCTF actively encourage each local to gain a working partnership with its school board in establishing priorities and in examining existing practices. 5. That the BCTF assist locals to increase member and public awareness of issues in education finance. 8.A.04—That the BCTF seek to ensure that Ministry of Education funding to school boards for students with special needs be increased to support integration and other models, be specifically designated in school board budgets, and be expended on behalf of these students. (93 AGM, p. 22) 8.A.06—That the BCTF oppose school-based budgeting and all other gainsharing plans. (May 97 RA, p. 17) 8.A.10—That members not participate in staffing decisions that result in reductions of teacher services to students. (Apr 02 Ex, p. 19) (Jan 17 Ex, in-cttee p. 2)

8.A.12—That members and locals should work with parents and other members of communities to oppose the closure of public schools solely for financial reasons. (AGM 03, p. 25) 8.A.14—That the BCTF members ensure that peer tutors are not used to provide relief to an underfunded education system or to replace the hiring of adequate numbers of teachers and/or educational assistants. (08 AGM, p. 22)

9.

Education Policy

I.

General Principles

POLICIES 9.A.01—The Mandate The broad prime aim of the public school system should be to foster the growth and development of every individual, to the end that they will become and be a self-reliant, self-disciplined, participating member with a sense of social and environmental responsibility within a democratic, pluralistic society. (1994 AGM) 9.A.03—Democratic Schools for a Democratic Society 1. A fundamental and continuing task of public schools is to ensure: a. that every student has an opportunity to learn about the origins and evolution of democratic systems, including an awareness of democratic/representative structures in public education and to learn in a school environment that models participatory democratic processes. b. that all students have systematic opportunities, appropriate to their stages of development, to participate in decision making regarding the policies and practices of their schools. (95 AGM, p. 14)

2. The BCTF support the democratization of schools by: a. keeping members informed about current research and developments. b. seeking government funding to assist school staffs in designing and piloting models of democratic governance and decision-making structures in their schools. 43

c. providing advice and support to school staffs seeking to design and implement democratic restructuring projects. d. providing school staffs with advice about accreditation and other processes to examine their school governance structures, and to make these structures more democratic. e. that the BCTF develop activities and materials including staff rep, PD rep, staff committee, and Continuing Ed workshops, to implement this procedure. (95 AGM, p. 14) (10 AGM, p. 11)

9.A.05—Public Education Alternatives That the BCTF continue to support alternatives within the public education system to meet the diverse circumstances of students, subject to the following principles: 1. That they be based on sound education pedagogy. 2. The full provincial curriculum will be in place. 3. There is equal access of all students to the benefits of public education. 4. All schools will have an equitable share of educational resources. 5. Students, parents and members are entitled to participate in discussions and decisions where appropriate about the philosophy and curriculum of their public school system. 6. There is prior discussion and agreement of those directly affected, in the case of school-wide alternative programs, the school staff, parents and students attending the school, the local teachers' union, and unions representing other workers employed in the school or district. 7. All members will have the right to participate in discussions and decisions about the philosophy, curricula, pedagogy and organization of their school, both as colleagues and as members of the school community of parents, students and teachers. 8. Organizational arrangements and teaching conditions will be consistent with collective agreements in effect in a school district 9. That schools will continue to offer an array of programs reflecting the diversity of the school population. (95 AGM, p. 34) (11 AGM, p. 14)

9.A.07—Provincial Education Goals Provincial educational goals should be directed towards ensuring: 1. for each student the opportunity for successful participation and for the enhancement of their self-esteem regardless of aptitude or background 2. equal opportunity for all regardless of age, learning disabilities or abilities, or interests and aspirations 3. protection from discrimination on the basis of place of birth, place of residence, gender identity, age, race, religion, socioeconomic status, disability or sexual orientation 4. that action be taken to reverse the effects of past discrimination 5. provision of lifelong access to public education 6. provision of programs that increase students’ options rather than limit them 7. equal opportunity for all students to develop capacity for intellectual and cultural growth, recreation and leisure activity, happy family relationship, productive community life, and participation as citizens in a democracy 8. opportunities for parents, students and members to develop objectives and programs 9. adequate teacher education programs in universities 10. adequate funding for the continued professional development of members 11. opportunities for students of any age to further their education (Feb 85 Ex, p. 12) (90 AGM, pp. 26-27)

12. the right of all students to have access to public education and opposition to any action to limit access of so-called “illegal immigrants.” (Jan 95 Ex, p. 23) 9.A.09—Rights and Roles of Members 1. Public schools must be organized and operated in a manner that balances public accountability structures of government and school boards with the principles of participatory democracy, in 44

order that members may model the democratic processes about which students learn. (95 AGM, p. 15) 2. Section 182(2) of the School Act on Minister’s Orders should be rescinded as it is undemocratic and erodes the professional autonomy of teachers. 3. There should be due process for members when their decisions are being appealed, including appropriate consultation with the member involved, the right of member appeal, and protection with respect to the inclusion of information in member evaluation reports, personnel files, and communication with the Disciplinary and Professional Conduct Board. (12 AGM p. 20) 4. The Royal Commission recommendation 6.11 (that the ministry provide funding through school boards for the BCTF to initiate relevant programs of professional development) should be implemented. 5. Teachers’ assistants and other auxiliary personnel should not be used to design, supervise or assess educational programs or to provide instruction to individual students or groups of students. Teachers’ assistants must work only under the direct supervision of a member. 6. Hiring policies should be developed to ensure that the teaching force reflects the diversity of society by recruiting members of under-represented groups into the profession. 7. In order to facilitate the growth and development of every individual, support services, provided by specialist teachers, must be made available to meet the needs of all students. 8. In co-operation with the BCTF, a mechanism should be developed for involving members in the discussion of the implementation of the inter-ministerial protocols on support services to schools. (90 AGM, pp. 26-32) 9.A.11—Continuous Learning/Retention of Students 1. That the BCTF supports the principle of continuous learning in the development of school programs. 2. That the BCTF adopt the following definition of continuous learning: That continuous learning be defined as opportunities for students to build progressively on their learning with respect to their prior knowledge, interests, capabilities and individual learning rates and styles. 3. That the means by which continuous learning is implemented should be determined by members at the school level. 4. That the BCTF supports the long-term aim of eliminating the year-long retention of students. (1994 AGM) 5. The means by which continuous progress is implemented in the primary program should be determined by members at the school level. 6. Continuous progress in the proposed intermediate program should not be implemented until there is clarity about the concept and agreement on its value. 7. Determining student movement in the continuous progress model should be the responsibility of the classroom teacher, in consultation, when necessary, with the school-based team and parents. (90 AGM, pp. 26-32) 8. That local school boards be encouraged to provide programs and conditions which will ensure that teen parents are able to complete their secondary education. (Jan 89 Ex, p. 26) 9.A.13—Primary Program 1. The BCTF supports the principles and school system organization of the revised Primary Program: A Framework for Teaching. (01 AGM, p. 35) (08 AGM, p. 11)

2. That a fully funded full-day Kindergarten be available to every student in BC. (07 AGM, p. 11) (Jan 10 Ex, p. 17)

3. That the BCTF advocate for a lengthened gradual entry for (June 10 Ex, p. 19) full-day Kindergarten students. 9.A.15—Intermediate/Graduation Programs 1. The BCTF supports the Ministry of Education’s three Principles of Learning: a. Learning requires the active participation of the student. b. People learn in a variety of ways and at different rates. c. Learning is both an individual and a group process.

(June 06 RA, p. 7)

2. The study of an Aboriginal language or any language that a board decides on in consultation with members of the communities concerned should be an option as an addition to or to replace any second language for students in the proposed intermediate and graduation programs. (90 AGM, pp. 26–32) 3. Meaningful work experience should be an option but not compulsory for all students. (90 AGM, pp. 26-32) 4. That the BCTF supports the belief that a general education should include opportunities for career education. (08 AGM, p. 11)

5. That the BCTF favors the issuance of an appropriate certificate to every student (showing the level of education completed) when they leave school. (69 AGM, p. 34) (Oct 80 RA, p. 3)

6. That there should be no permanent recording of failure on the senior secondary school graduation statement (Dogwood Certificate). (June 81 Ex, p. 4) 7. That the French Immersion Dogwood continue to be awarded to students who have completed Grade 12 French Immersion. (Aug. 02 Ex, p. 8) 8. The graduation transitions program should be implemented in such a way that students fulfill the requirements of the graduation transitions program of 80 hours of physical activity by taking courses in their public schools. (Sept. 07 Ex, p. 3) (10 AGM, p. 11) 9. Any decision about a student challenging a course should be made by teachers in consultation with the student and, as appropriate, their parent(s)/ guardian(s). (90 AGM, pp. 26–32) 10. That with respect to workload issues related to the challenge program: a. all committee work related to challenge be compensated for through release time b. additional remuneration as specified in the collective agreement be provided for work beyond the prescribed school year c. teachers receive adequate release time to prepare assessment materials, supervise the challenge and assessment, and evaluate student work for each student challenge of each course. 11. That there be no fees charged for school or district administration of challenge and equivalency programs. 12. That the Federation monitor on an ongoing basis equity questions to ensure that the program is offered as equitably as possible. 13. That the ministry provide additional funding for secondary schools so that this program can be offered in a manner which will not require reallocation of resources presently used for other programs. 14. That the ministry provide sufficient funding for in-service programs which help teachers explore methodologies which would be appropriate to challenge. 15. That the adjudication of whether students have successfully challenged a course and the establishment of the criteria for challenge reside with teachers. (May 10 Ex, p. 1) (Nov 10 RA, p. 9)

9.A.17—Assessment/Evaluation/Reporting General 1. The prime appropriate role of assessment and evaluation is to support learning. 2. Assessment systems should be designed after there is clarity and agreement on the curriculum so that curriculum drives assessment rather than assessment driving curriculum. (90 AGM, pp. 26–32)

3. That the BCTF supports the use of a variety of formal and informal assessment and evaluation techniques to assess student learning. 4. That the BCTF supports the use of a variety of reporting practices for communicating with parents about student progress. 5. That school districts are responsible for providing time, resources, and training opportunities to support members in reporting to parents about student progress. 6. That the provincial government and school districts are responsible for securing funding to provide schools with adequate

resources to facilitate reporting to parents in the language of the home. 7. That the BCTF supports the professional autonomy of the member in assessing, evaluating and reporting the progress of students. (1994 AGM) 8. That the BCTF believes that the interests of all concerned are best served when the evaluation of all students for all stages of school progress is the responsibility of the school, keeping in mind that the central relationship in education is the one that exists among the student, the parent and the teachers. (69 AGM, p. 32) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

9. That the BCTF actively oppose the use of standardized tests as a means of evaluating individual student, individual member or individual school performance. (Oct 75 RA, p. 21) (Feb 82 RA, p. 17)

10. That students designated as a result of an educational evaluation, retain such classification when transferring from one district to another. (June 93 RA) 11. That the Ministry of Education provide at least one day per reporting period for members to complete student reports. 12. That members be encouraged to continue to use a variety of formal and informal assessment, evaluation and reporting, including student self-evaluation. 13. That the Ministry of Education and school districts provide funding and resources, including time for more effective pre-service and in-service training opportunities for members to learn how to use a variety of informal and formal assessment, evaluation and reporting practices. 14. That the Ministry of Education, school districts, and schools provide adequate funds for reduced member loads, in order to facilitate the use of a variety of informal and formal assessment, evaluation and reporting by members. 15. That school districts and education partner groups, supported by the Ministry of Education, develop strategies to assist parents and the community to understand the role and nature of assessment, evaluation and reporting in schools. (May 94 RA) 16. That Ministry of Education requirements regarding reports on student progress be reasonable in terms of efficient ways of reporting appropriate information to parents and that the resources provided by the ministry to the school system should be adequate for the time required by members to prepare the reports. (Jan 96 Ex, p. 22)

17. New assessment practices and systems should not be established or required until there is clarity in definition, research demonstrating the validity and value of each, and extensive discussion on the key issues, including: a. normative or criterion-referenced assessment. b. the role of formative and summative evaluation. c. grades and grading practices. d. ‘’authentic assessment’’ practices. e. provincial examinations. 18. Student assessment practices and systems should provide for: a. time for the member to collect information and for record keeping, analysis and collegial consultation. b. additional time for formal and informal reporting to parents. c. a realistic teacher workload. d. teacher training on alternative assessment techniques. e appropriate facilities and resources. f. opportunities for parent education about curriculum, assessment and evaluation processes. g. time for parent-teacher conference. 19. There should be no centralized, provincial system for the collection of individual student achievement data. 20. There should be no centralized provincial system for collecting demographic data on individual students. 21. The uses of technology for assessment practices should be determined by members at the school level. Research, evaluation and training should be in place prior to the introduction of such technology. (90 AGM, pp 26.32) 22. That the Ministry of Education provide the appropriate technology to support members in assessment, evaluation and reporting practices, and that this technology: a. be teacher/user friendly. 45

b. be supported by in-service education. c. be funded for availability on an equitable basis. d. encourage personalized reporting. (May 94 RA) 23. That on any Ministry of Education committee established on measurement and evaluation, a majority of the members should be representatives nominated by the BCTF Executive Committee.

a.

Provides

co-ordination

of

support

services

to

students. b. Ensures an accountability system for support services at the school level focusing on the rights of the student. c. Develops mechanisms allowing field input into the implementation of the inter-ministerial protocols. (90 AGM, pp. 26–32)

(June 74 Ex, p. 15)

24. The BCTF is opposed to the development of standardized provincial report cards. (Apr 04 Ex, p. 4) 9.A.19—K–12 1. That the BCTF supports the use of written comments and is opposed to use of letter grades for reporting to parents about student progress in the Primary Program. 2. Written comments should identify both the accomplishments and the learning needs of students. (94 AGM) 3. That the BCTF supports the use of structured, written comments for formal reporting to parents about student progress in the primary grades; all other material (for example, checklists) will be considered supplemental. (Aug. 99 Ex, p. 15) 4. That in Grades 4 through 7, teachers should have the option of reporting to parents using letter grades and/or written comments. (1994 AGM) 5. That the BCTF opposes the use of rank order letter grades and comparative kinds of checklists for the purposes of reporting student progress in K-7, although the use of criterion-referenced checklists is not disputed. (May 81 RA, p. 18) 6. That if letter grades are to be used, a criterion-referenced (May 94 RA) system for their development be supported. 7. That in reporting to parents about student progress in Grades 8–12, teachers may support letter grades with written comments. (May 94 RA) (Nov. 99 RA, p. 7)

8. That the BCTF support the use of letter grades and percentages on both term and final student progress reports for Grades 10, 11 and 12. (May 12 RA, p. 15) 9. That the Ministry of Education and the BCTF reassess the purpose and impacts of the provincial examination program through research and dialogue, including holding a provincial forum on assessment and evaluation. (May 12 RA, p. 15) 10. That the BCTF’s long-term objective continue to be elimination of provincial examinations in BC public schools. (May 94 RA) (Nov. 07 RA, p. 12)

11. That the use of any kind of external leaving examination would be incompatible with school’s accepting responsibility for determining students had met graduation requirements.

secondary school the practice of the whether or not its

(May 72 Ex, p. 13) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

12. That the BCTF is opposed to provincial exams at the Grade 10, Grade 11, and Grade 12 level. (04 AGM, p. 39) (13 AGM, p. 8)

13. That the BCTF advise locals to insist that any teacher who is required to mark provincial exams is provided necessary release time. (Sept. 04 Ex, p. 8) (May 12 Ex, p. 4–5)

9.A.25—Standards and Accountability General 1. That the BCTF believes that standards should be used to help students, parents, and teachers interpret student performance and set realistic and attainable goals. They should be used to encourage personal commitment to learning and to assist each student to recognize and achieve their personal best. (1994 AGM) 2. That any indicators, criteria or standards for school district annual reports should be based on the full development of the student as a person and citizen, and should assess progress on all education goals, consistent with the mission statement for BC schools. (1994 AGM) 3. Authentic, democratic accountability systems should centre on goals set by teachers, parents and students in the context of the school community. 4. The school-based team, recognizing the diversity and complexity of special needs students: 46

9.A.27—That systems of accountability should be based on democratic principles that recognize: 1. the primary value of the professional judgment of the teacher; 2. that accountability is best achieved in the frequent dialogue among groups belonging to the school community. (June 90 RA, p. 16)

9.A.29—That the BCTF oppose accountability contracts in their current form and oppose the open-ended power being granted to the minister in Bill 34 with respect to prescribing what must be included in an accountability contract and a school plan. (May 02 RA, p. 17) 9.A.31—That the BCTF support the concept of a system evaluation and school plans under the following conditions: 1. support the broad goals, learning outcomes and curriculum that have been established. 2. system evaluation, school plans and other such initiatives should be governed by a set of principles on which there is agreement amongst the key stakeholders. 3. that the system evaluation be multifaceted and balanced, and not depend on narrow or exclusively quantitative data. 4. that teachers, through their locals, be involved throughout the process of developing, implementing, monitoring and assessing the success of the system evaluation. 5. the system evaluation and school plans be expressly precluded from dealing with personal and confidential information on students, teachers, and other employees, and from discussing the terms and conditions of employment of any school board employee. (May 02 RA, p. 17)

9.A.37—That the BCTF inform government that it supports a dramatic shift in our public school system away from the current accountability agenda that emphasizes inappropriate testing, ranking, and narrow achievement measures to one that focusses on providing the conditions for optimal teaching and learning. (06 AGM, p. 12)

9.A.41—That the ministry fund three additional non-instructional days within the traditional bookends of each school year for the purpose of supporting the implementation of new curricula, programs, and policies. (Nov 77 Ex, p. 5) (08 AGM, p. 11)

9.A.45—That members be mindful of the Code of Ethics when they participate in the written and oral components of any school evaluation process. (Feb 96 Ex, p. 14) (Oct 10 Ex, p. 6)

9.A.47—That FSA or standardized test results not be used as goals or measures of success for school accreditation or any other school or district evaluation or accountability process. (02 AGM, p. 36) 9.A.49—That locals should actively point out to all education stakeholders, and especially students and parents, the inappropriateness of using FSA or similar test results for any school or district evaluation or accountability process. (Nov. 02 RA, p. 15) 9.A.51—That the BCTF provide members with support and encouragement to withdraw their consent to having their own child(ren) write the FSA tests or other accountability driven standardized tests. (06 AGM, p. 13) 9.A.53—Implementing Change 1. That to successfully implement new curricula directions the BCTF urge the Ministry of Education to provide school districts targeted funding and resources associated with these changes including:

a. effective ongoing in-service training opportunities. b. additional time for effective in-service. c. equipment and educational resources needed to support these changes. d. maintenance and upkeep of equipment and technology. 2. Members’ involvement is the key element of the implementation of education change. 3. The structure, content, and timing of training activities specific to the implementation of any education change is best determined by members collegially. 4. The provision of funding for the implementation of education change is the responsibility of the Ministry of Education and school districts. 5. Proposed program changes should be implemented only after transition between levels has been clearly defined and articulated. 6. The Ministry of Education, in collaboration with the BCTF, continue to review/develop programs and policies so that they are consistent with the goals of education and principles of learning. (1994 AGM) (14 AGM, p. 26)

9.A.55—Learning Resources 1. That information about available learning resources funding and purchases should be reported to school staff on an ongoing basis. 2. That each elementary school elect a teacher representative to report learning resources funding, purchasing and allocation decisions to the teaching staff at regular staff meetings. 3. That district aggregate totals for ministry funds for learning resources, and total expenditures in the district be reported by school boards to local teacher unions on an annual basis, and also when there are any significant changes. 4. That the Ministry of Education and local school boards clarify rules and processes for spending of district learning resource funds, and that this information be sent to all teachers in each district. 5. That districts maintain, establish, or re-establish central learning centres which loan learning resources and materials to individual teachers. (June 01 RA, p. 15) 9.A.61—A. Foundation Skills Assessment 1. That the Federation join with the BC Federation of Labour and others to escalate our campaign to encourage parents to withdraw their children from writing FSA tests. 2. That teachers write letters to the minister of education calling on the minister to: a. eliminate the Foundation Skills Assessment program entirely, or failing that, b. change the administration of FSA tests so they are done on a randomized sampling basis with neither schools nor students identified. B. School and District-Wide Tests 1. That locals undertake an analysis of all school- and districtwide tests to determine whether or not they have any educational value to teachers, to schools or to students or are used primarily to collect data for district accountability contracts or school growth plans. 2. That the BCTF provide to locals an analytic framework to assist in determining the educational value of school- or district-wide assessments currently in use. 3. That locals seek the agreement of their school boards to eliminate any school- or district-wide tests that are determined to have little educational value or are used primarily to collect data for district accountability contracts or school growth plans. 4. That the BCTF and its locals assert the professional right of members to opt in or out of any school- or district-wide assessment. 5. That the BCTF initiate a study of the effects of district-wide testing on the professional practice of teachers. C. Provincial Exams for Grades 10 and 11 That the Federation initiate consultation with members about the current system of mandatory provincial exams in Grades 10 and 11, with a view to developing strategies for the elimination of these exams. (Feb. 07 RA, p. 4)

9.A.63—That the deans of education be requested to include prevention strategies for voice dysfunction in teacher education programs. (Oct. 07 Ex, p. 6) 9.A.65—1. That, again, the minister of education be urged to: a. bring an immediate end to the practice of ranking BC schools. b. eliminate the compulsory administration of Foundations Skills Assessment tests to all Grade 4 and 7 students, by changing to a process of random sampling with neither schools nor students identified. c. consult with the teaching profession to develop appropriate and educationally sound means of assessing BC’s education system. 2. That locals lobby MLAs, trustees, DPAC and PAC representatives, labour councils, and other union and community groups to help persuade the minister of education to make these changes. 3. That locals meet with superintendents and chairpersons of boards of education to discuss the educational and professional concerns of teachers related to the existing Foundation Skills Assessment program and to advocate for the foregoing changes. (Nov 08 RA, p. 4–5)

9.A.69―Meeting the needs of all students That the Federation call on the provincial government to: 1. provide the learning conditions and resources necessary to support BC teachers in meeting the needs of all students. 2. reject the “master teacher” scheme in favour of increased funding for professional development and in-service to help teachers ensure that all students have a broad-based education that prepares them to become engaged analytical, contributing citizens. 3. provide funding and support for the Federation’s successful Program for Quality Teaching, action research, and mentorship initiatives. (10 AGM, p. 12) 9.A.71―That school-based union meetings and/or staff committees be central to the establishment of or revision to school plans. (June 15 Ex, p. 15) PROCEDURES 9.A.02—That the BCTF support student evaluation practices that are determined at the school level. (83 AGM, p. 11) 9.A.04—That the BCTF will promote improvements in evaluation practices through: 1. an in-service program on effective evaluation 2. activities to raise public awareness of good evaluation practice 3. a program of member research in evaluation 4. support to schools and districts that demonstrate the use of effective evaluation programs. (Sept. 84 RA, p. 7) 9.A.10—That in support of increasing the focus on teaching and learning in public schools, BCTF members: 1. participate in educational change that will produce a positive outcome for student learning. 2. increase their active involvement at the school level with parents through parent advisory councils. 3. express to parents and trustees our educational and professional concerns with FSA testing and standardized tests. 4. withdraw from participation in the formulation of all accountability contracts and school growth plans. 5. withdraw from participation on School Planning Councils. (06 AGM, pp. 12–13)

9.A.12—That accreditation.

the

BCTF

oppose

mandatory

school

(1994 AGM) (1998 AGM, p. 11)

9.A.14—The responsibility for the effective operation of schools rests with local school boards, members, and their communities. The following policy is provided as guidance to those members who, by majority decision of the school staff, wish to undertake the school’s plan of self evaluation. (Nov 10 RA, p. 8) 47

1. That the purpose of school assessment is to provide school staffs with an opportunity to develop, in co-operation with their local communities, the best possible school climate and programs. The assessment should be forward-looking, for example, conducting an appreciative inquiry rather than a fault-finding evaluation of the past. (Nov 10 RA, p. 8) 2. That part of the professional responsibility of members includes participating in assessing the educational programs of the schools. 3. That the local should negotiate a policy for school assessment that includes the following prerequisite conditions: a. The right of the school staff to clarify its purposes and objectives in undertaking assessment. b. The right to determine the most appropriate instrument to use in meeting the objectives, and then the right to determine whether all or part of the instrument is used. c. The right of a school staff to determine if teacher/administrator evaluating should occur during the year of an assessment. d. The responsibility of the school staff to determine the extent of community involvement in the assessment. e. The need to provide adequate resources, including appropriate in-service education release time to carry out the assessment without jeopardizing the current educational programs. f. Adequate resources to implement assessment; for example, additional secretarial assistance, teachers teaching on call days. g. Adequate release time for full staff meetings that does not require the use of professional development days (non-instructional days). h. The time that will be required and the portion of the school year to be designated for school assessments. i. The frequency. j. The right of the school staff to determine if any external review team should visit the school. If the school does not agree to the visitation by an external team, the purposes and the membership (to include at least one classroom teacher) should be determined by the members of the school. k. The right of the school staff to determine to which external group, or individuals, if any, the results of the assessment shall be released. l. The agreement of the school board to implement the recommendations resulting from the assessment, wherever possible. m. The agreement of the school board to negotiate the priority of implementation of particular recommendations resulting from the assessment. 4. That school staffs have the right and responsibility to determine whether or not the negotiated conditions are satisfactory before undertaking school assessment. 5. That if a school staff has not achieved satisfactory conditions for undertaking assessment, an appeal shall be made to the local for support. 6. That the BCTF shall provide full legal and moral support to a school staff for the right to decline school assessment providing that the local has supported the appeal of the school staff. 7. That, in accordance with statement 4.4 of the learning conditions declaration, if a school staff is dissatisfied with school board actions in implementing recommendations in the assessment report, the school staff should grieve through the local grievance procedure. (June 82 RA, pp. 10-12) (Nov. 97 RA, p. 52)

9.A.16—That any self-evaluation by a staff in any public school should be confined to consideration of the suitability of the programs, and that the decision to undertake such evaluation, including its format, should be agreed to by a majority of the school staff. (80 AGM, p. 23)

9.A.18—That a particular school’s plan of self-evaluation shall be agreed to by the members prior to implementation. In exercising these rights and responsibilities, members should consider the following:

48

1. The need to provide adequate resources to carry out the self-evaluation without jeopardizing the current educational programs. 2. The time that will be required and the extent of release time that will be guaranteed. 3. The need at the beginning to clarify the purposes and the objectives of the staff in undertaking the evaluation. 4. The need to designate a major portion of the school year in order to carry out the evaluation. 5. The need to provide the necessary resources to ensure the implementation of the recommendations. 6. The need to determine to what external group, if any, the results of the evaluation shall be released. 7. The need to determine if an external evaluation team should visit the school. If the school does agree to the visitation by an external team, the purposes and the membership (to include at least one classroom teacher) should be determined by the members of the elementary school. (Sept 78 Ex, p. 7) 9.A.20—That part of the professional responsibility of members includes participating in the self-evaluation of the educational programs of the school. (Sept. 78 Ex, p.7) 9.A.22—That teachers no government’s satisfaction survey.

longer

participate

in

the

(Nov. 03 RA, p. 18)

9.A.24—That the BCTF advocate and support planned and responsible approaches to the implementation of change in education policies, practices, and curriculum. Specifically, implementation should adhere to the following principles: 1. Centrality of teaching—The implementation recognizes teachers as the key agents of educational change. The plan respects teachers as self-directed professionals committed to improving education policies, practices, and curriculum. 2. Clarity—Before the implementation begins, members, both individually and collectively, are clear about the concept, the value, and the process of change. a. Conceptual clarity—Members understand the proposed change and how it differs from their current practice. b. Value clarity—Members are convinced that the change offers an improvement over current practice. c. Procedural clarity—Members understand the steps to be taken during the implementation. 3. Resources—There are adequate and appropriate resources to support the implementation. Members identify their own resource needs. Provisions are made for equitable access to physical resources—facilities, equipment, technology, materials; organizational resources—workload, class size, class composition; professional support—coaching, training, in-service. 4. Time—There is adequate time for each phase of the implementation. Members have enough lead time to achieve conceptual, value, and procedural clarity. They have additional release time during the implementation process to assess, modify, solve unanticipated problems, and to evaluate, share, and report what they have learned. Wholesale transformative change is a paced process that acknowledges effective implementation must be incremental and staged over time. 5. Professional autonomy—The implementation recognizes the diverse talents, interests, and experiences of teachers. Members can adapt and implement change in a variety of ways. 6. In-service—The implementation of newly mandated curriculum: a. is identified as in-service. b. is not funded through the use of professional development funds. c. should not occur during professional development days. d. should be supported with targeted funding and release time provided by the Ministry of Education for orientation to, and professional reflection on, the curriculum revisions. 7. Empowerment—The implementation increases the confidence, vitality, and feeling of influence of both students and teachers. 8. Involvement and communication—The implementation provides for the involvement of teachers, parents, students, trustees,

district, and Ministry staff in ways that foster ownership and commitment. 9. Diversity—The implementation acknowledges the uniqueness of communities, school districts, and schools, and the diverse needs and expectations of parents and students. The process is flexible enough to accommodate these differences and equitably meet diverse needs. (89 AGM, pp. 13–15) (14 AGM, pp. 26–27)

9.A.26—That the BCTF and locals seek to establish statutory and contractual processes to ensure that provincial and local education policy and curriculum matters are developed with the full participation of the Federation and locals. (89 AGM, p. 15) 9.A.28—That the BCTF and locals provide active support to teachers who are being directed to use teaching and assessment strategies that are contrary to teacher autonomy and established policy. (Jan 05 Ex, p. 15) 9.A.30—That members participate in education policy discussions and initiatives from government or school districts only when the BCTF or local determine those initiatives respect teacher professional rights and autonomy and promote improvements for student learning. (05 AGM, p. 10) 9.A.32—That teachers not submit data in the form of “value added” test scores to administration. (Jan 06 RA, p. 4) 9.A.34—1. That the BCTF adopt the following statement of principle, communicate it to government, MLAs, education partner organizations, PACs, and DPACs, and develop communication strategies to further publicize it. A statement of concern from the teachers of British Columbia The public school teachers of British Columbia call upon government and school boards to make a dramatic shift in our public school system. The government’s current “accountability” system for public schools relies on narrowly focussed standardized tests as the main vehicle for determining the effectiveness of our schools. Teachers believe we should be more concerned about meeting the diverse needs of all the students in our public schools and the success of our schools is all about how well we do that. Why are we concerned? Standardized tests (such as FSA and provincial exams):  Do not address the individual needs of students. They tell us little if anything about what individual children are actually learning.  Can, and do, actually harm many students. They emphasize what students cannot do rather than what they can. Too often they discourage children rather than motivate them and in the end limit their options for learning.  Do not help teachers teach. Instead they force teachers to teach to the narrow scope of learning to be tested at the expense of a much richer learning experience. Important learning such as creative and critical thinking cannot be standardized and measured and therefore doesn’t “count.”  Lead to standardized teaching and that means too many of the individual needs of students are not addressed.  Result in a way of evaluating the school system that is simplistic and unfair. Research is clear, scores on standardized test have more to do with social and economic factors than what happens in school. There is a better way! The teachers of BC believe:  Every child counts and all can learn. Our joy in teaching and our students’ love of learning comes from meeting the needs of every student.  We are all accountable for maximizing students’ opportunities to learn. Teachers must teach well and governments must provide the conditions such as appropriate class sizes, class compositions, and learning resources that allow each student to learn.

 Teachers must be allowed to make professional judgments about how students are taught and assessed. We call on government to work with teachers, school districts, and parents to build a public school system that provides all students, including vulnerable learners, the best possible opportunities to create, to think, to learn, and to grow. (Jan 14 Ex, p. 9)) (May 15 Ex, p. 4)

9.A.36—Statement of Principle on Assessment We, the undersigned BC public school teachers, believe that the primary purpose of assessment is to support and promote students' learning. As teachers, we know it is important to use a variety of methods to assess students' progress and meet students' needs. Ongoing classroom assessment allows students to demonstrate in a variety of ways what they are learning and thereby informs teaching and learning. Teachers know that learning is a complex process and that students learn in different ways and at different rates. We also know that assessment is an important part of the learning cycle. We oppose the proliferation of mandated district-wide and provincial testing, including the Foundation Skills Assessment (FSA) and provincial exams, which take time away from teaching and learning and encourage misuses such as the Fraser Institute's ranking of schools. Results from these tests do not provide the resources necessary to improve public education and do not enhance learning for students. (Nov. 07 Ex, p. 10) 9.A.38—That teachers be advised to not participate in the distribution of marked FSA booklets to parents. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 10) 9.A.40—That in the event that marked FSA booklets are distributed to parents by administrators, teachers be advised to provide parents with accompanying printed information outlining teachers’ concerns about the FSA and the proliferation of mandated testing. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 10) 9.A.42—That the BCTF continue to communicate to members the Federation’s policy on testing and assessment in BC’s classrooms emphasizing teacher autonomy. (June 08 Ex, p. 7) 9.A.44—That schools in which the principal has arranged time during the school day for collaboration in the form of Grade-Group meetings, attendance be at the teacher’s discretion. (Nov 08 RA, p. 14)

9.A.46—That members who attend Grade-Group meetings insist that the choice of topics to be discussed be decided by consensus among the individual members attending. (Nov 08 RA, p. 14)

9.A.48—That members not support secondary school Professional Learning Communities unless they ensure that participation is voluntary, that members choose the topics, and how the work of their group is reported. (Nov 08 RA, p. 14) 9.A.50—1. That locals be requested to develop and implement plans that support colleagues and ensure that principals/viceprincipals work only through Local Presidents/school union representatives regarding the preparation for, administration of, or marking of FSAs. 2. The Executive Committee recommends to locals that local plans include: a. the collection of member signatures on letters of solidarity b. the copying and presentation of solidarity letters to principals, superintendents, school boards c. actions to support TTOCs d. meetings with DPACs and PACs to explain the BCTF position, seek PAC support of the random sampling administration of FSAs and request that DPACs and PACs communicate their support to the minister/ministry of education. (Dec 08 Ex, p. 4 9.A.52―That members not participate in any action or decision on educational matters that may impinge on the professional 49

autonomy of any teacher; that school staff decisions may not compel the pedagogical practice of any teacher. (09 AGM, p. 11) 9.A.54―That the BCTF insist that the provincial government recognize teacher professional autonomy in the use of marks programs of their own choice for assessing students and reporting to parents. (09 AGM, p. 12) 9.A.56—1. That the Federation: a. hold issue sessions with members to seek input into action plans to oppose the overuse and misuse of standardized testing. b. promote the work of others in the broader education community to expose the harm done by the current testing agenda and develop alternatives. c. develop a model of random sampling of the FSA and present this model to the ministry and education partner groups. 2. That the Federation, locals, and members continue to work with parents around the effects of the FSA on teaching and learning and continue to encourage parents to withdraw students from writing the FSA until such time as the FSA is administered on a random sampling basis. 3. That locals be encouraged to develop and implement local action plans that promote and support the professional autonomy rights of teachers and oppose the overuse and misuse of standardized tests. (May 09 RA, p. 15) 9.A.58―That the BCTF support local action campaigns by: 1. providing materials (in multiple languages, with content adapted for various cultural groups) to encourage parents to withdraw children from the FSA. 2. developing and initiating a campaign on the appropriate forms and uses of assessment across the grade levels (including provincial exams and district mandated assessments). 3. a video, communication support, and materials for use in community meetings. 4. a grant to facilitate local plans and campaigns. (Oct 09 Ex, p. 7)

9.A.60―That the BCTF support local action plans that address the broader issues of testing assessment including materials to support meetings with parents and teachers. (Oct 09 Ex, p. 9) 9.A.62―Protection and privacy of students That the BCTF use the right to be forgotten as a guiding principle in the BCTF’s advocacy work for the protection and privacy of students, in regards to data collection, record keeping, and data storage. (15 AGM, p. 17)

II.

General

POLICIES 9.B.01—That in accordance with Policy 9.A.01, it is through the knowledge, skills and example of teachers that schools foster the growth of students into autonomous, socially responsible citizens. Specifically, members help to educate their students in the following ways: 1. through philosophical understanding of the aims, goals and values of education for a society which is just, democratic and peaceful and which supports its citizens in their pursuit of happiness and fulfilment 2. through knowledge about teaching practice based on research and experience 3. through understanding current affairs and social developments such as technological changes, cultural changes and the arms race, which affect the context in which teaching and learning occur 4. by applying skills and understandings developed through formal and informal training, through feedback and coaching from colleagues, and through practice in the classroom 5. through serving as role models of caring, understanding, resourceful, responsible, self-directing adults who are committed to learning and personal growth and who exhibit honesty, openness and integrity 50

6. by planning and organizing learning experiences appropriate for their students 7. by participating within the teaching profession in developing new knowledge concerning teaching and learning, in sharing information, materials and knowledge with colleagues, and in supporting the development and enforcement of professional standards 8. by participating as an educational leader within the community, e.g., serving as an advocate for education, helping the community to understand the connections between the conditions for teaching and learning and the quality of education and to appreciate the types of changes required in the schools. (1977 AGM, pp. 7-9) (Feb. 85 Ex, p. 12)

9.B.03—That the BCTF believes that public schools should be primarily concerned with general education, not with training for specific jobs. (69 AGM, p. 34) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 14)

9.B.05—That section 92 of the Regulations of the LieutenantGovernor in Council should be amended to read: “The administrative officer and members of a public school shall endeavour to see that the students are made aware of the ideals of respect for and responsibility to Canadian institutions promoting a better democratic society.’’ (69 AGM, p. 37) (89 AGM, p. 51)

9.B.07—That the BCTF oppose the use of any form of corporal punishment in the public schools of BC. (76 AGM, p. 17) 9.B.09—The BCTF believes that: 1. The teaching process should emphasize human and social relationships and should guide students in their development. 2. a. Teaching processes aim to develop students to become self-reliant, self-disciplined, participating members with a sense of social responsibility within a democratic society. b. That the BCTF supports student involvement in democratic decision making, for example through class meetings, student councils, and other group problem solving, conflict resolution, and decision-making activities, when and where appropriate. (95 AGM, p. 16)

3. Teaching is a planned process that includes: a. assessing of learner needs b. establishing and communicating objectives to the learner; c. developing interpersonal relationships designed to motivate the learner d. creating a classroom climate that is conducive to learning e. matching content, materials, and strategies to the needs of the learner f. appraising selected content, and materials on an ongoing basis g. providing ongoing feedback to the learner. 4. Intended learnings should include a balance of objectives from all of the cognitive, the effective, and the psycho-motor domains. 5. A member is aware of many different styles and strategies in teaching and seeks to adapt those to meet their own unique situation. 6. The member is aware that the teaching process includes ongoing communication between the teacher and the parent(s)/guardian(s) of the student(s) and promotes such communication. (85 AGM, p. 12) 9.B.11—That the Ministry of Education should pressure publishers to eliminate all indications of grade and ability level from prescribed and supplementary texts in the BC public school system and include such indications as grade and ability level in the teacher notes or teacher manuals that accompany these prescribed and supplementary texts. (Jan 79 RA, p. 12) 9.B.13—Educational Leadership 1. That the BCTF believes that the central relationship in public education is among the teacher, student and parent, and that all others in the system are to support this fundamental relationship.

2. That the BCTF believes that the responsibility for providing educational leadership in the public school system of BC is a shared one and that members have provided and will continue to provide effective educational leadership at the school, district and provincial levels. (1994 AGM) 3. That the Ministry of Education and school districts provide funding and resources, including time, for effective, ongoing inservice training opportunities for members to develop/extend the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to successfully implement the new curricular directions. 4. That the BCTF and its locals continue to be advocates for professional autonomy that encourages members to be involved in innovative teaching practices. 5. a. That the BCTF and the other educational partners reassess the increasing social responsibilities expected of schools to determine if schools are the appropriate venue for these services. b. That if the school system is determined to be the appropriate venue for those social-responsibility services, the appropriate ministries of government and school districts must provide additional support to fulfil society’s expectations of schools. 6. That teacher assignments be organized within the work day/assignment to provide opportunities for members to collaborate/consult with other members and support personnel. 7. That the Ministry of Education and the BCTF as well as other partner groups more actively acknowledge and support public school teachers and the services they provide to youth and society. 8. a. That the BCTF and the Ministry of Education encourage member discussions about issues in education by providing time and opportunity for members to talk together about educational change issues. b. That the Ministry of Education provide funding to facilitate discussion and collaborative planning among members to promote educational change in secondary schools. 9. That school districts/schools promote programs/ structures that facilitate school-based collaboration. (May 94 RA) 10. That the Ministry of Education and the BCTF collect, publish and distribute research data on the relationship between school timetables and student/teacher needs. 11. a. That where members agree on their value, staffs design school timetables to facilitate the effective delivery of curricular directions in order to meet student/teacher/community needs and priorities. b. Once a significant majority of members agree, then staffs use school-based collaborative processes in designing timetables. 12. That districts review the manner in which support services are offered so that classroom teachers have ready access to regular consultation and support in the classroom. 13. a. That education partners at all levels be encouraged to use more collaborative decision-making processes. b. That the Ministry of Education, school districts and schools provide resources and time within the working day to facilitate member collaboration at the school, district and provincial levels. 14. a. That schools be physically structured and staffed to promote a safe and healthy learning environment. b. That schools use instructional materials/processes that promote a safe and healthy learning environment. 15. That the Ministry of Education, school districts, in collaboration with teachers, the BCTF and other appropriate educational partners, develop and provide school-based learning materials that acknowledge and honour the multi-ethnic/ multicultural diversity of the school community. 16. That members work with the other education partners in the school to establish policies and programs that will increase students’ responsibility/ accountability for their learning and behaviour. 17. That administrators provide support for members in matters of student discipline and attendance. 18. That the Ministry of Education and school districts provide increased opportunities for members to participate in programs of educational leadership. 19. That school board trustees and school district administrative staff remain current regarding education trends and classroom challenges.

20. a. That the Ministry of Education and school districts, in consultation with provincial partners, develop a comprehensive school-facilities action plan to upgrade/replace decaying school structures. b. That the Ministry of Education target funding to implement the above recommendation. 21. That teachers and other user groups of schools at the local level have a significant involvement in the design of school facilities. 22. a. That the Ministry of Education and school districts, in consultation with teachers and other education partners, improve supportive teaching/learning environments, such as teacher preparation areas, office space, storage, the general aesthetics of school buildings, internal environmental systems, libraries and cafeterias. b. That the Ministry of Education target new funding to implement the above recommendation. 23. That the Ministry of Education and school districts explore with the BCTF and other education partners, the advisability and feasibility of making school facilities available for other uses. (May 94 RA)

9.B.15—That the Federation oppose the use of PEN numbers (or any other personal identifier) on student surveys. (Dec. 01 Ex, p. 4) (Sept 10 Ex, p. 11)

9.B.17—That the BCTF oppose the use of instructional time for the administration of student surveys, and advise members that administrative officers have the sole responsibility for the distribution of both the parent and student surveys. (March 02 Ex, p. 3) 9.B.19—That the BCTF lobby the government to change the term “non-enrolling teachers” to “learning specialist teachers.” (02 AGM, p. 35)

III.

Curriculum Principles

POLICIES 9.C.01—That the curriculum of each public school should be so designed that it would promote and foster the growth and development of each individual, to the end that they will become a self-reliant, self-disciplined, participating member with a sense of social responsibility within a democratic society. 1. Programs should be specifically designed for individual students, recognizing the unique way in which each learns. 2. The following are some of the characteristics of the learning process that should be considered in the design of the curriculum: a. Students learn through a variety of processes: such as the manipulative, the imaginative, the creative, the intellectual. b Students learn best when a multi-sensory approach is used. c. Students learn most rapidly when the activities in which they are involved seem useful and important to them. 3. In the process of organizing learning experiences: a. Provision should be made for pupils to understand concepts, to acquire skills, and to develop desirable habits, attitudes and appreciations. b. Every student from the earliest years should be assisted in developing techniques for self-learning and given opportunities for self-evaluation. 4. In organizing and selecting learning experiences and in determining sequence, teachers of various disciplines, teachers of students of different ages, specialist teachers, and when necessary, members from the consultative services should communicate continually. 5. The intrinsic value of an organized series of learning experiences should be clearly recognizable to the students, to the parents and to the community. 6. The school system should be organized to permit each student to make continuous progress. 7. The progress of students should be evaluated in its relation to objectives that may have been agreed upon co-operatively by teacher and student.

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8. The program designed for each student, and the continuing evaluation and redesigning of the program, should in every case be the responsibility of the professional teacher. 9. In attempting to provide for the individual differences of pupils in the classroom, members should make continuing professional decisions concerning, for example: a. adaptations of the curriculum; b. the selection of a variety of materials; c. the methods of grouping the pupils; d. the identification of pupils with learning difficulties for referral to other professional people. 10. Curriculum revision at all levels should be a continuous process. 11. The public school system should be viewed as a single unit, which should foster in each pupil a lifetime desire for continuous learning. 74 AGM, pp. 33-35) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

9.C.03—That the development and approval of courses at the (Feb 71 Ex, p. 3) local level should be encouraged.

and social development of the students for whom the materials are selected. 4. Learning resources, across the subject areas, should be designed to help students gain an understanding of the knowledges, understandings, and experiences of Aboriginal peoples and equityseeking groups. 5. Learning resources should be designed to motivate students to examine their own attitudes and behaviours and to comprehend their own responsibilities, rights and privileges. 6. Learning resources on controversial issues should enable students to engage in critical reflection, open mindedness, and social justice. 7. Learning resources be free of implicit or explicit corporate advertising. (08 AGM, p. 12) (16 AGM, p. 37)

9.C.21—That when members are relieved from teaching duties to work on curriculum revision committees, no honoraria need be paid to the members involved, and the costs of teachers on call are paid by the ministry. (Nov 66 Ex, p. 3) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

9.C.05—That locally developed courses numbered 11 or 12 that have been evaluated and approved by the local school board and local teachers’ association, and registered with the Ministry of Education, should be recognized for credit for graduation on the same basis as provincially prescribed courses. (June 75 Ex, p. 25) (Reviewed Dec. 79 Ex, p. 19)

9.C.07—That funding of local curriculum development should be a responsibility of the Ministry of Education and the local school board. (Feb 76 Ex, p. 13) 9.C.09—That the ministry’s role in school curriculum should be to facilitate the development by the public of broad general goals and policies and to facilitate the efforts of trustees, teachers, parents and students in their pursuit of goals. (77 AGM, p. 7) 9.C.11—That the BCTF recognizes the need for educational planning and development at the school and local level that gives full consideration to the social, economic, ethnic and cultural nature of the students and others in the school community. (75 AGM, p. 9) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

9.C.13—That the concept of a provincial core curriculum with arbitrary levels of attainment for all students is not acceptable. (Oct 77 RA, p. 5)

9.C.15—That the Ministry of Education should institute an elective women’s study course as part of the curriculum in Grades 11 and 12. (79 AGM, p. 19) 9.C.17—That the BCTF affirm these principles of freedom of academic inquiry: 1. The study of and inquiry into controversial issues and/or difficult and disturbing issues is a fundamental right of the students of British Columbia. 2. The scheduling, organization, and execution of programs of study and inquiry into such issues is a fundamental right of teachers in the schools of British Columbia. 3. Members have the fundamental right to select the approach and resources that they consider most appropriate in presenting materials and topics. 4. Members are free to pursue the goals and objectives of courses being taught, in an atmosphere of openness and sensitivity. (86 AGM, pp. 24–25)

9.C.19—That BCTF members adhere to the following guidelines when selecting resources: 1. Learning resources should be consistent with the general educational goals of British Columbia, and with the aims of specific courses. 2. Learning resources should meet high standards of accuracy, currency, inclusivity, and presentation. 3. Learning resources should be appropriate for the subject area and for the diverse ages, emotional development, ability levels, 52

9.C.23—That the ministry should provide concentrated working time for its revision committees through extended periods of released time and/or summer work. (Feb 80 Ex, p. 9) 9.C.27—Issues of social responsibility, inclusive of a global and environmental education perspective, should be woven into the entire curriculum. (90 AGM, pp. 26-32) 9.C.29—There should be an exploration with Aboriginal representatives of a diversity of models, in order to provide equitable educational opportunities for Aboriginal students. There should be Aboriginal representation in the formation of education policy and curriculum development. (90 AGM, pp. 26-32) 9.C.31—There should be ethno-cultural representation in the formation of education policy and curriculum development. (90 AGM, pp. 26– 32)

9.C.33—Curricular programs and learning outcomes should be designed to help students gain an awareness of our pluralistic society as well as an understanding of the many important contributions made to civilization by minority and ethnic groups. (90 AGM, pp. 26–32)

9.C.35—There should be a labour education component in the (90 AGM, pp. 26–32) provincial curriculum. 9.C.37—There should be gender equity in all aspects of education including curriculum, counselling, and co-educational courses and programs. (90 AGM, pp. 26–32) 9.C.39—There should be a multicultural and anti-racist aspect integrated into the curriculum and student services. (90 AGM, pp. 26–32)

9.C.53—That members at the school/department level collegially determine the nature and extent of curriculum integration. (May 94 RA)

9.C.55—Integration of subjects should not occur until there is clarity about the concept, agreement on its value, and adequate resources. (90 AGM, pp. 26–32) 9.C.57—The degree and type of curriculum integration should be determined by members at the school level. (90 AGM, pp. 26–32) 9.C.61—The minimum time allocations for subjects be used as a guide to assist with program planning and not be viewed as prescriptive in nature. (94 AGM) 9.C.65—That the BCTF supports the inclusion of applications in curricula to increase student interest and relevance but is opposed to the artificial splitting of curricula into applied and theoretical courses. (Nov 95 Ex, p. 4)

9.C.67—That the BCTF demand that the ministry immediately include participation of teacher-librarians in all ministry curriculum and literacy committees and that a teacher-librarian be added to ministry staff to guide the building of strong school library programs in BC public schools. (07 AGM, p. 13) 9.C.69—That the BCTF engage PSAs, PD networks, locals, and education partner groups in efforts to secure adequate funding from the Ministry of Education for appropriate learning resources and in-service to support the implementation of new and revised curriculum. (08 AGM, p. 14) 9.C.71―That: 1. additional secondary school IRPs on Aboriginal culture (such as First Nations Studies 12, and English First Peoples 10, 11, and 12) be created, across the subject areas. 2. ministry funding be available to support the implementation of these courses. 3. should such additional courses be created and made available with the necessary supports, the completion of a (one) such course be a requirement of graduation for all students. 4. Aboriginal content be embedded in all K-12 IRPs.

2. That the BCTF request that the Ministry of Education remove the requirement that adult education be funded on enrolment and completion. 3. That the BCTF request that the Ministry of Education change the adult education funding formula to ensure that it recognizes and provides additional funding for services for students with special needs. 4. That the BCTF request that the Ministry of Education provide stable and adequate targeted funding for school district adult education programs. 5. That the BCTF request that the Ministry of Education include funding for adult education facilities in school district capital budgets. 6. That the system for distributing adult education funds at the school district should be transparent and accountable. (Feb. 03 Ex, pp. 6–7)

(11 AGM, p. 5)

9.D.05—1. That the BCTF recognize that adult education is an important alternative program for students within the public education system. 2. That the School Act recognize adult education as an important alternative program for students within the public education system. (AGM 03, p. 16)

PROCEDURES 9.C.02—That the BCTF provide professional guidance to members in the design and evaluation of locally developed courses.

9.D.07—That adult education programs leading to the completion of a Dogwood Certificate should be primarily provided in the K-12 public education system. (AGM 03, p. 16)

(72 AGM, p. 27) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

9.C.04—That the BCTF and locals seek to establish statutory and contractual processes to ensure that members have professional autonomy in determining the methods of instruction and the planning of course materials. (89 AGM, p. 15)

IV.

CURRICULUM AREAS

D.

Adult Education

9.D.09—That adult education programs should be accessible and stable, and that the BCTF call on school districts to make these programs visible in their communities. (AGM 03, p. 16) 9.D.11—That the criteria for measuring student/program success in adult education programs should take into account student needs and goals, learning abilities, life circumstances, and the role of adult education as a support system in the community. (AGM 03, p. 16)

POLICIES 9.D.01—1. That the BCTF promote and foster adult education as part of the process of life-long learning. 2. That the BCTF urge the provincial government to provide adequate funding for day-care facilities for children of adults attending educational centres. (1994 AGM) 3. That the BCTF urge the provincial government to provide adequate funding for educating adult students: a. with special needs. b. whose first language is not English. c. who are of Aboriginal descent. (Jan 97 Ex, p.22) d. to complete their high school education. (Jan 96 Ex, p. 21)

e. regardless of whether they have already obtained graduation status. (Dec. 98 Ex, p. 20) 4. That the BCTF urge the Minister of Education to establish a funding system which reflects the actual enrollment in adult education programs offered by school boards. (Dec. 98 Ex, p. 20) 5. That the provincial government should continue to provide the Dogwood Diploma, the BC Secondary Regular Graduation program and tuition-free education for adult students through programs offered by school boards. (1996 AGM p. 11) (Nov. 01 RA, p. 14)

6. That the BCTF urge the provincial government to provide additional funding, resources and support services to adult education programs and classes being offered in areas designated as the inner city. (Jan 97 Ex, p. 22) 9.D.03—1. That the BCTF inform the Ministry of Education of its support for: a. the continuation of funding of adult education in the K-12 public education system. b. the removal of the enrolment cap on adult education and funding. c. an increase in the per student amount for adult education students.

9.D.13—That the comprehensive theoretical and practical components of adult education should be available in teacher education programs that are offered by teacher education institutions in the province. (AGM 03, p. 17) E.

Career Education

POLICIES 9.E.01—That a general education should include opportunities for career education including: 1. knowledge of career options 2. counselling on appropriate career choices 3. “hands on’’ experience with broad, non-specialized training within school courses and work experience/work observation programs. (May 81 RA, p. 15) 9.E.03—That all career preparation programs should be designed to allow students to enroll in part or in all of the courses within a program. (May 81 RA, p. 16) 9.E.05—That the BCTF seek to ensure that each career preparation program: 1. provides opportunities in the curriculum and in the work experience for students to examine the rights, the contributions and the responsibilities of working people and of trade unions. 2. provides opportunities for students to acquire broad generic skills rather than narrow, specific job preparation skills. 3. is able to stand on its own merits as an integral part of secondary school education; that is, it does not have to be specifically articulated to a program in a tertiary institution. 4. is non-sexist in design, and content. 5. provides equal opportunity to both girls and boys to enroll in any career preparation program. 6. includes a work experience component that is solely educational.

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7. includes a clause that it is the responsibility of the work experience co-ordinator to ensure that the student is not replacing a regular employee. 8. is adequately funded. (May 81 RA, p. 16) 9. includes unlearning racism and learning skills for students at all levels to respond to racist incidents. (Feb. 99 Ex, p. 22) PROCEDURES 9.E.02—That the BCTF seek the redesign of those career preparation programs whose primary focus is on job training rather than on general education. (May 81 RA, p. 16) F.

Child Care/Parenting

POLICIES 9.F.01—That it is the responsibility of the federal and provincial government to establish and fully fund child care. (Oct. 80 RA, p. 11) (May 09 RA, p. 14)

9.F.03—That local school boards be encouraged to provide programs and conditions such as on-site child care, parenting skills and counselling which will ensure that teen parents are able to complete their secondary education. (AGM 90, p. 37) 9.F.05—That all Child Care programs for young children should: 1. be universally accessible. 2. be of high quality. 3. be publicly funded, non-profit, and regulated. 4. provide programs that are child-centred, play-based, developmentally appropriate, and culturally sensitive. 5. focus on the development of the whole child and four areas of growth: well-being and belonging, exploration and creativity, social responsibility and diversity, and language and literacies. 6. provide seamless care to all children integrated with K–7 school schedules at one location. (May 09 RA, p. 14) 9.F.07—That all of the ministries involved with supporting children and families fully fund and support a model of co-ordinated services that includes the comprehensive, seamless delivery of Child Care services. (May 09 RA, p. 14) 9.F.09—That the BCTF believes in regulated, fully public funded, and universally accessible child care programs for three- and four-year-old children based on the principles outlined in the British Columbia Early Learning Framework (2008) with a community-based democratic governance structure. (May 09 RA, p. 15) G.

9.G.03—That the BCTF opposes separate compulsory courses in consumer education in the secondary school program. (Feb. 82 RA, p. 6)

9.G.05—That the BCTF lobby the Ministry of Education to provide adequate funding for the implementation of new curriculum and other ministry initiatives. (June 08 Ex, p. 5) English as a Second Language

POLICIES 9.H.01—ESL programs should be reviewed and additional resources, including teachers and multicultural workers, should be provided to assist in the delivery of these programs. (90 AGM, pp. 26–30)

9.H.03—That the Ministry of Education and the BCTF develop provincial guidelines for assessment to support ESL/ESD learners, in particular, ESL/ESD learners with special needs (e.g., students with learning difficulties.); such guidelines to include: placement for ongoing language support; identification procedures for funding and appropriate services. (90 AGM, pp. 26–30) 54

9.H.07—That school boards recognize the developmental nature of language learning (second-language learning as well as first-language learning) and provide a continuum of services to meet the changing needs of ESL/ESD students as they progress in their language development. (90 AGM, pp. 26–30) 9.H.09—That school boards support the integration of ESL/ESD students into regular classes by providing both adequate space for the integrated students and ongoing support and resources for the students and the classroom teachers. (90 AGM, pp. 26–30) 9.H.11—That the Ministry of Education/school boards ensure that curricular resources are available to members that meet the specific needs of ESL/ESD learners and include accurate images of students from a wide variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. (90 AGM, pp. 26–30)

9.H.13—That school boards provide in-service training, funded by the Ministry of Education and developed in conjunction with the BCTF, in ESL/ESD methodology and practice for classroom teachers, teachers on call, and ESL/ESD teachers. (90 AGM, pp. 26– 30)

9.H.15—1. That school boards support regular liaison between schools, ESL/ESD teachers and families or sponsors of ESL/ESD students by providing orientation programs and ongoing educational support. 2. That the Ministry of Social Services, in collaboration with the Ministry of Education and school districts, provide multilingual home-school liaison workers proportional to the diverse backgrounds and numbers of ESL/ESD students in each school district. (90 AGM, pp. 26-30)

9.H.17—1. That the Ministry of Education in consultation with the BCTF ensure that the needs of ESL/ESD students are considered and met in the development of all curriculum (assessment) guides and resources. 2. That schools districts in consultation with local associations/unions ensure that the needs of ESL/ESD students are considered and met in the implementation of all curriculum (assessment) guides and resources. (90 AGM, pp. 26-30)

Consumer Education

POLICIES 9.G.01—That the BCTF supports maintaining and/or introducing the teaching of essential consumer education skills within existing required courses. (Feb. 82 RA, p. 16)

H.

9.H.05—That school boards identify, develop, and provide programs for ESL/ESD learners with special needs, and that these programs be funded by the Ministry of Education, with support from the federal government. (90 AGM, pp. 26–30)

9.H.19—1. That the Ministry of Education, through policy and funding, support the principle that students of all linguistic and cultural backgrounds have equitable access to educational opportunities within the BC public school system. 2. That the Ministry of Education ensure that significant school-related documents are available in the major languages of families whose home language is not English. (90 AGM, pp. 26-30) 9.H.21—That the BCTF promote public awareness of the issues related to ESL/ESD students by publishing the findings of its ESL/ESD study. (90 AGM, pp. 26–30) 9.H.23—That the Ministry of Education distribute its proposed policy on ESL/ESD learners to teachers and appropriate partner groups for advice and feedback. 9.H.25—That the federal government and the Ministry of Education target adequate funding to school districts to accommodate the needs of ESL/ESD learners and ensure accountability. (May 94 RA) 9.H.27—1. That ESL students who have additional special needs or educational handicaps be provided with assessment in their own language or with appropriately modified assessment instruments. (Jan 99 Ex, p. 20)

2. That ESL students be provided both ESL assistance and assistance as required to address additional special needs. (May 95 Ex, p. 10)

c. is available in a variety of settings within a safe and supportive school environment. d. recognizes the needs and abilities of individual students. (Jan 16 Ex, p. 11)

9.H.29—That ESL service be provided for students for whom English is an additional language in French Immersion at the time that they begin the English component. (Nov 08 RA, p. 13) 9.H.31―That the BCTF advocate for: 1. additional ESL reception-level support for students who speak English as a second language prior to classroom placement. 2. the removal of the five-year cap on service to students who speak English as a second language, and that part of the advocacy strategy be to work with various immigrant support associations and agencies, as appropriate. (Jan 10 RA, pp. 5–6) I.

Environmental Education

POLICIES 9.I.01—That the BCTF urge the Ministry of Education to encourage school districts to establish recycling programs in all BC schools, and assist the implementation of these programs with educational support materials and information. (AGM 90, p. 35) 9.I.03—That the BCTF urge the Ministry of Education to incorporate environmental education into the curricula from Kindergarten to Grade 12, and that these curricula be developed jointly with the BCTF. (AGM 90, p. 35) PROCEDURES 9.I.02—That the BCTF and its locals encourage all school staffs to work with students, parents, administrators and local authorities to establish and promote school-based environmental education and recycling programs. (AGM 90, p. 34) 9.I.04—That the BCTF and its locals demonstrate their commitment to environmental preservation in the operation of their daily affairs by reduction and recycling practices. (June 90 RA, p. 20) J.

Family Life and Sexual Health

POLICIES 9.J.01—That the BCTF believes that family life education and sex education should be an integral part of the school curriculum. (69 AGM, p. 33) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

9.J.03—That the Ministry of Education should, in conjunction with the BCTF, develop and implement family life and sex education courses at all levels of the public school system. (May 80 RA, p. 24) 9.J.05—AIDS 1. Information on AIDS should be provided as part of the compulsory curriculum. 2. In-service education should be made available to members concerning AIDS and other potentially communicable diseases. (88 AGM, p. 9)

3. That the BCTF call upon the Ministry of Education and school districts to make available accurate, age-appropriate, and upto-date learning resources to support the learning outcomes for intermediate grades pertaining to AIDS and HIV. (07 AGM, p. 11) 9.J.07—That the Ministry of Education should, in conjunction with the BCTF, develop and implement programs to educate students about rape and sexual assault. (78 AGM, p. 12) 9.J.09―Guidelines for Implementation of Sexual Health Education 1. That students have access to sexual health education that: a. is appropriate to their age and level of development. b. considers and respects the diversity of individuals and their families, (including students who are LGBTQ-identified, students from LGBTQ-headed families, or those who engage in sexual activity with others of the same sex, regardless of self-identification).

e. takes a positive approach to the body and its changes. f. takes a positive approach to sexuality, and is not limited to only discussion of reproduction. 2. That the content of the sexual health education curriculum: a. be age and developmentally appropriate. b. respect the diversity of individuals and their families (including students who are LGBTQ-identified, students from LGBTQ-headed families, or those who engage in sexual activity with others of the same sex, regardless of self-identification). c. include appropriate content for students with differing physical, mental, and cognitive abilities. d. reflect current and accurate knowledge. e. include relevant topics such as (but not limited to): i. basic anatomy and physiology, health, hygiene, and safety. ii. developmental changes of puberty. iii. reproduction and conception, effective contraception, prevention of STI/HIV iv. healthy relationships, setting personal boundaries and limits, sexual orientation, gender identity, communication, media influences. v. accessing information, and family and community resources. vi. prevention of abuse and exploitation. f. encourage safe decision-making, healthy behaviour, and critical thinking. g. provide opportunities to develop personal insight, values, motivation, and skills. 3. That members create a respectful and safe environment conducive to sexual health education by: a. encouraging interaction. b. establishing ground rules for discussion that: i. are considerate of students’ feelings and perceptions ii. respect personal privacy. c. setting a tone that encourages a positive and inclusive learning experience for all students. d. keeping the classroom discussion age and developmentally appropriate (physically, cognitively, emotionally, and experientially) for the majority of students in the classroom. e. using inclusive language. f. being present when a guest speaker is in the class. g. being prepared to refer students for follow-up and/or healthcare. h. responding to student questions by: i. focusing on sexual health, body science, and factual information. ii. taking time to consider how or whether to answer immediately or publicly. iii. acknowledging that the member may not be able to personally answer all questions. iv. providing resource information to students for having their questions answered outside of the classroom setting. v. providing an opportunity for students to ask questions anonymously (using, for example, a question-box format). vi. previewing, sorting, and grouping questions. vii. adding questions that students may be reluctant to ask. viii. using frequently asked questions to adapt future lessons. ix. depersonalizing questions to maintain students’ anonymity. 4. That members and locals ensure that classroom presentations by community health professionals and sexual health educators: a. reflect these guidelines. b. enhance but do not replace implementation of the sexual health education curriculum. c. respect the contracting-out language contained in the collective agreement. 5. That school districts ensure that: a. in-service is available and supported. 55

b. in-service is up-to-date and factual, covers topics, strategies, and resources that support the needs of learners and the sexual health curriculum at all grade levels. c. relevant, up-to-date, and comprehensive resources that reflect these guidelines and the curriculum that are available and supported. (Nov 15 Ex, p. 6) d. relevant, up-to-date in-service and resources be provided to teachers to support students with differing physical, mental, and cognitive abilities. e. administrators support the delivery of sexual health education. f. community health professionals, including sexual health presenters, enhance but do not replace the school’s sexual health education curriculum. g. the use of guest presenters does not violate the contracting-out language of the collective agreement. h.resource people, including guest presenters, provide detailed information on the content and their instructional approach prior to their presentation. (June 10 Ex, pp. 19–20) K.

Fine Arts Policy

POLICIES 9.K.01—1. That the BCTF support and encourage a basic education in the visual and performing arts as a part of a complete education for every student. 2. That a basic education in the visual and performing arts includes educational experiences in art, dance, music and drama. (May 81 RA, p. 19)

3. That all public schools in BC have a properly equipped fine arts complex for the instruction of music, art, drama, and dance. (91 AGM, p. 47)

4. That the BCTF work toward having secondary art classes designated as lab courses for the purpose of determining class sizes at the secondary level. (Nov. 02 RA, p. 9) 9.K.03—That the BCTF work toward inclusion of visual literacy as a vital component of the learning process in all aspects of the K12 and adult education curriculum. (Oct 82 Ex, p. 13) 9.K.05—That to provide for the fullest growth and development of every student, each elementary school must have adequate time for instruction in art, music and physical education during the week. (74 AGM, p. 60) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 14)

9.K.07—That every student shall be provided with a quality music program as mandated by the Fine Arts IRP. (Jan 01 RA, p. 5)

L.

Languages

POLICIES 9.L.01—That the BCTF support the principle that all parents have the right to have their students taught in either official language in any part of Canada where there are sufficient numbers to make it feasible. (Jan 78 RA, p. 14) 9.L.03—That the French as a Minority Language Program should not be offered in place of French Immersion programs and should be available, where numbers warrant, solely for the general education of French as a Minority Language students. (Sept 07 Ex, p. 4) (Dec 14 Ex, p. 5)

9.L.05—That the BCTF support the provision of opportunities for all students to become fluent in both official languages. (Jan 78 RA, p. 15)

9.L.07—That the Ministry of Education and local school boards should encourage the use of French as a language of instruction within the public school system for both French-speaking students and interested English-speaking students, where the numbers warrant it. (75 AGM, p. 11)

56

9.L.09—That the Ministry of Education in collaboration with the universities should ensure that sufficient numbers of teachers in BC are trained (or retrained) to teach French immersion, francophone, and Core French programs. (Feb 78 Ex, pp. 9–10) (Oct 06 Ex, p. 6)

9.L.11—That training programs for immersion teachers should accommodate the requirements of early immersion, late immersion, and expansion to the secondary level. (Nov 84 Ex, p. 12) (Jan 98 Ex, p. 15)

9.L.13—That the BC universities and the Ministry of Education, in consultation with the BCTF, develop adequate in-service retraining programs for members wishing to retrain or upgrade in second language instruction in one of the official languages. (Nov 84 Ex, p. 11) (Oct 06 Ex, p. 6)

9.L.15—That retraining programs should incorporate upgrading of the individual’s language abilities as well as opportunities for cultural immersion and professional development experiences in immersion setting. (Nov 84 Ex, p. 12) (June 97 Ex, p. 22)

9.L.17—That there be implemented in BC schools, second language learning programs in both official languages, in addition to immersion programs, which will provide students the opportunity to develop from an early age facility in a second language. (Nov 84 Ex, p. 12)

9.L.19—That learning assistance and special education services will be available for students with special needs which will enable a student to remain in the language program of their choice. (Nov 84 Ex, p. 12)

9.L.23—That the Ministry of Education and local school boards should encourage the teaching of local minority group languages, including Aboriginal languages, where the local minority group communities have requested that such teaching take place. (Jan 76 RA, p. 12)

9.L.27—That the following criteria be considered by locals and school districts prior to supporting an expansion of second language offerings other than in English, French, and First Nations’ languages in public schools: 1. availability of certified teachers presently in the school district who are able to provide instruction in that second language; 2. availability of age-appropriate and ability-appropriate resources and curricular materials in that second language that meet the requirements of the Prescribed Learning Outcomes; 3. availability of district funds to support teacher-led inservice and professional development to support pedagogy relevant to that second language; 4. the capacity of the school district to support and maintain the new second language program without negatively affecting other educational services in the district, including direct support to teachers and learners in regular programs; 5. the capacity of the school district to support and maintain the new second language program without having to access monies beyond grants from the provincial government. (June 79 Ex, p. 12) (Apr 10 Ex, p. 15)

9.L.29—1. That the BCTF support the provision of official French as a Minority Language (Francophone) instruction and facilities within the currently existing structures of the public school system, with such adaptations as may be necessary to meet legal and educational requirements. 2. That the BCTF support within existing structures, adaptations within existing structures that would: a. preserve the integrity and effectiveness of the public school system in the province. b. provide equity between programs offered in the two official languages. c. be organizationally sound and realistic from an educational point of view.

3. That the BCTF call on the provincial government to improve, for all French as a first or working language teachers, the quality of education and the working conditions in official French as a Minority Language or French as a second language programs by providing increased funding to meet special needs in those programs, including: a. development of French as a first or second language provincial curriculum along with program guides for all subjects. b. development of French as a first or second language resources and support materials relevant to BC and to BC curriculum. c. provision wherever possible of physical school facilities dedicated exclusively to official minority language (Francophone) programs, with Francophone school administration and support staff. d. prevention of teaching assignments with too many grade levels and/or subject preparations. e. in-service for specialized training in the teaching of French as a Minority or second language. (May 92 RA, p. 12-13) (Jan 15 RA, p. 9)

9.L.31—That the BCTF lobby the provincial and federal governments to provide all necessary resources that will enable students to better meet all the learning outcomes prescribed by the French programs IRPs. (Feb. 08 Ex, p. 6) 9.L.33—That where French Immersion programs are offered, members appointed to learning specialist positions such as, but not limited to, learning assistance teachers, special education resource teachers, learning support teachers or teacher-librarians, should be able to communicate and provide services in both official languages, whenever possible. (17 AGM, p. 30) 9.L.35—That where Core French, French Immersion, and/or Intensive French programs are implemented, school districts should provide equitable learning resources, library books, students services, and resource educational support for students with special needs in the same manner as they are provided for in regular English programs. (17 AGM, p. 31) PROCEDURES 9.L.04―That the BCTF communicate with boards of education and education partner organizations regarding the challenges facing teachers of Core French, French immersion, and French as a Minority Language in BC schools. (Jan 08 Ex, p. 8) (Dec 14 Ex, p. 6–7)

9.L.06—That the BCTF investigate available federal funding to expand the BCTF French Programs and Services to better serve its members. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 9) 9.L.10―That the BCTF ensure that any mentorship programs or initiatives include support to teachers of French as a first or working language. (Aug. 08 Ex, p. 1) M.

Library

POLICIES 9.M.01—That scheduling of classes in the school library be a matter of mutual consent between the teacher-librarian and classroom teacher on a needs basis. (85 AGM p. 12) O.

Multi-Cultural

POLICIES 9.O.01—That school boards should: 1. establish representative advisory committees to assist in the development of school-based committees to assist in the development of school-based programs that reflect the multiculturalism of Canadian society; 2. provide such committees with adequate funding to carry out their tasks. (77 AGM, p. 18) 3. provide programs for ESL learners with special needs, and that these programs should be funded by the Ministry of Education, with support from the federal government;

4. purchase additional curriculum resources that specifically meet the needs of ESL learners, and that accurately represent all students and include accurate images of students from a wide variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds; 5. provide in-service training, funded by the ministry and developed in conjunction with the ESL PSA, in ESL methodology and practice for classroom teachers and teachers on call as well as ESL teachers. 6. develop a partnership with families of ESL students through programs that provide orientation and involvement in public schools. (93 AGM, p. 18) 9.O.03—1. That the BCTF should be consulted by the ministry in the development of all curriculum/assessment frameworks to ensure that the needs of ESL students are considered and met. 2. That school districts should consult with locals regarding the implementation of curriculum/assessment frameworks for ESL learners. (93 AGM, p. 19-20) 9.O.05—1. That students of all linguistic and cultural backgrounds should have equitable access to educational opportunities within the BC public school system. 2. That the Ministry of Education should ensure that significant school-related documents are available in the major languages of families whose home language is other than English. (93 AGM, p. 18)

9.O.07—That multilingual home-school liaison workers should be provided proportional to the diverse backgrounds and numbers of ESL students in each school district, and that the cost of these workers be included in Ministry of Education ESL funding formulas, with support from the federal government. (93 AGM, p. 19) 9.O.09—That provincial and Federation funding should be available to develop and maintain adequate programs to orient the families of new immigrant students and to orient and place the students. (93 AGM, p. 18) P.

Peace Education

PROCEDURES 9.P.02—That the BCTF encourage its members to develop and present programs for Remembrance Day that emphasize the need for world peace. (Oct 82 Ex, p. 2) Q.

Pre-School/Early Childhood Education/Kindergarten

POLICIES 9.Q.05—That the BCTF promote and foster early childhood education as part of a lifelong educational continuum. (75 AGM, p. 10) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 14)

9.Q.07—1. The BCTF affirms and acknowledges the importance of quality early childhood education experiences. 2. Early childhood education experiences may be offered through a home with parents and caregivers, a variety of communitybased Child Care programs and Kindergarten programs. 3. The BCTF supports efforts to enhance communications about early childhood programs and issues with parents, child care providers and the public school system. (Jan 01 Ex, p. 31) 9.Q.09—That all Kindergarten programs: 1. be universally accessible. 2. focus on the development of the whole child and on the five areas of the Primary Program (aesthetic and artistic, emotional, intellectual, physical, and social development). 3. be culturally sensitive, developmentally appropriate, and child-centred. 4. offer a quality learning experience, recognize the importance of play, feature integrated subject matter, focus on experiential learning and higher-order thinking, and be delivered in a quality classroom environment that provides adequate space and has a sink and bathrooms. 57

5. acknowledge the unique needs of individual students and provide continuity of service. 6. have the classroom support and resources students need. 7. be based on the principles of learning in the Ministry of Education’s Early Learning framework document (2008) and Primary Program 2000. 8. should be facilitated and supported by teachers with training in early childhood education. 9. should be aligned and integrated with other community child care and government services. (01 AGM, p. 34) (09 AGM, p. 9)

9.Q.11—1. That Kindergarten students and staff should have consistent support of and timely access to specialized services and resources. 2. That teachers have access to in-service provided by the district when requested. (01 AGM, p. 60) (09 AGM, p. 10)

9.Q.13—That the BCTF call on the BC government to fund affordable early child care and education for every child in BC, and commit to staffing child care centres with certified early childhood educators in not-for-profit centres. (Feb. 05 RA, p. 7) 9.Q.15—That full-day Kindergarten programs be accessible to all Kindergarten students in schools that offer full-day Kindergarten programs. (05 AGM, p. 43) 9.Q.17—That the BCTF request the Province of British Columbia to appoint representatives of the Federation to the Early Childhood Learning Agency. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 9) 9.Q.19—The Federation agrees that universal high quality child care programs are urgently needed in this province but does not support the shifting downward of academic achievement expectations to three- and four-year-olds. (Jan 09 Ex, p. 9) 9.Q.21—That the BCTF urge the provincial government to: 1. fund child care programs separately from the K-12 system. 2. fully fund the child care and K-12 systems to meet the needs of all children. 3. provide the funding to ensure adequate classroom spaces for all Kindergarten programs. (Jan 09 Ex, p. 11) 9.Q.23—That the BCTF supports the Ministry of Education’s Early Learning Framework (2008) as the basis for learning for children aged 0 to Kindergarten entry. (May 09 RA, p. 14) PROCEDURES 9.Q.02―That the BCTF provide full-day Kindergarten workshops for schools on a cost-recovery basis. (Jan 10 Ex, p. 13) R.

Religion

POLICIES 9.R.01—That the BCTF reaffirm its stand that schools should be of a secular nature. (64 AGM, p. 35) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

9.R.03—That the study of creationism and intelligent design not be part of any curricula taught in any school supported by public funds. (Mar 81 Ex, p. 3) (Nov 09 Ex, p. 12) S. Resource Persons and Materials POLICIES 9.S.01—That the Ministry of Education and/or school boards should make every effort to provide learning materials, including textbooks, prior to the beginning of the term. (55 AGM, p. 6)

Resource persons are to be used on an occasional basis and only at the request of and under the direct supervision of the teacher. (Nov. 97 RA, p. 11)

9.S.05—1. That excellence in learning materials should be sought from all sources, with preference being given to Canadian materials. 2. That a qualified committee should examine thoroughly materials for suitability and accuracy before recommending them for use. 3. That, if no existing materials prove suitable, some qualified person or persons should be commissioned to prepare some. (75 AGM, pp. 7–8)

9.S.07—That the BCTF adopt the following basic principles for the development of learning materials appropriate to the ethnic diversity of Canada: 1. Learning materials should contribute to a feeling of selfworth in all students and reflect fully and accurately the reality of Canada’s racial, religious and cultural diversity. 2. Learning materials should facilitate the development of mutual awareness, understanding and appreciation among all racial, religious, and cultural groups in Canadian society. (Jan 83 Ex, p. 22) 9.S.09—That the Ministry of Education should enter into agreements necessary to provide legal use by members of a wide range of materials for teaching, including photocopying of print materials, use of multi-media materials and videotapes of educational useful programs, and licenses for software. (Oct. 93 Ex, p. 6) T.

Science/Social Studies

POLICIES 9.T.01—That members strive to choose resource material which do not contain glamorized and gratuitous violence. (June 93 Ex, p. 8)

9.T.03—That social studies, including aspects of geography, history, law, civilization, economics, political, labour, and women’s studies be required elements of the senior secondary program. (Feb 92 Ex, p. 6)

9.T.05―That the BCTF encourage teachers to consider the use of alternatives to animal dissection in meeting the learning outcomes in the science curriculum. (10 AGM, p. 8) U.

Summer School

POLICIES 9.U.01—That the BCTF support summer school courses/programs that adhere to the following principles: 1. They are based on sound education pedagogy. 2. They follow the full provincial curriculum. 3. There is equal access for all students. 4. Organizational arrangements and working and learning conditions are consistent with collective agreements. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 11)

5. They are taught by certificated teachers. 6. Teachers are covered under the full provisions of the collective agreement in their local, including salary and benefits. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 11)

9.U.03—That the BCTF lobby the provincial government to change current practices so that summer school can be free to all students. (Nov. 06 RA., p. 5)

V.

Involvement of Stakeholders

(Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

9.S.03—1. That subject to policies 47.B.01.E, 47.B.03 and 47.B.05, the BCTF believes that any person who is responsible for undertaking teaching duties must be a graduate of an accredited teacher education program and be certificated. (Jan 12 RA, p. 8) 2. That the BCTF supports the use of community resource persons to enrich classroom teaching and learning experiences. 58

POLICIES 9.V.01—That the BCTF believes in working co-operatively with the Ministry of Education and the BCSTA, the BC Confederation of Parent Advisory Councils, community agencies and other groups interested in education toward achieving this prime aim of the public school system. (74 AGM, pp. 56-57)

(May 77 RA, p. 7)

9.V.03—1. That the goals and directions of the school system should be determined by interaction of students, parents and teachers at the local level through a process that would involve examination of present and future needs of our young people. (Oct 77 RA, p. 51)

2. That locals be encouraged to establish communications with their district parent advisory councils.

regular

(95 AGM, p. 17)

9.V.05—That each school staff should consult with the students of the school, the parents of the students and other members of the community, with a view to formulating school policy regarding the effective and orderly operation of the school. (76 AGM, p. 18) 9.V.07—1. That the BCTF support the concept of parent and student involvement in educational decision-making, where appropriate. (76 AGM, p. 56) (98 AGM, p. 12)

2. That parent input in the classroom placement of children is valuable, but is only one part of a balanced decision-making process. The final decision should rest with the teachers and other educational professionals in the schools. (07 AGM, p. 11) 9.V.09—That the BCTF encourage community involvement at the school, district and provincial levels by promoting and fostering those organizations and structures supportive of public education. (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 14) (01 AGM, p. 35)

9.V.11—That members be encouraged to develop further the relationship between the home and the school. (Oct 75 Ex, p. 23) 9.V.13—That the BCTF support development of community schools.

and

encourage

the

(Jan 76 Ex, p. 2)

9.V.15—That members should be given the opportunity to participate in the formulation of educational policy on the basis of equality with other authorities, particularly at the local level. (61 AGM, pp. 32-33) (89 AGM, p. 51)

9.V.17—That all the educational partners continue to support and encourage meaningful student, parent and community involvement in schools. (May 94 RA) 9.V.19—That schools and school districts be encouraged to develop educationally relevant partnerships with the community and business/labour. (May 94 RA) 9.V.21—That the BCTF supports international student exchanges for cultural experiences as opposed to the sale, for profit, of BC education to international students both at home and abroad. (05 AGM p. 12)

9.V.23—That the provincial government enact legislation requiring that school boards: 1. report on the status of all international students under their care and the programs provided them. 2. establish minimum standards for the living conditions and guardianship of international students. (June 05 RA, p. 14)

VI.

Students With Special Needs

POLICIES 9.W.01—1. Every student is entitled to an appropriate education. All students, regardless of ability, can benefit from education and training. Some students require differentiated situations and programs to benefit from public education. Such students are said to have special needs. 1.1 That a student with special needs should be placed only after appropriate procedures have taken place. Full-time placement in a regular classroom may not best meet the special needs of some students. (1994 AGM)

1.3 That a student whom any member perceives to have special needs should be referred to appropriate services after obtaining parental approval. 1.5 That assessment of a student with special need’s progress should be an ongoing process of consultation between the teacher, parents, administrative officer, auxiliary professional personnel and the student (where applicable). 1.7 That the student with special needs is entitled to a program and services from within the school and community flexible enough to ensure that improvement is evident. 1.9 That prior to the introduction of the student with special needs in a regular class, appropriate release time and an intensive in-service program should be provided for the receiving teacher. 1.11 That in-service and ongoing support services should be present before the receiving teacher incorporates a student with special needs in the classroom. 1.13 That a student with special needs should be placed only after the teacher, parents, administrative officer, auxiliary professional personnel and the student (where applicable) have met to consider appropriate educational and medical information and a program, agreed to by all concerned, has been established, and that facilities, equipment and assisting personnel be in place. (90 AGM, p. 33)

2.1 That the member has the primary responsibility for assessing the classroom situation before and after the arrival of the student with special needs to determine the effects on the teaching and learning situation. 2.3 That the classroom teacher should be provided with adequate release time and resources for ongoing classroom assessment. 2.5 That where change is necessary to facilitate the establishment of an effective teaching and learning situation the member, auxiliary professional personnel and administrative officer should co-operate to provide the support and/or change required. 2.7 That adequate resources should be made available to ensure implementation of the member’s classroom assessment recommendations. 2.9 That the final responsibility for classroom management of the student’s program lies with the member. 3.1 That administration of medication to student with special needs should be in accordance with Policy 12.05. (12 AGM p. 18) 3.3 That where appropriate a student should be encouraged to wear a medic alert bracelet or medallion. 3.5 That the administrative officer should establish clear procedures known to all school personnel for the carrying out of fire regulations that would expedite the evacuation of students with disabilities. (16 AGM, p. 29) 3.7 Special needs students and teachers should be fully covered by insurance in case of accident or injury during voluntary activities as well as regular classroom hours. 3.9 That inter-communication devices should be provided in rooms wherever emergency aid may be required. 3.11 That in the event a student with special needs is unaccountably absent in the class designated, the member should immediately inform the school administration, who should take responsibility for locating the student. 4.1 That the provision, by the board of school trustees, of appropriate transportation services to students with special needs should be mandatory. 5.1 That all education students should be required to take an introductory course in special education. This course should include practicums working in a variety of situations involving special needs students. 5.3 That wherever practical, the emphasis should be placed on a practicum where students with special needs are being taught. (17 AGM, p. 30)

6.1 That school districts provide special education in-service to all teachers teaching on call. (17 AGM, p. 30) 6.5 That every effort should be made to encourage continuity in the assignment of teachers on call to classes with students with special needs. 7.1 That trained aides should be provided and be responsible for assisting special needs students during platooning, toileting, and 59

changing for physical education, including swimming, and participating in special activities. 7.3 That trained aides should be provided for students with special needs during lunch hour and recess breaks. 8.1 That the educational and support services for pre-school students with special needs should be provided at the local and/or regional level by the appropriate ministries. 8.3 That pre-school screening programs should be established to identify students with special needs as early as possible. 8.5 That pre-school programs that will meet the needs of students with special needs should be made available in each district. 8.7 That priority in these pre-school programs should be given to students who are physically, educationally, or socially challenged. (16 AGM, p. 29)

9.1 That the ministries of Education, Health, Human Resources and the Attorney General should co-ordinate through the Ministry of Education the delivery of adequate funds and services to school districts for students with special needs. 9.3 That the inter-agency effort should facilitate the provision of adequate co-ordinated and integrated services for students with special needs of public school age. (81 AGM, pp. 30-33) (89 AGM, p. 51)

9.5 That boards of education be lobbied to develop policy and procedures for the evacuation of people with special needs. (Nov 09 Ex, p. 6)

9.7 That the BCTF develop tools to support the development of effective policy and procedures for the evacuation of people with special needs. (Nov 09 Ex, p. 6) 9.W.03—1. That school-aged students are best served by speech-language pathologists and school psychologists working as an integral part of the public school system, under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Education. 2. That the BCTF advise the Ministry of Education that any proposed transfer of services provided by speech language pathologists and school psychologists to the Ministry of Health will be to the detriment of the needs of public school students. 3. That the BCTF urge all MLAs to oppose any transfer of services provided by speech language pathologists and school psychologists for public school students from the Ministry of Education to the Ministry of Health. (Feb 86 RA, p. 14) (17 AGM, p. 31)

(See also Section 4, Declaration) 9.W.05—1. That the BCTF strongly oppose any requirement that regular classroom teachers be responsible for developing individualized education programs for students. 2. When a special needs student is integrated into a regular classroom, adequate consultation time and in-service for I.E.P. writing, reviews and program monitoring be provided for the classroom teacher. (86 AGM, pp. 31,32) (90 AGM, p. 34)

3 That members with special education qualifications be available to consult, provide curriculum adaptations, integrate suggestions and to facilitate the development of I.E.P.’s for students. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 10)

9.W.07—1. That the BCTF opposes the elimination and/or reduction of programming options for students with special needs. 2. That the BCTF opposes the reassignment of special education and learning specialist BCTF members in response to budgetary constraints. (92 AGM, p. 12) (02 AGM, p. 35)

9.W.09—That, whenever possible, students with special needs will be educated in their neighborhood schools, and that accessible facilities, resources, staff and support staff will be in place prior to the integration of students with special needs. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 10) 9.W.11—That the BCTF acknowledge the wide range of qualified specialist teachers and associated professionals who work in concert with classroom teachers, supporting the education programs of students with special needs, including, but not limited to: school counsellors, elementary learning resource teachers, secondary learning resource teachers, district integration resource 60

teachers, speech and language pathologists, hearing resource teachers, and vision resource teachers, psychometricians and psychologists so that appropriate levels of support will be provided. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 11) (Jan 99 Ex p. 20)

9.W.13—That the Ministry of Education and school boards should provide the opportunity for study of ASL (American Sign Language) where it is requested by 10 or more students. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 10)

9.W.15—That the BCTF acknowledge the urgent need for, and call upon the ministries and boards to develop and provide, a full range of special needs services for adult students engaged in attaining a basic education. (93 AGM, p. 21) 9.W.17—That the BCTF continue to pressure the provincial government and school boards to provide support required for members to have the conditions for success in integrating students with special needs. (1994 AGM) 9.W.19—That adequate funds must be provided and that funds which are targeted for mainstreaming/inclusion be allocated to direct services to students so as to maximize the positive effect of mainstreaming/inclusion in classrooms. (1994 AGM) 9.W.21—That the Ministry of Education, in consultation with the education partners, review ministry policies and procedures regarding the inclusion of students with special needs in regular classrooms in order to provide greater support for these students and their teachers. (May 94 RA) 9.W.23—That the Ministry of Education review financial and designation policies on students with severe learning disabilities and/or severe behaviours so that there can be greater support of these students and their teachers. (06 AGM , p. 10) (17 AGM, p. 31)

9.W.25—That the BCTF confirm its commitment to inclusion of all students in a fully-funded universal public education system and oppose the segregation of students in provincial demonstration or model schools. (07 AGM, p. 10)

VII.

Criminal Records Check

POLICIES 9.X.01—1. That criminal records checks to investigate convictions on offenses against students should be conducted by certificated authorities and inappropriate records should result in denial of certification. 2. That entrants to teacher education institutions should be counselled on the effects of a criminal record, regarding an offense against students, on their ability to obtain a teaching certificate. 3. That school boards should not conduct criminal records checks because: a. Criminal records checks are not an effective means of preventing criminal actions against students. Most offenders do not have previous criminal records. b. The use of criminal records checks might lead to a false sense of security from actions by school board employees against students. c. The disclosure of records to the prospective and present employer might lead to unfairness and abuse of the information which might not relate to the appropriateness of the applicant as a teacher. (May 88 RA, p. 14)

9.X.05—That the BCTF lobby the government for the payment of the additional requirement for criminal records checks. (Jan 08 Ex, p. 9) (12 AGM, p. 20)

10. Finance A.

Financial Objectives

PROCEDURES 10.A.02—That the BCTF’s financial policies be based on planned programs continuously reviewed, in terms of current shortterm and long-term objectives. (70 AGM, p. 22) (Reviewed June 80 Ex, p. 13)

10.A.04—That in general, current year’s operations should be financed from current year’s general operating fund revenues. (79 AGM, p. 25) (89 AGM, p. 11)

10.A.06—That as an objective, the BCTF achieve a cash position that would avoid incurring net interest expense at any time during a fiscal year to meet current operating needs. (79 AGM, p. 25) (86 AGM, p. 39)

10.A.08—That with respect to property management, the Finance Committee be guided by the principle of service to the membership rather than by consideration of monetary gain. (55 AGM, p. 11) (June 81, Ex, p. 11)

B.

Fees and Levies

Note: See also section 20, “Membership.’’ POLICIES 10.B.01—That the BCTF negotiate an employee allowance equal to the SIP fee with the employer. (03 AGM, p. 19) PROCEDURES 10.B.02—1. That, for each active member, the BCTF portion of the annual membership fee shall be calculated as a percentage of the salary of the member. 2. That the ‘’salary’’ means basic salary received from the employer, and includes the allowance paid by the employer for supervisory or administrative duties or special qualifications, but does not include any other allowance except those approved for inclusion in salary by regulation. (83 AGM, p. 24) 10.B.04—That, for each member eligible to participate in the Salary Indemnity Plan, the Salary Indemnity Fund portion of the annual membership fee shall be calculated as a percentage of the actual salary of each eligible member, subject to such limitations as may be approved by the AGM, plus the participating employee’s share of the employer’s savings resulting from reduced unemployment insurance premiums. (88 AGM, p. 14) 10.B.06—That, for each active member, the local portion of the annual membership fee shall be an amount set by a general meeting of the local, and this portion of the fee shall be payable to the local. (75 AGM, p. 68) (Reviewed June 80 Ex, p. 13)

10.B.08—That the fee for an active member who teaches on a part-time basis be a pro rata fee deducted monthly, based on a percentage of time the member taught that month. (75 AGM, p. 68) (Reviewed June 80 Ex, p. 13)

10.B.10—That the fee for an active member who teaches for less than a full school year be a pro rata fee based on the number of months the member has taught, deducted in those months. (75 AGM, p. 68) (Reviewed June 80 Ex, p. 13)

10.B.12—That individuals coming to British Columbia as exchange teachers be given active membership without payment of fee. (75 AGM, p. 69) (Reviewed June 80 Ex, p. 13)

10.B.14—That the fee for an active member who is on leave of absence without pay shall be waived. (75 AGM, p. 69) (Reviewed June 80 Ex, p. 13)

10.B.16—That the fee for an active member who is on leave of absence and is receiving part salary shall be a pro rata fee, based on the percentage of salary the member is receiving. (75 AGM, p. 69) (Reviewed June 80 Ex, p. 13)

1. That for the 2017–18 membership year, the fee for those who are members under By-law 1.1(a) shall be 1.790% of the actual salary of the member, allocated as follows: 1.415% to the General Operating Fund 0.260% to the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund 0.040% to the Public Education Defence Fund 0.040% to the Provincial Bargaining Fund 0.027% to the W.R. Long International Solidarity Fund 0.008% to the Contingency Fund Except that the fee for active members who are teachers teaching on call shall be 1.49%. (17 AGM, pp. 13–14) 2. That for the 2017–18 membership year, the fee for affiliate administrative membership under By-law 1.6 exclusive of the Salary Indemnity Plan, be $100. (17 AGM, p. 14) 3. That for the 2017–18 membership year, the fee for those who are members under By-law 1.2 (associate membership), shall be $100, except that the fee for associate members who are uncertified teachers’ replacements shall be 1.490% of the actual salary of the member, except that the fee for associate members who are students enrolled in programs of study in university/college programs leading to certification as teachers shall be $1. (17 AGM, p. 14) 4. That for the 2017–18 membership year, a member who is on leave of absence either without pay or on deferred salary leave, remains an active member, without payment of fees. (17 AGM, p. 14) 5. That for the 2017–18 membership year, the fee for those who are members under By-law 1.6 (affiliate membership) shall be an amount negotiated between the BCTF and the affiliate, on a feefor-service basis. (17 AGM, p. 14) 6. That for the 2017–18 membership year, the fee for active membership for those who are members under By-law 1.1(b) shall be the same as the fee for active members under By-law 1.1(a), provided that the Representative Assembly may, in establishing policy regarding the eligibility of such members, waive or modify the fees. (17 AGM, p. 14) 7. That for the 2017–18 membership year, each member eligible to participate in the Salary Indemnity Plan pay, in addition to the fee for the operation of the Federation, a fee for the operation of the Salary Indemnity Fund of 1.67% of the actual salary of the member, plus the participating employee’s share of the employer’s savings from reduced Employment Insurance premiums. (17 AGM, p. 18) 10.B.20—That active members and voluntary active members whose fees cannot be deducted and remitted through a school board payroll system shall pay the appropriate BCTF and local fees (as established by By-law 4 and the rules respecting fees) directly to the BCTF office. (June 76 Ex, p. 27) (June 81 Ex, p. 11)

10.B.22—That any single or continuing special levy whose total exceeds $50 per member must be put to the general membership by a referendum and be passed by a simple majority before it can be assessed and collected. (73 AGM, p. 51) (91 AGM, p. 51)

10.B.24—That the base amount of the annual membership fee charged affiliate administrative members consist of: 1. the Salary Indemnity fee as set by the Annual General Meeting; 2. the pension program, the Income Security program, the Assistance Society program, and the Reserve Fund; 3. the estimated cost of the Members’ Guide, The BC Teacher, the BCTF Newsletter or equivalent; (13 AGM, p. 16) 4. an amount to cover membership processing costs. (88 AGM, p. 19) (June 14 Ex, p. 5)

C.

Accounting Policies

PROCEDURES 10.C.02—That the BCTF appoint the audit firm KPMG as its auditor for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2017. (16 AGM, p. 16) (17 AGM, p. 14)

10.B.18—2017–18 fees 61

10.C.04—That in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and the recommendations of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants, the significant accounting policies used in the preparation of the BCTF’s financial statements be as follows: 1. Marketable Securities That marketable securities be recorded at cost. c If the market value of the portfolio declines below cost, an adjustment be made to reflect the decline in market value (carrying value). If there are any subsequent declines in market value, further adjustments will be made in the carrying value to reflect these declines in value. The carrying value will not be increased to reflect any subsequent increase in market value. 2. Investments That investments be recorded at cost since they are held as long-term investments. In the event of a permanent decline in market value, the investments be written down to reflect the decline in market value (carrying value). The carrying value will not be increased to reflect any subsequent increase in market value. 3. Inventories That inventories be value at cost or net realizable value, whichever is the lower. 4. Fixed Assets That fixed assets be recorded at cost and that depreciation be calculated on a straight-line method based on anticipated useful lives: a. Furniture and equipment―3 to 15 years b. BCTF building―until the year 2015. c. That the capitalized values of the assets acquired under capital leases be amortized on a straight-line basis over the terms of the respective capital leases. 5. Financial Year That the financial year commence on July 1 of each year. (Jan 93 Ex, pp. 12–13)

10.C.06—That in normal circumstances, the audit appointment be reviewed by the Finance Committee at least every fifth year with proposals requested from the current and at least two other firms of auditors. (Jan 93 Ex, p. 13)

D.

Budgeting Procedures

PROCEDURES 10.D.02—1. That the Executive Committee recommend a program budget to the spring meeting of the Representative Assembly. 2. That the Representative Assembly adopt a budget at its spring meeting for the subsequent budget year. 3. That the Executive Committee be required to consider a Statement of Forecasted Revenues, Expenditures and Cash Flows for the succeeding year and recommend a fee to the winter meeting of the Representative Assembly. 4. That at its winter meeting the Representative Assembly consider a Statement of Forecasted Revenues, Expenditures and Cash Flows for the succeeding year and recommend a fee to the Annual General Meeting. 5. That the Executive Committee have the right to include a recommended fee in its report to the AGM. 6. That all committee recommendations to the AGM be accompanied by an estimate of cost implications, if any. 7. That the Policies and Procedures Committee assist the sponsors of resolutions to ensure that every resolution is accompanied by cost estimates that are as accurate as possible, and have the assistance of the treasurer as necessary. (May 78 RA, p. 36) (Jan 93 RA, p.5)

10.D.04—1. That no program budget, in total, be allowed to exceed the budget established in accordance with By-law 6.10 unless the Executive Committee authorizes such over expenditure in accordance with by-law 5.17. 2. That except with expenditures that are required by policy, within each program budget no line item budget of more than $25,000 62

be over expended without the approval of the Executive Committee given in accordance with by-law 5.17. 3. That within each program budget no line item budget of less than $25,000 be exceeded by more than 20 per cent without the approval of the Executive Committee given in accordance with bylaw 5.17. (Jan 93 Ex, pp. 12–13) 10.D.06—That in the development of programs and budgets, priority be given to those activities that provide direct services to members. (Jan 93 Ex, pp. 12–13) 10.D.08—That in principle, expenditures within programs be classified by type, with consistency maintained, as much as practical, throughout the whole expenditure coding structure. (Jan 93 Ex, pp. 12-13)

10.D.10—That in general, user charges for graphics, photocopying, bindery and mailing services be based on standard rates set at the beginning of each budget year, and adjusted as necessary during the year, with the overall objective of allocating the operating costs. (Jan 93 Ex, pp. 12-13) 10.D.12—1. That the Salary Indemnity Plan be charged an annual administration fee based on the actual costs of services, staff and facilities provided to the plan by the General Operating Fund of the Federation. 2. That the W.R. Long Fund be charged an annual administration fee based upon the actual costs of services provided to this fund by the General Operating Fund of the Federation. (Jan 93 Ex, pp. 12-13)

10.D.14—That an administration fee be charged to the PSA Services program for the costs of accounting, member mailing and computer services provided to that program. (Jan 93 Ex, pp. 12-13) 10.D.16—Capital Budgets 1. That in accordance with BCTF by-laws, a statement of proposed capital expenditures be submitted annually to the Executive Committee and include the following information for each budget item or groups of items: a. the anticipated capital cost of the item(s). b. reasons for the recommended purchase including potential benefits and cost savings, if any. c. information as to what other alternatives were evaluated. d. the life expectancy of the item and residual value, if any. e. potential increases or decreases in program operating expenses expected as a result of the expenditure, both short and long term. f. the type and cost of required software, if any. g. implementation costs, including installation, furniture and training costs. 2. That the Capital Budget be based on a three-year plan, reviewed annually. 3. That without Executive Committee approval, no expenditures on any single Capital Budget item exceed by more than 10% or $500 the amount approved by the Representative Assembly, and that the total Capital Budget not exceed the amount approved by the Representative Assembly except by motion of the Executive Committee made in accordance with by-law 5.17. 4. That when the cost of the Capital Budget item is less than the budgeted amount, the difference not be used to: a. upgrade the proposed item except when approved by the executive director, or b. for purchasing other items not included in the budget except by motion of the Executive Committee in accordance with Bylaw 5.17. (Jan 93 Ex, pp. 13-15) 10.D.18—That the initial assessment and development of program statements and budgets be the responsibility of the program co-ordinators, and that, insofar as possible, committee and task force members participate. (Feb 78 Ex, p. 2)

10.D.20—That the Executive Committee adopt in principle three general criteria for budget changes once the budget has been adopted: 1. money is not to be expended without budget authorization; 2. with the exception of essential services such as legal representation or legally required activities, when money runs out, services are cut off; 3. within program areas, subsequent to the annual budget being approved, any proposed amendment must be supported by reasonable justification and capacity within the recommending division. (Mar 81 Ex, p. 7) (Dec 11 Ex, p. 10)

10.D.22—1. That an amount of money not to exceed $500 may be granted by the president as a donation to worthy causes that are clearly consistent with the objects of the Federation. 2. That donations made under this policy shall be subject to budgeted limitations. 3. All donations made from the President’s Discretionary Fund shall be reported to the Executive Committee at least four times during the budget year, inclusive of an initial report to the October meeting of the Executive Committee, and a final report to the June meeting of the Executive Committee. (May 90 Ex, p. 2) (Jan 00 Ex, p. 30)

10.D.24—That any proposal for extension or initiation of BCTF services and financial policies be accompanied by a responsible estimate of its immediate and long-term costs, that, when the proposal is to be presented to an AGM, it be made early enough to be included in Reports and Resolutions and that the budget implications of each recommendation in the executive’s leadership report be provided to the AGM. (77 AGM, pp. 35-36) (86 AGM, p. 8)

F.

Purchasing Procedures

PROCEDURES 10.F.02—1. That the purchase of all services, supplies and capital items be controlled through the BCTF Purchasing Department. 2. That whenever possible, quotations be obtained from a minimum of three suppliers. 3. That the Purchasing Department be responsible for selecting and maintaining an inventory of standard stationery and office supplies. (Jan 93 Ex, p. 15) 10.F.04—That the BC Teachers’ Federation purchase unionmade goods where possible and that goods and services, including hotel services, be purchased from or through unionized firms where such union supplies are available. (June 84 Ex, p. 4) (Aug 88 Ex, pp. 13-14)

10.F.06—That the BCTF purchase Canadian made products where possible, and that meetings, conferences or other business organized by the BCTF staff, task forces or committees take place in Canada. (Jan 95 Ex, p. 23) 10.F.08—Contracts and Agreements 1. That, in general, all contracts between the BCTF and other organizations or companies supplying or providing services or materials to the BCTF be in writing and reviewed with tenders sought not less than every third year. 2. That, whenever possible, tenders be obtained from at least three unionized suppliers. 3. That all contracts over $5,000 per annum be approved by the Co-ordinator of Purchasing and Facility Services. 4. That all contracts over $25,000 per annum be approved by either the treasurer, the executive director or the assistant executive director. 5. That, in general, the length of contracts not exceed three years. 6. That a system of controlling and filing all contracts be implemented. (May 92 Ex, p. 11)

10.F.10—That the BCTF develop and implement ethical purchasing policies and procedures to ensure that goods and services secured by the BCTF have not been produced by workers toiling in unsafe and unhealthy environments. (Nov. 05 RA, p. 12) 10.F.12—BCTF Advantage Plan Social and Ethical Guidelines That the following be the social and ethical guidelines for the BCTF Advantage Plan: The BCTF Advantage Plan will take the following into consideration when selecting a supplier for the BCTF Advantage Plan: 1. The BCTF will avoid companies that:  are egregious offenders or have patterns of equal employment opportunity violations  have a pattern of anti-union actions or are on the Federation of Labour boycott list  use involuntary labour of any kind; including prison labour, indentured labour, or forced labour. Overtime must be paid and voluntary. Employees shall not be required to lodge “deposits” or identity papers upon commencing employment with the company or as a condition of employment.  employ anyone under the age of 15, and/or younger than the age for completing compulsory education. Furthermore, partners of any kind must comply with all local laws pertaining to the restrictions on workers under the age of 18, including restrictions on their exposure to situations in or outside of the workplace that are hazardous, unsafe, or unhealthy without adequate protection from such hazards.  are weapons manufacturers or produce or sell handguns  produce nuclear weapons  engage in the manufacture of tobacco based products  manufacture or sell products known to have adverse public health consequences, whether or not in contravention of local standards, or have misleading or irresponsible marketing of products and services such as stereotypical depictions of women and minorities in advertising  have a poor environmental compliance record, including a history of fines or civil penalties as a result of transgressing federal or provincial environmental legislation, when compared to industry counterparts  undertake tests on live animals in the development of cosmetic, personal care or household products  use illegal direct or indirect payments (bribes, kickbacks, nonmonetary favours, etc.) to obtain preferred status from channel partners, customers, or government officials, or accept such inducements from suppliers seeking their business  have demonstrated a lack of regard by failing to communicate about important corporate issues which directly involve the local community such as land use, facility closings, and pollution concerns 2. The BCTF will favour companies that:  offer products or services that reduce waste generation or conserve natural resources  show progress in reducing volume and toxicity of waste, emissions, and effluents  have innovative programs to reduce use of energy, water, materials, and land  consistently have good compliance records  have policies and programs that favour historically oppressed and marginalized people  have inclusive nondiscrimination employment policies that include sexual orientation  show positive union relations or employee participation relative to their industry  respect workers' rights to communicate with management, organize, and collectively bargain  negotiate and communicate in good faith and deal fairly and respectfully with all stakeholders  employ sound practices of corporate governance, including issues of board independence, board and executive compensation, and structural integrity. (Sept. 07 Ex, p. 12) 10.F.14—Ethical Purchasing That the following be the BCTF ethical purchasing policy: 63

1. The BCTF will purchase goods and services that meet the highest possible ethical standards, wherever practical. 2. Primary suppliers to the BCTF will adopt a Supplier Code of Conduct and compliance will be implemented over time and as resources allow. (Nov. 07 Ex, p. 2)

If in any circumstances a member or staff person finds himself/herself ‘’out-of-pocket’’ as a result of a strict application of these regulations They should bring the matter to the attention of the program coordinator or the treasurer. (Oct 77 RA, pp. 46-50)

10.F.16—Medical Services That the Federation investigate the provision and/or promotion of medical services through the Advantage Program and ensure that no medical service accessed through the Advantage Program advocates for privatized medical care. (March 08 Ex, p. 6)

10.I.04—Transportation That, as a general rule, staff persons and members should use the fastest and most economical mode of transportation. 1. Public transportation—first-class train fares plus lower berth or roomette; bus, ferry or plane fares (economy class wherever possible) at cost. 2. a. Limousine: where practical, limousines must be used for transportation to and from airports. b. Taxi charges: at actual cost. 3. Private automobile—subject to the special regulations governing the use of private automobiles, members may claim reimbursement for use of their private automobiles at a rate of 52 cents per kilometre. (May 14 RA, p. 4)

G.

Investment Policies and Objectives

PROCEDURES 10.G.02—1. That all investments be made in accordance with the Trustee Act except that those monies invested in accordance with By-law 5.11 be restricted to: a. Securities of Canada or a province, or b. Securities, the payment of the principal and interest of which is guaranteed by Canada or a province. c. Guaranteed Investment Certificates with (i.) a Dominion Bond Rating Service (DBRS) short-term credit rating of at least R–1 (DBRS rating scale varies from R–1 [low] [good credit quality], to R–1 [middle] [superior credit quality], to R–1 [high] [highest credit quality]), (ii.) a long-term credit rating of at least A (DBRS rating scale A is considered good credit quality), or (iii.) from a credit union which is guaranteed by a provincial or a federal government statutory corporation. (Oct 16 Ex, pp. 1–2) 2. That the Executive Committee approve a statement of investment policy, objectives and performance measures for each BCTF investment fund and that these be reviewed annually by the Finance Committee, seeking the advice of the fund actuaries, if any, the treasurer and the external investment managers. 3. That investments of the Salary Indemnity Fund be governed by ethical investment guidelines approved by the Executive Committee and reviewed annually by the Finance Committee. (Apr. 93 Ex, p. 17-18)

10.G.04—That the Treasurer, or, in their absence, a person designated by the Executive Committee and at least one of the president and vice-presidents jointly be and are hereby authorized and empowered on behalf of the BCTF to buy, sell, assign and transfer securities and to sign and execute on behalf of the Federation, all powers of attorney and endorsements as may be necessary for that purpose. (June 68 Ex, p. 17) (Sept 91 Ex, p. 5)

H.

Insurance

POLICIES 10.H.01—That the BCTF take action to lobby the provincial government to enact legislation to ensure that all students are protected through no-fault insurance, such that BC teachers are protected from having to be found personally negligent for injuries sustained by students under their supervision. (95 AGM, p. 31) PROCEDURES 10.H.02—That the BCTF provide group travel accident insurance to cover members and staff while they are travelling on BCTF business. (Aug 76 Ex, p. 12) (June 81 Ex, p. 11)

10.H.04—That either directly, or through a policy of insurance, the Federation will defend and indemnify all locals, all members and employees against any corporate or individual liability arising out of approved activities of the Federation or its locals. (Aug 86 Ex, p. 3)

I.

Travel and Expense Allowances

PROCEDURES 10.I.02—General In principle, a member or staff person should not be ‘’out-ofpocket’’ as a result of necessary expenses when on BCTF business. 64

(May 86 RA, p. 8)

(Jan 16 RA, p. 9)

4. a. That the BCTF recognize cycling as a form of transportation and compensate cyclists on the BCTF expense form, when travel expenses are to be compensated. b. That the recommended bicycle allowance be 26 cents per kiliometre. (08 AGM, pp. 29–30) 5. That taxi charges between Vancouver International Airport and the BCTF building not be reimbursed by BCTF, except for those who are physically challenged or who have excessive baggage. (Jan 10 Ex, p. 1)

6. That the Canada Line be used by staff when attending meetings in downtown Vancouver that are in close proximity to the Yale Town, City Centre, and Waterfront Stations. (Jan 10 Ex, p. 2) 7. That members travelling to BCTF meetings book their flights 14 days in advance of any meeting, where possible. (Aug 12 Ex, p. 12)

8. That the following suggested practices for booking air travel be implemented: a. Book when you know you need to go. This means book early for airfare savings, but not before you know your times of travel, to avoid change fees. b. When a member requests a change to an airline booking, the member shall be responsible for the costs related to the change unless W.E. Travel obtains authorization from a program co-ordinator or an acceptable reason is provided. (Jan 13 Ex, p. 2) (Special Regulations Governing Use of Automobiles) 1. Persons travelling on BCTF business by private automobile must charge expenses on the basis of public transportation costs except: a. when two or more persons are travelling in one car, in which case only the driver may claim reimbursement at the approved mileage rate. b. when in the opinion of the program co-ordinator or the Treasurer, the use of public transportation would be impractical or where rigid application of the regulations would cause an unreasonable hardship. (Nov 11 Ex, p. 9) Persons travelling by automobile instead of public transportation, but claiming expenses on the basis of public transportation, may claim only for the accommodation, meals, and other expenses that would have been claimable if public transportation had actually been used. 2. Persons travelling on BCTF business are expected to pool the use of cars whenever possible. 3. Staff persons and members must carry their own automobile insurance for passenger hazard, third-party liability, collision, etc. The BCTF will not reimburse anyone for losses incurred from accidents, parking or traffic violations. In no case shall anyone be entitled to any personal gain or profit arising out of the use of an automobile on BCTF business. 4. Parking charges: at actual cost. 5. Automobile rental: in cases where a combination of public transportation and automobile rental will best meet the needs of both the staffperson or member and the Federation, automobiles may,

with the approval of the program co-ordinator or the Treasurer, be rented. Automobile rentals should be of a sub-compact, compact or intermediate size automobile depending on conditions of use. In cases where automobile rental charges are paid directly by the staffperson or member, a copy of the rental agreement and the receipt for payment must be submitted with the claim for reimbursement. (June 03 Ex, p. 2) Apr 17 Ex, p. 2)

Third-party liability insurance coverage and collision coverage are not provided by the car rental agency as part of the basic rental charge and may be offered at additional cost. The coverage should not be accepted as the Federation maintains a separate third-party liability and collision policy. The Federation will cover the cost for any third-party liability and collision claims. (June 03 Ex, p. 2) (Apr 17 Ex, p. 2)

The renter may also be offered insurance covering personal injury or other coverages, on payment of an additional premium. Such premiums may not be charged to the BCTF; the Federation maintains a separate travel accident policy covering staff and members travelling on official BCTF business. (Apr 17 Ex, p. 2) 10.I.06—Accommodation, meals, and telephone expenses 1. a. Hotel rooms are at cost. Where the accommodation is billed directly to the Federation, members and staff must ensure that all personal expenses charged against the hotel account are paid to the hotel before checking out. Staff and members should stay, whenever possible, at one of the hotels recommended by the BCTF. i. Claims must be supported by receipts. ii. Should another person accompany the staff person or member, but not for official business reasons, reimbursement for accommodation will be limited to the expense that would have been incurred if that person had travelled alone. iii. That where members attending a BCTF meeting choose to share accommodation, each member shall be eligible to receive $20 per night. A receipt would not be required. (May 13 RA, p. 3) b. Overnight accommodations will be provided, at BCTF expense, to those members attending a Federation-sponsored meeting, conference, or seminar when any of the following conditions apply: i. weather or road conditions prevent a safe and timely return home in the judgement of the affected member. ii. on the day the meeting adjourns and the member is unable to arrive home in a safe manner and without undue hardship prior to 10:00 p.m. (Jan 12 RA, p. 5–6) (May 15 Ex, p. 13)

2. Where a staff person or member travelling on BCTF business stays with friends or relatives, their hospitality may be recognized to a limit of $30 per night. A receipt is not required. The description on the expense voucher should read ‘’Gift in lieu of hotel accommodation covering _____ nights.’’ The amount should be entered against the hotel item. (Jan 04 RA, p. 7) 3. Meals, including gratuities: breakfast—$14, lunch—$16, dinner—$26. Liquor consumed with meals is not a separately claimable expense. Liquor expenses must be funded by the regular meal allowance. When an Executive Committee member or a staff member is required to host a non-BCTF member at a meal, while on BCTF business, reasonable meal costs may be claimed at actual cost, subject to the approval of the executive director. Persons claiming for meals while attending a BCTF meeting, conference, seminar or training should use their reasonable judgement on whether to claim relative to meeting start and end times. (Feb. 07 RA, p. 7) (Jan 16 RA, pp. 9–10)

4. Committee meals: the total expense of committee meals may be paid and reimbursement claimed by a committee member or a staff member as long as the total claim, including gratuities, does not exceed the standard meal allowance rate times the actual number of persons attending the meeting. 5. That meal costs for all BCTF meetings attended by members and staff be limited to BCTF per diem policy amounts unless the prior approval of the FTTO is obtained. (Apr 10 Ex, p. 4) 6. Telephone and fax charges related to BCTF business:

Any claim must be supported by a copy of the telephone company billing or hotel account and an itemized explanation of the calls.” (Jan 10 Ex, p. 2) Staffpersons and members may claim a reasonable number and length of telephone calls to their home residence when absent from home on official business. Such calls are not to exceed one per day of absence. (Jan 00 Ex, p. 27) 7. Summer Conference delegates and family members: That delegates attending Summer Conference who bring their families to Summer Conference be able to claim for an additional flat rate for family in a car as determined annually by the BCTF treasurer. (Oct 11 Ex, p.35) (Apr 14 Ex, p. 11)

8. All delegates to the AGM are provided hotel accommodation for each night of the AGM, including the final night on which the meeting ends. Rooms will not be provided on the final night of the Annual General Meeting in cases where travel home is possible. (May 12 RA, p. 3) (Jan 13 Ex, p. 11)

9. Bargaining Team a. That non-Metro team members be provided with a onebedroom, furnished apartment and a start-up allowance of $200 to pay for incidentals. An alternative accommodation arrangement not to exceed an equivalent cost, may be approved upon application to the Treasurer. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 10) (June 14 Ex, p. 5)

b. Transportation Expenses—That transportation expenses incurred, vouchered as per current policy, be provided for team members to return home once a week. c. Per Diem Expenses—That team members be provided with meal and transportation or other Executive Committee approved expenses based on current policy for full-time table officers. d. Team members who have not exercised their option of having their residence relocated to Vancouver be provided with an expense reimbursement of up to $100 to cover additional expenses by virtue of now working full time out of the BCTF building. (May 01 Ex, p. 9) (Jan 12 Ex, p. 4)

10. Executive Committee a. That the BCTF pay the accommodation, meal and travel expenses for the family of each Executive Committee member in attendance at the initial meeting of the Executive Committee in August. If a family member(s) continues to stay with the EC member through the remainder of the summer conference, the EC member will pay the family accommodation unless there is greater expense for the Federation for the family member(s) to return home separately after the Executive Committee meeting concludes. b. That the BCTF pay accommodation, meal, travel, and childcare expenses to permit the spouse/guest of each Executive Committee member and each Executive Committee member-elect to attend the final dinner meeting of the Executive Committee. (Nov. 99 RA, p. 7) (Jan 12 Ex, p. 4)

11. That accommodation for the RA be provided on the following basis: a. Local Representatives, Local Presidents, and Executive Committee members have the option of staying in the hotel where the meeting is located on the Friday night of the RA. Non-metro delegates would be provided a room on the Thursday night, as well as on the Friday night, only when travel to the meeting on the Friday morning is not possible or would be unsafe and create undue hardship. Non-metro delegates would also be provided with accommodation on Saturday night, when travel home is not possible, in accordance with Procedure 10.I.06. b. In so far as possible, the RA agenda be structured with a later start time and a correspondingly later end time on the first day, in order to accommodate travel on the first morning and ensure no overall reduction in the available meeting time. (Jan 12 Ex, p. 4) (May 14 RA, p. 4)

12. Sharing of accommodation That the Federation encourage sharing of accommodation at BCTF-sponsored meetings. (May 81 Ex, p. 29) (Jan 13 Ex, p. 11)

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13. Definition of Metro That for the purposes of this procedure, Metro be defined as the area in which the destination is able to be reached by public transit within 90 minutes. For example: 1. that for travel to the BCTF building, Metro shall be defined as Anmore, Burnaby, Coquitlam (excluding the northern and eastern neighbourhoods of Burke Mountain, Lincoln Park, and Westwood Plateau), Delta, Lions Bay, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Pitt Meadows, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Richmond, Surrey (excluding the eastern neighbourhood of Cloverdale), Vancouver, West Vancouver, and White Rock. 2. that for travel to the Pacific Gateway Hotel for Representative Assemblies, Metro shall be defined as Burnaby, Delta, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Port Moody, Richmond, Surrey (excluding the eastern neighbourhood of Cloverdale, Fleetwood, and Guildford), Vancouver, West Vancouver, and White Rock. (June 14 Ex, p. 5) (Apr 16 Ex, p. 3)

10.I.08—Meeting Expenses At each meeting members should complete their expense vouchers and submit them to the staff person responsible for making the meeting arrangements. After being approved by the program coordinator, the vouchers will be submitted to the BCTF Accounting Department and a reimbursement cheque will be mailed to the member within the next seven days. The Accounting Department is unable to pay expense claims in excess of $100 in cash, or cash members’ expense cheques. (May 86 RA, p. 8) (May 08 RA, p.48)

10.I.10—Vouchers 1. A letter detailing expenses is acceptable whenever a regular voucher form is not available. 2. That if a voucher amount reimbursed is different than the amount claimed, a copy of the voucher be sent with the cheque to the member. (May 86 RA, p. 8) (Dec. 99 Ex, p. 9)

3. Vouchers must be submitted within three months of the relevant event but within two months after the year-end (June 30). (Feb 10 Ex, p. 8) (Apr 17 Ex, p. 2)

10.I.12—Travel Advances and Reservations 1. Members travelling long distances, on an extended basis or for any situation in which they cannot await reimbursement of their expenses by cheque may obtain a travel advance from the BCTF’s Accounting Department. Arrangements for travel advances should be made through the staff person responsible for the committee and the request should be submitted, if at all possible, two weeks prior to the travel date. Travel reservations and accommodation may be booked through the BCTF office. (May 86 RA, p. 8) (June 07 RA, p. 3)

2.

That W.E. Travel be used for BCTF-related business. (Apr 07 Ex, p. 9)

3. That all air travel arrangements for BCTF business be booked through the BCTF travel agent. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 18) (June 07 RA, p. 3)

10.I.14—Teachers on Call All school boards have been requested to bill the BCTF directly for the cost of a teacher teaching on call when a regular teacher is absent from duty on BCTF business. No individual claims should therefore be made for teachers on call. The Federation meets not only the salary costs but also the travel costs for teachers on call for members on Federation business in districts that provide for payment of both to teachers on call. (Oct 77 RA, pp. 46-50) (May 86 RA, p. 8)

10.I.16—That the BCTF fund all delegates to the AGM in the same manner as it funds the attendance of local representatives. (83 AGM, p. 25)

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Executive Committee 10.I.20—That the normal rates paid for all Executive Committee meetings apply to the Executive Committee meeting section of the Summer Conference. (Aug 74 Ex, p. 35) (Reviewed Dec 78 Ex, pp. 16-17)

10.I.22―That eligible travel expenses for Executive Committee members attending meetings and events consist of costs associated with one return trip from home to the meeting or event unless the Executive Committee member is a resident in Metro and commuting daily to the meeting. (Aug. 09 Ex, p. 7) Bargaining Team 10.I.24—1. That the BCTF second bargaining team members, normally on a school term basis. 2. That the bargaining team members be provided with a reasonable amount of release time as determined by the full-time table officers, prior to return to teaching duties. 3. That summer work: a. must be approved by the Executive Committee; b. be beyond summer training or meeting times; c. be compensated on the basis of one/one hundred and eight-nine (1/189) of actual salary. (Nov. 96 Ex, p. 6-7) Dependant Care 10.I.28—1. The definition of dependant is a person who is dependent upon an individual for their care and support and who is: a. the individual's spouse; or b. the child or grandchild of the individual or of the individual's spouse; or c. the parent, grandparent, brother or sister of the individual or of the individual's spouse. 2. Where permitted by community care licensing regulations the BCTF will provide daycare services for delegates’ families at the AGM and for other meetings and conferences, as designated by the BCTF Executive Committee. (Jan 09 RA, p. 6) (Apr 16 Ex, p. 9)

3. When on-site daycare is provided, these services be utilized by conference attendees wherever feasible. For dependants other than children, outside care, if required, is permitted. Those living outside the Lower Mainland are not required to bring dependants to on-site daycare facilities. Lower Mainland members should obtain approval of the program co-ordinator before using outside daycare services. 4. A maximum claim of $200 per 24-hour day will be paid for outside daycare services. Where care is required for less than a full day, the amount paid will be based on the number of hours of daycare at $15 an hour. The BCTF will only reimburse members for dependant costs that would not otherwise be incurred by the member. Members must submit a receipt with the expense voucher showing the name and address of the caregiver and amount expended. Members must obtain the approval of the program coordinator before incurring daycare costs in excess of the maximum to be reimbursed by the BCTF. (May 14 RA, p. 11) (May 17 RA, p. 4)

5. That where permitted by community care licensing regulations, the BCTF provide onsite childcare at all provincial meetings when extended beyond the working day. (May 11 RA, p. 16) (Nov 16 RA, p. 6)

6. That the Federation expand childcare services currently provided for BCTF delegates attending the AGM by including childcare services during lunch and dinner breaks, with parents bearing the responsibility for meals, to facilitate attendance at presentations and meetings. (Nov 13 Ex, p. 8–9) 10.I.30—That the BCTF recognize the need to provide dependant care expenses for members on BCTF business at any level of the organization. (77 AGM, p. 15) Hotel Accommodation 10.I.32—That the following policy apply for Executive Committee members who wish hotel accommodation for BCTF business in Vancouver. 1. Executive Committee meetings

a. Lower Mainland EC members―the nights before and during the meeting, but not the night of the day on which the meeting concludes, unless the meeting precedes another meeting that commences the following day. (Jan 12 Ex, p. 4) b. Outside Lower Mainland EC members―the nights before and during the meeting, and the night of the day on which the meeting concludes. 2. AGM Accommodation for EC members in relation to the AGM will be as follows: a. EC members will be provided with accommodation on the same basis as AGM delegates. b. EC members may request accommodation for the night between the pre-AGM EC meeting and the opening of the AGM. (Sept 94 Ex, p. 13) (May 14 Ex, p. 7)

10.I.38—1. That zone meeting participants have access to hotel accommodation on the Friday night of a zone meeting. 2. That all zone meetings be Friday and Saturday. (Sept. 08 Ex, p. 4) (April 16 Ex,p. 3)

Miscellaneous 10.I.42—That the BCTF make every effort to use cost effective sustainable practices when providing refreshments at events and meetings. (05 AGM p. 39) 10.I.44—That there be established a link on the BCTF web site to facilitate carpooling, both to BCTF events, meetings, and generally among teachers. (Nov. 07 RA, p. 3) 10.I.46—That if members register for a BCTF-sponsored event and fail to attend, that no per diem claim for that member be approved for that meeting. (Feb 10 Ex, p. 9)

J.

Grants

1. General PROCEDURES 10.J.02—That: 1. to be eligible to receive full grants from the BCTF, locals be required to levy a minimum local fee, and that the amount of that minimum fee be set annually at the winter Representative Assembly for the following school year; 2. locals whose fees are less than the minimum fee set by the winter Representative Assembly receive grants prorated on the basis of the relationship of the local fee to the provincial minimum; 3. for locals whose fees are a percentage of actual salary, the local fee for grant purposes be calculated by dividing the total local fees by the number of full-time equivalent fee-paying members. (Jan 89 RA, p. 5)

10.J.04—That for the 2016–17 budget year, the minimum local fee for BCTF grant purposes be $450. (Jan 15 RA, p. 5) (Jan 17 RA, p. 6)

10.J.06―That locals are not eligible to receive both the Local Action Grant and the Professional Issues Action Grant in the same school year. (May 11 Ex, p. 9)

2. BCTF Assistance Society 10.J.08—That the BCTF annually provide a grant to the BCTF Assistance Society in the amount of all the necessary administrative services for the operation of the BCTF Assistance Society. (June 83 RA, pp. 6–7)

3. School Union Representative Training 10.J.10—1. That the BCTF annually provide a grant to locals for up to four days of training of school/local union representatives, which may include:

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i.

staff representatives staff committee chairpersons school PD representatives social justice representatives school health and safety representatives local executive committee members TTOCs teachers new to the profession some combination of the above. (May 13 RA, p. 11)\ (16 AGM, p. 18)

2. That the grant be provided on the basis of a leadership training plan for union representatives in schools/locals jointly agreed by the local and the Federation. (97 AGM, pp. 34-35) (99 AGM, p. 37)

3. That for purposes of this grant policy, a staff is: a. The sum of members who work in a single work site, be it a school, a resource centre, a board office, or other facility. b. The sum of members who work in a single work site who are members of a separate bargaining unit represented by a local. c. The sum of teachers on call in the district who are members of the local. 4. That the grant include: a. up to four days teacher-on-call costs per staff. b. up to an additional four days teacher-on-call cost per staff for each 25 members or portion thereof in excess of 50, except that a “TTOC staff” shall be entitled to a maximum of two representatives. 5. That the grant may additionally include an amount not to exceed $4,000 per local to cover costs related to: a. travel and accommodation where geographical dispersion is a factor. b. the attendance of up to three local executive members when the total number of staff in the local is less than 10. 6. That: a. locals may use up to one day of their four day SURT allotment for the purpose of union training and collective agreement awareness for newly hired teachers. b. locals seeking variances to meet special circumstances under the provisions of this grant policy may submit a special request to the Executive Committee. (Jan 97 Ex, p. 5) (Apr 11 Ex, p. 14)

7. That in addition to the local dispersion grant an annual grant of $4,000 be provided to SEPF to cover additional costs associated with SEPF school union representatives travelling to Vancouver for school union rep training sessions. (Aug 00 Ex, p. 4)

4. International Solidarity 10.J.14—1. That the W.R. Long Committee be authorized to approve expenditures of up to $5,000 from the fund, and that expenditures in excess of that amount be approved by the full-time table officers, upon recommendation of the W.R. Long Committee, or by the Executive Committee. 2. That the full-time table officers and the W.R. Long Committee chairperson be authorized to approve expenditures of up to $2,000 for international assistance of an urgent nature, in accordance with the policies of the fund. 3. That the administrative and operating costs of the W.R. Long Committee shall be a charge against the W.R. Long Fund. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 8)

10.J.16—That the following be the criteria for expenditures from the W.R. Long Memorial International Solidarity Fund: 1. Education Projects in Developing Countries a. Expenditures may be made to promote partnerships with teacher organizations in developing countries located in identified priority areas. b. Expenditures may be made for projects in such areas as teacher union organizing, leadership training, involvement of women and professional development. Equipment, supplies and necessary resources to support these areas of work may be funded. c. That expenditures may be made from the W.R. Long Memorial International Solidarity Fund in extraordinary circumstances to assist non-teacher unions in developing countries located in identified priority areas. (92 AGM, p. 46) 67

d. Grants may be made to teacher organizations to provide relief to their members who are victims of natural disasters, wars, or political oppression. e. Expenditures may be made for training, equipment, supplies or necessary resources for other educational activities. 2. Expenditures may be made to support the activities of the exchange teachers’ association. 3. Expenditures may be made for projects that improve international understanding and promote global education within the BC educational system. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 9)

5. Locals and Sublocals 10.J.18—Local Organization Support Grant That an annual support grant to locals and sublocals be provided on the following basis: 1. A local support grant: a. will provide an annual grant to locals of $15 per FTE under 800 FTE, $12 per FTE between 801 and 1,000 FTE and a flat rate of $12,000 for locals with greater than 1,000 FTE. (May 14 RA, p. 3) (Jan 17 RA, p. 6)

b. a minimum grant of $5,000. c. a geographical dispersion grant of $1,500 to the local and to other locals in one or more of the following categories: i. the 10 locals with the greatest area per teacher; ii. the 10 locals with the lowest ratio of teachers to schools; iii. locals with one or more sublocals; iv. locals with one or more communities where float-plane transportation is the only viable option for teachers living and working in those communities; v. locals with one or more communities where 10 or more active members teach and which are, on a regular basis, one hour traveling distance away from the main centre. (May 08 RA, p. 5) 2.

A sublocal support grant of $10,000.

(May 12 RA, p. 11) (May 10 RA, p. 4) (May 17 RA, p. 4)

10.J.20—President’s Release Time Grant That the BCTF provide support to locals through a grant that enables the full-time release of Local Presidents to facilitate the support in each local for implementation of Federation priorities. (03 AGM, p. 40)

That grants for release time for Local Presidents be made on the following basis: 1. The grant shall cover salary and benefit costs, including contractual allowances paid to all members in the local (but not including allowances paid by the local) equal to the categories and increments they would have received had they been teaching, subject to adjustments in Procedures 10.J.20.2 and 10.J.20.3. The remaining portion will be paid by the local. 2. Each eligible local is entitled to a percentage of their President’s salary and benefit costs, as defined in Procedure 10.J.20.1, deducted by the amounts paid by locals in Procedure 10.J.20.3. The percentage depends on the locals’ full-time equivalent members (FTE) at September 30 of the previous year. The following is the range of FTEs and related grant %: a. Locals with 160 or less FTE will receive 100%. b. Locals with more than 160 and less than 500 FTE will receive 90%. c. Locals with 500 or more FTE will receive 80%. That the FTE ranges be examined on an annual basis to ensure that as a result of a change in FTEs, there is not a significant change in the total amount of the President’s Time Release Grants given by the Federation. 3. Eligible grant, as defined in Procedure 10.J.20.1, will be reduced by $150 per full-time equivalent member, The reduction will be paid by the local. That the amount paid per full-time equivalent member by a local be adjusted annually by a percentage increase equivalent to the percentage increase in the overall costs of the President’s Release Time Grants to all locals paid by the BCTF in the previous year. Any decrease in the total amount of the President’s Release Time Grant paid to locals in a given year would result in no change to the amount in 3. 68

4. Locals may use any portion of the cost of the difference between the release time provided under part 1 above and the greater of 50% release time or 0.5% release time per member to provide release time grant for other local officers. 5. To apply for the grant, the local must submit to the Federation: a. verification from the school board of the President’s salary under the position of the salary grid, allowance(s), and benefit costs, as defined in Procedure 10.J.20.1, to the board for the release of the President. b. verification of the cost of other local officers and/or support staff, as appropriate. 6. A grant request must be submitted by June 30 of the school year in which the grant applies, or the request will not be considered. (93 AGM, p. 15) (10 AGM, p. 22)

7. That the BCTF provide the equivalent of a .6, Category 5, of the salary scale, to a member or members of the executive of Local 93 as the need arises, in order to permit this local to be less isolated from its members and better answer the needs of its members in a timely fashion and equitable manner.n 8. That a local be given a President’s Release Time Grant that is the equivalent to the salary and benefit costs, defined by Procedure 10.J.20. Regardless of their employment status prior to the individual being elected as a Local President, the President’s Release Time Grant will be equivalent to a full-time teaching position. (Jan 17 Ex, p. 4) (17 AGM, pp. 27–28)

10.J.22—Special grant for computer and technology equipment (Sept 16 Ex, p. 2)

1. That the Executive Committee be empowered to accept and deal with requests of small isolated locals and sublocals for special grants, beyond the present grant formula, on the following basis: a. For the purchase of computer and technology equipment. b. Such a grant shall only be accessible to an individual local or sublocal once every five years. c. That special grant requests from locals for the purchase of computer and technology equipment be approved to a maximum grant of $1,500. d. That special grant requests from locals approved by the Executive Committee be paid on receipt of copies of invoices and supporting documentation. (May 14 RA, p. 3) (Nov 16 RA, p. 5)

2. That special grant requests from locals approved by the Executive Committee be paid on receipt of copies of invoices and supporting documentation. (Oct. 06 Ex, p. 2) 3. That special grant requests from locals for the purchase of computer and technology equipment be approved to a maximum grant of $1,500. (Oct. 06 Ex, p. 3) 10.J.24—That, subject to the approval of the Executive Committee, the BCTF may make loans to locals. Further, it may be required: 1. that all grants be withheld until the loan is repaid; 2. that such loans be subject to interest at current bank interest rates. (Mar 70 Ex, p. 11) (June 81 Ex, p. 15)

10.J.26—That training workshops be provided, on the request of locals by the BCTF. Training workshops shall be financed on the following basis: 1. The cost of resource persons, including BCTF staff and workshop materials, be paid by the BCTF. 2. On-site expenses, transportation and other expenses of local teachers attending the workshops be the responsibility of the local concerned. (May 78 RA, p. 4) 3. That when a local officer who has release time from the local to give workshops or training sessions required by the Federation in locals other than their own, the Federation provides release time to the local to enable it to replace the local officer as required. (01 AGM, p. 18)

10.J.28—Zone meetings 1. That the Federation zone meeting structure include the following minimum representation from locals: a. the president of each local and sublocal; b. the bargaining chairperson for each local; c. the professional development chairperson for each local; d. a social justice contact for each local; e. a health and safety representative for each local; f. a teacher teaching on call representative for each local; g. a local contact for Aboriginal education; and that the Executive Committee be authorized to include additional representatives as necessary. (05 AGM, p. 41) 2. That the Executive Committee procedure for representation at zone meetings be: a. locals between 1,000–1,600 members shall be entitled to one additional delegate. b. locals over 1,600 members shall be entitled to two additional delegates. (May 09 Ex, p. 7) c. that a representative from each of the following advisory committees be included: the Aboriginal Education Advisory Committee, the Health and Safety Advisory Committee, the Professional Issues Advisory Committee, the Working and Learning Conditions/Bargaining Advisory Committee, the Committee for Action on Social Justice, and the Teachers Teaching on Call Advisory Committee. (Apr 05 Ex, p. 6) (Apr 13 Ex, p. 8)

(Jan 12 RA, p. 6)

a. a new PSA requiring funds for promotion and organization; b. a new or more intensely pursued program activity that is seen as beneficial to the profession as a whole; 2. Grants shall be made with the approval of the president and first vice-president on the recommendation of the PSA Council. (May 78 RA, p. 5) (Jan 79 RA, p. 14)

10.J.34—That each PSA provide the following for its members, with copies to the BCTF and PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee, as a condition for a per capita grant in the subsequent year: 1. a financial statement; 2. a proposed budget and program statement; 3. a statement of disclosure consistent with By-law 5.14(c) re outside bank accounts, including a copy of the June 30 bank statement(s) 4. a statement of communications and representations to outside agencies 5. that each PSA will provide a report following each conference that includes a statement of revenue and expenditure and a comparison to the previous year 6. a PSA executive list consistent with Procedure 33.16 (d). (May 95 RA, p. 4) (May 11 RA, pp. 3–4)

6. Provincial Specialist Associations POLICIES 10.J.01—That the BCTF not spend BCTF funds in sponsoring national specialist associations. (June 67 RA, p. 6) (Reviewed Nov 76, Ex, p. 8)

PROCEDURES 10.J.30—1. That the per capita grants to provincial specialist associations be based on PSA membership counts as of April 15. (May 73 Ex, p. 12) (June 02 Ex, p. 5)

2. That all PSAs shall receive an identical basic per capita grant and that a minimum total grant per PSA be set annually when the BCTF budget is approved. (May 78 RA, p. 4) (June 85 RA, p. 12)

3. a. period.

will be granted to an individual PSA in a two-year period. There will be a maximum of two grants issued per year. Consideration in determining the merits of a special grant for a PSA are:

Regional conference grants PSAs are eligible for no more than one grant in a two–year (Jan 13 Ex, p. 12) (May 16 Ex, p. 3)

b. A PSA may receive only one grant in a year. c. The conference to which the grant is applied must be a second conference (not the usual provincial PSA conference) unless the PSA is a very small PSA (fewer than 150 BCTF members). In the latter case, the grant can apply to the first conference, provided the conference meets the rest of the criteria. d. The conference must be held outside of the Lower Mainland (the area east of Chilliwack and Mission) and/or southern Vancouver Island (Nanaimo and south). e. The application for a grant must include a plan which has the date, location, topic, and a proposed budget for the conference. Conferences must include participants from more than one school district. f. After the conference, a report is required which details the number of participants, a financial statement, and an evaluation of the conference. g. Two thirds of the grant will be released to the PSA before the conference and the final third of the money will be released once the conference report is received by the BCTF. (Sept. 01 Ex, p. 8) h. That PSA regional conference grants should be able to be used for a series of at least three professional development events, e.g., webinars or workshops. (May 12 Ex, p. 4) 10.J.32—1. That in any given year a specific PSA may apply for a special grant of up to a maximum of $2,000. Only one such grant

10.J.36—That on the written request of a PSA, and subject to the recommendation of ASC PSAC, the treasurer be authorized to approve no interest loans to a maximum of $5,000 for periods not exceeding 12 months, and that BCTF grants be applied directly against any outstanding loans. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 11) (Apr 17 Ex, p. 8)

10.J.38—That on the written request of a PSA, and subject to the recommendation of ASC PSAC, that no interest loans to PSAs in excess of $5,000 be subject to the approval of the president or one of the vice-presidents and the treasurer, and that BCTF grants be applied directly against any outstanding loans. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 1) (Apr 17 Ex, p. 8)

10.J.40—That teachers on call pay the equivalent rate as students and retirees for Provincial Specialist Association membership fees. (01 AGM, p. 44) 10.J.42—That the $1 required by the BCTF for student associate membership be deducted from the present student PSA membership fee. (01 AGM, p. 44)

7. Regional and Provincial Conferences/ Summer Conference 10.J.46—That the BCTF provide the necessary funding and support for training at the BCTF Summer Leadership Conference for one teacher teaching on call representative from each local. (93 AGM, p. 41)

10.J.48—Where site, facilities and program arrangements permit, locals may obtain permission from conference or meeting planners to send an additional representative to the conference or meeting at local expense. (Jan 75 Ex, pp. 18-19) (May 90 Ex, p. 24)

10.J.50—That the BCTF adopt a scaled representation system where appropriate for funded attendance at major BCTF training sessions to bring attendance closer to representation by population. (93 AGM, p. 39)

10.J.52—That no Federation budget include funds for attendance at any summer conference for representatives from executive advisory committees unless these representatives are invited by the planners of the conference. (May 78 Ex, p. 27)

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10.J.54—That the Federation enhance support and training for PD chairpersons by providing one day of training at Summer Conference for rookie PD chairs. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 2) 10.J.56—That rookie chairs/contacts training at Summer Conference be held every two years. (Apr 09 Ex, p 12)

2. Locals/sublocals be requested to submit an outline of proposed activities with estimated costs to the Federation to obtain approval for the grant before undertaking a program. 3. Grants cover costs related to influencing the public, not members, including planning costs to a maximum of 25% of the total. 4. Approval is by a Full-Time Table Officer on advice from the Director of CCD or designate. (June 97 Ex, pp. 14-15) (Oct. 00 Ex, p. 15)

8. Community Outreach Grants 10.J.56—That the following be the criteria for BCTF outreach grants to outside agencies: 1. Grants should not exceed $5,000. 2. Requests must be made in writing, and have the recommendation of the full-time table officers as to: a. support or non-support. b. amount. c. appropriate budget subcode or amendment. 3. Preference will be given to requests that have potential for a provincial rather than local impact. 4. If provision does not exist in an approved program budget, a budget amendment must be put forward and approved by the Executive Committee before a grant is issued. (Sept 88 Ex, p. 13) (Jan 00 Ex, p. 30)

9. Strikes and Third Party Disputes 10.J.58—Job Action Grants 1. That locals be eligible to receive job action grants when: a. the local is honouring picket lines in a third party dispute, or b. the Federation has completed a successful strike vote and the Executive Committee has decided to begin strike preparations, or c. the employer has served the Federation with lock-out notice. 2. The grant is intended to assist locals in paying costs related to internal local communications and organizing activities, including but not limited to, special meetings, teacher rallies, leaflets/bulletins for members, rental of office and/or meeting space, and teachers teaching on call and release time costs. Receipts must be provided. 3. Approval of actual expenditures is by one of the full-time table officers on the advice of the director of the Collective Agreement and Protective Services Division or designate. 4. The grant covers 100% of the first $5,000 and 50% of the balance of approved costs up to $20,000. (Jan 98 RA, p. 4) (Jan 13 RA, p. 4)

10.J.60—Successful Strike Vote That the following procedure apply to expenditures related to achieving a successful strike vote: That in preparation for a strike vote, the Federation assume the full costs, as authorized by the Executive Committee, of: 1. grants to locals to assist in local organization for a yes vote; 2. additional communications required to support a campaign for a yes vote; 3. additional meetings of Federation committees or governance bodies; 4. meetings and activities of committees struck by the Federation to plan and organize for a yes vote, including any committee(s) struck to develop plans for job action; 5. additional travel incurred by the Executive Committee, Bargaining Team and staff in organization for a yes vote; 6. other initiatives taken by the Federation in support of a yes vote. (Jan 98 RA, p. 6)

10.

Political Action/Public Relations Grants

10.J.62—That public relations/political action grants be given to locals and sublocals on the following basis: 1. The sharing formula be 50% BCTF, 50% local to a maximum grant of $2,000 per local. (Apr 17 Ex, p. 2)

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11.

Adult Educator Grants

10.J.64—1. That the BCTF provide locals with a one-time grant of up to $15,000 for those school years where the local is: a. involved in a sign-up certification drive of adult educators, or b. negotiating a first contract for a new unit of new adult educators. 2. That costs eligible for inclusion under the local grant for adult educator organizing and negotiations be: a. release time for local officers/adult educators to attend meetings with respect to the sign-up and certification process; b. costs of preparing and printing material regarding sign-up and certification; c. release time for local officers and/or d to develop “first contract” proposals; d. costs of preparing and printing “first contract” bargaining materials, including bargaining proposals and member communications; and e. release time for local officers and/or adult educators directly involved in bargaining a “first contract.” 3. That adult educators covered under a separate agreement be provided with an annual grant of $10,000 to support bargaining and collective agreement enforcement. (June 10 Ex, p. 14) (June 11 Ex, p. 15)

12.

Amalgamation Grant

10.J.66—That the BCTF provide the necessary staff resources and, upon application, up to $2,500 per amalgamating local, to support the actual costs incurred in the process of contract melding. (98 AGM, p. 35)

10.J.68—That for the next three fiscal years following the amalgamation of two or more locals into a single local, transition grants be available to the newly amalgamated local at local request on the following basis: 1. first fiscal year after amalgamation – $30,000 2. second fiscal year after amalgamation – $25,000 3. third fiscal year after amalgamation – $15,000 (Dec. 97 Ex, p. 6) (Feb. 01 Ex, p. 5)

13.

Social Justice Grants

Provincial Social Justice Initiatives Grants 10.J.70—1. That the Committee for Action on Social Justice will consider applications and make recommendations on the allocation of Provincial Social Justice Initiatives Grants. Two of the full-time table officers will consider the recommendations and criteria, and approve the grants to be allocated. (Apr 14 Ex, p. 16) 2. That all Provincial Social Justice Initiatives Grants be reported to the Executive Committee as part of Committee for Action on Social Justice reports to the Executive Committee following Committee for Action on Social Justice meetings. (Nov 11 Ex, p. 8) 3. That the following process and criteria apply to Provincial Social Justice Initiatives Grants: A. Criteria for projects i. Projects must: a. reflect the principles of the BCTF social justice lens: access, agency, advocacy and solidarity/action. b. have an ongoing impact on teachers and students across the province. c. involve several teachers. d. demonstrate potential for systemic change. e. provide a written summary of the project.

ii. funding is for projects that take place within the current school year. iii. projects may involve the local community. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 1) (Nov 11 Ex, p. 9)

Local Social Justice Grants 10.J.72—That social justice grants be available annually on the following basis: A. Criteria for Projects 1. Locals must have developed a local social justice plan which incorporates the principles of the BCTF’s Social Justice Plan. (Note: The BCTF Social Justice Planning workshop is recommended.) (Feb 16 Ex, p. 15) 2. Projects must: a. be designed to involve teachers in social justice issues. b. have an ongoing impact on teachers, students, and/or the community as an objective. c. reflect the principle(s) of social justice: equity, opportunity, security/safety, participation, and sustainability. d. include a follow-up component. e. contain an evaluation component. 3. Locals are encouraged to consider projects that involve the local community. 4. Priorities will be given to projects which involve several teachers and where the project fits into the local social justice plan. 5. Funding is for projects that will take place in the current school year. 6. The grant may not be used for overseas projects or for school supplies, school materials, or hardware that the school district or Ministry of Education is responsible for providing. (Apr 17 Ex, p. 9)

B.

Process 1. Locals submit an outline of proposed activities with estimated costs to the BCTF for approval of the grant before undertaking the project. 2. The local social justice grant is $4 per every $1 of local funds to a maximum total grant of $2,000. (June 05 Ex, p. 21) 3. All grant applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on the Thursday before April 15. Funds not committed at that time will be pooled and available to locals on a first-come, first-served basis. 4. Locals are eligible for one grant, subject to 5. below. 5. Grants will be approved by two full-time table officers on advice from staff. 6. A year-end report on expended grants received from the BCTF must be submitted before funding for new projects will be approved. (May 99 Ex, p. 10) (Aug. 02 Ex, p. 17)

14.

Union Mentorship Grant

10.J.74—That the BCTF annually provide a grant to locals of up to a maximum of $3,500 to support union mentorship initiatives. (00 AGM, p. 42) (16 AGM, p. 17)

10.J.76—That the following process, purpose, and criteria apply to Union Mentorship Grants: 1. Process a. That locals be requested to submit to the Federation an outline of proposed activities, with estimated costs, to obtain approval for a union mentorship grant before undertaking the program, and that approval be by a full-time table officer and the director of PSID. 2. Purpose a. To provide mentorship and/or training opportunities for members to undertake future leadership roles in their local. b. To promote mentoring/training opportunities for new members to become more involved in local executives and union activities. 3. Criteria This grant:

a. supports the engagement of members who are not already locally released officers 50% or more. b. requires prior approval. c. will be given with priority to locals that did not receive funding in the previous year. Applications made after November 1 will be considered subject to available funds. d. is not normally available to support opportunities available to members of locals, such as attendance at governance meetings and delegated conventions. (May 13 Ex, pp. 1–2) (June 13 Ex, pp. 9–10)

15.

Local Mediation Grant

10.J.78―That the BCTF provide one-time start-up grants of up to $5,000 to be made available to any local or group of locals intending to develop their own local mediation program. (09 AGM, p. 30)

10.J.80―That locals intending to develop their own mediation programs and applying for the mediation grant, must submit to the Federation, a plan which includes: 1. A financial plan with a detailed breakdown of costs. 2. Where the program includes mediators, a process and criteria for selection and appointment of mediators and a plan for ongoing training and development for those mediators. 3. Clearly articulated program guidelines and procedures. 4. Fair and equitable procedures for members to be eligible for and to access the service. 5. A plan for sustaining the program over time. 6. A program review process that includes a report back to the Internal Relations Staff person regarding the status and effectiveness of the program. (Sept 09 Ex, p. 9) 10.J.82―That the Federation monitor the requests for grants as they are received and develop plans in response to those requests as appropriate, including but not limited to: 1. Developing a package of materials to assist locals in establishing appropriate policies and procedures. 2. Establishing a cadre of trainers from current membership of the IMS as mediation trainers. 3. That locals be permitted to use the $5,000 grant to pay the costs of sending out mediation trainers to train teachers in the local. (Sept 09 Ex, p. 9)

16.

Local Action Plan Grant

10.J.84―1. That a grant be established to assist locals prepared to take political and demonstrative actions to assert their right to free collective bargaining on matters of significant concern to the local and its members. 2. The grant would cover costs related to a local campaign to obtain improvements for members to an amount of $25,000. Additional costs for the campaign would be shared equally between the local and the Federation up to a limit of $5,000. 3. The grant is to support campaigns beyond those related to formal contract negotiations. 4. Consent for the grant is by the Executive Committee upon application by a local that meets the following criteria: a. The local has already initiated work on the issue and it has a profile in the district. b. The issue has provincial application. c. The application has been approved by a general meeting of the local. d. There is evidence of broad member support in the local for the issue. e. the local action plan engages a broad base of members in collective actions. f. that the application include the following: i. identification of the issue that is central to the campaign. ii. date of the general meeting that endorsed the application. iii. a budget with a detailed list of estimated expenditures. 5. No local will be approved for this grant more than once in a three-year period. 71

6. If approved, expenses for local actions undertaken prior to submission of the grant request will not be reimbursed. 7. The funds may be accessed for a period of 18 months after the approval date. Grants issued under this proposal would be a cost to the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund as per Procedure 10.L.10 (i). 8. The local is expected to submit or present a written report to the RA, outlining the campaign supported by this grant. 9. Grants approved under this proposal may be increased by a favourable vote of the Representative Assembly. (Nov 08 RA, pp. 8–9) (Jan 11 RA, pp. 5–6)

17.

Labour Council Affiliation Grant

10.J.86―1. That all locals be encouraged to belong to and participate in their local labour council, where one exists in the region. 2. a. That the Federation provide an annual grant to locals to cover the costs of affiliating the local FTE membership to the local labour council. b. That the grant be provided upon application from the local and be based on the local FTE count on September 30 of that year. (June 06 Ex, p. 16) (Nov 15 RA, p. 7)

20.

Local Bargaining Grant

10.J.92―That the Federation provide a grant to locals during the school year when local bargaining occurs to support local bargaining teams to prepare for and conduct local bargaining campaigns on the following basis: 1. Locals be reimbursed for costs up to a maximum of $6,000 for release time, and other costs (such as room rental and travel costs, printing, and other actions related to local bargaining). 2. Locals may not claim for the cost of food or refreshments, nor for any portion of the ongoing cost of regularly released local officers or compensation for released officers or other members who undertake bargaining or bargaining related work during the summer. 3. Locals will be reimbursed upon receipt of an itemized account of expenditures including copies of invoices and receipts. (June 13 Ex, p. 9)

K.

(Nov 16 RA, pp. 4–5)

10.K.10—1. That the Executive Committee members-atlarge and past president be relieved of up to 40% of their duties as teachers or locally released officers for the duration of their terms of office. (02 AGM, p. 47) 2. That Executive Committee members-at-large and the past president be released at Federation expense during their term of office from their duties as teachers or locally-released officers for up to 0.4 of full-time assignments or 40% of school days in session, plus additional time as required for any additional duties assigned by the Executive Committee or the president in emergent circumstances. (00 AGM, p. 42) (02 AGM, p. 47-48)

3. That where a BCTF Executive Committee member is also a locally released officer, the Federation provide a grant to the local that will not exceed an amount equivalent to the cost of 0.4 FTE of the salary and benefits of that officer, with the approval of the fulltime table officers. The grant will be provided on the following basis: a. For locals that fully cover the costs of their released officers, the local will be reimbursed by the Federation for the equivalent cost per day of the released officer (salary and benefits) for each day on BCTF business. b. For locals in receipt of a presidential release grant, the local will be reimbursed by the Federation for the cost of bringing in a replacement for each of the days the officer is on BCTF business. The local must provide a copy of such costs paid to the school district to do work in the local as a result of the officer being on BCTF business. The day(s) when the replacement is obtained may or may not coincide with the days the officer is on BCTF business. (Jan 06 Ex, p. 5) (Oct. 07 Ex, p. 3)

4. That where Executive Committee members are required by the Federation to be absent from their duties in excess of the 0.4 FTE release time, the local or school board shall be reimbursed the cost of salary and benefits equivalent to what they would have received had they been teaching during that time, inclusive of any allowances as per the Collective Agreement. (May 93 Ex, p. 10) (May 98 Ex, p. 7)

BCTF Executive Committee

10.K.04—That the expense allowances for the President, and the first and second vice-presidents be 20 per cent and 15 per cent respectively of the average PA maximum salary. (June 85 RA, p. 4-5) (May 97 RA, p. 10)

10.K.06—That during their terms of office the President, the First Vice-President and Second Vice-President be considered BCTF employees with respect to the application of the Teachers’ Pensions Act. (74 AGM, pp. 45–46) (May 97 RA, p. 10)

10.K.08—1. That in the event that the President and/or first Vice-President, and/or second Vice-President do not reside in Metro and must move closer to or to Metro to perform their duties, arrangements be made between them and the BCTF Treasurer and CFO to ensure that they do not suffer financial loss or make a financial gain as a result of relocation with the following criteria: a. Accommodation provided to the President and/or First Vice-President, and/or Second Vice-President during their term will be temporary in nature, and in order to qualify they must maintain a separate primary residence outside of Metro. b. The BCTF will find and secure appropriate accommodation for the FTTO. The FTTO will provide their accommodation needs to the Treasurer’s Office. A search will be arranged by the Treasurer’s Office with a short-list of suitable options for viewing by the FTTO. c. In addition to providing the temporary accommodation, the following associated costs will be paid by the BCTF: i. relocation moving expenses to/from the primary residence. 72

ii. furniture and furnishings at the temporary accommodation, which will remain the property of the BCTF. iii. travel costs to/from their primary residence to an equivalent of three round trips per month. 2. That for purposes of this procedure, Metro will be defined as in Procedure 10.I.06.13. (May 97 RA, p. 10)

10.K.12—That subject to the restrictions regarding Executive Committee member release to undertake Federation responsibilities (statement 10.K.10), an executive member may use their allocated release time of up to one day per month for preparation for Executive Committee meetings. (Jan 01 Ex, p. 28) 10.K.14—That the Federation provide a subsidy of $100 per month to each non-FTTO member of the Executive Committee to support their access to and use of an appropriate communication device to conduct Federation business. (Aug 07. Ex, p.4)

L. 1.

Special Funds Collective Bargaining Defence Fund

10.L.02—That the purpose of the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund is to pay costs directly related to strikes, lockouts, the honouring of picket lines in third-party disputes, and contract enforcement in accordance with policies and procedures approved by the Representative Assembly. (91 AGM, p. 27) (May 97 RA, p. 13)

10.L.04—1. That as an objective, the BCTF achieve a balance in the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund of $40,000,000. (99 AGM, p. 36)

2. fund.

That any revenues generated by the fund remain in the (91 AGM, p. 27)

10.L.06—That, when the balance of the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund is less than deemed desirable, the Executive Committee may establish standby credits or lines of credit to ensure that adequate funds are available. (91 AGM, p. 27) 10.L.08—That the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund be financed by an allocation from the membership fee of each active member to be determined each year by the Annual General Meeting. (91 AGM, p. 28)

10.L.10—That the following be charged against the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund: 1. strike, lockout and third party dispute pay pursuant to procedures established by the Representative Assembly; 2. job-action-related public relations costs paid pursuant to procedures established by the Representative Assembly; 3. job-action grants paid pursuant to procedures established by the Representative Assembly; 4. costs related to BCTF-guaranteed loans to members who are locked out, on strike, or honoring picket lines in a third party dispute; 5. costs related to the support and defence of free collective bargaining. (May 04 RA, p. 3) and that the amounts spent under this policy be reported to the (Nov 16 RA, p. 7) Representative Assembly at least twice a year. 10.L.12—Strike, Lockout and Third Party Dispute Pay 1. Amount of pay: a. $50 a day commencing on the first full day of a member’s involvement in a BCTF-authorized strike; b. $50 a day commencing on the first full day of a member’s involvement in a lockout; c. $50 a day commencing on the first full day of a member’s involvement in a third party dispute; and, subject to (d) will continue for each work day the individual is not at work providing that they perform picket line duty or other job action support as determined by the local executive. (Aug. 01 RA, p. 3) d. in a third party dispute part-time teachers shall be eligible to receive strike pay only for each day of the dispute on which they would normally be scheduled to work. (Nov. 00 RA, p. 8) (Nov. 01 RA, p. 5)

e. in the event of a BCTF strike or lockout, part-time teachers shall be eligible for strike pay for each of the days of the dispute on which they are able to perform picket line duty or other job action as determined by the local executive. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 5) f. no teacher shall receive more than $50 per day of pay for each full day of BCTF-authorized strike, lockout, or third-party dispute. (Aug. 01 RA, p. 3) g. No member shall receive strike pay once the available funds in the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund have been exhausted. (14 AGM, p. 32) 2. a. That, in the case of a third-party dispute, locals will require boards to pay only those members who: i. are participating in supervision of field trips in progress at the time the picketing began. ii. are participating in supervision of field trips which the local has permitted to proceed because of financial or other commitment. iii. are attending previously scheduled offsite professional development activities. iv. are working at a regular worksite which has not had a picket line established by the striking union. v. are participating in a teacher exchange. b. That all members of the local who honour a third-party picket line, other than those paid pursuant to the foregoing and as per Procedure 10.L.12.4, shall receive strike pay. Membership shall be based on a list supplied by the local. (June 01 RA, p. 9) 3. Payment a. The executive of the local shall submit to the BCTF office a list of members who have become eligible for pay, and BCTF staff, when satisfied that the list is accurate, shall make payments directly to the members. b. In the event that members are paid by their employer(s) for any day for which they have received pay under this policy, the

amount of payment under this policy shall be repaid by the members to the Federation. c. Rotating strikes or lockouts directly related to the same basic issue shall qualify for payment on the same basis as a consecutive-day strike or lockout. d. Where only a small percentage of members in a local are off work because they are honouring a third party picket line, and where it is possible for those members to be reassigned, the local and those members shall first seek reassignment. Should reassignment be denied, or should it cease part way through a dispute, third party dispute pay provisions shall apply. 4. Eligibility a. Bargaining unit members who are active or associate feepaying members of the BCTF and are on the active payroll of the employer shall be eligible for pay. (For the purpose of this statement, being on a teachers teaching on call list in a school district shall constitute being “on the active payroll of the employer.”) b. Teachers on call shall only be eligible for pay in the local in which they exercise full membership rights. Teachers on call in receipt of salary for any days worked in another district shall not be eligible for strike pay for those days. (Jan 00 RA, p. 4) c. Individuals are ineligible for pay if they are: i. unemployed or, at the beginning of the job action, on a layoff unrelated to the job action. ii. in receipt of full sick leave benefits. (Dec. 01 Ex. p.4) iii. in receipt of full WCB wage loss replacement benefits. iv. in receipt of full SIP benefits. (Dec. 01 Ex. p.4) v. delinquent in the payment of BCTF dues, fees or levies; vi. on exchange and in receipt of salary from another employer. 5. Members in receipt of partial sick leave benefits or partial SIP benefits are eligible for strike pay for the days they would normally be scheduled to work. (Dec. 01 Ex. p. 4) 6. Employees who are in the unit as a result of a variance to the bargaining certificate, but not yet included in a collective agreement, are eligible for strike pay pursuant to Policy 10.L.12. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 7)

7. That in any job action, the involvement of members and locals should be as equitable as possible. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 8) 8. Any BCTF member dismissed or suspended following actions which are alleged to have been carried out as a result of a strike, lockout or honoring a picket line, may be entitled to benefits from the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund. The amount and duration of such benefits shall be determined by the Executive Committee. (Jan 98 RA p. 6) 10.L.16—That normally the Federation follow up with members who default on BCTF-guaranteed loans as follows: 1. If the member agrees to repay and is not experiencing financial difficulties, obtain a letter of commitment to repay the loan and post-dated cheques, with a time limit for repayment of up to two years. 2. If the member agrees to repay but is temporarily experiencing financial difficulties, obtain a letter of commitment to repay the loan and post-dated cheques, with commencement of payment to be delayed up to one year (subject to review and a further deferral of one year), and a time limit for repayment of up to two years thereafter. 3. If the member refuses to repay, pursue legally. 4. That normally the Federation charge members interest on defaulted loans, after the interest-free period. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 15) 10.L.18—1. That the BCTF, by decision of the Executive Committee, provide strike support to other unions using the following guidelines: a. strikes by provincial teacher unions in other parts of Canada, up to $15,000 b. strikes by teacher union locals in other parts of Canada, up to $2,000 c. strikes by other provincial unions in British Columbia, up to $10,000 d. strikes by locals of other unions in British Columbia, up to $2,000 73

e other strikes up to $2,000 or if greater by recommendation to the Representative Assembly. 2. That any amounts exceeding those indicated in a. shall be by recommendation to the Representative Assembly. 3. That all such expenditures be a charge to the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund. (Feb. 05 RA, p. 4) 2.

Contingency Fund

10.L.20—That the purpose of the Contingency Fund is to: 1. ensure that the Federation can meet, without delay, special or emergent significant expenses that could not reasonably have been anticipated and budgeted for by the Spring RA. 2. allow the Federation to promote the cause of public education by providing the financial means to respond effectively to any crisis in education. And that payments from the Contingency Fund be made in accordance with policies and procedures approved by the Representative Assembly. (91 AGM, p.25) 10.L.22—1. That as an objective, the BCTF achieve a balance in the Contingency Fund of $2,000,000, except, when the objective of $2,000,000 is reached, such revenues shall be deposited in the Collective Bargaining Defence Fund. 2. That any revenues generated by the fund remain in the fund. (91 AGM p. 26) 10.L.24—That expenditures from the Contingency Fund must be approved by the Representative Assembly. (91 AGM p. 26) 10.L.26—That the Contingency Fund be financed by an allocation from the membership fee of each active member to be determined each year by the Annual General Meeting. (91 AGM p. 26)

10.L.30—That when a public school experiences significant loss or damage as a result of a fire or other natural disaster, the Federation respond to assist members in replacing lost or damaged teaching materials by providing, through the local, a donation of $1,000 to the school, and that any costs incurred as a result be a charge to the Contingency Fund. (10 AGM, p. 1) (May 12 RA, p. 11) 3.

Provincial Bargaining Fund

10.L.32—1. That the purpose of the Provincial Bargaining Fund shall be to pay costs related to provincial contract negotiations, including initial, one-time-only costs, excluding grievance arbitration, associated with the implementation of a new provincial collective agreement, according to budgets established by the process set out in this procedure. (99 AGM, p. 20) 2. That the Provincial Bargaining Fund be financed by an allocation from the membership fee of each active member to be determined each year by the Annual General Meeting. 3. That the Executive Committee shall have prepared annually for the Provincial Bargaining Fund a budget statement of anticipated revenues and expenditures for the following year. The Representative Assembly shall consider such statement and with such amendments as it deems necessary, shall adopt a budget for the Provincial Bargaining Fund for the forthcoming year. No expenditures in excess of the budget so adopted shall be made except by a resolution assented to by a majority of at least two-thirds of the Executive Committee, or in accordance with subsequent budget amendments to the Provincial Bargaining Fund that may be made by resolution of the Representative Assembly. 4. That any revenues generated by the Provincial Bargaining Fund remain in the Fund. (97 AGM, pp. 35-36) 4.

10.L.36—1. That the Public Education Defence Fund be financed by an allocation from the membership fee of each active member to be determined each year by the Annual General Meeting. 2. That an annual budget of the Public Education Defence Fund be approved by the Spring Representative Assembly for use and implementation by the Executive Committee as per By-laws 6.10 and 5.17. 3. That any revenues generated by the Public Education Defence Fund remain in the Fund. (02 AGM, pp. 44-45) 10.L.38―That annual allocations to the Public Education Defence Fund take into consideration the need to maintain a positive fund balance in the PEDF, in order to ensure resources are available in the election program, in particular for provincial elections which occur every four years. (09 AGM, p. 28) 5.

Hardship Fund 10.L.40―That: 1. the Hardship Fund be established and funded from parties that wish to assist members who are under financial hardship during job action. 2. these funds received by the BCTF be distributed to locals, who will then distribute the funds to their members who are experiencing financial hardship. 3. these funds be distributed to locals on a pro-rata basis, per full-time equivalent member at each local at September 30. 4. locals be encouraged to establish criteria upon which members in their local who are under financial hardship are to receive funding. 5. The Hardship Fund is separate and distinct from the BCTF Assistance Society. (Oct 16 Ex, p. 2)

M. Special Support 10.M.02—That the BCTF provide political, legal, and financial support, as necessary, to any member who may face disciplinary action as a result of participation in a Federation approved job action activity or other collective strategy. (Sept. 01, Ex. p. 8) (May 03 RA, p. 13)

N.

Miscellaneous

10.N.02—1. That in granting charitable donations to outside organizations, the Executive Committee be guided by the following criteria: a. The organization has a provincial, national, and/or international profile. b. The work of the organization has a positive impact on teachers and/or students. c. The goals and actions of the organization are not in conflict with policies of the BCTF. d. The BCTF be publicly acknowledged as donor or sponsor. 2. The Executive Committee review charitable donations on an annual basis and consider a limited number of options which can be accommodated within budget priorities and available resources. (Apr 04 Ex, p. 4)

Public Education Defence Fund

10.L.34—That a Public Education Defence Fund be established with the following purposes: 1. to ensure adequate resources are available to effectively respond to the attack upon public education launched by government including reductions in education funding, deterioration of learning 74

conditions in the schools, the removal of full bargaining rights for teachers; and 2. to support the implementation of the Federation’s Public Education Advocacy Plan. (02 AGM, p. 44) 3. to ensure adequate resources are available to engage members in raising teacher and public education issues in municipal, provincial, and federal elections. (09 AGM, p. 28) 4. That a program to support a Federation role in raising teacher and public education issues in municipal, provincial, and federal elections be established as a component of the Public Education Defence Fund. (09 AGM, p. 28)

11. Goals of the BCTF POLICIES 11.01—Goals of the BCTF:

1. To help ensure that public schools provide for the continued intellectual, physical, social, and emotional growth and development of each individual. 2. To promote the establishment and continued development in every school of sound learning and teaching conditions, including the provision of adequate support services. 3. To work toward the integration of social and educational services that contribute to the welfare and development of students. 4. To encourage full public participation in determining the overall objectives of education at the provincial, district and school levels. 5. To create public awareness of problems in society that hinder student growth and development and to stimulate the search for solutions. 6. To strive to eliminate from the school system discrimination on the basis of sex, race, religion, age, handicaps, economic status, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, number of dependents or pregnancy. 7. To promote professional growth of teachers through the continuous development of pre-service, internship and in-service education. 8. To establish a code of ethics and professional conduct, criteria of qualification, and criteria and procedures for the assessment of professional competence, and to ensure that teachers are effectively subject to the judgment of their peers in these matters, with guarantee of due process. 9. To ensure, through the development of democratic processes, professional autonomy for teachers and protection from capricious or malicious action, unjust regulations and the abuse of authority. 10. To maintain for teachers a level of status and economic standing appropriate to the responsibility of the profession. (74 AGM, pp. 53-54) (May 80 RA, p. 16)

11. To work co-operatively with other groups and agencies to transform the public schools to make them more relevant and effective in preparing students for their futures. (Jan 87 RA, p. 18) 12. To promote a working and learning environment in the public schools of British Columbia that is free from violence. 13. To support the right of all students, regardless of age, to free basic education as defined by the current K–12 and adult education programs. (93 AGM, p.14) 14. To promote the well-being of members through working conditions that nurture ongoing health and vitality. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 12) PROCEDURES 11.02—That the following be the 2017–18 Leadership Priority: The universal right to education is affirmed in international law and is a value held passionately by teachers worldwide. For that right to be upheld in children’s lives, they must have access to fully funded quality public schools which are the heart of every community. Strong and caring relationships between teachers and students are essential for learning, and for fostering an engaged citizenry in a socially just democracy. 1. To help create the conditions for those relationships to thrive, the Federation will engage and support members in: a. furthering equity and inclusion within our union, schools, and communities. b. developing and fostering a deeper understanding of Aboriginal ways of knowing, history, and culture. c. achieving significantly increased funding for public education. d. securing appropriate resources and time to implement changes in curriculum, assessment, reporting, and teacher mentoring. e. ensuring that the restored collective agreement language is respected and fully funded. 2. Preparing for the 2019 round of bargaining by identifying improvements in our collective agreement. (17 AGM, p. 7) 11.04—That the BCTF seek legislative changes that would: 1. Expand the statutory mandate of the BC public school system to include fostering the growth and development of every individual, to the end that they will become and be a self-reliant, self-

disciplined, participating member with a sense of social and environmental responsibility within a democratic society. 2. Remove restrictions on teachers’ collective bargaining from the School Act. 3. Remove provisions from the School Act which undermine professionalism and quality education, specifically those permitting boards to utilize ‘’teachers’ assistants’’ and to contract out the provision of educational programs. 4. Replace the centralizing power of ‘’minister’s orders’’ with a representative educational body to recommend to the minister regulations in areas such as curriculum, graduation requirements, and student/program evaluation. 5. Re-establish a provincial school calendar—providing set holidays, winter, spring and summer breaks. (May 90 RA, pp. 14-15) (99 AGM p. 18)

11.06—That the BCTF and its locals take political action aimed at enhancing educational program quality and equality of access to educational programs. (82 AGM, p. 17) 11.08―That the goal statements for Summer Conference, FLI, and FIT be as follows: 1. Summer Conference―to develop local leadership, while focusing on BCTF priorities. 2. Federation Leadership Institute (FLI)―to support local leadership in developing the knowledge, skills, and attributes needed to fulfill their union roles. 3. Facilitators’ Institute Training (FIT)―to prepare facilitators to present BCTF workshops in an engaging and interactive manner while representing the BCTF. (June 11 Ex, p. 11)

12. Health and Welfare of Students POLICIES 12.01—That the BCTF, in principle, recognizes and supports the following rights and responsibilities of students: 1. Rights of Students The right: a. to be informed of the rights and responsibilities of students. b. to enjoy freedom of speech and assembly. c. to enjoy equal access to free public school education. d. to enjoy access to stimulating learning resources—both human and material. e. to enjoy basic communications skills, including functional literacy. f. to be provided with opportunities for optimum growth and development through various learning processes—manipulative, imaginative, creative, intellectual. g. to appropriate diagnosis and remediation where handicaps of any kind exist. h. To have access to educational options and alternatives to suit needs (i.e., recognition and appreciation of uniqueness). i. To receive guidance for developing the individual’s own integrated system of values. j. to enjoy freedom from sex-role stereotyping. k. to enjoy opportunities for developing self-confidence, selfdiscipline and self-reliance. l. to retain an ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritage. m. to be made aware of the ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritage of others. n. to be exposed to global concerns. o. to due process. p. to participate in decisions in accord with the growth of maturity of the student, both as an individual and as part of a group. q. to physical environments that are hygienic, safe and conducive to learning (appropriate temperature, lighting, colors, humidity and cleanliness), and free from barriers to persons with disabilities. r. to enjoy freedom from physical and psychological abuse and any form of harassment, including sexual harassment. (93 AGM, p. 13)

75

s. to have access to their personal records in accord with the growth of maturity of the student, both as an individual and as part of a group. t. to enjoy access to adequate food, clothing and housing. u. to safety. v. to enjoy access to health instruction and facilities. w. to protection from contagious diseases. x. to have access to condoms in all secondary school washrooms in conjunction with appropriate education for students. y. to enjoy access to recreation facilities and programs. 2. Responsibilities of Students The responsibility: a. to be aware and considerate of the rights of others. b. to refrain from infringing on the right of others to freedom of speech and assembly. c. to utilize learning resources. d. to develop basic communication skills. e. to take advantage of opportunities for growth and development. f. to develop an integrated system of values and to know the limit to which an individual’s value system may be incompatible with the values of society. g. to become self-disciplined and self-reliant. h. to recognize and respect various ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritages. i. to insist on due process for self and others. j. to participate in decisions in accord with the growth of maturity of the student, both as an individual and as part of a group. k. to protect others from physical and psychological abuse. l. to respect and not to abuse the right of access to adequate food, clothing and housing. m. to refrain from practices that endanger the safety of others. n. to practise health habits that will contribute to the welfare of the group. o. to practise health habits that will protect others from contagious diseases. (90 AGM, p. 38) 12.03—That the BCTF encourage schools to develop a student behavior code with input from students, parents, and teachers, administrators and non-teaching personnel. (94 AGM) 12.05—1. Teachers have a duty to render assistance in an emergency. 2. Teachers shall not be called on to administer medication on a regular or predictable basis. 3. School boards should establish policies that require schools to establish systems for administering medication after consultation with parents, family physicians, the public health nurse and the Medical Officer of Health. 4. The administration of medication should be the responsibility of appropriate health personnel except for those mature students capable of and trained in self-administration. 5. If isolation or other exceptional circumstances prevent the foregoing policy from being applicable and teachers are required to administer medication, the following conditions constitute prerequisites: a. appropriate amendments are made to the Medical Practitioners Act; b. teachers volunteer to provide the service; c. teachers receiving training appropriate to the required duties; d. payment for any services rendered by teachers in administering medication are negotiated between boards of school trustees and locals of teachers. (Jan 81 RA, p. 14) 12.07—That the provincial government should establish regional centres with residential and outpatient capabilities for the care and education of students with severe psychological, emotional and behavioral disorders.(81 AGM, p. 33) 12.09—That only nutritious foods should be sold in school cafeterias. (74 AGM, pp. 60–61) (Oct. 80 RA, p. 3)

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12.11—That because of the privileged relationship between counsellors and students, counsellors should not be required to give evidence against students. (Jan 75 Ex, p. 8) 12.13—That the BCTF support the establishment of a dental (Nov. 75 Ex, p. 26) health program for all BC students. 12.15—That the BCTF support a program of school-based dental clinics supplemented by mobile units, with the following provisos: 1. That existing space be used for clinics only where the school board and the staff of a particular school agree that such space is not required for other purposes now or in the foreseeable future. 2. That additional space be provided where this is not the case. 3. That the cost of all space used for dental clinics be charged directly to the Ministry of Health. 4. That teams of dentists perform regular inspections and checkups to ensure overall professional supervision of the program. (Nov 75 Ex, pp. 26–27)

12.17—That students should be provided the opportunity to participate in organized physical activity for a minimum of 40 minutes daily during school instructional hours. (Jan 76 RA, p. 17) (Jan 77 RA, p. 8)

12.19—That provincial legislation should be improved to protect the rights of abused and neglected children. (Jan 80 Ex, p. 6) 12.21—Students with HIV/AIDS That the following policies refer to individuals who have tested positive for antibodies, as well as those in whom the virus is active. 1. Students infected with the AIDS virus should have the right to attend their regular classes. 2. The identity of a student affected with the AIDS virus should be protected in accordance with our Code of Ethics. 3. When, in the opinion of the Medical Health Officer or the attending physician, the physical condition or behavior of a student infected with AIDS virus poses a health risk, alternative instruction should be provided. 4. Decisions regarding alternative instruction should be made on a case-by-case basis. 5. Alternative instruction for students infected with the AIDS virus should be provided by teachers who fully understand the situation of a student who has developed AIDS related illnesses. (88 AGM, pp. 8–9)

12.23—Breast and Testicular Cancer Self-Examination That breast self-examination training for early detection of breast cancer for young women, and testicular self-examination training for early detection of testicular cancer for young men be introduced at the high school level in BC public schools. (Nov. 90 Ex, p. 3) (Jan 10 Ex, p. 14)

12.25—That the BCTF state its opposition to: 1. the use or promotion of “reparative therapies” or “conversion therapies” aimed at changing lesbian, gay or bisexual students’ sexual orientation. 2. the referral of any student to therapists who promote and practice this form of abuse. and, that the BCTF call upon both the provincial and federal governments to ban “conversion therapies.” (Nov. 00 RA, p. 5) (Nov 15 RA, p. 9)

12.27—1. That all students on work experience in schools be given occupational health and safety training by the employer. 2. That no student be placed in a work experience assignment which does not provide WCB coverage and the appropriate occupational health and safety training. 3. That teachers working in work experience programs receive occupational health and safety training as it related to their supervisory duties with regard to students in the workplace. (01 AGM, p. 12)

12.29—That the BCTF call on the Liberal government to fulfil its campaign mandate to provide equitable and effective levels of service to BC’s most vulnerable children and families. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 9)

12.31—That the MCFD (Ministry of Children and Family Development), MOE (Ministry of Education), MOH (Ministry of Health) join together with education partner groups, including unions, the First Call Coalition to design an effective, stable delivery model that co-ordinates and integrates services to support BC’s most “at risk” children and families. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 10) 12.33—That the BCTF affirms the necessity of human rights for all students in an inclusionary public education system which prepares students for full citizenship in a democratic society. (Apr 03 Ex, p. 6)

12.35—That the Ministry of Education provide monetary incentives to schools to ban the sale of junk food and drinks from their premises. (May 04 RA, p. 13) 12.37—That school districts develop policies prohibiting the referral of students to private education providers. (Jan 05 Ex, p. 20)

12.12—That the BCTF, as a part of its commitment to the welfare of students and the elimination of discrimination, work towards a safe and inclusive public school environment that respects the religious diversity of students, including those from non-religious backgrounds, within the context of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.(Jan 00 Ex, p. 3) 12.14—That BCTF members continue to participate on schoolbased teams: 1. to advocate for the educational and resource needs of individual students (without being limited to available resources), and 2. to inform, through school union representatives, affected parents, school parent groups, and other interested parties of educational needs not being met. (Sept 02 Ex, p. 17) (Feb 10 Ex, p. 3)

12.16—That locals recommend to their local trustees that they (04 AGM, p. 35) ban the sale of junk food and drinks from schools. 12.18—That the Federation advise teachers and schools that cannot meet all the Daily Physical Activity requirements to focus on increasing the number of students in the school who are physically active with the highest quality programming available. (June 08 Ex, p. 15)

12.39—That BCTF members advocate for a healthy, scent-free environment by discouraging students from using scented body sprays, and by educating them about the negative health effects of body spray on themselves and others. (07 AGM, p. 17) 12.41—That the BCTF recommend to the provincial government that, in accordance with Canada Safety Council recommendations, 15-passenger vans be banned for transporting students. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 9) PROCEDURES 12.02—That the BCTF encourage co-operation among agencies interested in the education of students with special needs.

12.20—That BCTF members encourage students to wear hats and use sunscreen whenever they are participating in outdoor activities generally, and in particular during outdoor school activities. (Nov 08 RA, p. 140)

13. Health, Welfare, and Safety of Teachers A.

Miscellaneous

(Jan 79 Ex, p. 6)

12.04—That the BCTF monitor, through its locals, the delivery of services to students with special needs. (Jan 79 Ex, p. 6) (Dec 94 Ex, p. 10)

12.06—That the BCTF urge all teachers to develop an awareness of child abuse. (Jan 80 Ex, p. 6) 12.08—That the BCTF take a leadership role in designing and implementing professional development and preventive programs in the area of child abuse. (Nov. 86 Ex, p. 13) 12.10—1. That locals participate with school boards in the development of policies and protocols for the prevention, detection and reporting of child abuse in co-operation with other school board employee groups, based on the BCTF protocol model. 2. That locals monitor all school board application forms used for screening applicants for teaching positions and report any concerns to the BCTF, and that furthermore, the BCTF, in conjunction with the BCSTA, develop a model teacher application form. 3. That locals work with the school boards to develop inservice programs and call upon school boards to provide release time in addition to regular non-instructional days, and money for in-service to: a. educate teachers about the prevention, detection and reporting of child abuse; b. familiarize teachers with school board and community child abuse protocols. 4. That each local request the school board to join with it to demand that the Ministry of Education provide funding for the implementation of mandated family life programs which include a child abuse prevention component at all levels of the school system. 5. That locals work with school boards to inform and familiarize parents and guardians about the prevention, detection and reporting of child abuse. (Aug. 74 Ex, pp. 35-36)

PROCEDURES 13.A.08—Transportation of students for voluntary activities: The provision of bus transportation to facilitate curricular and voluntary activities is a responsibility of the local school board, and should, through the finance formula, also be a responsibility of the Ministry of Education. Members have a heavy teaching load in addition to voluntary activities and should therefore not undertake further duties such as driving buses to transport students. As a general principle members should undertake that job for which they were hired—teaching. While voluntary activities may enrich the school experience, that assistance should not include driving buses to transport students, any more than it includes secretarial and other support tasks. It is recommended that: 1. Members should not be responsible for the transportation of students by bus. 2. Locals should urge their boards to provide adequate financial assistance to voluntary activities, including transportation. 3. Members should refrain from: a. driving buses for the purpose of transporting students; b. participating in societies or other such business arrangements that are made to transport students on curricular or voluntary activities. (80 AGM, pp. 5–6) (89 AGM, p. 53)

13.A.10—Salary Indemnity Plan Investment Policy 1. Purpose 1.1 Pursuant to the Part 2 of the BCTF Constitution, a purpose of the BCTF is to organize and administer a Salary Indemnity Fund (“SIF”) among its members to provide benefits to members who are disabled from employment as a result of illness or accident. The benefit provisions of the SIF, described as the Salary Indemnity Plan (“Plan”), are contained in the Plan Regulations of the Salary Indemnity Plan (“Plan Regulations”).

(Jan 87 RA, pp. 7–9)

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1.2 The Plan benefits are financed through fees paid by the members and the EI rebate, both as described in paragraph 7.1 of the Regulations, that are deposited and invested in the SIF, and from the investment income earned by the SIF. The prudent investment management of the SIF will have a direct effect on the ability of the BCTF to achieve the goals of the Plan. (Sept 14 Ex, p. 2) 1.3 This section constitutes the Statement of Investment Policy (“Policy”) established by the BCTF to document the governance structure and the policies and procedures for the management of the SIF investments. Scope 1.4 The Policy applies to the investments of the SIF only, and does not apply to any of the other assets of the BCTF. 2. Governance Governing Principles 2.1 The investment management of the SIF will at all times comply with the Policy, the BC Trustee Act and any other applicable legislation. 2.2 This Policy shall put into operation the high standards of governance established by the Executive Committee (“Executive”) of the BCTF in the management and oversight of SIF investments. (Sept 14 Ex, p. 2)

2.3 External resources for the operation and management of SIF investments may be used when the use of such resources is warranted and cost effective. Responsibilities for SIF Investments 2.4 The Executive of the BCTF has the responsibility for the investment of the SIF, pursuant to paragraph 5.12 of the BCTF Bylaws that states: “All investments shall be in accordance with policies and investment objectives approved by the Executive Committee.” 2.5 Under paragraph 5.6 of the by-laws, the Executive can delegate certain investment responsibilities for the SIF investments to the Finance Committee (“Committee”). The responsibilities of the Committee for the SIF investments are set out in the Terms of Reference of the Committee. 2.6 Under paragraph 5.11 of the by-laws, the Executive can delegate certain responsibilities for the SIF investments to the Treasurer of the BCTF (“Treasurer”). 2.7 The Executive’s responsibilities in connection with the SIF include: a. appointing a Committee b. annual approval of the Policy c. appointing external investment managers, pursuant to paragraph 5.10 of the by-laws, to invest the assets of the SIF on the recommendation of the Committee d. receiving and reviewing recommendations from the Committee on possible changes to the Policy and on the investment management and operation of the SIF, and making any changes as it considers appropriate. 2.8 Pursuant to their Terms of Reference, the Committee’s responsibilities include: a. annually reviewing the Policy and making recommendations for any amendments to it to the Executive that the Committee considers in the best interests of achieving the objectives of the SIF. b. recommending to the Executive, the selection, termination or replacement of the Investment Managers, the Custodian, consultants and any other independent experts, as appropriate. c. reviewing quarterly the investment performance of the SIF and the Investment Managers retained by the BCTF 2.9 The Treasurer’s responsibilities include a. preparing the agenda for the Committee’s meetings and arranging for the preparation and delivery of all meeting materials b. meeting regularly with the Investment Managers and with the Investment Consultant c. adjusting the allocation of assets in accordance with the Policy d. investing any assets not specifically allocated to an external investment manager e. providing information on significant cash flow changes to the Investment Managers. 3. Overview of the SIF 3.1 The liabilities of the Plan at any given time consist of obligations to pay benefits to existing claimants at that time for as 78

long as they remain entitled to benefits under the Plan. The obligations range from a small number of days of claim payments to members receiving short-term disability benefits to potentially 25 or more years of claim payments to members receiving long-term disability benefits. 3.2 The benefit levels are based on the disabled member’s salary at the time of disability. Long-term disability benefits may be adjusted for inflation pursuant to paragraph 19.6 of the regulations, at the discretion of the Executive. 3.3 Paragraph 7.5 of the Plan Regulations specify that “reserves, determined by actuarial study, shall be established in order to support the objective that the plan operate on a fully funded basis,” to increase the certainty that future claim payments will be made to the existing claimants. 3.4 The level of fees to be deposited to the SIF is established by the BCTF at its annual general meeting, based on the recommendation of the Executive who receive advice from the actuary. 3.5 The actuary of the Plan performs an actuarial valuation as of June 30 of each year, the fiscal year-end of the BCTF. The actuary also performs estimates of the Plan’s position as at December 31 each year. The key financial results as at June 30, 2016 were: Market value of assets Liabilities Fund balance (based on market value)

$262.4 million $179.8 million $82.6 million (Dec 15 Ex, p. 2) (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8)

3.6 SIF has an excess surplus in assets compared to its expected liabilities. The SIF fee has been set to be less than the longterm loss. The net cash flow to the SIF (member fees and EI rebate income less benefit payments and administrative expenses) is expected to be negative over the next few years. The SIF assets are expected to change over the next few years by the difference between investment earnings and the net cash flow. (Jan 10 Ex, p.1) (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8)

4. Investment Objectives 4.1 The primary investment objective of the SIF is to earn an annual rate of return that exceeds the annual rate of increase in the Consumer Price Index by at least 3.0%, after deduction of investment management and custodial expenses. If the SIF earns such a rate of return, the reserves should be sufficient, based on normal actuarial experience, to provide the future claim payments for existing claimants, including the discretionary inflation adjustments. 4.2 The secondary investment objective of the SIF is to earn over the long-term a return after investment fees higher than the Benchmark Portfolio as described in Section 7. 4.3 The risk objectives of the BCTF for the operation of the SIF are: a. to ensure that the benefits will be paid, both over the shortterm and the long-term b. to avoid having significant fluctuations to the fee on an annual basis 4.4 To some extent the elimination or reduction of risk competes with the primary and secondary investment objective returns, and steps that may be taken to reduce or eliminate risk could reduce the likelihood of achieving the investment objectives. As the SIF has a long-term time horizon that extends beyond a normal business cycle, the SIF can assume some risk of declining asset values over the short term. It is understood, therefore, that the primary risk objective and the investment objectives might not be achieved over the short term in order to achieve the investment objectives, on average, over the long term. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) 5. Investment Principles 5.1 This Section describes the principles to be applied to the investment management of the SIF. 5.2 The SIF is to be invested in investments that a prudent person would make, in accordance with the BC Trustee Act, as amended. 5.3 The selection of investments in the SIF should be made in the context of the total portfolio, with a reasonable expectation of a fair return or appreciation. 5.4 The assets of the SIF should be invested in the capital markets to achieve the investment objectives. Although exposure to the capital markets could lead to short-term declines in the market

value of the SIF, this risk is acceptable over the long term, as long as the increased risk results in rates of return that support or improve the expected level of income from the SIF. 5.5 The investment objectives can best be achieved by investing in a mix of diverse asset classes with varied investment characteristics. 5.6 The risk of price fluctuations within the asset classes and the uncertainty of future economic and investment conditions dictate prudent diversification by economic sector, industry, quality and market capitalization, so that no single security or class of securities will have a disproportionate impact on the performance of the total rate of return of the SIF. 5.7 Competent external professional investment management can add value, relative to a static benchmark portfolio, through opportunistic security selection, and that selecting external professional investment managers can add value relative to the Benchmark Portfolio, as described in Section 7. 5.8 Risk should be controlled, and guidelines and constraints should be established to ensure that any Investment Manager retained by the Executive does not take excessive risk. 5.9 Diversification of investment managers is desirable to reduce the probability of a substantial shortfall inherent in a single investment style or investment manager. The advantage of retaining multiple investment managers shall be balanced with the disadvantage of over-diversification and excessive investment management and administration costs. 6. Permitted Categories of Investments 6.1 The SIF may be invested in any of the following permitted categories of investments: a. debt secruties of Canadian or non-Canadian issuers, issued in Canadian or non-Canadian currencies, including sovereign, provincial, municipal and corporate bonds, debentures, mortages, mortgage-based securities, asset-backed securities, notes and other debt instruments, Credit Unions that are domiciled in the province of British Columbia; (Jan 07 Ex, p. 5) b. income-producing commercial, industrial, and residential property, held in a professionally-managed, diversified, pooled real estate fund; c. interest-bearing cash and cash equivalents, including guaranteed investment contracts or term deposits with banks, trust companies or insurance companies; d. unitized pooled funds or mutual funds consisting of eligible investments in the above categories, managed in accordance with the guidelines and constraints as set out in Section 9. (Sept 14 Ex, p. 2) (Feb 17 Ex, p.8)

6.2 As there may be other categories of investment that, when added to the SIF, may further increase the probability of achieving the investment objectives, the Committee shall review other categories of investment from time to time, as they deem fit and shall recommend to the Executive for inclusion any other categories of investments that, in their opinion, will help achieve the investment objectives. 6.3 Should the Executive approve a new category of investment appropriate for inclusion in the SIF, the Committee, with the advice of the Treasurer, shall develop constraints and guidelines in respect of investing in that category of investment for approval by the Executive. 6.4 Until such time the Executive approves a new category of investment and approves amendments to this Policy to include the constraints and guidelines as described in paragraph 6.3, any investment not specifically permitted by this Policy shall be prohibited. 6.5 All investments are subject to the constraints of this Policy, as specifically set out in Section 9, and any legal requirements, including the BC Trustee Act. 7. Benchmark Portfolio 7.1 A Benchmark Portfolio is a hypothetical portfolio, defined and specified in advance, consisting of specified asset classes, each invested in the percentage for that asset class set out in the benchmark asset mix, and, within each asset class, invested in the market index specified for that asset class.

7.2 The Benchmark Portfolio is the set of asset classes, in combination, that is expected to have the greatest likelihood of achieving the investment objectives, as set out in Section 4. 7.3 The Executive shall establish a Benchmark Portfolio for the SIF, based on the recommendations of the Committee. If the Committee believes that the Benchmark Portfolio established for a SIF cannot meet the investment objectives over the following fouryear period, it will develop an alternative Benchmark Portfolio for recommendation to the Executive. 7.4 The current Benchmark Portfolio for the SIF is: Asset Class

Canadian Equities US Equities Global Equities ESG Universe Bonds Real Return Bonds Mortgages Real Estate

Benchmark Index

S&P/TSX Russell 1000 Value ($Can) Morgan Stanley (MSCI) World FTSE TMX Universe Bond Index FTSE TMX Real Return Bond Index FTSE TMX Short-term Bond Index IPD Canada Quarterly Property Fund Index

Benchmark Asset Mix %

February 10, 2017 12.5 0

December 11, 2015 15.5 5.0

20.0

15.0

22.5

22.5

15.0

15.0

17.5

17.5

12.5

12.5 (Dec 15 Ex, p. 2) (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8)

8. Fund Management Custodian 8.1 Under paragraph 7.6 of the Plan Regulations, the assets of the SIF are to be segregated from other BCTF assets. Accordingly, the Executive shall appoint a Custodian to hold the assets of the SIF. The Custodian’s responsibilities are as follows: a. perform its duties in accordance with the terms of its Custodial Agreement with the BCTF; b. fulfil the regular duties of a Custodian as required by law; c. maintain in good order each security owned by the SIF; d. provide the treasurer with accurate and complete accounting of the SIF, including monthly reports of all assets of the SIF and transactions during the month; and e. process the security transactions that result from the buy and sell orders placed by the Investment Managers, provided that the transactions comply with all applicable legislation. Investment Managers 8.2 Except for as otherwise specified, the Executive, upon the recommendation of the Committee, will appoint one or more competent external professional investment managers (“Investment Managers”) to manage the assets of the SIF. For the purposes of this Policy, the treasurer, who may be investing a portion of the SIF, is also considered an Investment Manager. 8.3 The Executive, upon the recommendation of the Committee, shall develop an Investment Management Structure, consisting of Investment Managers to invest the assets of the SIF in accordance with the investment principles as set out in Section 5. The Investment Management Structure and Mandates shall be attached to the Policy as Appendix 1. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) 8.4 The selection of an Investment Manager will be made in a prudent manner, applying fair and reasonable identification, evaluation and selection standards for a potential Investment Manager. The selection shall take into account: a. the relevant experience and expertise b. suitability of investment style c. the structure of the organization d. turnover of personnel e. capacity and servicing capabilities f. investment performance record, including consistency of performance and risk g. fees 8.5 An Investment Manager, in performing their duties, shall: a. exercise the care, diligence and skill of a prudent investment counsellor and shall at all times act on a basis that is fair and reasonable; 79

b. adhere at all times to the Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct adopted CFA Institute and to the internal conduct guidelines established by the Investment Manager; c. manage its portfolio account in accordance with the terms of its Investment Management Agreement with the BCTF, its Investment Management Mandate and the specific guidelines set out herein. 8.6 The responsibilities set out for an Investment Manager in the Investment Management Mandate shall also apply to any subadvisors retained by the Investment Manager. 8.7 Unless directed by the treasurer, each Investment Manager shall be responsible for choosing brokers to execute transactions in the best interests of the SIF. 8.8 The Committee, shall monitor the performance of the Investment Managers, in accordance with Section 11, and shall recommend to the Executive any changes in Investment Managers as it deems in the best interest of the SIF. Investment Consultant 8.9 The Investment Consultant shall, at the request of the treasurer, consult with the Committee on issues relating to the SIF, the Managers and other investment-related issues. 8.10 The Investment Consultant shall prepare and deliver a report at the request of the treasurer at least four times a year. The report shall include a review of the performance of the SIF investments and on each Investment Manager’s performance. 9. Guidelines and Constraints Application of Guidelines and Constraints 9.1 Paragraph 5.8 states the investment principle that risk should be controlled and guidelines and constraints should be established by the Executive, on the recommendations of the Committee, to ensure that any Investment Manager retained does not take excessive risk. This Section describes the approved guidelines and constraints established to ensure that the Investment Managers in making investment decisions, do not take excessive risk. 9.2 All investments shall confirm with the BC Trustee Act, the BCTF Constitution and By-Laws, the Plan Regulations and any other applicable law and regulations, notwithstanding any other provision in this Policy. 9.3 An Investment Manager shall not, without the prior approval of the treasurer, invest in any assets which are not approved or readily marketable. 9.4 All securities shall be purchased through normal public market facilities, unless the purchase price approximates the prevailing market price and is negotiated on an arm's length basis. 9.5 Only the treasurer is authorized to waive or modify any of the restrictions in appropriate circumstances. Any such waiver or modification will be made only after a thorough review, and all requests for waivers and modifications will be maintained in the permanent records of the BCTF. Socially Responsible Investing 9.6 The Fund shall seek to avoid investments in governments or corporations whose policies on environmental, social and governance issues conflict with the goals of the BCTF. The investments of the Fund shall be subject to the following criteria wherever such will not result in the breach of trust, fiduciary duty or applicable statute: a. The corporations should have as their business, the provision of products or services only for non-military use. b. The corporations should earn most or all of their revenue from non-nuclear forms of energy. c. The corporations should not earn revenue from the production of pornography. d. The corporations should not earn revenue from the production or sale of tobacco products. e. The corporations should have a record of constantly striving to support and strengthen the communities in which they operate. f. The governments or corporations should encourage progressive industrial relations with all members of their staff or employees. g. The corporations should have a record of constantly striving to comply with governmental environmental regulations and of implementing environmentally conscious practices. 80

h. The governments or corporations should not practice gender, racial or religious discrimination or cultural genocide, or do business in any jurisdiction where such discrimination is legislated. The governments or corporations should not produce or source products through the use of child labour or sweatshops. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 5)

i. That the trustees of the Teachers’ Pension Board be encouraged to further enhance responsible investing through actions such as positive screening of future investments, shareholder engagement, support of appropriate shareholder initiatives, proxy voting, and participation in socially screened investment pools. (09 AGM, p. 17)

j. The corporations should not directly earn revenue from private education nor the privatization of public education. (17 AGM, p. 19) (June 17 Ex, p. 8)

9.7 Should the divestiture of any security be deemed necessary for failure to meet the criteria set out in paragraph 9.6, the schedule of the divestiture shall be established by the BCTF and the Investment Manager. Asset Mix 9.8 The treasurer shall review the SIF’s asset mix as soon as possible at the end of each calendar quarter following receipt of the custodian’s report. 9.9 In the event that the treasurer should find that as of the end of a calendar quarter the percentage allocated to an asset class is more than 4% higher or lower than the Benchmark Asset Mix, the treasurer shall allocate assets between Investment Managers to rebalance the asset mix to the Benchmark Asset Mix as soon as practicable by instructing the Custodian to transfer assets between Investment Managers. Liquid asset classes will not be re-balanced. Executive Committee approval shall not be required to make changes solely to return the asset mix within the tolerance ranges. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8)

9.10 Subject to paragraph 9.11, the allocation of cash payments into or out of the SIF will normally be made to and from the Investment Managers in the same percentages as the target amount of assets in Appendix 1 by standing instruction to the Custodian. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 5) (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8)

9.11 When making cash payments into or out of the SIF, the treasurer will examine the asset mix of the SIF and the amount of assets currently under management by each Investment Manager, and may provide instructions to the Custodian as to a different allocation from that described in paragraph 9.10 if, in the opinion of the treasurer, the different allocation will lead to an asset mix and an Investment Manager allocation that are closer to the Benchmark Asset Mix and the allocation percentages of Appendix 1; the Investment Management Structure and Mandates. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) Fixed Income and Cash 9.12 All investments in Canadian fixed income securities shall be in securities that are the subject of regular price quotations by recognized investment dealers in Canada and for which ratings are available for the borrower or the debt issuer. 9.13 All investments in the Real Return Bond portfolio will be invested in debt issues of Canada or of a province of Canada having at least an A credit rating. No more than 20% of the Real Return Bond portfolio shall be invested in debt issues of any one with an AA credit rating, as measured by the Dominion Bond Rating Service (“DBRS”) or equivalent service. No more than 10% of the Return Bond portfolio shall be invested in debt issues of any one issuer having an A rating. Alternative wording: All investments in the Real Return Bond portfolio will be invested in debt issues of Canada or of a province of Canada having at least an A credit rating or higher. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) 9.14 The investment restraints of the ESG Universe Bonds are as follows: Market Value Maximum Government Bonds Sovereign and Sovereign Guarantees 100% Provincials 80% Municipals 10% Overall Non-Government Bonds 75%

Mortgage-backed and Commercial Mortgage-backed Securities 25% Asset-backed Securites and Other Securitized Debt 25% Corporate Bonds (2) 65% BBB Rated Corporate Bonds 20% Foreign Pay Bonds 30% Foreign Pay Bonds―Unhedged 0% Cash and Cash Equivalents (3) 25% Notes: 1. The maximum exposure to any one non-government issuer is 5% of the market value of the portfolio excluding Schedule 1 banks. The maximum exposure to any Schedule 1 bank is 10% of the market value of the portfolio. 2. Debt securities of governments and corporations must carry a minimum BBB rating by either DBRS, S&P credit agencies, or other rating agencies where applicable, at time of purchase. In the event of one or more ratings differing from the others, the majority conservative rating will prevail. The average credit quality of the overall bond portfolio holdings will be at least “A” rated. 3. Cash and cash equivalents may range from 0% to 25% of the portfolio excluding any cash designated to collateralize derivatives exposure. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) 9.15 All Canadian cash equivalents and short-term commercial paper shall be rated minimum R-1 Low (good credit quality) by the DBRS, an equivalent rating from another agency, or, where not rated, an equivalent level as determined by the market. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) Equities 9.16 An Investment Manager with the mandate to invest in equities shall apply the limits and diversification rules described in their Investment Management Mandate. Mortgages and Real Estate 9.17 Investments in mortgages (other than mortgage-backed securities) and real estate may be made only through the purchase of units of pooled funds or mutual funds, invested primarily in those asset classes. The Committee shall satisfy itself that a pooled or mutual fund chosen for the SIF, containing mortgages or real estate, is broadly diversified. Loans and Borrowing 9.18 The Investment Managers shall not purchase securities on margin or engage in short sales, without specific, written permission of the treasurer. 9.19 No entity, including the Investment Managers, the Custodian or representative of the BCTF, may lend, pledge or otherwise encumber any of the SIF’s assets. 9.20 No money is to be borrowed by the Fund, except occasionally on a short-term basis, as provided in the Income Tax Act. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) Other Limitations 9.21 At least 2% of the SIF should be held in liquid securities so that the BCTF will always be able to make its payments without the distress sale of assets. 9.22 The Investment Managers may not create exposure in currencies, except as specifically allowed under their Investment Management Mandate. The Investment Managers may not engage in the purchase or sale of derivatives, options or futures, except as specifically allowed under their Investment Management Mandate. Under no circumstances will derivatives be used for culative purposes or to create leveraging of the overall portfolio. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) 10. Communication Requirements Communication by the Investment Managers 10.1 Each Investment Manager will prepare and deliver a report on the management of their portfolio as soon as practicable at the end of each calendar quarter. Such report shall contain the required information, as set out in the Investment Management Mandate of that Investment Manager. 10.2 At the request of the treasurer, each Investment Manager will meet with the Committee at least twice a year to review the results they have achieved, and to provide other information as set out in their Investment Management Mandate. 10.3 Each Investment Manager shall inform the treasurer promptly of any changes in the Investment Manager’s firm, including

any changes in ownership, senior investment personnel or investment management style or of any element of the Policy that could prevent attainment of the Plan’s objectives. Communication by the Treasurer and the Committee 10.4 At the meetings with the Committee, the Treasurer will report: a. on the performance of the SIF, as described in Section 11, b. on the results of any meetings the treasurer has had with the Investment Managers and the Investment Consultant since the previous meeting. c. on any issues that the treasurer believes may affect the ability of the SIF to achieve the investment objectives, as set out in Section 4. 10.5 The treasurer will provide such information as may be necessary for the annual review of the Policy that is required under paragraph 11.6 10.6 The treasurer will meet at least once annually with the Executive to report on the activities of the Committee on the investment management of the SIF. The treasurer will include in the treasurer’s report a review of the investment performance of the SIF and any recommendations by the Committee to amend the Policy. The treasurer will provide copies of the minutes of the Committee’s meetings to the executive. 11. Monitoring and Review Monitoring and Review of Investment Performance 11.1 The treasurer shall conduct a quarterly evaluation of the performance of the Investment Managers. Such an analysis will include both quantitative and qualitative measures, including an evaluation of the rates of return, an analysis of the areas where the Investment Managers have added or subtracted value, an evaluation of the degree of risk taken in the pursuit of stated objectives and an assessment of any changes in each Investment Manager’s firm. 11.2 The committee shall at its meetings review the reports prepared by the Investment Managers, by the treasurer or by the Investment Consultant on behalf of the Treasurer. They shall review: a. the investment returns of the SIF and the Investment Managers, including each component of the SIF and of the Investment Managers’ portfolios, over both the short-term and the long-term b. the value added or lost by the SIF and the Investment Managers relative to the target rates of return c. the sources of the value gained and lost, and their amounts, relative to the target rates of return d. the level of risk taken by the Investment Managers in making their decisions, and the appropriateness of those decisions e. the level of risk within the SIF overall f. the acceptability of the performance of the Investment Managers and of the SIF overall g. the economic conditions that may affect future performance of the SIF and the potential impact on the SIF h. any recommendations made by the treasurer for changes relating to the performance or management of the SIF. 11.3 At its regular meetings, the Committee will assess the performance of each Investment Manager. The assessment of an Investment Manager shall be made in the context of the criteria for the Investment Manager’s original selection and shall include: a. the rates of return earned by the Investment Manager, relative to the performance target as set out for them in their Investment Management Mandate; b. the Investment Manager’s adherence to this Policy and their Investment Management Mandate ; c. the Investment Manager’s adherence to the investment approach and decision-making process for which the Investment Manager was hired; d. any changes in the Investment Manager firm, including ownership, organizational structure and key investment personnel. 11.4 An Investment Manager’s continued suitability for the SIF may be examined at any time should the Committee lose confidence in the Investment Manager’s ability to succeed. Factors that might lead to a review include one or more of the following: a. performance substantially below the expected rate of return b. changes in the Investment Manager’s investment approach and decision-making processes 81

c. inappropriate levels of risk d. fundamental changes within the Investment Manager’s firm, including changes in ownership, personnel or a substantial growth or reduction in assets under management e. evidence of malfeasance by the Investment Manager f. failure to adhere to this Policy 11.5 Concerns about the performance of an Investment Manager shall be noted in the minutes of the Committee’s meeting, and shall include the conclusions of the Committee as to the next steps that will be taken in connection with the retention of such Investment Manager. The Committee shall make any recommendations to the Executive for any changes in Investment Managers that it deems in the best interests of the SIF and the members. Review of the Policy 11.6 The Committee shall review the Policy at least once each year. They shall: a. re-assess the SIF's investment objectives, the Benchmark Portfolio and the impact of any changes in the SIF's cash flow on the investment of the SIF b. examine the target rates of return for the Investment Managers and for the SIF overall, and determine if such targets remain appropriate given the prevalent economic conditions c. examine the cash flow levels, and determine the likelihood of any changes in those levels and their impact, given the prevalent economic conditions d. consider opportunities available in the market, through asset classes not currently being used by the SIF, to add value or to reduce risk e. examine the investment management structure, including the choice of active and index management, and the extent to which investment management styles have been diversified, to determine if the investment management structure remains appropriate f. consider the impact of any changes in legislation 12. Conflict of Interest 12.1 These guidelines apply to the Executive, the Committee, the BCTF administration including the treasurer, the Investment Managers, the Custodian, the Investment Consultant, any other external advisors retained by the BCTF and any employee or agent retained by these individuals or entities to provide services to the SIF. 12.2 A conflict of interest exists when a person has the opportunity to advance or protect one’s own interest or the private interests of others with whom one has a relationship, including a familial or other personal or business relationship, in a way detrimental to the interests, or potentially harmful to the integrity or fundamental mission of the BCTF. 12.3 No person listed in paragraph 12.1 may exercise their powers with regard to the investment of the SIF in their own personal or business interest or in the interest of their family or of a third person, nor may they place themselves in a situation of conflict of interest or potential conflict of interest. 12.4 An individual listed in paragraph 12.1 shall disclose in writing the nature and extent of an interest to the treasurer immediately upon first becoming aware of a conflict of interest or a potential conflict of interest. The treasurer shall report such disclosure to the Committee. 12.5 If the party disclosing the conflict of interest has the capacity to participate in or to make decisions affecting the investments of the SIF, the party may only continue to participate with the approval of the Executive. 12.6 The failure of a person to comply with the procedures described in this Section shall not of itself invalidate any decision, contract or other matter. Investment in an Investment Manager’s Firm 12.7 An Investment Manager shall not invest in its own securities from the assets of the SIF unless such securities are publicly traded and selected by the Investment Manager on behalf of all that Investment Manager’s discretionary accounts or pooled fund having mandates similar to that of the SIF. Each Investment Manager shall provide the treasurer with its internal guidelines on purchasing securities of its organizations or affiliates. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) 13. Delegation of Voting Rights 13.1 The BCTF has engaged the services of the Shareholder Association for Research & Education (SHARE) to exercise voting 82

rights for Canadian equities in accordance with the Proxy Voting Guidelines approved by the BCTF. 13.2 The global equity Investment Managers are delegated the responsibility of exercising voting rights acquired through the SIF investments. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8) 13.3 The global equity Investment Managers will exercise acquired voting rights with the intent of fulfilling the BCTF’s investment objectives and policies in the best interests of the SIF. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8)

13.4 The global equity Investment Managers will maintain a record of how they exercised voting rights on behalf of the SIF. 13.5 If there is a need for clarification on how to exercise voting rights, the global equity Investment Managers should obtain a directive from the Treasurer. 13.6 The Executive, through the Treasurer, reserves the right to provide specific direction on the exercising of any voting rights. 13.7 The global equity Investment Managers are charged with the responsibility of bringing any significant or special voting matters to the attention of the Treasurer within a reasonable period of time. (Dec 15 Ex, p. 2) (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8)

Investment Management Structure As of February 10, 2016 the Investment Management Structure is as follows: Investment Manager Great-West Life Investment Management USB Global Asset Management Connor Clark & Lunn BCTF – Treasurer ACM Advisors Great-West Life Investment Management

Mandate Canadian equities Global equities ESG Universe Bond Real return bonds Mortgages Real estate

Percentage of the SIF 12.5% 20% 22.5% 15.0% 17.5% 12.5% (Sept 14 Ex, p. 2) (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8)

Canadian Equity Manager Mandate Underlying Portfolio Manager: GLC Asset Management Underlying Strategy/Fund: Canadian Equity Performance objectives over moving 4-year periods: a. The time weighted return on the portion of the Funds net of any pooled or mutual fund direct expenses and transactions costs, and before the Manager’s investment management fees, will be compared against the S&P/TSX (Capped). b. Median or better relative comparison against a Canadian equity peer group. Portfolio limitations, characteristics and diversification limits. In addition to the Policy guidelines, the manager must adhere to the following: Diversification a. The Manager shall diversify the portfolio appropriately among sectors. ESG/SRI a. The Manager must adhere to an ESG/SRI investment strategy. Global Equity Manager Mandate Underlying Portfolio Manager: UBS Asset Management Underlying Strategy/Fund: UBS Global Sustainable Equity Performance objectives over moving 4-year periods: a. The time weighted return on the portion of the Funds net of any pooled or mutual fund direct expenses and transactions costs, and before the Manager’s investment management fees, will be compared against the MSCI World (net) ($Cdn) index measured in Canadian dollars. b. Median or better relative comparison against a global equity peer group. Portfolio limitations, characteristics and diversification limits. In addition to the Policy guidelines, the Manager must adhere to the following: Diversification a. The Manager shall diversify the portfolio appropriately among countries and sectors. ESG/SRI b. The Manager must adhere to an ESG/SRI investment strategy. ESG Bond Universe Manager Mandate

Underlying Portfolio Manager: Connor, Clark & Lunn Investment Management Ltd. Underlying Strategy/Fund: Environmental Social Governance Universe Bond Performance objectives over moving 4-year periods: a. The time weighted return on the portion of the Funds net of any pooled or mutual fund direct expenses and transactions costs, and before the Manager’s investment management fees, will be compared against the FTSE TMX Canada Universe Bond Index. b. Median or better relative comparison against a Canadian Universe Bond peer group. Portfolio limitations, characteristics and diversification limits. In addition to the Policy guidelines, the Manager must adhere to the following: a. Diversification The Manager shall diversify the portfolio appropriately among sectors. b. ESG/SRI The Manager must adhere to an ESG/SRI investment strategy. c. Derivatives Derivative instruments will only be used in ways that are consistent with the Fund’s investment objectives. The underlying exposures facilitated through the use of derivatives will be incorporated into the Fund’s constraints detailed above. Counterparty risk arising from derivative transactions will be limited to credits rated "A" or better. Instruments used may include but are not limited to futures, forwards, options, swaps and structured notes. Derivatives cannot be used to facilitate or effect the borrowing of money. Real Return Bond Manager Mandate Underlying Portfolio Manager: BCTF Treasurer Underlying Strategy/Fund: Real Return Bond Performance objective over moving 4-year periods: a. The time weighted return on the portion of the Funds net of any pooled or mutual fund direct expenses and transactions costs, and before the Manager’s investment management fees, will be compared against the FTSE TMX Canada Real Return Bond Index. Portfolio limitations, characteristics and diversification limits. In addition to the Policy guidelines, the Manager must adhere to the following: Diversification a. The Manager shall diversify the portfolio appropriately among Government of Canada and Provincial Governments. Mortgage Manager Mandate Underlying Portfolio Manager: ACM Advisors Ltd. Underlying Strategy/Fund: Commercial Mortgage Fund (CMF) Performance objectives over moving 4-year periods: a. The time weighted return on the portion of the Funds net of any pooled or mutual fund direct expenses and transactions costs, and before the Manager’s investment management fees, will be compared against the FTSE TMX Canada Short Term Bond Index plus 2.0% per annum. b. Median or better relative comparison against a domestic mortgage peer group. Portfolio limitations, characteristics and diversification limits. a. Commercial Mortgage Fund is to invest in a portfolio of diversified mortgages across Canada secured by properties in industrial, commercial/office, retail, multi-residential, and development. b. Maximum loan-to-value allowed on any mortgage will be 80% at the date of investment. Real Estate Manager Mandate Underlying Portfolio Manager: GLC Asset Management Underlying Strategy/Fund: GWL Real Estate Fund #1 Performance objectives over moving 4-year periods: a. The time weighted return on the portion of the Funds net of any pooled or mutual fund direct expenses and transactions costs, and before the Manager’s investment management fees, will be compared against the IPD Canada Property Fund Index. b. Median or better relative comparison against a domestic real estate peer group. Portfolio limitations, characteristics and diversification limits. a. The fund is to invest in a diversified portfolio of commercial real estate investments in various industrial, retail and office buildings diversified in multiple provinces.

b.

Some leverage is allowed: a. Maximum leverage on a single property is 75%. b. Maximum leverage on total assets is 35%. c. Up to 15% of assets can be invested in cash and money market investments. d. Up to 10% of assets can be invested in non-real estate assets. (Feb 17 Ex, p. 8)

B.

Sick Leave

POLICIES 13.B.01—Teachers are entitled to protection against loss of salary during the school year as a result of absence due to illness, accident or quarantine. (78 AGM, pp. 20-21) (89 AGM, p. 53)

13.B.03—That teachers should not normally be required to furnish medical certificates to verify absences. (Feb. 79 Ex, p. 12)

C.

Salary Indemnity Plan

PROCEDURES 13.C.02—Pursuant to the BCTF Constitution and By-Laws, the Federation shall administer a Salary Indemnity Plan (hereinafter called the “plan”) for the benefit of its members. The plan shall provide short-term and long-term benefits, in accordance with the following regulations, to members disabled from employment as a result of illness or accident. Note: The Salary Indemnity Plan is not insured by an insurance company regulated under the Financial Institutions Act. The BCTF is exempt from the regulatory requirements of the Financial Institutions Act. These regulations, adopted by the 1984 Annual General Meeting and amended by subsequent Annual General Meetings, are effective September 1, 2017. These regulations apply to members whose first date of eligibility to receive benefits occurs on or after September 1, 2017. Members whose first date of eligibility to receive benefits is prior to September 1, 2017 will continue to receive benefits based on the plan in effect at that time. Regulations General Provisions 1. Eligibility and participation 1.1 (a) All active members of the Federation employed by a school board or a local association on a regular full-time or regular part-time assignment shall participate in the plan. (b) All employees of the Federation except those specifically exempted from participation in the plan by the Federation; and (c) All affiliate administrative members not participating in a wage loss replacement plan may participate in the plan, providing they do so within 30 days of appointment as an administrative officer. (16 AGM, p. 20)

1.2 For the purposes of these regulations, the word “member” includes the following: (a) an individual who became disabled from employment while a contributor to the plan; and (b) except for the purposes of the Salary Indemnity Plan—shortterm portion of the plan, employees of the Federation participating in the plan pursuant to Regulation 1.1(b). 1.3 A member who has attained age 64, has reached the Factor “88” or, who is in receipt of a retirement pension under a registered pension plan may voluntarily withdraw from the long term section of the plan. Withdrawal may be made during any school year in which one of the foregoing conditions has been met and upon the completion of the appropriate withdrawal form. Withdrawal will be effective, upon approval, in September for applications submitted in that month, and applications submitted later will be effective the month following approval of the application. 1.4 A member who has previously applied for and been granted a pension through the Pension Corporation (BC), and has subsequently returned to employment as defined in 1.1 is ineligible for long-term disability benefits. 1.5 A member who is an inmate of a prison or similar institution shall not be eligible for benefits from the plan during such period of incarceration. A member whose teaching certificate is suspended or 83

cancelled due to a criminal conviction shall not be eligible for benefits from the plan. Where such conviction is unrelated to the member's teaching career and/or is medically based, the Income Security Committee shall review the case and, at its sole discretion, may determine that benefits should continue to be paid. 1.6 The plan at its discretion shall have the right, on behalf of claimants, to purchase leaves of absences or to reinstate previously withdrawn service through the Pension Corporation (BC), where in the opinion of the Income Security Committee such a purchase will be cost effective in conjunction with the application of regulation 21.1. 1.7 Non-compliance with a licensed physician’s, recommendations related to the disabling condition may result in suspension of benefits until the claimant follows the physician's advice. Such suspension will be reviewed by the Income Security Committee. (12 AGM p. 17) (16 AGM, p. 20)

1.8 Failure to acknowledge in writing, within three months at the request of the plan administrator, a willingness to participate or co-operate in a rehabilitation program that has been recommended by the member’s licensed physician and approved by the Salary Indemnity Plan will result in the termination of benefits, forthwith. (13 AGM, p. 18) (16 AGM, p. 20)

1.9 If a repayment is owed to the plan, the member shall make such repayment forthwith or in a repayment schedule approved by the plan administrator. Any amount owing and not repaid may be deducted from current or future benefits despite any passage of time. 2. Effective date of coverage 2.1 A member shall be eligible for benefits under this plan as follows: (a) for Salary Indemnity Plan: Short-term, benefits from the date they are first actively at work. (b) for Salary Indemnity Plan: Long-term, benefits from the twentieth or later day of employment exclusive of sick leave. Employees of the Federation participating in the plan pursuant to Regulation 1.1(b) are not eligible for benefits under the Salary Indemnity Plan—short-term portion of the plan. 3. Proof of Claim 3.1 (a) Proof of claim, satisfactory to the plan administrator, must be made to the plan within 12 months of the expiration of the qualifying period. The Income Security Committee, in its sole discretion, may extend this period. (17 AGM, p. 18) (b) Any action against the British Columbia Teachers' Federation with respect to the denial or termination of disability benefits under the plan must be commenced not later than one year after the claimant has been advised of the decision to deny or terminate benefits. (c) Any action against the British Columbia Teachers' Federation with respect to the plan, other than those actions referred to in regulation 3.1.(b), must be commenced not later than one year from the furnishing of a reasonably sufficient proof of a loss or claim under the plan. 3.2 All claims for benefits shall be accompanied by such forms as are required by the plan administrator, specifically: (a) claimant application form signed by the member; and (b) a medical form signed by a licensed physician, nurse practitioner, or registered midwife, or in special circumstances, a notarized statement signed by the member; and (c) the school board verification of sick leave form signed by an official of the employing school board or local association or the Federation. (16 AGM, p. 22) 3.3 The plan administrator is empowered to secure from the employing school board or local president or the Federation, information in regard to accumulated sick leave, number of days' absence or other information which the plan administrator may require in connection with the payment of benefits. 3.4 A member applying for benefits under the plan may be required to submit to an independent medical examination by a licensed physician selected by the plan administrator. (12 AGM p. 18) (16 AGM, p. 20)

3.5 The plan administrator shall select only licensed physicians who have agreed to provide information regarding a member's illness to

84

that member's personal physician at the time it is provided to the plan administrator. (16 AGM, p. 21) 3.6 A member in receipt of benefits will be required to provide, at periodic intervals, medical evidence of continuing disability. 3.7 A member in receipt of benefits for more than three months will be required to provide supporting medical evidence indicating that they are receiving ongoing care and treatment by a licensed specialist physician for that disability, or a registered psychologist as directed by a licensed physician except where the plan administrator is aware that the disability is terminal. (16 AGM, p. 21) 3.8 Expenses incurred by a member in obtaining medical certificates or other requested information under this regulation shall be borne by the member, except that the costs of an independent medical examination required under regulation 3.4 shall be borne by the plan. (12 AGM p. 18)

3.9 Receipt of benefits for an illness which is caused by drug or alcohol abuse shall be contingent upon the claimant's enrolment and ongoing participation in a substance withdrawal program recognized by an addiction medicine specialist. (12 AGM p. 18) 3.10 Where a claim is the result of a work-related injury or illness, the member must file a Workers’ Compensation Board claim prior to payment of benefits pursuant to the plan. (17 AGM, p. 18) 4. Leave of Absence 4.1 A member on a leave of absence who becomes disabled while on leave and qualifies for benefits under the plan shall be eligible for benefits as follows: (a) if the member is on leave with pay, benefits shall commence on the date they would normally have commenced if the member had not been on leave; (b) if the member is on leave without pay, for a period not exceeding 36 months, the qualifying period shall commence on the date the leave is scheduled to expire. 4.2 For the purposes of these regulations, the phrase “sick leave” shall mean paid leave of absence provided by the employer for reasons of illness or accident. 5. Death of a claimant 5.1 In the event of the death of a claimant, the full benefit for the month in which the death occurs shall be paid to the claimant's beneficiary or estate. 6. Administration 6.1 The Federation shall appoint a Income Security Committee to operate the plan in accordance with the terms of these regulations and to submit reports to the Federation respecting member contributions, benefits, and the financial and claims experience of the plan. 6.2 The plan shall be administered by a plan administrator and their assistants who shall be employed by the Federation. 6.3 The Income Security Committee shall review and rule upon any issue of interpretation or application of the regulations in any claim where a member questions the decision of the plan administrator. 6.4 In the event a claimant disputes the decision of the Plan Administrator regarding eligibility for benefits, the claimant shall have six months from the date of notification of the decision being disputed to appeal that decision to the Income Security Committee. The decision of the committee shall be final and binding. 7. Financing of the Plan 7.1 The plan shall be financed from the Salary Indemnity Fund (hereinafter called the "fund"). The revenue of the fund shall include: (a) the allocation of a portion of the membership fee of each eligible member; (b) the premiums paid by the employees of the Federation participating in the plan pursuant to Regulation 1.1(b). (c) the allocation of the full amount of the savings of the unemployment insurance premium reduction accruing to each eligible member from the acceptance of the short-term section of the plan as a EI Wage Loss Replacement Plan; (d) the investment income from all monies allocated to the fund. 7.2 The fee allocation shall be fixed annually by resolution of the Annual General Meeting. 7.3 The fee allocation or premium is waived for each member in receipt of benefits from the plan. 7.4 A member who has been granted permission to withdraw from the long-term section of the plan, pursuant to regulation 1.3, will be assessed a fee for participation in the short-term section of the plan only.

7.5 Reserves, determined by annual actuarial study, shall be established in order to support the objective that the plan operate on a fully funded basis. 7.6 The assets of the fund shall be segregated from Federation assets and shall be used solely for the provision of benefits and for the expenses incurred in the administration of the fund and the plan. 7.7 Insufficient actuarial reserves may result in benefits being suspended and/or reduced by decision of the Executive Committee, until the Unfunded Liability is fully amortized. 7.8 Reserves and operational monies of the fund shall be invested as provided for under by-law 5 of the BCTF Constitution and By-Laws. 7.9 All monies payable under this plan to or by members shall be payable in Canadian currency. 8. Amendments 8.1 The plan shall be amended only by special resolution of an Annual General Meeting of the Federation. Salary Indemnity Plan―Short-term 9. Definition of Disability 9.1 To qualify for benefits under this section of the plan a member must be prevented, by illness or injury, from performing their normal employment duties. 10. Qualifying Period 10.1 Subject to the other provisions of the plan, a member who becomes disabled through illness or injury shall be eligible for benefits on the first working day following the termination of sick leave. Such a member shall be referred to as a claimant hereinafter. 10.2 A member who voluntarily terminates employment while having sick leave days to their credit shall not be entitled to benefits. 11. Benefits 11.1 Benefits shall consist of: (a) an amount paid on a daily or monthly basis to each eligible claimant during the benefit period; plus (b) an amount equal to the contribution to the Teachers' Pension Plan or other BC public sector pension plan required of the claimant by the applicable Public Sector Pension Plan Act, which amount shall be paid directly to the Teachers' or public sector pension plan by the plan on behalf of the claimant. 11.2 Benefits shall be based on the gross annual salary of the claimant applicable on the last day of work or of sick leave. No adjustment of benefit attributable to increased salary shall be paid except when a claim is closed in one school year and subsequently reopened in the following school year. Then a salary increase, due to a salary grid increase prior to the reapplication, will be recognized. No adjustment of benefits attributable to increases in percentage of contract will be paid until the claimant has returned to work at the new percentage of contract for 20 consecutive working days. (05 AGM, p. 28) 11.3 The gross annual salary of the claimant applicable on the last day of work or sick leave shall not be adjusted due to salary increases negotiated retroactively. 11.4 The benefit shall be 50% of salary plus the employee contribution to the Teachers' Pension Plan, with the basic benefit never less than Employment Insurance benefits. Notwithstanding 7.7, the basic benefit shall never be less than the benefit which would have been provided by the Employment Insurance Corporation. 11.5 A benefit month is composed of 20 benefit days. 11.6 A claimant who is eligible for benefits for part of a month shall be entitled to 20 days of benefits less the number of days for which salary was received for the month, with that number of days determined by the ratio of the monthly salary received to the claimant's regular monthly salary. 11.7 If while in receipt of benefits from this plan the claimant is entitled to claim benefits from Workers' Compensation for the same accident or illness, or Employment Insurance (maternity/parental), the benefits from this plan shall be reduced by the amount of benefits from the Workers' Compensation or Employment Insurance (maternity/parental) plan. (16 AGM, p. 21) 11.8 The benefit shall be offset by the amount of a retirement pension received under any registered pension plan if the retirement income from same would be considered earnings under section 35 of the Employment Insurance Regulation, or for a retirement pension from the Teachers’ Pension Plan (BC). (16 AGM, p. 21) 12. Successive Claims

12.1 When a claimant resumes employment, following a period of short-term benefits in respect of one accident or illness, other than for approved accommodation employment purposes, and again suffers a disability that is related to the preceding accident or illness, that claimant shall: (a) if the resumption is for a period of less than 90 consecutive calendar days, be entitled to benefits of not more than the balance of the 120 day maximum benefit period, or (b) if the resumption is for a period of 90 but less than 180 consecutive calendar days, be entitled to whatever number of benefit days remain of the original maximum of 120 benefit days and, in any event, not less than 75 benefit days, or (c) if the resumption is for 180 consecutive calendar days or more, be considered to have a new disability. 12.2 If a claimant returns to work at a reduced salary, and within 180 consecutive calendar days again suffers a disability that is related to the preceding disability, and subsequently establishes a claim for benefits from the plan, the benefit shall be based on the salary used to determine the initial benefit. 12.3 Periods of absence from employment for an accident or illness unrelated to the original claim and the months of July and August shall not constitute a break in the resumption of employment. 12.4 No additional period of return to work other than that required by the regulations on eligibility is required for qualification for receipt of benefits in respect of a different accident or illness. 13. Duration of Benefits 13.1 Except as noted in 12.1(b), 14.3, or 15.4, and provided all other requirements are met, the maximum number of work days for which benefits shall be paid in respect of any one claim shall be 120. 13.2 No benefits shall be paid in respect of July and August. However, in the event that a provincial resource teacher, a teacher in a year-round school, or an adult educator, with a contract for services during July and August makes a claim, the plan administrator, with the Income Security Committee, has the authority to grant benefits during July and August. 13.3 When a claimant in receipt of benefits subsequently becomes eligible for sick leave from the employing school board, payments of benefits shall be suspended. On the day following the termination of resumed sick leave, the claimant shall, provided all other requirements are met, be eligible to resume receipt of benefits. 14. Accommodation (Teaching) Employment 14.1 For a claimant to remain eligible to receive benefits, any return to normal employment duties on a part-time basis, undertaken as accommodation employment, must be recommended by a physician and approved by the plan administrator. The plan administrator’s decision is subject to review by the Income Security Committee. 14.2 The claimant must have worked 20 or more days, exclusive of sick leave, to qualify for accommodation (teaching) employment benefits, and the benefits shall be based on the gross annual salary of the claimant’s last day of work. 14.3 The claimant shall continue to receive benefits from the plan as calculated in regulation 11.6. 15. Accommodation (Non-Teaching) Employment 15.1 For a claimant to remain eligible to receive benefits, any remunerative employment other than the claimant’s normal employment duties must be recommended by a physician and approved by the plan administrator. The plan administrator’s decision is subject to review by the Income Security Committee. 15.2 The claimant shall continue to receive benefits from the plan but the benefit will be reduced by an amount equal to 50 per cent of the amount earned in employment. 15.3 Days or partial days spent in accommodation (nonteaching) employment shall be assessed as part of the claimant’s benefit period. Where questions arise, the length of the entitlement period shall be determined by resolution of the Income Security Committee. 15.4 The claimant is responsible for reporting involvement in approved accommodation employment in the manner established by the plan administrator. 15.5 The benefit of a claimant engaged in remunerative employment for other than approved accommodation purposes shall be reduced by the full amount earned from that employment. 16. Adjudication of Claims 85

16.1 Claims shall be adjudicated by the plan administrator and assistants. Salary Indemnity Plan―Long Term 17. Definition of Disability 17.1 To qualify for benefits under this section of the plan a claimant must: (a) continually for a period of up to 12 months commencing at the expiration of the qualifying period, be suffering from a disability that prevents the claimant from performing their normal employment duties (b) subsequently, be suffering from a disability that prevents the claimant from performing the duties of any gainful employment. 17.2 Gainful employment means work which the claimant is medically able to perform (a) for which the claimant has the requisite qualifications by reason of education, training, or experience (b) which will provide a gross income of at least 60% of the predisability full-time equivalent gross employment income within five years of starting the new employment, this income to be adjusted annually to reflect the cost of living allowance the claimant would have received since the date of disability. (13 AGM, p.18) 17.3 During a period of total disability, the claimant must be under the ongoing care and attendance of the appropriate specialist for that disability. 17.4 For the purposes of this section of the plan, "disability" means either a physical or mental illness or injury. 18. Qualifying Period 18.1 Subject to the other provisions of the plan, a claimant who is not an employee of the Federation, and who becomes disabled through injury or illness shall be eligible for benefits immediately following the termination of sick leave and Salary Indemnity Plan short-term benefits, when no fewer than 120 days of benefits have been paid for that claim. 18.2 Subject to the other provisions of the plan, a claimant who is an employee of the Federation participating in the plan pursuant to Regulation 1.1(b) and who becomes disabled through injury or illness shall be eligible for benefits immediately following the termination of sick leave benefits or as set out in a collective agreement with the Federation. 19. Benefits 19.1 Subject to Regulation 7.7, the benefit shall be 65% of the first $40,000 of gross annual salary, 50% of the next $40,000 of gross annual salary, and 40% of the balance. (13 AGM, p. 18) (14 AGM, p. 17)

19.2 Gross annual salary shall be the annual salary of the claimant applicable on the last day of work or sick leave. No adjustment of benefit attributable to increased salary shall be paid until the claimant has returned to work or sick leave for 20 consecutive working days. 19.3 The gross annual salary applicable on the last day of work or sick leave shall be adjusted due to salary increases negotiated retroactively. 19.4 The benefit payable in a month shall be reduced by the sum of: a. the initial (basic) amount of monthly disability or retirement pension paid to the claimant in the month from the Canada Pension Plan, excluding all allowances for dependent children and any cost of living adjustments. b. the sum of monthly wage loss and disability benefits paid to the claimant in the month from Workers’ Compensation, which are related to the current disability claim. c. the amount of monthly disability benefits paid to the claimant in the month from any plan or program or under any law of any government, within or without Canada, excluding any cost of living adjustments to that benefit or any benefit a claimant was receiving prior to the date the claimant was first absent from work as a result of total disability. d. the amount of monthly retirement pension received from any registered pension plan. e. the amount of the Accommodation Employment Offset (Offset). The Offset is intended to ensure that total income from accommodation employment and the Salary Indemnity Plan does not exceed the employment income before the disability occurred. “Net Employment Income” in a month, whether before or after the disability has occurred, is equal to the gross employment income in 86

that month, minus the deductions under the Income Tax Act, the Canada Pension Plan Act, the Employment Insurance Act and the Teachers’ Pension Plan Act. If the total of Net Employment Income from accommodation employment (as described in Regulation 23) and the gross benefit from the Salary Indemnity Plan is greater than the Net Employment Income before the disability occurred, the benefit from the Salary Indemnity Plan shall be reduced. After the reduction, the Net Employment Income from the accommodation employment plus the net benefit from the Salary Indemnity Plan will be equal to the Net Employment Income before the disability occurred. This reduction is referred to as the Offset. 19.5 The net benefit shall be paid in monthly instalments, including July and August. 19.6 The net benefit may be increased annually, effective July 1, at the discretion of the Federation, to a maximum increase of five per cent, except that: a. a claimant who as of July 1 has been in receipt of benefits for less than 12 months shall have the indexation increase prorated on the basis of the number of complete months of benefits paid prior to July 1. b. a claimant who as of July 1 has been in receipt of benefits for less than 12 months due to successive claims, and whose benefit has not changed, shall have the indexation increase prorated on the basis of the number of complete months of benefits paid prior to July 1. c. a claimant who as of July 1 has been in receipt of benefits for less than 12 months due to successive claims, and whose benefit was increased due to increased salary, shall have the indexation increase prorated on the basis of the number of complete months of benefits paid from the most recent recommencement of benefits to July 1. 19.7 Supplementary indexing payments may be approved by the Federation following the annual review of the financial experience of the plan. Note: The period of time during which a claimant is in receipt of SIP: Long-term benefits is credited as pensionable service in the Teachers' Pension Plan, without contribution. 19.8 A member in receipt of benefits for more than twelve months may be required to provide proof of acceptance or denial of Canada Pension Plan benefits. A member who has been requested by the Plan Administrator to re-apply for, or to appeal a declination of Canada Pension Plan benefits, shall provide proof of acceptance or denial of such re-application or appeal. If the member fails to provide proof of the required application, re-application or appeal, as the case may be, the benefit shall be reduced by an amount equivalent to Canada Pension Plan disability benefits. (04 AGM, p. 20) (17 AGM, p. 19)

20. Successive Disabilities 20.1 When a claimant resumes employment, following a period of long-term benefit payments, for other than rehabilitative purposes, and within 180 consecutive calendar days again suffers a total disability that is related to the preceding disability, the disability shall be deemed a continuation of the preceding one, and that claimant shall; a. if the resumption is for a period of less than 90 consecutive calendar days, be entitled to whatever benefits the claimant remains eligible to receive, or b. if the resumption is for a period of 90 but less than 180 consecutive calendar days, be entitled to whatever benefit days the claimant remains eligible to receive and, in any event, not less than 75 benefit days. 20.2 When a claimant resumes employment, following a period of long-term benefit payments, for other than rehabilitative purposes, for 180 consecutive calendar days or more, any disability incurred by that claimant, whether related to the preceding disability or not, shall be considered a new disability. 20.3 When a claimant returns to their normal employment duties at a reduced salary, following a period of long-term benefit payment, and within 180 consecutive calendar days suffers from a disability that is related to the preceding disability and re-establishes a claim for benefits from the plan, the benefits shall be based on the salary used to determine the initial benefit. 20.4 When a claimant who has received benefits under the plan returns to work for any period and suffers a disability that is unrelated to the previous disability, the subsequent disability shall be considered a new disability and the claimant shall be entitled to benefits pursuant to the provisions of the plan.

21. Duration of Benefits 21.1 Benefits shall continue as long as a claimant remains disabled in accordance with the terms of the definition of disability, and shall cease on the earliest of: a. the date the claimant recovers except in cases of approved accommodation employment or retraining where the benefits may be extended to the end of the school term in which an approved accommodation return to normal employment duties is completed, or three months following completion of an approved retraining program, or b. the end of the month in which the claimant's age and contributory service equals “90” with the Pension Corporation (BC), or c. the end of the month in which the claimant attains age 65, or d. the end of the month in which death occurs. Effective January 1, 2018, 21.1 to be replaced in its entirety with: 21.1 Benefits shall continue as long as a claimant remains disabled in accordance with the terms of the definition of disability, and shall cease on the earliest of: a. the date the claimant recovers except in cases of approved accommodation employment or retraining where the benefits may be extended to the end of the school term in which an approved accommodation return to normal employment duties is completed, or three months following completion of an approved retraining program, or b. the earlier of i. the attainment of 35 years of Contributory Service (minimum 55) ii. the later of: (1) the end of the month in which the claimant’s age and Contributory Service equals “90” with the Pension Corporation (BC), and (2) the end of the month in which the claimant attains age 61, or iii. the end of the month in which the claimant attains age 65, or c. the end of the month in which death occurs. (17 AGM, p. 18)

22. Benefit Exclusions 22.1 No benefits shall be payable for, or on account of; a. intentionally self-inflicted injuries or illnesses, or b. illness or injury incurred while in the service of the armed forces of any country. 22.2 Benefits may be suspended due to refusal to participate in a medical or vocational assessment requested or approved by the independent external agency or plan administrator. (17 AGM, p. 18) 23. Accommodation Employment 23.1 For a claimant to remain eligible to receive benefits, any remunerative employment must be recommended by a physician and approved by the plan administrator. The plan administrator’s decision is subject to review by the Income Security Committee. 23.2 Any of the following may be eligible for consideration as accommodation employment: a. a return to normal employment duties on a part-time basis; b. any gainful occupation that is of a less demanding nature than the normal employment duties; c. a formal vocational training program. 23.3 The claimant is responsible for reporting involvement in approved accommodation employment in a manner established by the plan administrator. 23.4 Any request by the claimant for an extension of benefits beyond that outlined in regulation 21.1 must be presented to the Income Security Committee for decision. The Income Security Committee’s decision shall be final and binding. 24. Adjudication of Claims 24.1 The medical adjudication of claims shall be conducted by an independent external agency selected by the Federation. 24.2 In the event a claimant disputes the decision of the external agency and/or the plan administrator regarding the medical acceptability of a claim, the dispute shall be finally and conclusively determined by a medical review committee. The medical review committee shall be composed of three physicians; one designated by the claimant, one by the Income Security Committee, and a third agreed to by the first two. The third physician shall act as a chairperson of the committee.

24.3 Any referral of a dispute to a medical review committee must be commenced not later than one year after the claimant has been advised of the decision which is the subject of the dispute. To commence the referral to a medical review committee, a claimant must: a. advise the plan administrator in writing that they are referring the matter to a medical review committee; and b. provide the plan administrator with a written statement signed by a physician that they agree to act as the claimant’s designated physician for the medical review committee. The Salary Indemnity Plan shall apply for a doctor to represent the plan within 15 days of the above notification, and advise the claimant of its designated physician as soon as reasonably possible thereafter. If the designated physicians cannot agree upon a chairperson within 30 calendar days after the date the plan advises the claimant of the name of its nominee, the appointment shall be made by the Dean of Medicine at the University of British Columbia, or their delegate. 24.4 The medical review committee shall a. conduct such examinations and review such materials as it deems necessary; b. ensure that the claimant is aware of all information considered by it, and has a fair opportunity to respond to it; c. consider the real substance of the dispute between the parties within the terms of the plan, and issue a decision which resolves the dispute. The decision of the medical review committee shall be final and binding upon the claimants, the plan and the external agency. 24.5 Costs incurred by the medical review committee in adjudicating any claim shall be borne equally by the claimant and the plan if the appeal is denied. If the appeal is granted, the costs incurred shall be borne entirely by the plan. 24.6 The provisions of the Commercial Arbitration Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c55, as amended from time to time, shall govern the medical review committee proceedings, and the provisions of this Article 24 shall be deemed to be a submission to arbitration within the provisions of the Commercial Arbitration Act. 25. Subrogation The Plan and the British Columbia Teachers' Federation shall have full rights of subrogation with respect to the full amount of any long-term benefits paid or payable to a claimant where the disability of the claimant is caused or contributed to by the action of any third party. The terms of subrogation in relation to the claimant are set out in Schedule A of the Plan, and form part of the plan. A claimant may be required, as a condition precedent to receipt of long-term benefits, to execute an agreement substantially in the terms of Schedule A. Schedule A (Proportional Recovery of Benefits) BC Teachers' Federation Salary Indemnity Plan—Long-term Subrogation Agreement In consideration of the payment to me of long-term disability benefits by the British Columbia Teachers' Federation Salary Indemnity Plan (“the Plan”) I, agree as follows: (name) 1. I agree that the British Columbia Teachers' Federation is fully subrogated, to the extent of the gross benefits I am entitled to under the Salary Indemnity Plan―Long-term disability benefits, in respect of any claim that I may have against any person who may be found to have legal responsibility to me in respect of my disability (the tort-feasor). I specifically agree that the British Columbia Teachers' Federation: a. is entitled to recover the proportion of such benefits set out in paragraph 7 below in the event I am entitled to compensation for loss of income (whether or not included in an “all inclusive” settlement or judgment) as a result of a claim, cause of action, settlement or judgment in respect of the tort-feasor; and b. s authorized by me to commence action in my name against the tort-feasor in the event I do not do so. 2. I agree to fully cooperate with the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, its employees and agents, to provide full details of my injury or disability including the names of any tort-feasors and witnesses, and to provide copies of all documentation which the British Columbia Teachers' Federation may request in relation to its subrogated claim. 3. I agree that I will not conclude any settlement with the tortfeasor or the tort-feasors' insurer without consent of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. 87

4. I agree that if I commence legal action against any tort-feasor for damages which I have sustained and for which I have received or may receive any benefits from the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, I will advise the British Columbia Teachers' Federation immediately, will not conclude any settlement without the British Columbia Teachers' Federation consent, and will instruct my solicitor accordingly. 5. I agree to repay to the British Columbia Teachers' Federation the proportion of benefits set out in Paragraph 7 in the event that I recover compensation for loss of income as a result of a settlement, judgment or award, and will instruct my solicitor to pay the appropriate sums directly to the British Columbia Teachers' Federation before any monies from the settlement or judgment are disbursed to me. 6. I agree to release the British Columbia Teachers' Federation from obligation under the Salary Indemnity Plan Long-term Disability Plan, to the extent that my recovery as a result of a settlement, judgment or award in respect of the tort-feasor includes compensation for future loss of wages and/or loss of ability to earn income. 7. The proportion of benefits repayable under paragraph 5 of this agreement is calculated according to the formula A–L ———- = B

C — D

where: A is the total amount of recovery from the tort-feasor pursuant to the settlement, judgment or award which may be reasonably allocated to loss of wage; L is the net legal cost attributable to recovery of A, which is the percentage of the overall net legal cost of the action against the tortfeasor which A constitutes in relation to the total amount recovered against the tort-feasor; “net” means net of taxable costs and disbursements and any other costs and disbursements recovered by me other than taxable costs and disbursements; B is the total claim for recovery of lost wages against the tortfeasor; or the total amount which could reasonably be claimed for recovery of lost wages given the evidence and circumstances at the time the settlement, judgment or award is made, whichever is less; C is the amount of benefits to be repaid under Paragraph 1 and 5, and shall not exceed the net benefits paid to date; and D is the gross amount payable to date without deduction for Canada Pension Plan disability benefits, Workers Compensation benefits or Employment Insurance maternity benefits. 8. The portion of benefits released under paragraph 6 of this agreement is calculated according to the formula A–L C ———- = — B D where: A is the total amount of recovery from the tort-feasor pursuant to the settlement, judgment or award which may be reasonably allocated to future loss of wages and or loss of ability to earn income; L is the net legal cost attributable to recovery of A, which is the percentage of the overall net legal cost of the action against the tortfeasor which A constitutes in relation to the total amount recovered against the tort-feasor; "net" means net of taxable costs and disbursements and any other costs and disbursements recovered by me other than taxable costs and disbursements; B is the total claim for recovery of lost wages against the tortfeasor, or the total amount which could reasonably be claimed for recovery of lost wages given the evidence and circumstances at the time the settlement, judgment or award is made, whichever is less; C is the amount of benefits to be released under Paragraph 1 and 6, and shall not exceed the net benefits payable; and D is the total amount of gross benefits payable without deduction for Canada Pension Plan disability benefits, Workers Compensation benefit or Employment Insurance maternity benefits. 9. All matters and differences in relation to this agreement shall be referred to the arbitration of a single arbitrator to be chosen by the parties. The award and determination of such arbitrator shall be final and binding upon the parties hereto. The provision of the Commercial Arbitration Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 55, as amended from time to time, shall govern the arbitration proceedings, and the provisions of this 88

paragraph shall be deemed to be a submission within the provisions of the Commercial Arbitration Act. Dated at ______________, British Columbia, this ______ day of_________________, _______. __________________________ Signature __________________________ Witness __________________________ On Behalf Of: British Columbia Teachers' Federation Salary Indemnity Plan

__________________________ Witness (In case of any discrepancy between this document and the Regulations, the Regulations shall apply.) 13.C.04—1. That the Director of Income Security and the Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator be excluded from participation in the BCTF Salary Indemnity Plan on the basis of fiduciary obligations to the plan. 2. Subject to negotiations with the individuals involved, the BCTF excluded staff is included in the BCTF Salary Indemnity Plan. 3. That the following statement of policies and procedures be adopted: Policies and procedures regarding employee participation in the Salary Indemnity Plan (Long-term) A. Decision to include/exclude 1. Subject to the Salary Indemnity Plan regulations, the final decision to incorporate a class of employees shall rest with the Executive Committee, upon the recommendation of the Income Security Committee. 2. The Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator, and the Director of Income Security in a fiduciary position to the plan, shall not participate in the plan. B. Policies and procedures with respect to the handling of employee LTD claims 1. All employee applications shall be handled exclusively by the Salary Indemnity Administrator and in their absence, by the Director of Income Security Division. 2. The Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator and the LTD administrative service contractor (Great-West Life), shall administer the plan rules in an even-handed fashion and consistent with their fiduciary obligations to the plan. 3. In the case of employee applications, the Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator shall act as a Claims Officer in establishing a Salary Indemnity Plan file, in forwarding primary documents to GreatWest Life (Administrative Services Only Service Provider), and in the updating of files. 4. All employee files shall be retained in a locked and separate filing cabinet located in the office of the Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator. Keys to the filing cabinet shall be kept in the personal possession of the SIP Administrator and the Director of the Income Security Division. 5. Other than the Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator and the Director of the Income Security Division, no other BCTF employee or officer shall have access to employee Long Term files or handle completed applications or correspondence related to an employee LTD file. 6. Employees shall not have access to their Long Term file. 7. There shall be separate application forms and files for employees that shall be marked in such a way as to distinguish them from BCTF member application forms and files. 8. As a condition of the administrative service only contract, the service provider (Great-West Life) shall designate one of their employees who shall have sole responsibility for the handling of BCTF employee claims. 9. The Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator shall review annually with the designated service provider employee (Great-West Life) and with all Income Security staff, the procedures and

processes that have been developed for the handling of employee claims. 10. The Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator shall not use the software and electronic information systems used for BCTF member claims, but may utilize a spreadsheet or data base for maintaining records, providing that such information is accessible only by the SIP Administrator and the Director of the Income Security Division. 11. The Salary Indemnity Plan Administrator shall establish other necessary routines and procedures to ensure that communications and correspondence exchanged between BCTF and its Service Provider (Great-West Life) keep employee information confidential. (Aug. 01 Ex, p. 3) 13.C.06—1. That the BCTF support programs of employee rehabilitation that meet the following criteria: a. The program is voluntary. b. The program be delivered by qualified rehabilitation consultants. c. Medical information is kept confidential and not released to the employer. d. Employers agree that they will not use any information relating to the employee’s involvement in the rehabilitation program against any employee in disciplinary proceedings or in any evaluation of the employment performance of the employee. e. The employer provides accommodation employment and complies with the duty to accommodate. 2. That a Health and Wellness Program be funded by the Salary Indemnity Plan, as a component of the disability services provided to members. 3. That the BCTF Salary Indemnity Plan Health and Wellness Program assist members who become disabled to return to their teaching positions as early as possible through a rehabilitation program offered, on a voluntary basis, early in the disability absence. 4. That participation in the BCTF Salary Indemnity Plan Health and Wellness Program be restricted to BCTF members that contribute to the Salary Indemnity Plan. 5. That the Income Security Committee continue to review and rule on appeals of administrative decisions regarding participation in the BCTF Salary Indemnity Plan Health and Wellness Program. (03 AGM, p. 19) (Apr 10 Ex, p. 7)

D.

Health and Safety

POLICIES 13.D.01—That locals be advised that all workplace health and safety committee meetings must be held during instructional time.

2. all teachers on call receive annual school district orientation(s), including a section on occupational health and safety which includes violence prevention; 3. all student teachers receive an orientation on occupational health and safety issues, which relate to their practicum assignment and worksite particularly violence prevention; 4. all exchange teachers receive an orientation on occupational health and safety which relates to their assignment and worksite particularly violence prevention. (Jan 01 RA p. 12) (Oct. 04 RA, p. 12)

13.D.13—That a safety plan for working alone as required by the OH&S Regulation 4.21 be provided by the employer for all BCTF members who work alone, including but not limited to the following situations: 1. one-room schools. 2. portables. 3. hospital/homebound. 4. storefront. 5. remote wings of schools. 6. morning/weekend, single evening classes. 7. individual work at school outside of regular hours. 8. voluntary. 9. outdoor schools. 10. home visitations. 11. alternate education programs off site;. 12. remote or isolated areas, including teacherage issues. 13. itinerant teachers. (01 AGM p. 16) 13.D.15—That the employer ensure a safety plan for hospital/homebound and distributed learning teachers and that it include a non-smoking environment, the presence of another adult at all times, and a way of communicating in an emergency. (01 AGM p. 16)

13.D.17—That the provision of any support staff time due to safety reasons be done in the context of an overall safety plan which includes training, resources, program placement, consultation with the BCTF member(s) concerned, and other issues. (01 AGM p. 28) 13.D.19—That ozone generators not be used in schools or other school board worksites. (June 01 RA, p. 18) 13.D.21—That school districts be requested to develop risk control programs to limit the exposure of members to viral diseases including West Nile, Hanta Virus, Fifth Disease, SARS, and Norwalk Virus. (June 03 Ex, p. 12) (Mar 4/5 04 Ex, p. 4)

(Sept. 99 Ex, p. 15-16)

13.D.03—That locals be advised that the annual eight hours educational leave for health and safety committee members be provided during instructional time. (Sept. 99 Ex, p. 15-16) 13.D.05—That locals be advised that health and safety training required under the Workers Compensation Act is not an appropriate use of professional development days and must be done during instructional time. (Sept. 99 Ex, p. 15-16) 13.D.07—1. That there be a designated local health and safety representative, selected in accordance with procedures of the local at each work site. 2. That no BCTF member serve as an employer health and safety representative. (01 AGM, p. 13) 13.D.09—That locals and district health and safety committee members: 1. encourage all health and safety representatives to utilize their entitlement to an eight-hour annual educational leave under S.135 of the Workers Compensation Act, and 2. request the BCTF/WorkSafe course as the content for the education leave. (Nov. 00 RA, p. 10) 13.D.11—That: 1. all school district orientation programs for teachers include an occupational health and safety section particularly violence prevention;

13.D.23—That school staffs should have the opportunity to use school district recreational facilities without charge, for recreation. (Oct. 80 RA, p. 3)

13.D.27—That a teacher returning from long-term medical leave should: 1. receive support and assistance from school administrators, supervisory and consultant personnel and staff members; 2. receive an appropriate assignment within their area of training and experience; 3. have an opportunity for appropriate in-service and adequate preparation time; 4. have, on request of the teacher, an opportunity for a transition period of part-time teaching with the option for returning to full-time assignment. (Feb 82 RA, p. 5) 13.D.29—Teachers with HIV/AIDS That the following policies refer to individuals who have tested positive for antibodies, as well as those in whom the virus is active. 1. The identity of a teacher infected with the AIDS virus should be protected. 2. Teachers infected with the AIDS virus should have the right to continue their employment. 3. Where a teacher with an AIDS related illness becomes too sick to work, full access to sick leave, long-term disability and medical benefits be ensured. (88 AGM, p.8) 89

4. The BCTF supports the rights of individuals to decide when and if to have the HIV antibody test. The BCTF is opposed to mandatory HIV testing of teachers. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 11) 13.D.31—That the BCTF encourage locals to urge school boards to ensure that both itinerant teachers and teachers on call are provided with a practical written guide, outlining the location of, and emergency procedures for, each work site in the district and are provided with all district health and safety procedures. (Jan 99 Ex, p. 22) (Jan 03 Ex, p. 28)

13.D.33—1. That Workers’ Compensation Board health and safety regulations should apply to all schools and school sites. 2. That students should be counted as employees for purposes of WCB regulations affecting first aid training, requirements for safety equipment, and other health and safety regulations. 3. That government be urged to establish additional statutory, regulatory and administrative standards for healthy and safe schools. 4. That the BCTF seek to have the permissible concentration standards for airborne contaminants substantially reduced and seek to have standards for molds and fungi included in the WCB Health and Safety regulations. (Jan 96 Ex, p. 22)

b. urge locals to lobby their school boards to ban the use from their facilities, of cleaning products that contain known carcinogens, endocrine disrupters and reproductive toxins. c. seek the support and co-operation of CUPE and other support staff unions. (05 AGM, p. 46) 13.D.53—That the BCTF call upon WorkSafeBC and national health authorities to establish healthy reference levels for mercury over long-term exposure. (Nov. 05 Ex, p. 2) 13.D.55—That locals be encouraged to ask their members to participate in Day of Mourning ceremonies on April 28 in their communities. (Apr 06 Ex, p. 4) 13.D.57—1. That the BCTF urge government to co-ordinate with employers and the WCB, the production of a safety manual for teachers working in correctional centres with input from the BCTF and locals and members involved in working in these correctional centres. 2. That the BCTF request that the Ministry of Education coordinate with employers and the WCB, the provision of regular inservice to teachers working in provincial correctional centres. (Oct. 06 Ex, p. 4)

(Jan 12 Ex, p. 3)

13.D.35—The BCTF supports the right of teachers and students to a working environment that is free from violence, threats of violence, abuse, intimidation or harassment of any kind -physical, verbal or emotional. (Jan 93 Ex, p. 24)

13.D.59—That locals be urged to lobby their school districts to observe a “minute of silence” at all school district worksites each year on April 28 in recognition of the National Day of Mourning. If April 28 falls on a day when school is not in session, the “minute of silence” should be observed on the nearest school day prior to April 28. (Oct. 07 Ex, p. 6)

13.D.37—1. That, in those schools where members know from past experience that they can expect trouble from outsiders at school functions, police protection be provided before members undertake to sponsor such functions. 2. That when a case is such that the BCTF feels that a charge should be laid, individual BCTF members should be encouraged to sign the necessary information, with the understanding that if they have followed the correct procedures (i.e., consulted with the executive director before taking any action), they will be supported. (Sept 57 Ex, p. 6) (Reviewed Nov 76 Ex, p. 10)

13.D.39—That the BCTF strongly oppose any deregulation of health and safety laws. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 10) 13.D.41—That the BCTF recommend to locals that the provisions of the collective agreement and WCB/health and safety regulations be used to enforce working, learning, and safety/security conditions of adult educators. (Feb. 03 Ex, p. 7) 13.D.43—That the BCTF request the colleges and institutes that train teaching assistants include health and safety in their curriculum. (Nov. 04 Ex, p. 3)

13.D.45—That the BCTF request that health and safety be included in the program for all student teachers prior to them undertaking their first practicum. (Nov. 04 Ex, p. 3) 13.D.47—That locals lobby their school boards to develop and implement policies for scent-free worksites. (05 AGM, p. 29) 13.D.49—That the BCTF is opposed to the use of pesticides on school board property, and as such, the BCTF in co-operation with CUPE and other support staff unions: a. request the provincial government to ban the use of pesticides on school property, and b. urge locals to lobby. (05 AGM, p. 45) 13.D.51—That the BCTF is opposed to the use in schools of cleaning products that contain known carcinogens, endocrine disrupters and reproductive toxins, and as such, the BCTF: a. request the provincial government to ban the use in schools of cleaning products that contain known carcinogens, endocrine disrupters and reproductive toxins, and

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13.D.61—That the BCTF lobby the provincial government to legislate that the first day of school—that is, the day after Labour Day, before any students are scheduled to be at school, be a day when at each school district workplace the new and young worker orientation required by Part 3 of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation is implemented. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 8) 13.D.63—That the BCTF work with education partners to lobby WorkSafeBC and the provincial government to provide a level of first aid coverage for schools that accounts for the number of people in a workplace and not just the number of workers. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 8) 13.D.65—That the BCTF lobby the provincial government to financially support school boards so that they are able to address the Ministerial Order relating to anaphylaxis plans. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 8) 13.D.67—That BCTF members encourage boards of education to ensure that solar index warnings and air quality indexes be posted daily. (Nov 08 RA, p. 15) 13.D.69—That the BCTF lobby the Ministry of Education to develop protocols for the evacuation of persons with physical challenges in the event of an emergency at a school district site. (Nov 08 Ex, p. 7)

13.D.71—That the BCTF: 1. raise with BCPSEA the employers’ responsibility to ensure that all administrators be adequately trained in health and safety to WorkSafeBC standards, prior to assuming their supervisory roles. 2. communicate our intention to seek orders from WorkSafeBC should the situation not be rectified. (Apr 09 Ex, p. 5) 13.D.73—That the Federation support the implementation of a Universal Public Drug Plan as recommended by the Canadian Health Coalition and lobby the federal and provincial governments to develop such a plan. (May 09 Ex, p. 11) 13.D.75―That newly elected officers of the BCTF receive new and young worker orientation prior to taking office, and that locals be requested to develop procedures to ensure that all locally released officers receive new and young worker orientation. (June 09 Ex, p. 15)

13.D.77―That the employer provide, every year, free flu shots for teachers who choose to participate. (Nov 09 Ex, p 10)

standards for maximum and minimum temperatures in classrooms.

PROCEDURES 13.D.02—That the BCTF provide advice and advocacy on health and safety matters, including: 1. advice to members on when and how to use the WCB Teleclaim process. 2. appeals to WCB. 3. assistance in the initiation of a WCB claim when in the judgment of the health and safety officer it is deemed in the interest of the Federation and the individual member. 4. representation at the WCB. 5. medical reports and other documents necessary to establish a WCB claim. 6. return to work and accommodations arising out of WCB claims. (Nov. 00 Ex, p. 24)

13.D.22—That the BCTF work with the BC Federation of labour, SNAG (the School Noise Abatement Group), and WCB/Worksafe BC to establish more appropriate and improved standards for classroom noise levels. (07 AGM, p. 16)

(Jan 12 Ex, p. 3)

13.D.04—1. That the district health and safety committee be actively involved in ensuring and reviewing health and safety plans for all BCTF members who work at sites governed by employers other than a school board. 2. That adult educators/night school instructors and summer school teachers have representation on the health and safety committee at each site. (Jan 12 Ex, p. 3) 3. That all BCTF health and safety representatives consult with other employee health and safety representatives or members on an ongoing basis. (Nov. 00 Ex, p. 28) 13.D.06—That any incident, including an accident, near miss, injury, threat of violence, or occupational disease involving a BCTF member be investigated by a team which includes the worksite BCTF health and safety representative, or another BCTF member designated by the representative. (Nov. 00 Ex, p. 28) (June 03 Ex, p. 12)

13.D.08—That members must report any incident, and forward a copy to the local office, including an accident, near miss, injury, threat of violence, or occupational disease to the WCB.

(07 AGM, p. 16)

13.D.24—That the BCTF continue to provide advice on safety issues to locals and to members working in provincial correctional centres across the province. (Oct. 06 Ex, p. 4) 13.D.26―1. That when a BCTF member is requested by the BCTF to attend a WCAT hearing during the summer recess, and when that member is not an officer or official from the local or Federation in receipt of an allowance or additional payment over regular salary, the Federation shall compensate that member for 1/189 of the salary of the member for each day that a member is requested to be in attendance. (Sept.08 Ex, p. 6) 13.D.28―That the BCTF include in its public and member communications the health and safety concerns associated with class size and composition issues. (Nov 08 Ex, p. 6) 13.D.32―That the BCTF develop policies and procedures for complying with the working alone and in isolation regulation for BCTF members who are on BCTF business. (Nov 08 Ex, p. 6) 13.D.34―That the Federation join the Concerned About Classrooms Coalition. (Nov 08 Ex, p. 7) 13.D.36―1. That, as appropriate, health and safety workshops be included in BCTF conferences including new and student teacher conferences. 2. That health and safety workshops be made available for locally organized new and student teacher conferences. (Apr 09 Ex, p. 6)

(June 03 Ex, p. 12)

13.D.38―That local presidents receive instruction on the incident reporting process for when members are injured at local and BCTF-sponsored events. (June 09 Ex, p. 15)

13.D.10—That the BCTF work with Human Resources Canada to provide services and assistance to teachers who are considering leaving the profession. (Jan 03 Ex, p 28)

13.D.40 That a risk assessment be performed for BCTF committees while working outside the normal work day. (June 09 Ex, p. 16)

(Jan 78 RA, p. 11)

13.D.12—That all schools and worksites be non-smoking areas. (87 AGM, p. 27) (04 AGM, p. 21)

13.D.14—That the BCTF establish a support system for teachers who have been investigated but not charged with sex/child abuse, or have been exonerated by the courts. This support system should also provide assistance to spouses and students of such teachers. (May 89 RA, p. 12) 13.D.16—1. That the BCTF oppose the use of screening questionnaires such as the Gallup Teacher Insight, in the selection process for teachers and that the Federation protect the privacy and human rights of our members. 2. That BCTF members and prospective members be advised not to complete screening questionnaires such as the Gallup Teacher Insight. 3. That any local facing use of screening questionnaires such as the Gallup Teacher Insight, be advised of the in-dispute procedures in the Members’ Guide. (Feb 05 RA, p. 7) 13.D.18—That BCTF members complete only the current mandated WorkSafeBC Form 6A: “Worker’s Report of Injury or Occupational Disease to Employer,” to be found on the WorkSafeBC web site, and not any other locally made district form for reporting purposes. (June 06 RA, p. 12) 13.D.20—That the BCTF work with the BC Federation of Labour and WCB/Worksafe BC to establish more appropriate and improved

13.D.42―That the BCTF Meeting Room Inspection Checklist be distributed to locals to be used at local meetings. (Aug. 09 Ex, p. 4) 13.D.44―That the BCTF provide training and support to locals for the development of appropriate policies and practices that will foster a safe and professional workplace for their employees. (10 AGM, p. 19)

13.D.46―Health and Safety Representatives The BCTF recognizes the health and safety representative as a union leader and encourages locals to adopt and promote the following description for the role and function of the health and safety representative: A. Health and safety representative—school level 1. Organizer/leader: a. is a member of the site-based joint health and safety committee or is a worker representative. b. complies with the Workers Compensation Act and Regulation in establishing a health and safety program. c. advocates for workers’ health and safety rights. 2. Communicator: a. receives and distributes relevant health and safety information. b. attends staff meetings to report on school, district, and provincial health and safety issues. c. attends local meetings of health and safety representatives. 91

d. participates in health and safety representative training. 3. Advocate: a. is familiar with local collective agreement, Workers Compensation Act and Regulation and how it applies to educational environments. b. is familiar with local and district health and safety policies. c. advocates for members in matters relative to health and safety to improve working conditions. d. works collegially with school union representatives, professional development representatives, social justice representatives, and school committees B. Health and safety representative—local level 1. Locals ensure that each worksite in the district elects at least one school-based health and safety representative. 2. Locals ensure the role and function of school-based health and safety representatives are included in local policy. 3. Locals ensure school union representative training programs be provided for health and safety representatives. 4. Locals be encouraged to provide release time for school union representative health and safety training. 5. Locals encourage health and safety representatives to participate in the legislated eight-hour training. 6. Locals be encouraged to actively participate in district health and safety committees. C. Health and safety representative—provincial level The Federation will: 1. communicate with BCTF school health and safety representatives on all matters related to the health and safety of BCTF members. 2. promote and provide health and safety training for school health and safety representatives. 3. inform and advise school staffs regarding BCTF policies. (June 10 Ex, pp. 11–13)

13.D.48―That the BCTF supports members who are suffering from Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity by ensuring that their medical needs are accommodated in the workplace. (13 AGM, p. 20)

E.

Benefit Plans

PROCEDURES 13.E.02―That the BCTF support locals and members with ongoing information resources supported by print, online materials, and training to achieve the following: 1. To raise member awareness about current benefit plans including coverage, access, exemptions, eligibility, penalties, and cost saving measures. 2. To support local leaders and WLC/Bargaining chairs in providing advice to members about benefits through the provision of workshops and training at summer conference, FLI, rookie FLI, zone meetings. 3. To provide members with the historical context in which defined benefit plans were achieved, and to educate members about how defined benefit plans best support the principles of union solidarity and benefits security for all members. 4. To educate members, locally and provincially, about the need to make benefit improvements in the next rounds of bargaining. (Dec 09 Ex, pp. 7–8)

13.E.04―That the BCTF: 1. support the institution of the Vitality Program through the BCTF Rehab Program 2. encourage members to take workshops on contract language and other documents such as Workers Compensation Act to empower members to understand and exercise their rights 3. provide members through a variety of communication tools with information on work/life balance 4. create a work/life balance section on the BCTF website/webpage. (Dec 09 Ex, p. 11–12) 13.E.06―That any savings in benefits plans realized through structural changes or bulk buying be re-invested in the benefits plan. (Dec 09 Ex, p. 12) 13.E.08―1. 92

That all members be eligible for benefits.

2. That all plans permit dual coverage between members and their spouse. 3. That all members in receipt of short- and long-term disability payments remain eligible for all employee benefits and that the employer continue to pay its share of premiums. 4. That members determine which dependents are to be covered by their benefit plans, including, but not limited to, commonlaw relationships and same-sex couples. 5. That the BCTF table improvements to supplemental employment benefit plans and ensure that these plans are extended to birth fathers, adoptive parents, and same sex couples. (Dec 09 Ex, p. 12)

14. Independent Schools POLICIES 14.01—That teachers in all provincially-funded schools should be subject to the same certification standards as teachers in the public school system. (Oct 78 RA, p. 15) 14.03—That the following principles should be strictly adhered to by all schools receiving public funds: 1. There should be equality of opportunity with respect to admission, discipline, learning conditions, standards of service, and course offerings for students within a school district. 2. All schools should be governed by the same laws, regulations, and procedures as set by duly-elected representatives of the public, both provincially and locally. 3. Parents and other members of the general public should have equal rights to involvement in the operation and activities of all such schools. 4. No public funds, directly or indirectly, should be used to proselytize, to the exclusion of others, any one religion, or to give any imbalanced views of particular moral codes or political views. 5. The operating funds spent on behalf of each student at the school level should not be greater in the publicly-funded private school(s) than in the public schools in the same district. 6. All such schools should be subject to the same public control, requirements, scrutiny and accountability with respect to budgeting, expenditure and reporting. 7. There should be strict enforcement of the same ethical considerations with respect to conflict of interest by publicly-elected officials on matters dealing with governance and financial support of public or independent schools. (79 AGM, pp. 5–6) 14.05—That the BCTF demand that the Ministry of Education enforce the provisions of Section 1A of the Independent School Act and withdraw all government funding from private schools that violate that section of the Act. (06 AGM, p. 11) 14.07—That the BC government withdraw funding for the religious schools in Bountiful. (Nov 08 RA, p. 16) PROCEDURES 14.02—That the BCTF actively oppose any restrictive admission policies of the private schools of this province that receive public funds. (Oct 78 RA, p. 16) 14.04—That the BCTF oppose the centralization of the administration of independent school funding in BC and campaign to have all publicly funded schools accountable to the local taxpayers from whom they receive support. (Oct 78 RA, p. 16) 14.06—That BCTF members should not provide to independent schools information that assists those schools in their discriminatory or selective admission of public school students. (June 82 Ex, p. 2) 14.08—That the BCTF Committee for Action on Social Justice develop recommendations for changes to the Independent School Act that assure the following: 1. that independent schools adhere to the BC curriculum

2. respect for the UN Charter on the Rights of Women and Children 3. that inspections are yearly, unscheduled, and conducted by educators who are not aligned with independent schools 4. that no government funds be provided to independent schools. (Nov 08 RA, p. 15)

15. Induction Ceremonies, Awards POLICIES 15.01—That the BCTF go on record as favoring, wherever possible, either in our own association or in the communities of which we are citizens, the establishment and expansion of loans, bursaries and scholarships for the recruitment to the teaching profession of the best possible students, to the end that a high standard of teaching may be maintained in this province. (56 AGM, p. 9) (Reviewed Jan 75 Ex, p.8)

PROCEDURES 15.02—That all locals shall hold annual induction ceremonies, preferably early in the new school year. All new contract teachers and new teachers on call shall be inducted into the teaching profession. All new teachers shall accept the BCTF Code of Ethics. If an individual is unable to attend the induction ceremony, other arrangements shall be made for their acceptance of the Code of Ethics. (98 AGM, p. 43) (Sept. 99 Ex, p. 6)

15.04—That each local shall have a member responsible for induction ceremonies and initiation of new members. (76 AGM, p. 54)

15.06—That locals shall make certain that each new contract teacher and new teachers on call receive a copy of the BCTF Code of Ethics, and notification of membership in the BCTF. (98 AGM, p. 43) (Sept. 99 Ex, p. 6)

15.08—That the BCTF support teachers’ awards that meet the following criteria: 1. Awards are open to all practicing public school teachers. 2. Public school teachers are included on the awards selection committee. 3. Award criteria and application processes are widely publicized. (Aug. 97 Ex, p. 9) 15.10—G.A. Fergusson Memorial Award That unsuccessful nominations for the G.A. Fergusson Memorial Award be kept on file and reconsidered for the two succeeding years. (54 AGM, p. 28) 15.12—That there be five trustees of the G.A. Fergusson Memorial Award, four appointed for three-year terms, and one Executive Committee member. These trustees shall name the recipient of the annual award and report to the president. (Nov 81 RA, p. 6) (Nov. 97 RA, p. 4)

15.14—1. That schools, local presidents, local representatives, and PSA presidents be informed annually of the criteria and process for nomination for the G.A. Fergusson award. 2. That nominations consist of a summary of the basis for the nomination as per the criteria not to exceed three pages in length and to be accompanied by no more than three supporting letters. 3. That the major criteria for receipt of the award remain “an outstanding contribution to public education.” Exemplary service to colleagues through activism in the BC Teachers’ Federation is a major avenue for making such an outstanding contribution. (Dec. 05 Ex, p. 7)

4. That, while serving as trustees for the G.A. Fergusson Award and as the Executive Committee representative to the G.A.

Fergusson Award Trustees, members not be eligible for nomination for the award. (Apr 16 Ex, p. 19) 15.16—Maxwell A. Cameron Memorial Award 1. That the BCTF make available the Maxwell A. Cameron Memorial Award to students enrolled in a discrete teacher education program at a public university in British Columbia. 2. That the award be granted annually to a student completing the final year of the Bachelor of Education Degree in secondary school teaching and a student completing the final year of a Bachelor of Education in elementary school teaching who, in the opinion of the Dean of Education and director of the division (elementary or secondary), is an outstanding student in the graduating class who has: a. initiated, worked, or participated in a project that created positive change globally or in their local community, and/or b. been actively involved in issues related to poverty, LGBTQ rights, women’s rights, antiracism, peace, global, or environmental issues. 3. That the Maxwell A. Cameron Memorial Award consist of a silver pin and cheque for $250. (Apr 03 Ex, p. 15) (May 10 Ex, p. 7)

15.18—That the BCTF decline participation in the selection process for the premier’s award for teaching excellence. (Sept. 07 Ex, p. 7)

15.20—International Solidarity Program Award That the following be the criteria and process for selecting recipients of an Award of Recognition for Outstanding Contribution to the BCTF's International Solidarity Program: 1. That the purpose of the award be to recognize individuals and organizations that have made outstanding contributions to the BCTF's international solidarity work over an extended period of time. 2. That the BCTF partner NGOs, BCTF members and staff be eligible for nomination by the International Solidarity Committee. 3. The Executive Committee shall decide, on an annual basis, the recipient of the award. (Oct 95 Ex, p. 6) 15.22—That BCTF members be discouraged from participating in or accepting awards, which are bases solely upon government measures of accountability or Fraser Institute rankings. (07 AGM, p. 12)

15.24—Stewart Schon Health and Safety Award 1. That the Stewart Schon Health and Safety Award be granted to a member or honorary associate member who has made an outstanding and sustained contribution to the health and safety of BCTF members. 2. That a call for nominations, with a brief biography of Stewart Schon, be sent to members by November 1 each year and that the deadline for nominations be January 31. 3. That nominations may be submitted by locals, groups of members, or individual members. 4. That the award be determined by decision of the Executive Committee at the February Executive Committee meeting. 5. That no member of the Executive Committee, holding office at the time of selection, be eligible to be nominated for the award. 6. That the award be presented at the Annual General Meeting and that the recipient have their name listed in the Members’ Guide and receive a framed certificate. (Apr 08 Ex, pp. 6–7) (Apr 16 Ex, p. 19)

15.26—That BCTF members not accept awards from or participate in award ceremonies or celebrations hosted by the Fraser Institute. (Oct. 06 Ex, p. 12) 15.28―That the Federation facilitate the communication of scheduled local induction ceremonies to PSA Council. (Dec 09 Ex, p. 9)

15.30―Bob Rosen Social Justice Award 1. That the Bob Rosen Social Justice Award be granted to a member or honorary associate member who has made an 93

outstanding and sustained contribution in working for systemic change on issues of social justice, including but not limited to one or more of the following: antiracism, peace and global education, environmental justice, the status of women, antipoverty, and LBGTQ issues. 2. That a call for nominations, with a brief biography of Bob Rosen, be sent to members by November 1 each year and that the deadline for nominations be January 31. 3. That nominations may be submitted by locals, groups of members, or individual members. 4. That the award be determined by decision of the Executive Committee at the February Executive Committee meeting. 5. That no member of the Executive Committee, holding office at the time of selection, be eligible to be nominated for the award. 6. That the award be presented at the Annual General Meeting and that the recipient have their name listed in the Members’ Guide and receive a framed certificate. (June 12 Ex, pp. 8–9) (Apr 16 Ex, p. 19)

16. International Solidarity PROCEDURES 16.02—That the W.R. Long Memorial International Fund fee allocation be set annually by the AGM to be used in developing countries to: 1. build partnerships with teacher organizations; 2. promote universal quality education; 3. foster equality, mutual respect and reciprocal growth; 4. support self-determination and empowerment; 5. develop understanding of global interdependence; 6. strengthen teacher union links and co-operation. (92 AGM, p. 46) (16 AGM, p. 18)

17.04—That each and every member be given the opportunity of voting by referendum ballot prior to any affiliation of the BCTF with labour. (73 AGM, p. 5) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

17.08—That locals be encouraged to continue contacts, liaison and support work with other unions including local labour councils to promote common education, social and economic objectives. (Jan 89 RA, p. 9)

17.10—1. That the BCTF maintain liaison with other employee groups to promote the cause of education and to discuss educational and economic objectives. 2. That such a program of liaison be specifically concerned with: a. the policies and procedures of local government and school boards; b. the legislative policies of the provincial and/or federal governments and policies and procedures of government-controlled institutions; c. common areas of concern to BCTF and other employee groups that are affected by such policies and procedures. (73 AGM, p. 3) (Oct 80 RA, pp. 3-4)

17.12—That the BCTF continue to co-operate with labour, particularly the public sector, education partners and community groups to eliminate wage "guidelines," promote public services and advance alternative economic strategies. (96 AGM, p. 35) 17.14—1. That the BCTF endorse the democratic right of public and private sector workers to strike. 2. That the BCTF oppose government legislation that interferes with or obstructs the legal right to strike. (Jan 79 RA, pp. 24-25)

17.16—That the BCTF support the use of union labour in all construction projects where public funds are used, including construction projects tendered by school districts. (Apr 85 Ex, p. 12)

17. Labour Affairs POLICIES 17.01—That the BCTF call upon the government not to proceed with the “training wage.” (Nov. 01 RA, p. 10) 17.13—That the BCTF support the unionization of all Wal-Mart stores. (Nov 05 RA, p. 11) 17.15—That the BCTF support workers in Colombia by asking members to join the boycott of Coca-Cola products. (Nov 05 RA, pp. 11-12)

(Feb 10 Ex, p. 12)

17.18—That in the event that the “training wage” is instituted the BCTF work with the BC Federation of Labour to: 1. encourage businesses not to use the “training wage,” and 2. identify those businesses who have chosen to pay the full minimum wage or better and encourage union members and others to patronize those businesses. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 10) 17.20—That the BCTF fund the participation of up to two Executive Committee members at the CLC Harrison Winter School. (Aug. 03 Ex, p. 1) (Nov 09 Ex, p. 1)

17.17—That the BCTF oppose the “Security and Prosperity Partnership” that is part of a program of deep integration among the countries in NAFTA. (Aug 07 Ex, p. 3) (May 11 Ex, p. 7)

17.19—1. That the BCTF call on the BC government to place the Trade, Investment and Labour Mobility Agreement before the legislature for debate and action rather than proceeding with the significant changes in BC that have been secretly negotiated by the BC and Alberta governments without legislative authority. 2. The BCTF opposes the Trade, Investment and Labour Mobility Agreement (TILMA) between Alberta and British Columbia. (Nov 07 RA, p. 11)

PROCEDURES 17.02—That as part of the ongoing process of building increased member awareness of issues related to affiliation with labour, the BCTF continue to maintain a good working relationship with organized labour through: 1. contact with political officers; 2. ongoing bargaining liaison and support; 3. labour education. (May 86 RA, p. 22) (Jan 89 RA, p. 9)

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18. Leaves of Absence POLICIES 18.A.01—That the School Act should be amended to ensure that: 1. On receipt of a request from the local, a board of school trustees shall grant leave to a member who is elected to local office. 2. On receipt of a request from the Executive Committee of the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation, a board of school trustees shall grant leave to any member who is elected as an officer of the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation. 3. On receipt of a request from the Executive Committee of the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation, a board of school trustees shall grant leave up to a maximum of five consecutive years to any member who is appointed to the administrative staff of the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation. (Feb 82 RA, pp. 18–19)

18.A.03—That the BCTF seek the introduction of new provincial legislation that would permit an employee to have leave of absence for a period of up to 36 months for parenting. (Oct 79 RA, pp. 3–4)

19. Legal Services/Contract Enforcement PROCEDURES 19.02—Legal Services to the Federation and Locals 1. General a. The Federation provides necessary legal advice, through the staff lawyer assigned to legal aid or outside counsel assigned by the Federation, to locals through their presidents or other authorized officials, on all aspects of the operations of the local within its objects. Legal advice on all aspects of the operations of the Federation with its objects is similarly available to Federation staff, the Executive Committee and full-time table officers. (May 04 Ex, p. 1) b. The president and general counsel, subject to review by the Executive Committee, may authorize the payment of legal costs (on a full or partial basis) of any necessary legal action brought or defended on behalf of the Federation, its elected officers or staff in such capacity, or a local or its elected officers in such capacity, or on behalf of a member when in the opinion of the president and general counsel the legal issue is of significant importance to the Federation as a whole. The president and general counsel may refer the matter to the Executive Committee for decision. Where authorization to fund a matter involving a local or its officers is not granted by the president and general counsel, the matter shall, at the request of the local, be referred to the Executive Committee for a final decision. (Aug 12 Ex, p. 8)

2. Contract enforcement a. Grievance Handling i. Locals shall enforce the terms and conditions of the Provincial Collective Agreement in accordance with BCTF advice. ii. Locals shall seek advice from the BCTF prior to settling a grievance. iii. The Federation shall assume the primary responsibility for a grievance not settled at step 3 in the grievance procedure. Any grievance not settled at the completion of step 3 shall be referred at that point to the BCTF through Field Services. iv. The BCTF, in consultation with the respective local, shall decide the disposition of a Provincial Matters grievance. v. The BCTF, in consultation with the respective local, shall recommend the disposition of a Local Matters grievance to the respective local. vi. The BCTF shall appoint an advocate for a grievance under (iv) and (v) above, if such an appointment is necessary. vii. A local shall have the right to appeal a decision under iv, v, and ix., pursuant to Procedures for Appeals by Locals in part (b) following. viii. If a grievance proceeds beyond step 3 of the grievance procedure, the BCTF shall continue to ensure that the local which initiated the grievance is fully consulted and involved. ix. Should an arbitration award deny a grievance, the BCTF shall decide, in consultation with the respective local, whether or not to appeal the decision. x. The BCTF shall report regularly on grievances to locals, staff representatives, and members. b. Grievance Appeals i. The Executive Committee will appoint five of its members annually to hear grievance appeals. One of these members will be appointed as chair of the grievance appeal panel and another as the alternate chair. A grievance appeal panel will consist of three of these five members and will include the chair or the alternate chair. ii. Grievance appeals must be supported by the local executive. iii. Grievance appeals must be in writing, setting out the reasons why the local wishes to appeal the decision of the Federation and those reasons should be related to the grounds for appeal set out in (vii). iv. Grievance appeals should be addressed to general counsel and be made within 30 days of receipt of notification of the

Federation's decision. The appeal should be accompanied with the appropriate documentation in support of the appeal. (Aug 12 Ex, p. 8) v. If desired, a member or members authorized by the local executive may appear to present the appeal to the grievance appeal panel. The panel will have the power to determine its own procedures in accordance with the rules of natural justice. vi. All documentation and information received shall be dealt with in a confidential manner. vii. The grounds for grievance appeal are that: 1. The decision being appealed was made in a manner that was arbitrary, discriminatory, in bad faith, or negligently; 2. There is a question as to the correctness of the original decision; 3. The decision was made without attending to the real substance of the matters in dispute. viii. If there is evidence that was unavailable at the time that the Federation's decision was made, or new evidence that has become available, and this evidence might affect the Federation’s decision, then this matter must be remitted to the Federation's grievance assessment process for further consideration prior to being appealed. ix. Grievance appeals will be conducted in confidence. The decision of the grievance appeal panel will be made by secret ballot in committee with the Federation grievance assessment lawyer and local representative(s), if they choose, present. x. The grievance appeal panel may deny the appeal, direct the matter back to the Federation's arbitration review process, or direct that the grievance be referred to arbitration. xi. If the local executive authorizes it, then a member or members directly affected by the outcome of the grievance in issue may assist in the presentation of the appeal. xii. The BCTF will pay the travel, accommodation, and release time expenses of two representative of the local. (June 01 Ex. p.4) (Nov 09 RA, p. 4)

c. Mediation Locals shall consult with BCTF staff prior to entering into mediation proceedings related to either bargaining or contract enforcement. Where mediation is undertaken, the BCTF must be directly involved. d. Interest Arbitration on Local Matters i. The decision to settle a Local Matters agreement by arbitration shall be approved by the director of the Collective Agreement and Protective Services Division in consultation with appropriate staff or, on appeal, by the BCTF Executive Committee. ii. The choice of advocate shall be decided by the Federation in consultation with the local. (Dec. 96 Ex, p. 16-17) 3. Payment a. The BCTF will pay the costs incurred for approved mediation and/or contract grievances and/or applications before the LRB and/or interest arbitration. b. Where a Labour Relations Board application, initiated by the employer is involved, choice of advocate will be decided by the Federation in consultation with the local. (97 AGM, p. 43) (98 AGM, p. 40)

4. Payment during arbitrations That when a BCTF member is required or requested by the BCTF to attend an arbitration during the summer recess, and when that member is not an officer or official from the local or the Federation in receipt of an allowance or additional payment over regular salary, the Federation shall compensate that member for 1/189 of the salary of the member for each day that a member is requested to be in attendance. (Jan 99 RA, p. 6) 19.04—Legal Advice, Assistance, and Aid to Individual Members 1. Advice Advice of a practical and legal nature is available to members from local officials and BCTF staff assigned to locals, on any matter arising out of the member’s employment. Where required in the opinion of staff or the president of the local, members may be referred to the Federation’s legal staff for specific legal advice. 2. Legal assistance and legal aid In sections 3–9 of this procedure:

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a. “Legal assistance” means the provision of services to a member by a Federation staff lawyer or other qualified administrative staff member in accordance with this procedure. b. “Legal aid” means the authorization of funding for outside legal counsel at the legal aid rate to assist in the payment of legal fees in accordance with this policy. c. “Legal aid rate” means the fee rate and rules with respect to approvals and disbursements established in sections 3.d. and 6 of this procedure. d. “Member” means an active member of the Federation, and includes a person who was an active member at the time the circumstances leading to the request for legal assistance arose, provided that: i. no former member who subsequently became a member of an organization that provides, or ought reasonably to provide, assistance in respect of the matter may be granted legal aid or legal assistance; and ii. the circumstances of the loss of active membership may be considered as a relevant factor by staff in considering applications under this procedure. iii. no more than two years has passed since the individual ceased to be an active member. Where the merit of the case is strong, legal aid may be granted for criminal matters more than two years after the loss of active membership. (June 13 Ex, p. 11) e. “Matters arising directly out of the member’s practice of the teaching profession” are those which involve work related activities on or off school property. Legal aid or legal assistance may be granted in exceptional cases where the member’s only connection to the complainant is via employment. (June 13 Ex, p. 12) “Practice of the teaching profession” means teaching in a position which requires membership in the Federation. (June 13 Ex, p. 11)

“Staff” means lawyers employed by the Federation (including, where appropriate, general counsel), or other qualified members of the administrative staff, who have been specified by general counsel to be responsible for the administration of particular areas of this procedure. 3. Criminal matters The Federation may provide legal aid to members, in matters arising directly out of the member’s practice of the teaching profession, in accordance with the following policies: a. Upon request by a member, staff may, subject to b. below, provide legal aid to assist the member in respect of legal representation costs up to plea, or determination of guilt or innocence by the trier, in defence of any criminal investigation or criminal charge. b. Staff may decline to provide or continue legal aid in circumstances which, in the opinion of staff, in accordance with the criteria listing in 19.04.4.a.i and ii., is not in the best interests of the Federation to provide legal aid. (Aug 12 Ex, p. 9) (June 13 Ex, p. 12)

c. Where legal aid has been granted under a. and the member is found guilty or pleads guilty, staff may give the member notice that subsequent funding in respect of sentencing is denied. d. The grant of legal aid does not cover expenses in respect of pre-trial applications pursuant to the Charter unless specifically approved in advance by general counsel. e. Staff may, prior to considering an application under this section, request the member or member’s representative to provide an estimate of the legal costs expected to be encountered, and/or may authorize legal aid expenditures only to a specified level, after which further expenditures must be approved by general counsel. f. Where legal aid has been granted and the member discharges counsel originally retained, or due to actions of the member, that counsel will no longer agree to represent the member, staff may make further funding conditional on the member assuming responsibility for costs wasted, or may, with notice to the member, discontinue funding. 4. Other legal matters a. General principles of assistance i. In determining whether or not to grant or continue legal assistance or legal aid funding under section 4 of this procedure, staff may have regard to all the circumstances of the matter, including the legal merits of the case, the nature of the individual’s interest in 96

question, the effect of the case on the Federation and its membership, and the reasonable use of the Federation’s resources. Staff may consider the amount of legal aid or assistance already provided by the Federation and may decline further assistance where the amount exceeds what is reasonable to provide for one member. (June 13 Ex, p. 12)

ii. Staff shall determine the form of assistance given to the member, including the selection of counsel, and has the discretion to terminate assistance upon notice to the member where circumstances warrant. The member must follow the reasonable advice of counsel. The member must also provide any information staff considers necessary for administering the provision of legal aid. (June 13 Ex, p. 12)

(iii) Where outside counsel is employed, such counsel shall be instructed by the Federation. (Aug 12 Ex, p. 8) b. Disciplinary and Professional Conduct Board (“commissioner”) Staff provides legal assistance and/or legal aid to members facing proceedings or investigations against them by the commissioner in accordance with the following guidelines: i. Legal assistance or legal aid will not be granted or continued where the member has:  on substantially the same allegations been finally found or pleaded guilty and convicted on a criminal charge; or  been dismissed by the employer and the dismissal has not been grieved or the dismissal has been finally determined against the member. Where staff believe there are compelling reasons for continuing assistance despite this rule, the member’s application for further assistance may be approved by general counsel. ii. Where the member has resigned employment subsequent to the allegations which are the subject of the Disciplinary and Professional Conduct Board proceedings, legal assistance or legal aid shall not be granted or continued without the approval of general counsel. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 18) iii. That members who have faced criminal charges that have arisen directly out of the member’s practice of the teaching profession, and who have had the charges dropped, dismissed, or who have been found not guilty of those charges, may apply to have their legal defence costs reimbursed after the conclusion of criminal proceedings if the member used a BCTF-approved lawyer. (Jan 10 RA, p. 14) (Aug 12 Ex, p. 9)

iv. Subject to b.i and b.ii, staff provides legal assistance or grants legal aid to defend the member when the member has received a citation to appear at a disciplinary hearing. v. The Federation shall not be responsible for any fines or costs levied against the member by the council. c. Civil litigation i. When requested by a member, staff may provide legal aid to commence, continue or defend civil litigation in respect of a matter arising directly out of the member’s practice of the teaching profession where no other forum is appropriate and the member has no other institutional source of funding. ii. Civil legal aid is subject to the following: (1) unless there are compelling reasons to the contrary, members involved in civil litigation with other members shall not be provided with legal aid; (2) legal aid shall not be granted to file and prosecute a civil suit unless in the opinion of staff the member has suffered significant and wrongful damages; (3) in the event of a successful outcome or settlement, courtawarded costs or a reasonable portion of the settlement shall be used to offset legal aid paid by the Federation; (4) in the event of an unsuccessful outcome the Federation shall be responsible for adverse court-awarded costs, but shall in no event be responsible for damages, fines, or any portion of a settlement; (5) legal aid shall not be granted where there has been a final determination against the member based on substantially the same allegations in another legal proceeding; (6) an application for legal aid to defend civil proceedings shall not be considered while any other legal proceedings based on substantially the same allegations are outstanding, unless staff

believes there are compelling reasons to do so, in which case the request may be approved by general counsel; and with the approval of general counsel, legal aid may extend to defending a favourable decision appealed by the opposing party. d. Human rights complaints The Federation may provide legal assistance or legal aid to a member in matters arising directly from the member’s practice of the teaching profession where: i. In the opinion of staff no other means of proper defence is available, legal assistance or legal aid may be granted to a member facing a complaint under human rights legislation. ii. In exceptional circumstances, where there is no alternative means of pursuing the matter, staff may provide legal assistance or legal aid to a member to initiate a human rights complaint. iii. With the approval of the general counsel, legal assistance or aid may include judicial review to defend a favourable tribunal decision. e. Employment Insurance and Worksafe/WCB matters Staff may provide legal assistance or legal aid as appropriate to assist members in dealing with employment insurance or Worksafe/WCB issues arising directly from their employment. With the approval of general counsel, legal aid may extend to include judicial review to defend a favourable tribunal decision. 5. Appeals of judicial and quasi-judicial decisions a. Where legal assistance or legal aid has been granted under this procedure and a decision or verdict favourable to the member has been obtained which is then appealed by the opposing party, unless otherwise specified in this procedure staff will generally continue legal assistance or legal aid to defend the appeal. b. Where legal assistance or legal aid has been granted under this procedure and the decision or verdict is unfavourable to the member, any request for further legal aid or assistance must be referred to the Executive Committee. 6. Legal aid funding rate and conditions Where staff authorizes legal aid under this procedure, the following applies: a. The maximum hourly rate for which the Federation is responsible is established periodically by the Executive Committee. The current rate is a maximum of $185.00 per hour. b. The authorization for legal aid assumes one lawyer on the file and includes payment of reasonable and necessary disbursements. The following disbursements require pre-approval of staff: i. single disbursements over $1,000; ii. aggregate disbursements over $5,000; and iii. travel costs of the member or witnesses from outside BC. c. Unless there are compelling reasons to the contrary, no member shall be reimbursed for legal costs in any action or appeal commenced by the member without prior approval under this procedure. 7. Travel and accommodation Travel and accommodation expenses for members shall be paid in accordance with Federation procedure 10.I. 8. Legal aid and legal assistance process a. Applications for legal aid or legal assistance shall be in writing from the member and directed to staff. b. Where the application for legal aid is not approved, staff shall inform the member of the rights of appeal within the Federation under section 9 of this procedure. 9. Member appeals a. Within 60 days of notification that legal assistance or legal aid is denied, an active member may appeal the decision to the Executive Committee by notifying general counsel of such appeal in writing pursuant to by-law 5.19. Where the application of a former member is refused, the member may request general counsel to place the matter before the Executive Committee, and general counsel may do so at their discretion. (Aug 12 Ex, p. 9) b. Where a member appeals to the Executive Committee, both the member and staff who made the decision appealed from shall forward relevant documents to the Executive Committee, and the member may provide written argument. The member may seek information about the appeal process through the local or directly

from Federation staff but neither the local nor the Federation will provide representation for the appeal. (Aug 12 Ex, p. 9) c. The Executive Committee may decide the matter on the basis of the written material before it, or alternatively may consider the matter at a scheduled meeting with the member and staff present. d. Where the Executive Committee considers only the written material, staff who made the decision appealed from shall not be present. e. Where the Executive Committee decides to conduct an oral appeal, it shall hear from the member and/or a representative of the member, staff who made the decision appealed from, and the member shall have the right to make final comments. When the Executive Committee deliberates on the appeal, neither the member nor staff shall be present. f. All consideration of legal aid requests by the Executive Committee shall be in committee, with Executive Committee members only, and all information in connection with them shall be treated in strict confidence. g. Where there is an oral appeal, the commitment of the Federation extends to the travel and accommodation expenses, where applicable, of the member and representative at Federation rates but does not extend to any fees or other charges by the representative. h. The decision of the Executive Committee is final and binding. (May 04 Ex, p. 1) (May 08 Ex, p. 9)

19.06―Arbitrator’s costs for expedited arbitration process That, should locals successfully negotiate an expedited arbitration process that the Federation will pay the locals’ half of the cost of the arbitrator, at the arbitrator’s hourly rate; however the Federation reserves the right to limit such costs in appropriate circumstances. (Nov 10 RA, p. 8)

20. Membership Definitions 1. Active members [by-law 1.1(a) and 1.1(b)] must sign up with a local and the Federation. Have voting rights. 2. Associate members [by-law 1.2] must apply to the Federation. Do not have voting rights. 3. Honorary associate members [by-law 1.3] have membership conferred on them by the Executive Committee. Do not have voting rights, other than the right to select delegates to vote on pensions resolutions at the Annual General Meeting. 4. Honorary members [by-law 1.4] have membership conferred on them by the Annual General Meeting or the Representative Assembly. Do not have voting rights. 5. Honorary life members [by-law 1.5] have membership conferred upon them by the Annual General Meeting. No payment of dues while active members. Have voice but no vote at the BCTF AGM when no longer active members. (Nov 11 Ex, p.5 ) 6. Affiliate members [by-law 1.6] must apply to the Federation. Do not have voting rights. (Includes affiliate administrative members.) (Mar 88 Ex, p. 9) (Jan 00 Ex, p. 10)

A. Active (Voting) Membership 20.A.02—Active (voting) membership shall be granted for the term of a person’s employment to: 1. All persons employed as teachers in a BC school district who sign up to a local and the Federation, including: a. teachers on call who hold a valid BC teaching certificate; and b. persons who hold a valid BC teaching certificate, and who are employed by school boards to teach K–12 curriculum courses, or equivalent thereto. 2. All exchange teachers coming to BC from another country or province, without signing up or paying a membership fee. Exchange teachers are not eligible for a number of collective agreement benefits that are negotiated for members and are not eligible to receive benefits from the Salary Indemnity Plan. (Jan 16 RA, p. 8)

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3. Associated professionals and others who are employed in a school district to provide professional services to students and/or teachers, who are covered by the collective agreement, and who sign up. (Jan 00 RA, p. 12) (Nov 09 RA, p. 7)

20.A.04—For certainty, the following categories of persons are deemed pursuant to By-law 1.1(b) to be active members of the Federation and of the local in which they have applied for active membership: 1. Teachers on call who have not previously been active members, who are included on the TTOC list in the district, and who are actively seeking work as a TTOC: from the date of application for active membership for six months or until dues from employment are received, whichever period is shorter. 2. A teacher teaching on call active member who is elected as president or to another full or part-time position in a local: for the period of the term or terms of such office(s), provided dues are paid, at the regular rate, on the salary received by such active member for such office. 3. An active member who is elected as a delegate to the Annual General Meeting, during the period up to the commencement of the AGM, for purposes of acting as a delegate to the AGM, provided that the individual may only attend the AGM as a delegate if active membership status has been otherwise re-acquired by the commencement of the AGM. 4. An active member who has been elected to a BCTF local or provincial office or who has been appointed to a provincial committee or other position requiring active membership, and who retires from continuing employment with the school district, provided that, a. the individual is placed forthwith on the TOC list in that district, and b. the individual is actively seeking TTOC work for a period of six months or until dues are paid from employment as a TTOC, whichever period is shorter. (Jan 00 RA, p. 12) 20.A.06—Where an active member works in more than one local: 1. the active member is presumed to be able to vote and hold office (“voting membership”) in the first local in which application for membership is made 2. where an active member works as a teacher teaching on call in more than one local and is subsequently employed on a regular temporary or continuing contract, voting membership will be assigned to the local in which the member has the temporary or continuing contract 3. an active member working in more than one local may elect to change their voting membership by notice to the BCTF membership department, and the “old” and “new” voting locals, provided such notice is not given after lockout, or when strike notice is served by BCTF or a third party. (Jan 00 Ex, pp. 10-11) (10 AGM, p. 14) B. Associate Membership 20.B.02—Associate membership shall be granted upon application and receipt of fees to the following people: 1. Persons holding instructional positions in recognized education institutions that are not public schools. "Public school" means a school established and maintained under the provisions of the BC School Act. 2. Persons who do not hold valid BC teaching certificates and are employed as teacher replacements by a board of school trustees. 3. Persons who hold valid BC teaching certificates but are not employed as teachers. 4. Persons employed as home-school co-ordinators by a board of school trustees. 5. Members of the BC Early Childhood Educators' Association. 6. Teachers, active or retired, holding certificates valid in other provinces. 7. Students enrolled in programs of study in university/college programs leading to certification as teachers. (Apr. 01 Ex, p. 8)

8. Associated professionals who are employed in a school district to provide professional services to students and/or teachers, and who are not covered by the local’s collective agreement. 9. Persons employed by school boards who teach in night school or adult education programs or courses which are part of the regular school curriculum or equivalent thereto, who have university level training or relevant specialized experience, and who are not covered by the local’s collective agreement. 10. Members who as active or affiliate administrative members have been in receipt of, and who will continue to receive Salary Indemnity Plan benefits or benefits from another salary continuance plan, who cease to be employed by a school board, shall be granted associate membership without application or payment of fees. 11. Other persons who meet the criteria of by-law 1.2, and who apply to and are accepted by the Executive Committee. (Jan 94 Ex, p. 19) (Jan 00 Ex, p. 11)

20.B.04—Associate memberships other than those granted under 20.B.02(2)―teacher replacements are subject to the following conditions: 1. The membership year corresponds to the membership year in by-law 4.2. 2. To continue their membership, an individual must submit a renewal application each year. (Mar 88 Ex, p. 9) 20.B.06—That associate membership entitle a member to: 1. join provincial specialist associations on payment of the PSA membership fee. 2. participate in BCTF PD activities, as appropriate. 3. participate in BCTF/Seaboard Voluntary Group Life Insurance Plan, the BCTF/North American Group Life Insurance Plan, and the BCTF/Royal Trust Group Registered Retirement Savings Plan where school board payroll deduction is available, and subject to eligibility conditions under the terms of those plans. (June 11 Ex, p. 16) (Aug 12 Ex, p. 10)

C. Affiliate Membership (by-law 1.6) 20.C.02—a. That, in keeping with by-law 1.6, the BCTF enter into affiliation with the education student society executive committees of the public universities and university-colleges of BC according to the terms agreed to by both parties. b. That no affiliation fee be levied upon the education student society executives of the public universities and university-colleges. (85 AGM, p. 23) (94 AGM)

D. Affiliate Administrative Membership 20.D.02—That affiliate administrative membership entitle the member to: 1. participate in the Salary Indemnity Plan; 2. participate in the BCTF/BCSTA Group Life Plan, the BCTF/Seaboard Voluntary Group Life Plan, and/or the Citadel Life Insurance Plan, or their equivalents, where applicable; 3. receive pension and income security advice, such as advice on BCTF benefit plans, unemployment insurance, WCB, the teachers’ pension plan and the Canada pension plan, and have the right to attend pension seminars; 4. receive the Members’ Guide, on request; 5. receive the Teacher, or their equivalents; (13 AGM, p. 16) 6. join provincial specialist associations; 7. participate in BCTF PD activities, as appropriate. (88 AGM, pp. 18-19) (10 AGM, p. 13)

E. Honorary Membership Categories 20.E.02—Honorary Associate Membership (by-law 1.3) 1. Honorary associate membership shall be granted to all active members upon their retirement from teaching. 2. Honorary associate membership may be granted upon application, and with the approval of the president and executive director, to any retired person who at any time prior to retirement was an active member of the Federation. (June 78 Ex, pp. 24–25) (Dec 09 Ex, p. 23)

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20.E.04—Honorary Life Membership (by-law 1.5) 1. Active and retired members who have given outstanding service to education at a provincial level may be nominated for honorary life membership. (June 78 Ex, p. 25) (Mar 82 Ex, p. 9)

2. The rights of honorary life membership vary with employment and be equivalent to the membership category related to employment status of the individual. 3. That fees be waived for all honorary life members. (Jan 90 Ex, p. 12)

4. That honorary life members be granted voice at BCTF Annual General Meetings. (94 AGM p. 40) 5. That, while serving on the Executive Committee, Executive Committee members not be eligible for nomination to be granted Honorary Life Membership. (Apr 16 Ex, p. 18) 20.E.06—Honorary Membership (by-law 1.4) 1. Persons who have made a contribution to education that is recognized provincially may be nominated for honorary membership. 2. Where honorary membership has been granted in recognition of public office, such membership shall terminate when their terms of office end. (June 78 Ex, p. 25) F. Miscellaneous POLICIES 20.F.01—That the BCTF work towards the inclusion of all adult educators in BC school districts as members. (Feb. 03 Ex, p. 7) 20.F.03—That the BCTF seek changes to Sections 20 and 21 of the School Act that would make provisions governing membership in the teacher bargaining unit a matter to be resolved through the collective bargaining process. (March 03 Ex, p. 7) PROCEDURES 20.F.02―That the BCTF continue as the single organization for teachers in the BC public schools. (June 78 Ex, p. 25) 20.F.06—That providing new members with information about the benefits of belonging to the BCTF be initially the responsibility of the local, with the assistance of the BCTF Membership Department. (June 78 Ex, p. 26)

20.F.08—That membership certificates be issued to new members upon formal induction into the local. (June 78 Ex, p. 26) (Aug 11 Ex, p. 6)

20.F.10—That it be the responsibility of each local to ensure that members who are on leaves of absence continue to receive all local materials and information that are available to their active members. (June 78 Ex, p. 27)

20.F.14—That members conduct themselves in a manner to avoid arrangements that undermine the policies and procedures of the Federation. (Nov. 01 Ex. p. 4) (Dec 12 Ex, p. 15)

20.F.16—That locals consider developing local procedures to ensure that locally-elected officers do not place themselves in a conflict of interest or a perceived conflict of interest when applying for school district human resources or management positions. (May 04 RA, p. 12)

20.F.18—That the Federation publicly express its opposition to the removal of freely negotiated membership requirements and that all MLAs be made aware of the results of previous attempts by government to do so. (Aug. 02 Ex, p.16) 20.F.20―That the BCTF: 1. organize all certified teachers working in the public school system across the province who are teaching BC curriculum courses leading to graduation, but who are not currently members of the bargaining unit. 2.ensure that those teachers have equal rights and protections including equal pay scales. (09 AGM, p. 20)

G. BCTF Conflict of Interest Policy for Members PROCEDURES 20.G.02―BCTF Conflict of Interest Policy for Members 1. Purpose The purpose of this Policy is to promote transparency and reduce the incidence and impact of conflicts of interest. It is intended to identify real, potential and perceived conflicts of interest and provide for the consistent application of measures to prevent and deal with such conflicts of interest. The Federation is committed to ensuring that its business and activities are conducted in a manner consistent with the interests of the membership as a whole and in a manner that maintains the memberships’ trust and confidence. To achieve this, the Federation is putting in place this Policy to provide procedures to ensure conflicts of interest are disclosed and either avoided or appropriately managed. 2. Application This Policy applies to all members of the Federation. It is anticipated that members who are politically active in the Federation will be at a greater risk of being in breach of a real, potential or perceived conflict of interest. For this reason, Federation officials (i.e., those politically active in the Federation) are responsible for informing themselves and complying with the requirements imposed on them by this Policy. 3. Definition A conflict of interest includes a situation where personal considerations may compromise, or have the appearance of compromising, a person’s professional judgment. A personal interest includes business, commercial and financial interests, as well as personal matters and career interests. Conflicts of interest are situations in which an impartial observer might reasonably question whether actions or decisions taken by a member are influenced by considerations of personal interest. There are three distinct types of conflicts: a. A real conflict of interest is a situation where the personal interest actually conflicts with the member’s obligations to the Federation. b. A potential conflict of interest is a situation where the personal interest has not yet conflicted with the member’s obligations to the Federation but might in the future. c. An apparent conflict of interest occurs where an actual or potential conflict may not exist but where there may be, from the perspective of a reasonably well-informed, impartial observer, a perception of a conflict of interest. This is also referred to as a “perceived” conflict of interest. Conflicts of interest fall into two further categories: those that may be appropriately managed and those that are prohibited because they cannot be appropriately managed. A conflict does not occur when the interest or benefit to the member is only as part of the advancement of the interests of the Federation as a whole (i.e., negotiations regarding salary, benefits and other terms and conditions of employment that will benefit a larger group). 4. General Principles A conflict of interest occurs when the proper administration of a member’s duties clashes, or appears to clash, with their private financial affairs. A conflict of interest occurs when the proper administration of a member’s duties clashes, or appears to clash, with their political or professional interests outside of the Federation. Members should not, for private gain, make use of information obtained through in-committee sessions, or is otherwise confidential and not available to the public, and to which they have access by reason of their membership in the Federation. A member should not put herself or himself in a position where their judgment could, even unconsciously, be affected by a friendship or close relationship with someone whose interests diverge from those of the Federation. A conflict of interest can arise at any time. The mere existence of a conflict of interest does not imply wrongdoing or impaired judgment on a member’s part. However, conflicts of interest must be recognized, disclosed and avoided or appropriately managed. 5. Examples of Specific Conflicts of Interest 99

A conflict of interest would occur if a member were to become involved in a Federation election in which they were the nominating chair for the election. Nominating chairs must be seen to be completely neutral. A conflict of interest would occur if a member were to become involved in Federation politics when employed as a staff member of the Federation. Staff members should remain neutral so that they can serve all those within the Federation, regardless of political affiliation. A conflict of interest would occur if a member who was also a member of the BC Teachers’ Council of the Teachers’ Regulation Branch remained at a meeting that was discussing, in-committee, Teacher Regulation Branch issues. The member could remain if they were specifically invited by the chair of the meeting to stay. 6. Personal and Confidential Information A member who receives personal or confidential information in the course of Federation business or activities must not use the confidential information for any purposes other than those for which it is disclosed. 7. Obligation to Disclose Any member who becomes aware that they have an actual, potential or apparent conflict of interest that would, or may reasonably be perceived to, affect the member’s participation in Federation business or activity must, as soon as practical, disclose the existence, nature and scope of the conflict to the Executive Director. A disclosure statement should be updated if any material change occurs. Members are encouraged to raise matters of concern regarding conflicts of interest to the Executive Director. Any information provided anonymously will not be acted upon unless the information is independently substantiated. A member’s disclosure of a conflict of interest will be kept confidential, except as necessary to investigate whether a conflict of interest exists and, if so, its scope. The failure to disclose a conflict of interest or abide by the provisions of this Policy may result in disciplinary action. 8. Determination of Conflict of Interest Where an actual, potential or apparent conflict of interest has been disclosed, the Executive Director shall determine whether a conflict of interest exists and, if so, the appropriate measures to deal with the conflict of interest including whether the member can continue to participate in the activity, whether it can be carried out with appropriate safeguards, or whether the member must remove herself or himself from the situation or activity. If there is an actual, potential or apparent conflict of interest involving the Executive Director, the Executive Committee shall determine the issue. Where the Executive Director has made a determination that a conflict of interest exists, and the appropriate measures for dealing with it, the Executive Director shall notify the member, generally in writing, and include any terms and conditions that must be followed. Note: The decision of the Executive Director is binding and final, subject only to external review by appropriate legal bodies. 9. Consequences Terms and conditions imposed by the Executive Director may include the removal of Federation privileges such as, but not limited to: a. removal from discussion and vote regarding the matter in which the conflict arises. b. attendance at Federation meetings partially or wholly prohibited. c. access to the portal partially or wholly removed. d. (in rare circumstances) a recommendation to the Executive Committee that a member be removed from an official position (elected or appointed) within the Federation. All consequences will be conducted in accordance with the principles of due process and procedural fairness. (Jan 13 Ex, p. 15) 20.G.04―BCTF Conflict of Interest Policy for Executive Committee and Senior Management (collectively referred to as “EC Members”) 1. Purpose This policy is intended to be read and interpreted as additional to the BCTF Conflict of Interest Policy for Members. The purpose of this policy is to promote transparency and avoid the incidence and 100

impact of conflicts of interest. It is intended to identify real, potential and perceived conflicts of interest and provide for the consistent application of measures to prevent and deal with such conflicts of interest in compliance with the Societies Act. 2. Definition A conflict of interest includes a situation where personal considerations may compromise, or have the appearance of compromising, an EC member’s professional judgment. A personal interest includes any direct or indirect material and career interests. Conflicts of interest are situations in which an impartial observer might reasonably question whether actions or decisions taken by an EC member are influenced by considerations of personal interest. A conflict of interest does not occur where the interest or the benefit to the EC member is only as part of the advancement of the interests of the EC or the Federation as a whole (i.e. voting on bargaining matters for the entire bargaining unit or the purchase of insurance to benefit all EC members). 3. General Principles EC members must act honestly, in good faith and with a view to the best interests of the Federation and its purposes. EC members must exercise the care, diligence and skill of a reasonably prudent person in similar conditions. EC members should not, for private or political gain, make use of information to which they have access by reason of their position as EC members. EC members should not participate in decisions if they have a direct or indirect material interest in a contract or transaction, or a proposed contract or transaction, that conflicts with their duties to the Federation as a whole. EC members should not participate in decisions that could create a duty that materially conflicts with their duty to the Federation. EC members should not act in manner that advances the interests of their local over the EC member’s obligations and responsibilities to the Federation. EC members should not put themselves in a position where their judgment could, even unconsciously, be affected by a friendship or close relationship with an individual about whom a decision must be made or who will benefit from an EC decision. 4. Disclosure If there is a potential conflict of interest, the EC member must: a. fully disclose to the full EC the nature and extent of the material/career interest, friendship or relationship. b. leave the EC meeting when the matter is discussed, unless specifically asked to provide information. c. leave the EC meeting and abstain from voting on any recommendations or resolutions pertaining to the matter. d. not take any action or engage in any discussions intended to influence the discussion or vote, including discussions outside the EC meeting. The disclosure of any conflict of interest must be recorded in the minutes of the relevant EC meeting. (Apr 17 Ex, Appendix 1)

21. Ministry of Children and Family Development POLICIES 21.A.01—Delivery Model That the following principles be the foundation for any schoollinked integrated service delivery model for students “at risk”: 1. Child-centred: The well-being, development and safety of children/youth (persons under 19 years of age) is the primary focus of all policies, programs and services. It is understood that children/youth are usually best served in the context of their families. 2. Integrated and Comprehensive: The integrated, service delivery system supports the child and family through access to a continuum of services, from prevention to intervention, that are integrated provincially, regionally, locally and in the school. 3. Respectful of collective agreements: Providing integrated services and bringing personnel together from various agencies can be complicated without an awareness and respect for the collective agreement(s). 4. Collaborative: Collaborative processes and team structures strengthen the capacity of communities, service providers

and families to support children and youth. Role clarity underpins the ability to collaborate effectively. 5. Empowering: Processes that strengthen the capacity of communities and families to operate independently and selfsufficiently, to determine their own needs, and to plan how they will meet these needs are pivotal. 6. Quality and accountability: The new system will be open and accountable to clients, and the public, with consistent standards and quality that service the comprehensive mandate of public schools (e.g., BCTF policy 9.A.01). Services provided by teaching professionals will be governed by the BCTF Code of Ethics, policies on the roles, responsibilities, and rights of members (e.g., 9.A.01, 9.A.09), and the provincial collective agreement. 7. Equity: Children/Youth and families need access to educational opportunities and the necessary supporting human services to achieve equitable outcomes. It is recognized that some students, because of social, economic, physical or cultural barriers, require additional specialized support (see BCTF policy 9.A.07). 8. Culturally sensitive: Programs and services are culturally sensitive and appropriate. 9. Resources: Programs and services are adequately funded and all personnel are provided with the necessary time to do the work. (Jan 97 Ex, pp. 25–26) 21.A.03—That any successful, school-linked integrated service delivery model will meet the following operating criteria: 1. Develops a local school-community model that identifies the best match between needs and resources. 2. Ensures appropriate school personnel (such as school counsellor, inner city project teacher or youth at risk co-ordinator) link with community human service agencies in a multidisciplinary team in a manner respectful of the collective agreement and work jurisdictions. 3. Involves all key players in the formulation of policy and protocols resulting in clarity around roles/responsibilities. 4. Uses an integrated case management system, with clarity around information sharing. 5. Designates a liaison for each child and family receiving services. 6. Provides a continuum of year-round services/programs from prevention to intervention to treatment and support. 7. Researches and builds on successful models and best practice. 8. Builds shared understanding and shared vision among community members regarding a child-centred integrated service model. 9. Respects the integrity of school-community based programs. 10. Agrees on criteria and processes for on-going evaluation. 11. Provides on-going, job-embedded, multi-disciplinary training, the necessary time and professional development for all staff. (Jan 97 Ex, pp. 26-27) 21.A.05—That no locally-developed protocols exceed reporting requirements as laid out by the Ministry of Children and Family Development. (May 00 RA, p. 16) 21.A.07—That the BCTF demand that the Ministry of Children and Family Development and school boards ensure implementation of the confidentiality provision in the provincial template in order that teachers who report suspected child abuse are protected from violence and other forms of intimidation and harassment. (June 00 Ex, p. 21)

PROCEDURES 21.A.02—That the BCTF seek to establish ongoing liaison meetings between representatives of the BCTF, the representative for children and youth, and representatives of the Ministry for Children and Family Development to discuss issues around children in care and our respective roles and responsibilities to ensure the highest quality of services and care. (Feb 09 Ex, p. 5)

21.A.04―1. That teachers co-ordinate the development of common education plan for children in care and that appropriate support staff be included in the development of such plans. 2. That schools employ on-site school counsellors whose sole work is to support children in care at a ratio of 8 CIC per-schoolbased counsellor. 3. That Ministry of Children and Families Development staff act as prudent parents and be fully involved in the development of common education plans. 4. That all teachers receiving a child in care be informed about the individual child’s status and history prior to the child being assigned. (Aug. 09 Ex, p. 6) 21.A.06―That school counsellors be informed of and be requested to annually remind students in care of post secondary bursaries, grants, and funding opportunities to further their education. (Sept 09 Ex, p. 4) 21.A.08―That the Federation request the Ministry of Education (MOE) and the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) to include teachers in the work of developing transition plans for students in care. (Sept 09 Ex, p. 4) 21.A.10―That the BCTF encourage teachers working with the CIC to involve these children, if appropriate, in developing transition plans when they move between grades or schools. (Sept 09 Ex, p. 4) 21.A.12―That the Ministry of Education (MOE) and the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) use a wide range of indicators that include the child’s aesthetic, social, emotional, intellectual, and physical development and well being when supporting and assessing the individual progress of children in care.” (Sept 09 Ex, p. 5)

22. Ministry of Education A. District Superintendents POLICIES 22.A.03—That the Minister of Education should implement procedures to provide for consultation with locals of teachers in the hiring of locally or provincially appointed district superintendents. (June 73 Ex, p. 21) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

B. Scholarships 22.B.01—That the Ministry of Education should expand its financial assistance program to any student who requires assistance to start and/or continue their tertiary education. (75 AGM, p. 92) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

22.B.05—That the BCTF encourage the provincial government to reallocate its present budget for government scholarship examinations on an equitable basis to schools that wish to reward graduating students for any kind of excellence. (Oct 74 RA, p. 18) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 18)

22.B.07—That the BCTF promote structures and processes to the end that the secondary school staff recognize and reward, from a provincial fund, secondary school students who are prepared to undertake practical, creative and self-initiated projects that will advance personal career goals and/or benefit society in some tangible manner. (Oct 74 RA, p. 18) (Reviewed June 80 Ex, p. 14)

22.B.09—That the BCTF seek a more equitable distribution, based on a broad variety of specialty areas, in the presentation of special government bursary awards to graduating secondary students. (Feb. 86 RA, p. 13) C. Miscellaneous 22.C.01—That the Ministry of Education should bear the cost of teachers on call and/or other expenses for member representatives to attend ministry-initiated meetings. (June 79 RA, p. 13) 101

22.C.03—That teachers who are employed by the Ministry of Education to do non-seconded curriculum work such as writing, revising and reviewing Integrated Resource Packages, reviewing and evaluating resources, preparing and marking provincial exams and evaluating resources, and other similar activities be paid their daily rate as per their collective agreement for weekends and/or summer work. (Nov. 00 RA, p. 6)

25. Organization of the BCTF PROCEDURES A. General 25.A.02—That the BCTF publication, Simplified Rules of Order, shall apply as establishing rules of order for all meetings of the Federation other than the Annual General Meeting, and Representative Assembly, and for all meetings of its locals, provided that, where a local constitution does not prescribe a figure to represent a quorum, 15 per cent of the members in good standing shall constitute a quorum. (75 AGM, p. 8) (83 AGM, p. 22)

25.A.04—1. That all BCTF province-wide votes be administered, counted and released by the BCTF. (84 AGM, p. 40) (May 97 RA, p. 13)

2. That for ratification votes, advance polls be allowed in order to provide every member a reasonable opportunity to vote. (Nov. 00 RA, p. 6)

25.A.06—Procedures for Ratification and Other ProvinceWide Votes (except strike votes and as otherwise determined by the Representative Assembly): 1. All members shall receive at least 48 hours notice of the vote. 2. The vote shall be conducted by secret ballot. 3. The vote will be conducted in all parts of the province in the same period of time. 4. Notice of the vote will be: a. posted to all schools and other major work sites; and, b. provided in local newsletters or bulletins to all members. 5 The executive of each local shall notify the Provincial Returning Officer of the local’s request to conduct the vote in that local in one of the following manners: a. at all schools/work sites, b. at specific central schools/work sites or union offices, c. at a general meeting(s), d. at a general meeting(s) and at specific schools/work sites. The Provincial Returning Officer shall approve the request and any vote to be conducted in a manner other than as outlined above must be approved by the Provincial Returning Officer. The Provincial Returning Officer shall ensure that all requests for alternative methods afford members a reasonable opportunity to vote. 6. Information regarding the issue to be determined must be provided to members in a timely manner before the vote takes place. 7. Reasonable provision shall be made for advance voting for members who will not be able to vote in their local during the voting period. 8. Each local shall appoint a local returning officer who is an active BCTF member to assist the Provincial Returning Officer. 9. The count shall be conducted by the Provincial Returning Officer. Any information obtained during the count, except the provincial results of the vote, shall remain confidential. The vote will be counted locally with reports from local returning officers to the provincial returning officer. Any information obtained during the count, except the provincial results of the vote, shall remain confidential. 10. The results of the vote will be reported by the Provincial Returning Officer to the Federation president and the Executive Committee. The president will notify local presidents of the results of the vote, prior to any public release of the count. (June 01 RA, p. 9-11) (June 06 RA, p. 7)

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25.A.08—That Federation resources not be used to support or advertise unofficial groups within the Federation, except for letters and articles in the Teacher Magazine. (May 98 RA, p. 9) (Nov 15 Ex, p. 8) 25.A.10—1. That, upon request of a hearing-impaired participant, a sign language interpreter be provided for any meeting of a Federation decision-making body, committee or task force and that locals and PSAs be encouraged to make similar provisions for any of their activities. (Oct 90 Ex, p. 11) 2. That the BCTF provide sign language interpretation services upon request and with 10 days notice for members who are deaf and hard of hearing and are attending meetings or professional development activities organized or sponsored by the BCTF. (Jan 02, Ex. p. 8)

3. That locals be encouraged to provide, upon request, sign language interpretation services for members who are deaf and hard of hearing and are attending meetings or professional development activities organized or sponsored by the locals. (Jan 02, Ex. p. 8) 25.A.12—That member opinion surveys be conducted from time to time on matters of specific or general interest. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 10)

25.A.14—That the full-time table officers be authorized to release all or sections of any member or public survey conducted by the BCTF provided such release does not compromise the interest of members and/or the Federation. (Apr. 97 Ex, p. 3) 25.A.18—That in meeting dietary requests of members at BCTF functions where meal(s) are provided, such requests be limited to those made for health or medical reasons only. (Apr. 01 Ex, p. 9) 25.A.22—That BCTF work areas, hallways, and meeting rooms in the BCTF building be declared scent-free effective July 1, 2004 and that all employees and members who regularly attend meetings at the building be so advised. (June 04 Ex, p. 12) 25.A.24—That, effective October 1, 2005, no smoking be permitted anywhere on BCTF property. (June 05 Ex, p. 21) 25.A.26—1. That the Spring RA annually elect four members who will be members of the RA for the upcoming year, two male and two female, to serve as ombudspersons for the RA to assist members who feel they have been harassed at the meeting. 2. That the Executive Committee appoint four members, two male and two female, to serve as ombudspersons for the AGM to assist members who feel they have been harassed at the meeting, and that these members: a. not be voting members of the assembly or have other elected or appointed responsibilities at the meeting b. have current or past experience in internal mediation service experience or other relevant experience in conflict resolution. c. complete specific antiharassment training with a focus on issues relevant to equity groups. 3. That the RA ombudspersons and the AGM ombudspersons: a. provide assistance to members who feel they have been harassed or assist in the resolution of member to member complaints. b. assist with disputes discretely and confidentially with the members directly concerned, involving others only when absolutely necessary. c. respect the confidentiality of all individuals throughout the process and ensure that all individuals directly involved in the process are made aware of any outcome directly concerning them. d. bring to the attention of the chairpersons, rather than the meeting directly, those concerns that, on rare occasion, are pertinent to the whole assembly, recognizing that the chairpersons are responsible for the decorum and conduct of the meeting as a whole. e. take action to stop harassment, up to and including recommending to the chairpersons, Executive Director, and president, the removal of an individual from the meeting. 4. That the following Commitment to Solidarity guide the conduct of members participating in BCTF meetings:

a. We believe that union solidarity is based on the principle that all members are equal and deserve mutual respect. b. We understand that an inclusive union is a stronger union, and commit to embracing both unity and diversity. c. We commit to ensuring that members of equity-seeking groups are welcomed, fully included, and treated equitably and respectfully at all Federation meetings and events. (Nov 16 RA, p. 6) d. We believe that all members have the right to feel safe and be treated with dignity at BCTF meetings. e. We commit to conducting all Federation meetings in an environment free from harassment, discrimination, and intolerance. f. We undertake to give our full attention to members, presenters, and invited guests who are addressing our meetings. g. We value vigorous discussion, welcome active participation, and encourage members to share perspectives and debate positions because through such debate we develop strong policies and practices. h. We appreciate that our union has a long and spirited tradition standing up for firmly held views, and that we do this internally with each other and externally as a collective. i. We respect our democratic processes and understand that, once our decisions are made, the collective position prevails. 5. That the Commitment to Solidarity statement be: a. read to the meeting by a chairperson in the opening session of every Annual General Meeting and at the Representative Assemblies. b. reviewed annually at Federation committee meetings. c. circulated to participants in major Federation meetings, conferences and events. (May 13 RA, pp. 16–17) 6. That the Commitment to Solidarity be translated into French and made available. (June 13 EC, p. 22) 25.A.28―Safe, secure, and respectful environment The BCTF is committed to providing a safe, secure, and respectful environment that is free from bullying and harassment at all BCTF-sponsored meetings and events as is reflected in Procedure 25.A.26.4, the Commitment to Solidarity. This applies to all members attending BCTF-sponsored events. 1. Definition of bullying and personal harassment a. Bullying and personal harassment is defined as behaviours that would be understood by a reasonable person to be contrary to the development and maintenance of a respectful relationship. These behaviours include, but are not limited to, incidents that are: i. vexatious; conduct, comments, actions, or gestures which are humiliating, offensive, hurtful, or belittling. ii. repeated; conduct, comments, actions, or gestures that when taken in isolation seem minor, but when repeated can lead to a conclusion of harassment. iii. a single incident of sufficient seriousness to have a significant impact on the recipient or the environment. iv. hostile or unwanted. v. affecting the member’s dignity, well-being, or physical integrity. vi. resulting in a harmful or poisoned environment. b. Examples of bullying and personal harassment include, but are not limited to: i. written or verbal comments, actions, gestures, or other behaviours or “jokes” which are humiliating, offensive, hurtful, or belittling. ii. intimidation. iii. abusing authority. iv. yelling or shouting at an individual or group (except where intended to alert another to danger). v. attempting to discredit an individual or group by spreading false information about them. 2. Actions that are not included in this policy a. Nothing in this policy is meant to fetter lively discussion of different points of view and vigorous debate, as reflected in the Commitment to Solidarity statement, or the exercising of authority as provided for in the Standing Rules of Order of the Annual General Meeting and Representative Assembly, and the Simplified Rules of Order for other BCTF meetings. b. The policy is also not meant to discourage well-meaning, active engagement in the union and should be seen as a way to

prevent complaints and/or support the resolution of complaints, rather than a means to limit engagement, influence political decisions, or restrain participation. 3. Member responsibilities Every member has the right to be treated in a fair, reasonable, and respectful manner. Members covered by this policy are responsible for creating a respectful environment by: a. ensuring behaviours are respectful and appropriate at all times. b. accepting responsibility for one’s actions, reactions, and behaviours, and their impact on others. c. making one’s concerns known promptly and appropriately. d. being a part of the solution by raising concerns directly with the member in private, by approaching the conversation with an open mind, by clarifying one’s concerns in a respectful manner with resolution being the focus and goal. 4. No reprisals No adverse action, including retaliation, shall be directed to either a member making a complaint or receiving a complaint. All complaints are made in good faith and on the basis of reasonable beliefs. 5. False or frivolous complaints Members shall not make false or frivolous complaints. 6. Confidentiality All proceedings under these procedures including resolutions shall remain confidential, subject to the Federation’s ability to conduct a full and thorough investigation, if necessary. The Federation will not disclose any information about a complaint except as is necessary, and only to the extent that is necessary, in order to investigate the complaint, to take action on the complaint or as may be required law. 7. Expected behaviours and stated values Appropriate behaviours create an environment of mutual support and respect. a. All members are equal and deserve mutual respect. b. An inclusive union is a strong union and we commit to embracing both unity and diversity. c. All members have the right to be safe and to feel safe and be treated with dignity at BCTF meetings. d. All Federation meetings will be conducted in an environment free from harassment, bullying, discrimination, and intolerance. e. All members commit to giving our full attention to members, presenters, and invited guests who address our meetings. f. Vigorous discussion and active participation is valued. g. Sharing and debating perspectives respectfully and sharing our firmly held beliefs with each other in meetings and externally as a collective. h. Members strive to resolve member-to-member conflicts in a timely, constructive, resolution-focused manner. 8. Resolution―BCTF, RA, or AGM All members will commit to good faith participation in the process by seeking resolution. When a member feels that they are the target of bullying or harassing behaviours they may: a. raise concerns directly with the member in private, by approaching the conversation with an open mind, by clarifying one’s concerns in a respectful manner with resolution being the focus and goal, and/or. b. contact the appointed ombudspersons for the meeting. The procedures outlined in 25.A.26.3 will be followed. (Nov 14 RA, pp. 9–11)

9. Resolution―other BCTF meetings and events (sponsored and initiated by the BCTF) All members will commit to good faith participation in the process by seeking resolution. When a member feels that they are the target of bullying or harassing behaviours they may: a. raise concerns directly with the member in private, by approaching the conversation with an open mind, by clarifying one’s concerns in a respectful manner with resolution being the focus and goal, and/or. b. Contact the Executive Director as per the process outlined in 10 below. 103

10. Resolution―additional processes Where member-to-member conversations have not achieved resolution and/or when a member has chosen to take the complaint directly to the Executive Director, the following process will be followed: a. The member making the complaint (initiator) will submit to the Executive Director a written complaint, signed and dated. A copy of this complaint will be provided to the responder. The complaint must include: i. the names of the initiator and responder. ii. details of the incident(s) that led to the complaint, including dates, places, names of members involved or witnesses to the incident(s) and any other relevant information. b. The Executive Director will review the complaint. This review will include contact with the initiator, the responder, and may include any witnesses if, in the opinion of the Executive Director, more information is required. Should the responder choose to provide written information that information will be provided to the initiator. The Executive Director will determine whether: i. the complaint has been appropriately dealt with and resolved, or ii. if not resolved satisfactorily, commence a mediation process. c. If it is determined that a mediation process will commence, mediation may include: i. support and guidance to members in conducting difficult conversations. ii. development of new skills or approaches for resolving the conflict. iii. exploration of options for resolution. iv. facilitation of joint problem solving meetings. d. The Executive Director will have the discretion to draw on BCTF members from the Internal Mediation Service or seek assistance from external sources. (Jan 15 RA, p. 10–11) Note: None of these procedures are applicable to local association offices. Locals, as employers are obliged to develop their own policies and procedures dealing with bullying and harassment in the workplace, and are advised to put their own policies and procedures in place for locally sponsored meetings and events. (Nov 14 RA, pp. 9–11)

25.A.30―That the BCTF mirror their policy of purchasing fair trade coffee by purchasing fair trade tea and encourage other BC unions to adopt a similar policy. (Oct 08 Ex, p. 107) 25.A.32—That the Federation charge a minimal fee for access to a members’ personal information in the possession and/or control of the Federation, and that the Federation provide the member with a written estimate of the fee before providing the personal information and that staff be requested to identify a threshold and possible schedule of charges and authorization protocols. (March 09 Ex, p. 15)

25.A.34—That at the commencement of major Federation meetings, e.g., RAs and AGMs, conferences, trainings, or workshops, the following announcement be made if photographs and/or videos are to be taken: “Members are reminded that photographs and/or videos may be taken during the course of this meeting. Any member not wishing to be included in any post-meeting publication, should notify the director of the Communications and Campaigns Division or member of staff responsible at the beginning of the meeting.” (Nov 09 Ex, p. 15)

25.A.42—That BCTF Annual General Meetings and Representative Assemblies be declared scent-free, and that delegates be requested not to wear perfume, cologne, or any scented products. (04 AGM, p. 41) 25.A.44—That the BCTF ensure that every building used for BCTF events or meetings have a designated gender-neutral washroom that is accessible to all members. (17 AGM, p. 34) 25.A.46—That the BCTF encourage all attendees and speakers, including invited quests, at BCTF meetings to use genderneutral language and provide a list of suggested terms. (17 AGM, p. 36)

B. Governance Structure 25.B.02—That the organizational structure of the BCTF be as follows: 1. An Annual General Meeting as provided for in By-law 8. (05 AGM, p. 41)

2. A Representative Assembly, which shall consist of: a. Local representatives chosen by locals according to the following formula: Percentage of BCTF Membership Less than 2.5 per cent 2.5 per cent to 4.99 per cent 5 per cent to 7.49 per cent 7.5 per cent to 9.99 per cent 10 per cent and more

Number of Local Representatives 1 2 3 4 5

plus 1 additional local representative for locals of 1,000 or more members. No local with more than 500 members shall have fewer than 2 local representatives. (00 AGM, p. 23) b. Members of the Executive Committee as non-voting members. c. Local presidents as non-voting members, unless elected by their local as a Local Representative. (04 AGM, p. 15) 3. An Executive Committee consisting of: a. The immediate past president. b. President, first vice-president and second vice-president— elected for one-year terms by the Annual General Meeting. c. Seven Executive Committee members-at-large—elected by the Annual General Meeting for two-year terms in such a manner as to ensure that at least three vacancies shall be filled at each Annual General Meeting. (65 AGM, pp. 4-5) (Sept 90 RA, p. 4)

4. That until the investigation of representation is complete and the amalgamated and non-amalgamated locals are treated equally, if locals amalgamated in or after 1996, the formulae for determining representation and voting cards as set out in procedure statements 25.B.02 and 25.D.02 shall be applied to the amalgamated local so that it is entitled to the total representation of the former locals as though there had been non amalgamation. (03 AGM, p. 41) (04 AGM, p. 34)

25.B.04—1. That the position of BCTF Past-President be limited to a one-year term immediately following the person’s term as President. 2. That, for the one-year term a Past-President serves, the Past-President position will be an additional position on the Executive Committee and will not alter the number of Member-at-Large positions nor the length of the Member-at-Large terms.

25.A.36―That bottled water not be provided at any Federation meetings. (Nov 09 RA, p. 11)

(84 AGM, p. 39) (17 AGM, p. 21)

25.A.38―That vendors providing food for meetings at the BCTF building do so using containers that are reusable or recyclable and that the Federation only use vendors who do so. (Oct 10 Ex, p. 13)

25.B.06—That if a member, who has served as full-time table officer or as a term appointee to the Federation staff, exhausts all their sick leave after returning to teaching, unused leave accumulation during service with the Federation be automatically available, and that attendant costs be a charge against the Federation. (Jan 78 RA, p. 13)

25.A.40―When the representatives to BCTF training, meeting, and conference events are selected, equity in access and representation should be a guiding principle. (11 AGM, p. 16) 104

25.B.08—That the three main constituent parts of the organization named above be allocated powers as follows: 1. The Annual General Meeting shall be the sovereign body of the Federation. Both the Executive Committee and the Representative Assembly shall be responsible to it. 2. All powers at present vested in the Executive Committee shall continue to be so vested except as specifically allocated to the Representative Assembly. 3. The powers of the Representative Assembly shall be: a. to exercise budgetary control. b. to advise the Executive Committee on any matter concerning the welfare of the Federation. c. to authorize or prohibit any proposal of the Executive Committee for action that is contrary to, or beyond the scope of, BCTF policy. d. to make reports, submissions and recommendations to the Annual General Meeting. e. to nominate candidates for the offices of president, vicepresidents and members-at-large of the Executive Committee. f. to receive full reports of all actions of the Executive Committee and its appointees, and to meet as often as required for thorough discussion of these reports. g. to reprimand or suspend for cause any local or provincial specialist association. h. to nominate persons for honorary membership in the Federation. i. to carry out such duties and to accept such powers as shall be assigned from time to time by the Annual General Meeting. (65 AGM, pp. 6–7) (May 80 RA, p. 15)

C. Executive Committee 25.C.02—That all decisions of the Executive Committee or Representative Assembly that affect the autonomy of locals must be ratified by the next ensuing AGM before becoming BCTF policy or procedure. (61 AGM, p. 20) (Reviewed Nov 76 Ex, p. 8)

25.C.04—That the chairperson of the Executive Committee have a deliberative vote. (Jan 74 Ex, p. 26) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

25.C.06—That, upon request of two or more members of the Executive Committee, the vote on any motion shall be recorded by name. (May 75 Ex, p. 2) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

25.C.08—That the Executive Committee agenda: 1. be set by the president in consultation with the other fulltime table officers and the executive director, and considering advice from committee chairpersons, Executive Committee members and staff, received prior to agenda preparation; 2. be premailed (normally the Friday preceding an Executive Committee meeting); 3. be added to or amended by formal motion; 4. be controlled as to the scheduled time of items; 5. be based on premailing of background information, working papers and reports for prestudy; 6. normally, not include recommendations from a committee or task force meeting concurrently with the Executive Committee; 7. list persons who will be present to speak to any item; (Jan 95 Ex, p. 12) (Dec. 97 Ex, p. 19)

25.C.10—That committee and task force chairpersons and staff be advised of the normal dates on which agendas will be set. (Aug 75 Ex, p. 2)

25.C.12—That there be no recorded vote in open session on any legal aid, personnel, or staffing issue, or on any issue on which a secret ballot was taken while the Executive Committee was meeting “in committee" or “in-private” session. (May 76 Ex, p. 1) (Nov 14 Ex, p. 3)

25.C.14—That after having received pertinent information from the party or parties concerned, decisions regarding requests for legal aid be dealt with in committee of the whole with only members of the Executive Committee present. (Sept 77 Ex, p. 3) 25.C.18—Procedures for Executive Committee conference call meetings: 1. Executive members will be notified in advance before the date and time for conference calls and their purpose. 2. Background information will be available to Executive members electronically. 3. When possible, information will include agenda, recommendations, and background. 4. The meeting shall be run by the normal rules of order; motions shall be moved and seconded; the vote shall be taken by calling out the name of each Executive member on the call. 5. Minutes of the call shall be printed and distributed on the same basis as minutes of meetings of the Executive Committee. 6. Minutes shall be subject to correction (not amendment) prior to adoption at the next regular meeting of the Executive Committee. (Aug 81 Ex, pp. 5-6) (Oct 14 Ex, p. 8)

25.C.20—Executive members are generally expected to be physically present at Executive Committee meetings. Executive members may request participation in an Executive Committee meeting by telephone or electronic hook-up under the following conditions: 1. a personal or family emergency, or medical accommodation requires the Executive Committee member to remain close to home. 2. Weather conditions make it impossible or a risk to one’s safety to attend the Executive Committee. 3. The Executive Committee member is elsewhere on urgent BCTF business authorized by the Executive Committee or the President. 4. The Executive Committee is representing the Federation at another body as authorized by the Executive Committee or the President. (Apr 02 Ex, p. 9) (Oct 14 Ex, p. 8)

25.C.22—That a BCTF Executive Committee member be able to assume a staff position only after they have left the Executive Committee for a minimum of one full school year. (Nov 89 Ex, p. 9) (May 08 RA, p. 3)

25.C.24—1. That the Executive Committee be authorized to consult with the Ministry of Education on any matter on which BCTF policy has been established. 2. That the Executive Committee should consult the Representative Assembly and/or the membership for instruction on any matter on which BCTF policy has not been established. (56 AGM, p. 2) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 14)

25.C.26—That the following guidelines be adopted for Executive Committee zonal contacts and visits to locals. 1. EC Zonal Contacts a. Prior to the August Executive Committee meeting, the President will determine the assignment of Executive Committee zonal contacts. b. FTTOs will not be zonal contacts. c. Other EC members will be assigned to zones which do not include their own locals unless it is not possible to do so. d. Zonal contact assignments will be rotated periodically. No EC member shall be assigned to a zone for more than two consecutive years. (Dec 11 Ex, p. 18) (Dec 15 Ex, p. 6)

2. EC Visits to Locals a. All requests for EC visits to locals shall be directed to the BCTF. b. FTTOs will fill these requests where possible. If an FTTO is not available, other EC members shall be asked on an equitable basis. (Dec. 97 Ex, p. 19)

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25.C.30—That Executive Committee members, staff, and guests be requested to turn off their cell phones while a meeting of the Executive Committee is in progress. (Aug. 03 Ex, p. 2)

25.D.08—That an important function of all local representatives be to exchange and interpret information between the BCTF office and locals. (65 AGM, pp. 5-6) (Reviewed Oct 80 RA, p. 13)

25.C.32―That newly elected officers of the BCTF receive new and young worker orientation prior to taking office, and that locals be requested to develop procedures to ensure that all locally released officers receive new and young worker orientation. (June 09 Ex, p. 15) 25.C.34―Posting on social media Executive Committee members should: 1. be guided by the principles of the Commitment to Solidarity when posting on social media at BCTF meetings. 2. be familiar with the Federation’s Conflict of Interest policy and avoid any real, potential, or apparent conflict in relation to their use of social media. 3. not post any information related to the business of an incommittee or private session. 4. not post the decisions of the Executive Committee until after the key decisions document has been published online. 5. consider the best interest of the Federation when posting on social media about reports and presentations to the Executive Committee meetings, visits to locals, and participation in Federation events. (Dec 13 Ex, p. 6) 25.C.36―Federation spokespersons That the following be the procedure pertaining to Federation spokespersons: 1. The President is the official spokesperson for the Federation. 2. Where authorized in advance by the President, the spokesperson’s role may be delegated to the First Vice-President or Second Vice-President. The President may also ask Executive Committee members or other active members, where appropriate, to act as official spokespersons for the Federation on specific matters. In these circumstances, a briefing will be provided accordingly. The use of the Federation’s name and one’s office as an Executive Committee member may only be cited when authorization as spokesperson has been granted. 3. Those authorized to act as spokespersons shall do so responsibly, recognizing that speaking on behalf of the Federation generally means to communicate or report authoritatively, including but not limited to: a. official positions or policies of the Federation as articulated in the Members’ Guide, or by other decisions of the Executive Committee, Representative Assembly, or Annual General Meeting. b. campaigns and activities of the Federation. c. information that has been developed by Federation. (Apr 14 Ex, pp. 16–18)

25.C.38― Posting EC meeting documents That all formal documents and reports submitted to the Executive Committee, with the exception of those deemed to be confidential, be made available to Local Representatives and Local Presidents on the member portal, and that Local Presidents and Local Representatives be notified of the material posted in advance of each Executive Committee meeting. (Nov 16 RA, p. 7) D. Representative Assembly 25.D.02—That allocation of voting cards at the Representative Assembly be determined as follows: each local and sublocal shall be assigned a number of voting cards equivalent to one vote for every 0.2 per cent of the total voting membership of the Federation, or fraction thereof; however, each local and sublocal shall be assigned at least one voting card. (73 AGM, p. 60) (79 AGM, p. 31)

25.D.04—That local representation and voting card entitlement for the Representative Assembly for the succeeding school year shall be computed on the BCTF membership figures available on March 31 each year and shall remain in force for the entire succeeding school year. (May 76 Ex, p. 17) (Reviewed Oct 80 Ex, p. 13)

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25.D.10—That the RA elect its Agenda Committee. (Jan 79 RA, p. 25)

25.D.12—That members being nominated to the Representative Assembly Agenda Committee must already be elected as LRs for the ensuing year. (May 80 RA, p. 9) 25.D.14—1. That the RA Agenda Committee consist of: a. the president and the chairpersons of the RA as non-voting members; b. five LRs, elected by the assembly at its spring meeting, as voting members. 2. That the Agenda Committee elect its own chairperson. (June 79 RA, p. 12)

25.D.16—1. That locals, prior to submitting resolutions to the Representative Assembly, be requested to seek advice and background information from the Executive Committee and staff and appropriate committees. (May 94 RA, p. 11) 2. That the RA Agenda Committee, in recommending an agenda to the RA, be requested to place local resolutions at an early point on the RA agenda. (Jan 90 Ex, p. 35) 25.D.18—That where possible, the RA agenda and full documentation of BCTF RA agenda items be provided to local representatives at least three weeks before the RA to allow for local input on issues and that materials on emergent issues be sent at least seven days prior to the RA. (Feb 91 RA, p. 3) (Nov. 02 RA, p.7)

25.D.20—That all business sessions be non-smoking sessions. (Oct 78 RA, p. 2)

25.D.22—That to fulfil the requirement of By-Law 6.10, the RA shall: 1. approve a budget that will meet the financial objectives of the Federation; 2. ensure that significant shifts in resources are consistent with priorities set by the AGM; 3. approve the creation, continuance, expansion or curtailment of programs. (June 79 RA, p. 13) 25.D.24—That budget information to be considered by the RA be circulated at least two weeks prior to the Spring RA. (Jan 90 Ex, p. 35)

25.D.28—That alternate local representatives who request it shall be added to the BCTF Representative Assembly mailing list. (Jan 79 RA, p. 33)

25.D.30—That the Representative Assembly receive documentation concerning legal aid requests or decisions only through formal motion by the Executive Committee and/or Representative Assembly. (Jan 78 RA, p. 15) 25.D.34—That all Federation documents sent to local representatives and local presidents be labelled clearly regarding the following: 1. confidentiality 2. appropriate distribution 3. as an action request and/or 4. as information. (Feb. 01 Ex, p. 8) 25.D.36—That the RA adopt the following voting procedures for election for RA positions: 1. Election for positions voted on by the Representative Assembly shall be by secret ballot. 2.The Nominating Chairperson or alternate shall oversee all elections. (Jan 15 RA, p. 8)

3. Curriculum vitae for each individual running for election will be distributed to local representatives if received before the close of business on the previous day. 4. Ballots shall be distributed to duly recognized local representatives on the basis of one ballot for each voting card held by the LR. 5. If the meeting concurs, balloting for more than one position may be done concurrently. 6. A ballot shall be deemed valid if marked for at least one candidate, but shall be declared invalid if marked for more candidates than the number of vacancies to be filled. Should the validity of any ballot be questioned by any person assigned to count the ballots, it shall be the sole responsibility of the chief scrutineer to decide whether or not that ballot is valid. 7. On the completion of the count, the chief scrutineer shall report to the meeting the number of votes received by each candidate, without attaching names to the numbers. Following an indecisive ballot, and before each candidate is identified with the vote count, the candidate receiving the fewest votes shall be dropped from the ballot. At this time, the meeting may, at its discretion, order the dropping of additional candidates from the next ballot. 8. No candidate shall be declared elected unless th receives more than 50 per cent of the number of valid ballots cast. 9. At any time prior to the conducting of a ballot any candidate may, by giving notice to the meeting, withdraw their name from further balloting. (Jan 87 RA, p. 14) 25.D.38—That the scrutineers at the RA be selected from members of the Representative Assembly or alternate LRs. (June 82 RA, p. 10) (Nov. 07 RA, p. 12)

25.D.40—That prior to the adoption of major policies and procedures by the Representative Assembly, locals be given adequate time and information to consider the issues and advise their representatives of the local’s views. (86 AGM, p. 9) 25.D.42—That at the first RA in the fall, a presentation on RA policies and procedures precede the official start time of the meeting. (Nov. 02 RA, p.7)

25.D.44—That in order to prepare for the RA, locals be encouraged to provide release time for LRs as necessary. (Nov. 02 RA, p.8)

25.D.46—That Representative Assemblies be scheduled in keeping with its organizational and decision-making role and consistent with past practice as follows: 1. The Fall RA should normally be at the end of the ninth week following the September opening of school. 2. The Winter RA should normally be held six weeks prior to the commencement of the AGM. 3. The spring RA should normally be held at the end of May or beginning of June, approximately four weeks prior to the end of the school year. (Jan 04 RA, p. 5) 25.D.50—That any publications or documents distributed at Annual General Meetings or Representative Assemblies will be consistent with anti-discriminatory social justice policies of the BCTF. (May 04 RA, p. 12)

25.D.52—That the process for submitting local resolutions for consideration of the Representative Assembly be as follows: 1. Local resolutions received a full two weeks prior to the Representative Assembly will be sent out to local representatives with the agenda. These resolutions will be costed and the costing made available to local representatives at the RA. 2. Local resolutions received a full week prior to the Representative Assembly will be sent to local representatives electronically. These resolutions will not be costed. All resolutions received by the BCTF a full week prior to the Representative Assembly will be placed on the RA Agenda as a local resolution. 3. Resolutions submitted after the deadline for a particular meeting of the RA will be considered as late resolutions by the RA Agenda Committee if the matter dealt with in the resolution occurred too late for the motion to be submitted prior to the deadline.

(June 06 RA, p. 7) (May 09 RA, p. 13–14)

25.D.54—That when a local president is also a member of the Executive Committee, the local be permitted to send a designate to the Representative Assembly. (May 04 Ex, p. 4) 25.D.56—That, in the event that a local president or local representative is elected to the position of RA chairperson, the local be permitted to send an alternate at BCTF expense. (May 11 RA, p. 12)

25.D.60—That all BCTF Annual General and Representative Assembly meetings have: 1. at least one microphone that is easily accessible to people with disabilities. 2. a system in place that allows people with disabilities to speak without having to make their way to a microphone. (Jan 09 RA, p. 9)

25.D.62―Health and safety reps at RAs and AGM That the RA yearly elect two local representatives of the RA to sit as health and safety representatives for members at the Representative Assembly meetings, and recommend to the Executive Committee that the AGM do the same. (Nov 13 RA, p. 3) 25.D.64—Finance Committee representation That the Representative Assembly annually at the Spring RA elect two local representatives, who have been elected as LRs for the ensuing year, to serve as members of the BCTF Finance Committee in addition to those appointed by the Executive Committee. (Nov 13 Ex, p. 6)

25.D.66―Health and safety representatives 1. That the Spring RA annually elect two members, who will be local representatives for the upcoming year, to serve as health and safety representatives for the RA. 2. That the Executive Committee annually recommend to the AGM the names of two members who will serve as health and safety representatives for the AGM. 3. That the health and safety representatives for the RA and AGM be provided an orientation prior to the commencement of the Fall RA and of the AGM. 4. That the role of RA and AGM health and safety representatives be as follows: a. To assist designated staff with the health and safety inspections done before the commencement of the RA and AGM as well as the inspections done at intervals during the meetings. b. To advise designated staff of any health and safety concerns brought to their attention or observed during the meetings. c. To investigate and remedy, in conjunction with designated staff, any situation that poses a health and safety hazard. d. To bring to the attention of the chairpersons, if necessary, any information that is deemed relevant to the health and safety of members at the meeting. (Dec 13 Ex, p. 4) F. Committees, Task Forces and Representatives to Outside Agencies 25.F.02—That the Executive Committee define and approve terms of reference for all committees and task forces, and review same at least triennially. (Aug 78 Ex, p. 40) 25.F.04—That no task force or committee be struck until its terms of reference have been defined and approved by the Executive Committee. (Aug 78 Ex, p. 40) 25.F.06—That when a task force is established, it be given a time limit of no more than two years for preparation of a final report. (Oct 78 Ex, p. 14)

25.F.08—That any BCTF member be eligible to serve on any BCTF committee or task force. (Feb 80 Ex, pp. 2-3) (91 AGM, p. 46)

25.F.10—That committee vacancies normally be posted and filled once annually. (June 81 Ex, p. 11) 107

(Nov. 02 Ex, p.8)

25.F.12—Procedures for recruiting BCTF committees and task force members: 1. Vacancies on committees will be publicized to the membership through email bulletins and on the BCTF website. Postings for task forces positions will be posted at large, or, depending on the terms of reference and composition of the task force, may be advertised to specific groups within the membership. Postings for committee or task force appointments will provide relevant information about the role and a link to the BCTF curriculum vitae form online. All postings will specify the date and time of the deadline for receipt of the curriculum vitae by the BCTF. The postings will also make members aware of the considerations listed in 25.F.12.5. Postings will also encourage the FFWL members to apply. 2. Each nominee will be required to submit a BCTF curriculum vitae form, available on the BCTF website, that includes: a. educational background; b. an outline of teaching experience; c. an outline of BCTF (including local) experience; d. a statement of why they wish to serve in the specific position; e. names of two references. Applications received after the deadline will not be considered. 3. Curriculum vitae forms will be kept confidential, to be shared with the Executive Committee, the recording secretary for the EC and the BCTF administrative staff member who co-ordinates the committee or task force. The fact that a person has expressed a willingness to serve will not be confidential. 4. That in making appointments to BCTF committees and task forces, the Executive Committee will take into account: a. the importance of representation from members in their first five years of teaching. b. the importance of representation from all areas of the province. c. the need for diversity and to ensure that members from equity-seeking or minority groups are represented on committees. d. the importance of achieving a balance of males and females representative of the general membership. Note: the points above are not listed in priority order. 5. That in making appointments to the Advisory Committee on French Programs and Services, attempts be made to make appointments representative of the range of French programs in the province (including core French, French immersion, and the Francophone school district). 6. Appointments will normally be made after receipt of a report and recommendations to the Executive Committee from a table officer. The designated table officer will consult with the staffperson who co-ordinates the committee or task force in advance. 7. In filling committee and task force vacancies the following will apply: a. The Executive Committee will vote by secret ballot, with applicants being required to receive more than 50% support in order to be appointed. b. When a ballot has been inconclusive, the name with the lowest number of votes will be dropped off. c. If a subsequent ballot is not conclusive, the Executive Committee may vote to repost the vacancy. d. Where family members of Executive Committee members are candidates for an appointment to any Federation body, the Executive Committee members shall absent themselves from deliberations and the absence shall be recorded in the minutes. e. Out-going Executive Committee members will not be eligible for appointment to committees or task forces until a period of one year has elapsed between leaving the Executive Committee and beginning a committee or task force term. 8. a. The normal term of appointment shall be three years, expect where one- or two-year appointments are made to ensure that approximately one-third of the committee members are appointed each year. b. Except by special resolution of the Executive Committee no person may serve more than six consecutive years on any particular committee. 9. When a committee member completes a term: 108

a. they are eligible to apply again, if they have not yet reached the limit of six years, but must submit a new curriculum vitae to apply for reappointment. b. being eligible does not guarantee appointment for a subsequent term. Note: When a member is not reappointed, it may be for various reasons such as the considerations listed in section 5. above, and should not be taken to imply a lack of confidence in the applicant. (May 12 RA, p. 10) (Aug 15 EC, pp. 7–15)

25.F.14—That committees and task forces annually select a chairperson/chairpersons from the membership of the committee/task force at a meeting after July 1. (Aug 78 Ex, p. 41) 25.F.16—That, in the event a BCTF committee or task force is unable to select a chairperson, the Executive Committee shall decide who shall be chairperson. (Aug 78 Ex, p. 41) 25.F.18—That committee and task force chairpersons serve on a voluntary basis. (Aug. 78 Ex, p. 41) 25.F.20—That members of the Executive Committee not serve as voting members or chairpersons of BCTF committees or task forces. (Aug 78 Ex, p. 41) (Sept 17 Ex, p. 2)

25.F.24—That printed guidelines and terms of reference for the guidance of committee and task force members be mailed out to these members: (a) on appointment, and (b) at least once each year to continuing members. (Aug 78 Ex, p. 41) 25.F.26—That committees and task forces annually review pertinent policy and procedure statements, by-laws and terms of reference. (Nov 76 Ex, pp. 9–10) (Aug 78 Ex, p. 38)

25.F.28—1. That BCTF advisory committees, as committees, not become involved in attempting to influence the election of candidates to the Executive Committee. (Sept 89 Ex, p. 2) 2. That BCTF advisory committees not become involved in (June 17 Ex, p. 13) staffing decisions of the Federation. 25.F.30—1. That the reports and recommendations of all Executive-appointed committees and task forces be submitted to the Representative Assembly and Annual General Meeting only through the Executive Committee. 2. That, in the event that the Executive Committee does not endorse, or substantially changes, any of the recommendations from a BCTF committee or task force, the Executive Committee shall, upon the request of a committee or task force, make an annotation in the report of the Executive Committee to the Representative Assembly and/or Annual General Meeting. 3. That all committees and task forces be requested to keep their reports to the Executive Committee and/or Representative Assembly as concise as possible, emphasizing general matters of policy or procedures rather than details. 4. That the deadline for submission to the BCTF office of reports for the Executive Committee be the Tuesday of the week before the Executive Committee’s meeting. 5. That the reports of all committees and task forces to the Executive Committee consist of two parts: a. recommendations, together with supporting statements, and b. additional information. 6. That committees and task forces be encouraged to distribute minutes of their meetings no later than one week following a meeting. 7. That reports and recommendations from committees and task forces that differ from the Executive Committee’s recommendations should be available to the appropriate decisionmaking body. 8. That major committees schedule one of their already funded meetings between January 31 and the AGM to deal with any resolutions that are within their terms of reference.

9. That, unless otherwise approved by the Executive Committee or a full-time table officer, only one member of a committee/task force report on behalf of the committee/task force. (Nov 76 Ex, pp. 8-9) (Nov 88 Ex, p. 10)

25.F.32—That committees and task forces obtain Executive Committee approval before soliciting funds from any outside organization, and that no committee or task force may solicit funds from locals. (Aug 78 Ex, p. 38) 25.F.34—That with the exception of committees/task forces dealing with personnel matters, any member may, at their expense, attend committee/task force meetings. (Dec 78 Ex, p. 2) 25.F.36—That any member making a scheduled presentation at a committee/task force meeting may enter debate on that presentation. (Dec 78 Ex, p. 2) 25.F.38—That any member may enter debate at a committee/task force meeting with the agreement of the meeting. (Dec 78 Ex, p. 2)

25.F.40—That the special members to the BCTF Assistance Society be from the Lower Mainland. (Mar 81 Ex, p. 5) 25.F.42—The Federation both appoints representatives to outside agencies (these representatives promote the objectives of and are responsible to the BCTF), and nominates representatives to outside agencies that make the appointments (these representatives safeguard the interests of BCTF members, may not always have the opportunity to actively promote BCTF objectives, and are responsible to the agencies). (Aug 78 Ex, p. 38) 25.F.44—BCTF Representatives to Outside Agencies 1. That the BCTF, through its representatives, assert itself as the voice of public school teachers in British Columbia and speak on behalf of public school teachers in all areas that address the professional, social, and economic interests of teachers. (Jan 10 RA, p. 14)

2. The Executive Committee decides whether or not the BCTF shall appoint or nominate representatives to outside agencies, what process shall be followed in making appointments or nominations, and the term of appointments. 3. Before appointing or nominating representatives, the following information shall normally be obtained and included in any posting: a. the terms of reference of the group b. the time frame of the group c. the expected frequency of meetings of the group d. the reporting lines of the group. 4. In appointing or nominating representatives to outside agencies, the Executive Committee may: a. post province-wide b. post regionally c. solicit names from local presidents, PSA officers, etc. d. appoint without posting; e.g., Executive Committee members, committee members and task force personnel, staff members e. authorize BCTF committees/task forces and/or PSAs to make appointments or nominations from among their own members f. authorize BCTF committees/task forces and/or PSAs to post positions and make appointments or nominations from among the nominees. 5. When circumstances dictate, the president and/or first vice-president and/or executive director may make appointments on an interim basis subject to review by the Executive Committee, and in making such appointments, may solicit names. 6. When positions are posted: a. nominations be accepted from locals, provincial specialist associations, district councils, local representatives, members or groups of members b. nominees be required to submit curriculum vitae forms. 7. Those who are appointed or nominated by the BCTF:

a. shall have demonstrated familiarity with and support for BCTF policy b. be encouraged to seek advice from BCTF officers concerning proposals that appear to deviate from BCTF policy c. be prepared to make recommendations that would assist in developing policy. 8. Those who are appointed: a. regularly submit reports to the BCTF as requested; b. shall, when there is more than one representative to the same agency, be permitted to meet together with BCTF staff as needed at BCTF expense to prepare reports and consider recommendations. (Feb. 06 Ex, p. 9) 9. Except by special resolution of the Executive Committee, no person serve more than two consecutive terms on any one group. 10. Any BCTF active member in good standing be eligible to serve on provincial advisory committees. (Aug 78 Ex, pp. 42-43) (Rev. Jan 95 Ex, p. 13)

25.F.46—BCTF Representatives on Ministry Committees That the following principles be endorsed for the governance of BCTF participation on ministry policy committees: 1. member representatives are of the organization not from the organization; 2. BCTF names representatives, the minister does not choose from a list; 3. ministry choice from membership-at-large is not acceptable. (May 81 RA, p. 16) 4. members serving on ministry committees submit a report as requested to the BCTF in writing on the work of that committee within 30 days. (Apr. 00 Ex, p. 19) (Feb. 06 Ex, p. 9)

25.F.48—1. Any ministry advisory committee should include a majority of members, appointed by the BCTF. 2. BCTF opposes any reduction of numbers of members on ministry committees. 3. The current committee structure should remain in place until the end of this school year. 4. Program steering committees should continue until programs have been implemented. (Jan 94 RA, p. 8) 25.F.52—Selection of BCTF Representatives on Ministry Curriculum Committees 1. The core selection committee be a minimum number of three who fit the basic criteria (in item 4. below). 2. The three on the committee include the PSA Council chairperson or designate, a PSA president or designate who fits the discipline or cross-curricular concern, and member of the BCTF staff. 3. When a three-person committee is deemed to be too narrow pursuant to PSAC policy, the PSA Council chairperson, member of BCTF staff, and a full-time table officer shall decide on the number and composition of the enlarged committee. 4. The basic criteria for members of the selection committee include: a. expertise in the area required by the committee. b. sensitivity to process skills and team building. c. collaborative skills. d. understanding the terms of reference and the implications for the work of the committee. e. familiarity with Ministry committee structures and protocols. f. ability to work within timelines. 5. If the PSA Council chairperson or designate or a PSA president or designate applies for a ministry committee, they shall not also be a member of the selection committee. 6. Opportunities to serve shall be advertised to all members via the Federation’s electronic distribution lists. 7. Proposed advice to BCTF representatives should: a. understand their role as a representatives of the Federation as a whole; b. be cognizant of the Code of Ethics; c. contact BCTF staff for assistance in mediation processes, should the need arise;

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d. understand their responsibilities and be fully prepared and committed to do the necessary preparation, reading and other work associated with the committee. (Nov 93 Ex, pp. 10-11) 8. The final selection of BCTF representatives on Ministry curriculum committees shall be authorized by the FTTOs, based on recommendation from the selection committee. (May 16 Ex, pp. 2–3) 25.F.54—That the BCTF advertise, shortlist and nominate BCTF members as possible members of ministry curriculum committees only if the ministry agrees to use the BCTF as the sole means of obtaining its nominations of BCTF members. (May 81 RA, p. 17)

25.F.56—1. That the president and executive director or their designates determine those conferences at which the BCTF will be represented and appoint the delegates who will attend. 2. That, wherever possible and appropriate, the conferences be advertised so that any BCTF member may apply to attend. 3. That, in selecting delegates to conferences, the president and executive director shall be guided by the following provisions: a. The member must have some background in the area to be studied. b. The topic of study must be of general concern to the profession. c. The member attending must be prepared to report back to the Federation and, as appropriate, to advisory committees, to PSAs, or, through the Federation, to the broader membership. (Mar 78 Ex, p. 9) (Oct 13 Ex, p. 7)

25.F.58—That upon specific request from the ministry for teacher consultants, and following consultation with the appropriate PSA(s), the BCTF: 1. names individual members; or 2. provides a list of names to the ministry; or 3. waives the opportunity to name members. (June 90 Ex, p. 15)

25.F.62—That in developing protocols with the ministry, the BCTF seek to include an understanding on the part of the ministry that Federation members be surveyed only through the Federation and/or its locals. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 10) 25.F.64—That regular meetings of BCTF standing committees be held between the school year book ends of the first school day after Labour Day and the last school day in June. (Feb. 04 Ex, p. 7) 25.F.66—That advisory committees may use conference calls to co-ordinate their work but shall seek FTTO approval for any conference call meeting where advice or recommendations to the Executive Committee will be considered. (Apr 06 Ex, p. 4) 25.F.68—1. That prior to the August Executive Committee meeting, the President will determine the assignment of Executive Committee liaison to advisory committee meetings and PSA Council. 2. That no Executive Committee member shall be assigned as liaison to an advisory committee for more than two consecutive years. The exception to this shall be liaison with PSA Council, which will be assigned to the FTTOs, and is deemed to be ongoing. 3. That Executive Committee members attend meetings of advisory committees as non-voting members of the committee. 4. That the purpose of Executive Committee attendance at advisory committee meetings be to enhance the ongoing liaison between the advisory committee and the Executive Committee. 5. That advisory committees and PSA Council be advised that when they have a substantial report to present to the Executive Committee, the committee or council may wish to have their chairperson attend the Executive Committee and can make appropriate arrangements to do so by contacting their designated FTTO. (Oct 09 Ex, p. 5) (Dec 15 Ex, p. 6)

G. Locals POLICIES 110

25.G.01—That the BCTF encourage locals, where appropriate, to ensure that adult educators are represented on local structures. (Feb. 03 Ex, p. 8)

25.G.03—That the BCTF encourage locals to facilitate the participation of adult educators at local general meetings, and, where appropriate, staff representative assemblies. (Feb. 03 Ex, p. 8)

25.G.05—That the BCTF encourage locals to provide adult educators with opportunities for professional development and access to PD funds. (Feb. 03 Ex, p. 8) 25.G.07—That the Executive Committee encourage locals to elect social justice representatives at every worksite. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 20)

25.G.09—That the Executive Committee recommend that locals facilitate union orientation presentations to student teachers, TTOCs, and new teachers in each local. (Nov. 04 Ex, p. 3) 25.G.11—1. That the BCTF recommend that each local establish a working and learning conditions committee. 2. That the following list be a suggested outline of actions for local working and learning conditions: a. collect and analyze local data b. receive and act on teaching and learning conditions reports from the Federation (Aug 11 Ex, p. 5) c. liaise/assist with local executive committee re: local working and learning conditions objectives d. participate on joint local/board committees e. collect stories regarding class-size and class composition issues f. prepare and make presentations to board members and MLAs g. report to members regarding working and learning conditions issues h. undertake any other initiatives identified by the local. (Jan 06 Ex, p. 13)

25.G.13—1. That locals be encouraged to select a local member to serve as a local parent contact. 2. That the role of the local parent contact be to work with the local to: a. maintain and build on partnerships with parents. b. help inform parents about current education issues. c. facilitate discussions with parents and teachers on issues of mutual interest and concern. d. be available to assist in promoting parent presentations in the local upon PAC request. 3. That support for the local parent contact include: a. web site and email support. b. providing materials to assist in carrying out the role. c. video conferencing. d. encouraging locals to support the LPC in carrying out the role. (June 06 Ex, p. 12) 25.G.17―That locals (where applicable) be asked to name one adult education teacher as the contact for the local. (Feb 11 Ex, p.6) 25.G.19―Union- and Canadian-made products and services That the Federation encourage locals to: 1. purchase union- and Canadian-made products and use union services wherever possible. 2. urge boards of education to incorporate a commitment to supporting union products and services in board policy. (15 AGM, p. 12)

25.G.21―French as First or Working Language chair That the BCTF recognizes the importance of a FFWL representative as a union leader and encourages each local to elect a chair to represent FFWL members (French as First or Working Language), and that: 1. the chair encourage each school site to elect a FFWL representative to communicate with them.

2. the Federation recommends the following description for the role and function of the FFWL chair and FFWL school representative, while recognizing that each local is unique and adjustments to the model may be necessary: A. FFWL Chair—local level 1. Locals ensure that each worksite in the district elects at least one FFWL school representative. 2. Locals ensure the role and function of FFWL school representatives are included in local policy. 3. Locals ensure school union representative training programs be provided for FFWL school representatives. 4. Locals are encouraged to provide release time for FFWL school union representative training. 5. Locals are encouraged to actively participate in or create a district French advisory committee. 6. FFWL chair informs and advises school staffs regarding BCTF FFWL policies. B. FFWL School Representative 1. Organizer/leader a. liaise with and support FFWL members and French programs in the school b. advocates for FFWL rights. 2. Communicator a. receives and distributes information relevant to FFWL members b. attends local meetings of concern to FFWL members c. participates in school professional development representatives’ training to advocate for FFWL members. 3. Advocate a. is familiar with local collective agreement provisions pertaining to FFWL members b. is familiar with local and district FFWL policies c. advocates for members in matters relative to FFWL to improve working conditions d. works collegially with school union representatives, professional development representatives, social justice representatives, and school committees. (Apr 16 Ex, pp. 8–9)

of sublocals in each of the separate communities wherein 10 or more active members of the local teach. (71 AGM, pp. 30-31)

PROCEDURES 25.G.02—That no new locals be formed with a membership of fewer than 20 and any existing local whose membership falls below 12 be discontinued. (Oct 59 Ex, p. 9)

25.G.24—That each local be encouraged to elect one person to act as a contact with the Program Against Racism, and that locals work actively, including through collective bargaining, for the elimination of racism in the schools, and that locals be encouraged to establish an executive position and standing committee with responsibility for actions against racism. (May 92 RA, p. 16)

(June 80 Ex, p. 12)

25.G.04—That no further separation of locals within any one school district be approved. (Jan 64 Consultative, p. 4) (Reviewed 78 AGM, p. 41)

25.G.08—That, pursuant to By-Law 3.1, the executive has a duty to advise each local on the constitution adopted. (Jan 66 Ex, p. 2) (Nov 74 Ex, p. 5)

25.G.10—1. It shall be the function of locals to make representations to appropriate boards of school trustees concerning matters that affect the welfare of the members of the local and to make representations to the BCTF about matters deemed to concern the welfare of members generally. 2. It shall be the function of the BCTF to make representations about matters concerning the welfare of members to any authority or agency whose powers are such as to affect the welfare of members and the profession. (May 97 RA, p. 14) 3. It shall not be the right of any member to make representations to any authority or agency outside the BCTF on any matter that is properly the concern of the local or the BCTF. 4. It shall not be the right of any local to make representations on any matter that is properly the concern of the BCTF. (63 AGM, p. 4) (Reviewed Jan 76 Ex, p. 23)

25.G.12—That the BCTF recognizes the value and importance of sublocals within any school district that includes communities isolated geographically from the main centre of population in which the school district administrative offices are located. A local may make provision within its constitution for the formation and operation

(90 AGM, p. 63)

25.G.14—1. That it shall be the function of a sublocal of a local to provide a forum through which members of the sublocal may consider, debate and vote on matters about which the local will make or may make representation to appropriate boards of school trustees. 2. That a sublocal shall make representations to a board of trustees only with approval of the local. (71 AGM, p. 32) (90 AGM, p. 63)

3. That sublocal presidents be included in all BCTF meetings (other than those relating to bargaining) which are open to local presidents. (May 98 RA, p. 9) 25.G.16—That locals be encouraged to elect at or before their May meetings their table officers and local representatives, the chairpersons of their bargaining, status of women and professional development committees. (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19) (Jan 95 Ex, p. 13)

25.G.18—That locals be urged to organize and assist such special interest groups as specialist associations, departments or sections responsible to the local. (Oct 64 Ex, p. 21) (Jan 76 Ex, p. 29)

25.G.20—That each local be encouraged to appoint a local professional development committee to offer advice and to stimulate programs in such areas as in-service education, curriculum design and implementation, and school buildings, facilities and grounds; to help co-ordinate the activities of PSA chapters; and, where applicable, to work with the Professional Issues Advisory Committee through the member of PIAC assigned to the local and its BCTF zone. (74 AGM, pp. 22-23) (June 02 Ex, p. 13)

25.G.22—That each local be encouraged to make an annual (Feb 76 Ex, p. 15) budget presentation to its school board.

25.G.26—That unincorporated locals be advised to have ByLaw provisions for emergency general meetings on short notice. (Jan 83 Ex, p. 3)

25.G.28—That locals incorporated under the Society Act be advised to make By-Law provisions for emergency representational and/or informational meetings. (Jan 83 Ex, p. 3) 25.G.30—That the local fee for voluntary active membership should not exceed 10 per cent of the local active fee. (June 83 Ex, p. 13)

25.G.32—That locals be encouraged to include the representational role and function for local representatives in local constitutions and/or policy and procedure statements. (Jan 90 RA, p. 9)

25.G.34—That locals be urged to consider RA agenda items at local membership meetings prior to the provincial RA. (Jan 90 RA, p. 9)

25.G.36—That locals be encouraged to include teacher-on-call members in local induction, orientation and training opportunities. (Apr. 98 Ex, p. 2)

25.G.38—That local officers with 50% or more release time be provided, on request from the local president, with a BCTF email username, access to the bctf-pres email list, and access to the internet through the BCTF Internet Service. (Dec. 98 Ex, p. 16)

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25.G.40—That the determination of “large local” be based on the number of members in the local unrelated to the number of fulltime equivalent local officers released. (Jan 01 RA, p. 14)

25.H.06—That locals use the Declaration of Continuing Education Principles (30.A.09) as a guide when planning training for staff representatives. (May 86 RA, p. 21)

25.G.42—That the BCTF recognize, as per By-law 3.1, all current locals and sublocals. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 5)

25.H.08—That the Staff Representative Training Program: 1. Provide staff representatives with the skills and knowledge to fulfill their role as a communicator, advocate, and union leader in the school. 2. Ensure that staff representatives have a current knowledge and awareness of the collective agreement including specifically those processes which require school-level representation and/or advocacy. 3. Familiarize staff representatives with current local and BCTF priorities and communications vehicles relevant to union members in the school. (Jan 89 Ex, p. 28)

25.G.44—That locals be encouraged to establish: 1. a local WLC position on the local executive, or 2. a joint WLC and bargaining position on the local executive. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 5) H. Staff Representatives 25.H.02—That the BCTF continue its program to support local staff representative networks. (86 AGM, p. 42) 25.H.04—That the BCTF encourage locals to adopt and promote the following description of the role and function of staff representatives: Role of Staff Representatives 1. Staff Representatives—School Level a. Communicator: i. Attend local staff representatives meetings to provide liaison between the local and the school staff. ii. Hold school meetings to report on local/BCTF activities and concerns. iii. Post, retain, and file contracts, policies and all relevant information regarding local and BCTF activities. b. Advocate: i. Serve as the school advocate for all staff members regarding: ii. Services and benefits. iii. Contractual rights and responsibilities. iv. Grievance procedure. v. Local and BCTF policy. c. Organizer/Leader: i. Ensure that elections for school-based positions are held annually. ii. Carry out duties and responsibilities assigned by the local. iii. Translate school concerns into local action/policy. iv. Ensure that democratic structures (e.g., staff committees) are in place so that staff members can be involved in decisions that affect them. v. Be a member of the school staff committee. vi. Increase the school staff’s participation in the bargaining process (e.g., setting objectives, action to support objectives). vii. Ensure that staff/professional development be promoted so that the real needs of school staffs can be assessed and addressed. 2. Staff Representatives—Local Level a. That locals ensure that each school in the district elects at least one staff representative by June 30 of each year. b. That locals ensure that the role and function of staff representatives be included in local constitutions or policies. c. That locals ensure that regularly scheduled meetings of staff representatives be held each year. d. That, each year, locals provide for ongoing training of staff representatives. e. That locals be encouraged to provide release time for staff representative training. 3 Staff Representatives—Provincial Level a. That the BCTF, when communicating with individual schools, should normally do so through the elected staff representative(s). b. That the BCTF promote and provide a training program for staff representatives in locals. c. That the design and planning of all local staff representative training programs include consideration of the needs identified by the staff representatives participating in the training program. d. That staff representatives inform and advise school staff regarding BCTF policies. (May 86 RA, pp. 16–21)

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(May 97 Ex, p. 10)

25.H.10—The BCTF recognizes the PD Representative as a union leader and encourages locals to adopt and promote the following description of the role and function of the school-based professional development representatives, recognizing that each school situation is unique and adjustments to the model may be necessary. 1. PD Representative—School Level a. Organizer/Leader i. Ensures that an election for school professional development representatives and members of the school professional development committee is held annually. ii. Chairs the school professional development committee. iii. Develops with the staff a job description of the school professional development representative and the committee. iv. Encourages staff members to identify professional development needs and establish goals each year. v. Develops with the school professional development committee a professional development plan based on the needs and goals identified in (iv) above. vi. Ensures that where school-based professional development funds exist, they are distributed equitably according to locally established policies and procedures. vii. Carries out other duties and responsibilities within school professional development guidelines as assigned by the school professional development committee and the district professional development committee. b. Communicator i. Receives and distributes relevant professional development and BCTF information. ii. Attends staff meetings to report on school, local, and BCTF professional development/BCTF education change opportunities and information. iii. Attends local meetings of school-based professional development representatives to provide liaison between the local and school professional development committees. iv. Participates in School Professional Development Representatives’ Training which provides the knowledge and skills to assist the school PD rep in performing their roles. c. Advocate i. Is familiar with contract language and local policies related to professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. ii. Serves as school advocate for all teachers in any matters related to professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. iii. Participates with other school-based professional development representatives in generating appropriate contract language and local policies for professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. iv. Works collegially with Staff Representatives and school committees. 2. PD Representative—Local Level a. That locals ensure that each school in the district elects at least one school-based professional development representative each year.

b. That locals ensure that the role and function of schoolbased professional development representatives is included in local policies and professional development handbooks. c. That locals ensure that training programs, provided at BCTF expense, be held each year for school-based professional development representatives. d. That locals ensure that release time for this training is available. 3. PD Representative—Provincial Level a. That the BCTF Professional and Social Issues Division communicate to the schools through the school-based professional development representative on all matters related to professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. b. That the BCTF promote and provide School Professional Development Representative Training for school-based professional development representatives. c. That School Professional Development Representative Training contains a strong locally developed component to meet the specific needs of the schools and the local. d. That school-based professional development representatives inform and advise teachers regarding BCTF policies and activities related to professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. (Aug 00 Ex, p. 10) 25.H.12―The BCTF recognizes the social justice representative as a union leader and encourages locals to adopt and promote the following description of the role and function of social justice representatives, recognizing that each school situation is unique and adjustments to the model may be necessary. A. Social justice representative—School level 1. Organizer/leader: a. collaborates with staff members to identify social justice needs and establish goals each year. b. develops, with other school union representatives, a social justice plan based on the goals for each year, using the social justice lens as an analytical tool to aid in this process. c. carries out other social justice duties and responsibilities within the schools to meet the needs of teachers and students and the goals of the local social justice committee and the BCTF Committee for Action on Social Justice. d. is elected annually. 2. Communicator: a. receives and distributes relevant social justice and BCTF information. b. attends staff meetings to report on school, local, BCTF, and community social justice actions and opportunities. c. attends local meetings of school-based social justice representatives to provide liaison between the local and schoolbased social justice activities. d. participates in social justice representative training. 3. Advocate: a. is familiar with, and implements, contract language, BCTF policies, and local policies related to social justice in the everyday life of the school. b. serves as a school advocate for all teachers in matters related to social justice and its implementation in the curriculum, classroom, and the culture of the school. c. participates with other school-based social justice representatives in identifying appropriate new contract language and local and BCTF policies for social justice. d. works collegially with school union reps, PD reps, health and safety reps, and school committees. B. Social justice representative—Local level 1. Locals ensure each school in the district elects at least one school-based social justice representative. 2. Locals ensure the role and function of the school-based social justice representative is included in local policies. 3. Locals implement training programs for school-based social justice representatives. C. Social justice representative―provincial level 1. The BCTF will communicate to schools through the school union rep to school-based social justice representative on all matters

related to social justice, its implementation in the classroom, and the culture of the school. 2. The Federation will provide a SURT package to locals for school social justice representative training. (Aug. 08 Ex, pp. 16–17) 25.H.14―School Union Representative Training 1. That locals may be permitted to combine the allocated amount for its four days of SUR training into a single training event each year. (Dec. 05 Ex, p. 7) (08 AGM, p. 29)

2. That the content of the training, method of delivery, and dates for the training to occur be mutually agreed by the local and the Federation. 3. That wherever possible, the training of staff representatives and staff committee chairpersons be provided by BCTF-trained facilitators and local leaders, supplemented by BCTF staff. 4. That school PD representative training be facilitated by teacher trainers, supported by staff. (Apr. 00 Ex, p. 2) 5. That the Federation ensure that training materials are current and adaptable to reflect BCTF and local priorities and needs. 6. That where two or more locals exist in an amalgamated school district and the locals choose to have joint school union representative training sessions, those locals be eligible to receive reimbursement of travel costs under the current school representative training grant policy 10.J.10. (Feb 99 Ex, p. 2) 7. That part-time teachers who attend a school union representative training session during instructional time when they do not normally teach, be compensated on a per diem rate of 1/189 of the member’s regular scale placement or portion thereof, if the training session is less than a full day. (00 AGM, p. 43) 8. That school union rep training include a component on the role and function of the school social justice rep. (Nov 02 Ex, p. 10)

9. That when locals are unable to schedule their school union representative training during regular school hours, the BCTF will provide compensation for the cost of any meals incurred as part of the training at the regular per diem rate. (Sept 06 Ex, p. 6) 10. That locals unable to schedule SURT training during instructional time within the school year may provide such training during non-instructional time. (Nov 07 RA, p. 3) 11. That members attending SURT training referred to in 10.J.10 can be compensated with time-in-lieu equivalent to time spent in training. (Nov 07 RA, p. 3) 12. That School Union Representative Training trainers that are scheduled to deliver SURT training during non instructional time can be compensated with time in-lieu equivalent to time spent in training. (Jan 08 Ex, p.10) 13. That the Federation provide resources to assist locals and school union reps with class organization activities. (March 09 Ex, p. 9)

14. That every SURT, where appropriate, contain a brief component of the relevant history of local bargaining. (Jan 10 Ex, p. 15)

15. that new teacher SURTs include a component on the BCTF Code of Ethics. (Apr 14 Ex, p. 16) I. Federation Leadership 25.I.02—1. That the Field Service Division administrative staff, in collaboration with the co-ordinator of the Federation Leadership Institute, will ensure that local leaders are consulted in the development and evaluation of workshops for the Federation Leadership Institute. Federation priorities will also be taken into account when developing workshops. 2. That FLI be expanded to include additional local leaders selected by the local and that the cost of each day be $600. All costs such as per diems, TTOC costs, travel, and accommodation will be included. (Nov 00 RA, p. 11) (May 16 Ex, p. 14)

J. Office Procedures 25.J.02—BCTF member and school records are for internal use—that is, to serve organizational objectives and meet statutory requirements. “Internal” is defined as BCTF staff, Executive 113

Committee, Representative Assembly, committees and task forces; local executive committees; provincial specialist association executive committees; the Retired Teachers’ Association; the Teacher Qualification Service; Teachers’ Political Action Committee. (Mar 83 Ex, p. 5) (Feb. 03 Ex, p. 15)

25.J.06—That the following be adopted as policy on the BCTF archives: 1. The BC Teachers' Federation maintains archives to provide an historical record of the policies and activities of the BCTF. The archives contain print materials, photographs, electronic media, audio and video tapes, and artifacts. 2. Archive material is available to members, students, labour and education historians, archivists, university researchers, and journalists at no cost except for photocopy charges. 3. An individual who wishes to use the archives shall make a request in writing to the executive director. The request shall include: a. a description of the research project; b. a description of the type of materials to which the researcher is seeking access. 4. Access will be provided subject to arrangements with the Federation Records manager. Essential internal tasks will be given priority. Priority of other requests will be determined according to department workload, availability of staff and degree of difficulty of the request. 5. Utilization of the archives is subject to directions from the Records manager necessary to protect the materials. 6. Photocopies of documents may be made, on request, by the Records staff, with costs paid by the person using the archives. (Sept 92 Ex, p. 9)

25.J.08—That no illegal copies or reproductions of any portion of any computer program be made, and unauthorized copies of software not be used on computers owned by the Federation. (Nov 92 Ex, p. 9)

K. Trainers and Associates 25.K.02—That the following processes be used in posting and selecting facilitators, trainers, or associates for BCTF programs: 1. Requests for facilitators, trainers or associates (including staff representative trainers, school professional development representative trainers, PD program associates, WOW trainers, health and safety trainers, parent workshop presenters) shall be posted in schools and locals at least one-month prior to selection. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 28)

2. Such posting shall include the criteria for selection, the number to be selected, the length of term for each selection and deadline for the receipt of applications. Members shall be appointed for up to three year terms, renewable for an additional three years through the posting and selection process. All trainers and associates eligible for re-appointment shall be notified of the need to re-apply if they wish to continue serving. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 28) 3. Criteria for the selection of trainers and associates shall include: a. knowledge in the content area, b. proven successful workshop presentations, c. a commitment to undertake a minimum amount of workshop delivery. 4. Trainers and associates shall initially be recommended by the appropriate staff person. In consultation with the appropriate staff person, the final approval shall be made by two full-time table officers designated by the president. 5. If insufficient applicants exist to make a complete selection of the number of trainers/associates posted, the FTTOs involved in the selection may: a. appoint fewer trainers/associates than posted, b. re-post for additional applicants, c. undertake a combination of a. and b. above. 6. Once the selection of posted trainers/associates is complete, the Executive Committee and the Executive director shall receive a confidential report from the staff person involved in the process which provides the following information: a. the number of trainers/associates requested, 114

b. c. d.

the criteria for selection included in the posting, the names of all applicants and their locals. the names of applicants selected by the FTTOs. (June 01 Ex, p. 18.)

25.K.04—That release time for members be provided as required for workshop presentation preparation but that in lieu release time for work done on a member’s own time not be covered by this procedure. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 2) 25.K.06—That when appointing members to committees and as workshop facilitators, the BCTF consider bilingual representation. (June 12 Ex, p. 9)

25.K.08―That the BCTF uniformly adhere to the policy of a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work for all trainers, facilitators, meeting chairs, and committee members. (15 AGM, p. 8) 25.K.10―Appointments of members as facilitators to Federation services That the appointment of members as workshop and SURT facilitators, Parent Presenters, and Peer Support Service Consultants, and to the Internal Mediation Service be done by the full-time table officers, following consultation with the relevant staff program co-ordinator. (Aug 15 EC, p. 15) L. Staff 25.L.02—That the Executive Committee determine whether an administrative staff position shall be posted. (Nov 76 Ex, p. 12) (Apr 16 Ex, p. 13)

25.L.04— That the Executive Committee appoint or dismiss the Executive Director and other excluded staff; and, that authority to enter into personal services contracts with excluded staff be delegated to the President and First Vice-President. (Aug 78 Ex, p. 19) (Apr 16 Ex, p. 13)

25.L.06—Administrative staff That appointment for all administrative staff positions be conducted on the following basis: 1. Shortlist and interview panels consist of the Executive Director, Human Resources Director, one full-time table officer, and two members-at-large. Full-time table officers and members-at-large will participate on shortlist and interview panels on a rotational basis, in alphabetical order by last time. If there is a potential conflict of interest (as per Procedure 20.G.02) or if the individual full-time table officer or member-at-large is unable to participate, the next individual in the alphabetical rotation will be chosen. The Executive Committee representatives on the shortlist and interview panels must also include at least one woman. The alphabetical rotation will move to the next woman on the list, when necessary, and then return to the original sequence. 2. The shortlist and interview panel will review applications, select those candidates to be interviewed, and conduct the interviews. 3. Upon completion of interviews, the panel will make a recommendation by majority vote to the Executive Committee. 4.In an in-committee session with the Executive Director and Human Resources Director only, the recommendation will be moved and the EC will discuss the merits of the recommendation. The Executive Committee will vote by secret ballot to accept or reject the recommendation. If the recommendation is rejected, the panel will meet again and come back with a different recommendation. (Aug. 00 Ex, p. 16) (Apr 16 Ex, p. 12–13)

25.L.08—That no task force, PSA, or advisory committee be represented on the screening panel for short listing and interviewing candidates for BCTF staff positions. (Oct 76 Ex, p. 16) (Apr 16 Ex, p. 13)

25.L.12—That the concept of part-time continuing appointments to the Federation’s administrative staff be endorsed. (Dec 78 Ex. p. 14)

25.L.14—That whenever possible, BCTF administrative staff appointees have recent teaching experience in a Canadian public school system. (Jan 79 Ex, pp. 16-17)

conditions, and negotiate directly with excluded staff to establish personal services contracts. (Jan 80 Ex, p 11)

25.L.18—That all applicants for staff positions be provided with a copy of the position description and an outline of duties, qualifications and experience, and be informed of the procedure and schedule that will be followed in making the appointment, including information that references may be checked, and that additional information may be sought and/or considered. (Nov 76 Ex, p. 18)

25.L.42—That the executive director be an excluded staff position. (May 80 Ex, p 13)

25.L.20—That if a member, who has served as full-time table officer or as a term appointee to the Federation staff, exhausts all their sick leave after returning to teaching, unused leave accumulation during service with the Federation be automatically available, and that attendant costs be a charge against the Federation. (Jan 78 RA, p. 13) 25.L.22—That a copy of the current collective agreements between the Federation and its administrative and/or support staff be available on the Members Only section of the BCTF website. (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19) (Jan 12 RA, p. 7)

25.L.24—That once policy has been formally adopted by the Executive Committee, Representative Assembly or Annual General Meeting, it is the responsibility of any member of staff to explain and support that policy before the members of the general public. (May 77 Ex, p. 9)

25.L.26—That where policy exists or does not exist it is the responsibility of any member of staff to take the initiative in analyzing situations, in anticipating changes in the internal and external environment, in exploring and exposing all the possible alternatives on any given issue and developing alternative programs of action for consideration by both advisory and decision-making bodies of the Federation. (May 77 Ex, p. 10) 25.L.28—That the BCTF have at least one person on staff who is fluent in both official languages. (Jan 78 RA, p. 10) 25.L.30—That BCTF staff shall be provided with the rights of due process that the BCTF seeks for its own members and in accordance with the provisions of the collective agreements between the BCTF and each of the staff unions. (Jan 79 RA, p. 3) (May 12 RA, p. 15)

25.L.32—That the rights of due process be established through a collective bargaining process between the Executive Committee and each of the staff unions. (Feb 91 RA, p.3) (May 12 RA, p. 15)

25.L.34—That the BCTF shall not dismiss or discipline an employee except for just and reasonable cause. (Nov 79 Ex, p. 4) 25.L.36—That the following elements are a necessary minimum to establish "just and reasonable cause:" 1. The nature and details of the job must be outlined to and clearly understood by the employee. 2. Performance on the job must be analyzed in a rational manner—that is, be based on sound evaluation. 3. Should the employer perceive shortcomings in the employee’s work, the employee must be informed in plain terms, of the specific manner in which their performance is considered to be lacking. 4. A proposal for rectification must be presented to the employee, coupled with an explanation that should they fail, over a specified period, to meet the standards required, they may be dismissed. 5. That the employee shall be provided with a process to appeal a decision to dismiss. (Nov 79 Ex, pp 4-5) 25.L.40—That the Federation negotiate with the unions representing BCTF support staff and administrative staff to enter into collective agreements addressing salaries, benefits, and working

(May 12 Ex, p. 7)

(May 12 Ex, p. 7)

25.L.44—That the Executive Committee support in principle the concept of developing in consultation with the Administrative Staff Union procedures to address issues of concern to either party or both parties. (May 83 Ex, p. 9) 25.L.48—That, in general, BCTF staff represent the BCTF at conferences and meetings only as observers, not as voting delegates. Exceptions should be made only in consultation with the Executive Committee or the full-time table officers. (Sept 84 Ex, p. 2) 25.L.50—Term Appointments: 1. With the exception of specialized positions requiring training outside of teaching, working on the professional staff of the BCTF is to be regarded as part of a career in teaching, not a career in itself. 2. That, as long as applicants with appropriate qualifications and experience are available, changes to staff have a positive value for the BCTF in helping make it a more flexible, changing, adaptive organization. 3. That, particularly in a climate of limited opportunities within the school system, opportunities for members to include working on BCTF staff as part of their career pattern (rather than having all staff positions filled with long-time staff members) are in the interest of all BCTF members. 4. That the BCTF will maintain a policy which includes a mix of continuing and term appointments for staff. 5. That individuals obtaining term appointments should regard experience on staff as part of their teaching career, and thus should maintain leaves of absence from their school boards so they may return to teaching. (Dec 89 Ex, p. 5) (March 00 Ex, p. 1)

6. a. That all on-going positions on the administrative staff for which a teaching certificate is a requirement of employment be designated as either continuing or four-year term positions. It is understood that four-year term means a term of at least four years and six weeks. b. That there are two types of term appointments: i. ongoing term appointments of at least four years and six weeks; ii. temporary term appointments of less than four years to fill temporarily existing positions. 7. That a four-year term position vacated by an incumbent shall be posted in accordance with the provisions of the CEP/BCTF collective agreement regarding vacancies and postings of term positions, except when: a. the Federation wishes to discontinue the position and/or b. the Federation determines to post it as a continuing as per the provisions of the CEP/BCTF collective agreement on the posting of continuing positions. (June 01 Ex. p. 3) 8. That term appointments be staggered in each of the divisions so that no more than two four-year term appointments be replaced in any division in any one year. 9. That, wherever possible, engagement of term staff shall commence on July 1 of the year of their appointment and expire six weeks past June 30 in the year their term expires. (March 00 Ex, p. 1-2)

25.L.52—Continuing appointments 1. That the ongoing administrative staff positions of lawyers and media relations officer be posted and filled as continuing. (May 12 Ex, p. 7)

2. That a continuing position vacated by an incumbent shall be posted as either a continuing position or a four-year term position except when the Federation wishes to discontinue the position. (June 01 Ex. p. 3)

3. Staff currently filling a four-term position shall be eligible to apply for any continuing vacancies that may arise on the staff but 115

shall not be eligible to apply for any four-year term vacancies that may arise until at least one year after the expiration of their term appointment on the BCTF staff. 4. That all director positions be continuing positions. Term or continuing staff may be appointed as an acting director for a period up to one year or for a longer period when the incumbent director is on approved Federation leave. 5. That the number of continuing positions on the administrative staff as a percentage of the total ongoing administrative staff positions for which a teaching certificate is a requirement shall not drop below 50%. (Mar 00 Ex, p. 1-2) (June 01 Ex. p.3)

25.L.54—1. That in making appointments to the BCTF administrative staff, the Executive Committee actively work toward establishing an equal balance between continuing and term appointments. (Mar 75 Ex, p. 11) (91 AGM, p. 45)

2. That this policy be interpreted to mean ongoing administrative staff positions for which possession of a teaching certificate is a requirement. (March 00 Ex, p. 1) 25.L.56—That, as a bargaining objective, the BCTF seek to reduce the salary differential between members working on administrative and executive staff appointments at the BCTF, and members working in the schools of the province. (92 AGM, p. 37) 25.L.58—That members, other than full-time table officers, acting on behalf of the Federation in collective bargaining with either of the two staff unions receive compensation for such work during the summer on the basis of one/one hundred and eighty-ninth (1/189) of actual salary per day. (Sept. 01 Ex, p. 3) 25.L.60—That the following constitute BCTF procedure for staff regarding conflict of interest: 1. To avoid a conflict of interest between an employee’s personal interest such as a business or other type of financial enterprise with their duties and responsibilities as an employee of the BC Teachers’ Federation, the employee shall adhere to the following: a. They shall not engage in work outside of the BCTF that: i. would interfere with or influence their judgment or the impartial discharge of their duties as BCTF employees, or ii. would provide services such as those normally provided by the BCTF to clients that may include as recipients of the service, member(s) of the BCTF. b. An employee shall not use an occasion while in the employ of the BCTF to refer either members or other people encountered while carrying out Federation duties to services they may provide in their private life. c. Except with the express written permission of the BCTF, an employee shall not provide services, such as those normally provided by the BCTF, to public education partner groups including the Ministry of Education. 2. It is the responsibility of each employee of the BCTF to inform the BCTF of their involvement in any business interest of a commercial or financial nature where such interests might be construed to be in conflict with the employee’s BCTF duties and responsibilities. (Feb. 05 Ex p., 7-8) 25.L.62—That the BCTF establish and maintain a balance of minority, Aboriginal people and people with disabilities, representative of the population of BC on its: 1. administrative staff, 2. support staff, 3. committees. (87 AGM, p. 31) 25.L.64—1. That the Federation endeavor to establish and maintain a representative balance of males and females on the BCTF staff. 2. That advertisements for BCTF staff positions state that ‘’female and male applicants are encouraged to apply.’’ (82 AGM, p. 30)

25.L.66—That in order to establish and maintain a representative balance of males and females on the BCTF administrative staff, hiring practices for such positions shall include: 1. interviewing a significant number of women; 2. giving particular consideration to potential as well as proven abilities of female candidates; 3. giving priority to the hiring of women until that representative balance is achieved. (82 AGM, p. 30) (85 AGM, p. 44)

25.L.68—The Federation is committed to increasing the participation of under-represented and/or historically marginalized groups such as women, people with disabilities, people of colour, Aboriginal people, young members, and LGBTQ people, in all facets of our work as a union. In order to achieve a representative balance, the following measures be taken: (15 AGM, p. 12) 1. Hiring Practices The Executive Committee, in consultation with other BCTF committees, review existing hiring and committee selection practices with the aim of eliminating barriers to racially visible, Aboriginal and other minority, and female candidates, and candidates with disabilities. (01 AGM, p. 30) 2. Outreach That the Executive Committee: a. Make a special outreach effort to LPs and LRs to inform minority and Aboriginal members, and members with disabilities of opportunities to apply for positions on BCTF administrative staff and on committees, and to encourage them to apply for these positions. b. Ensure that qualified minority and Aboriginal candidates, and candidates with disabilities are interviewed. 3. Selection Committees That the Executive Committee: a. Encourage representation from targeted groups (minority, Aboriginal and people with disabilities) on selection committees. b. Ensure that selection committees for administrative and support staff and for committee positions are aware of the affirmative action policy. c. Instruct selection committees for administrative staff and support staff and for committee appointments to give consideration to potential as well as proven abilities of minority and Aboriginal people, and people with disabilities. 4. Opportunities for involvement at the local level a. Encourage locals to call on their minority and Aboriginal members, and members with disabilities, to become involved at the local level. (May 88 RA, pp. 15-16) 25.L.70—That all administrative staff postings be distributed electronically to members with details available on the website. (May 08 Ex, p. 4) (Apr 16 Ex, p. 13)

M. Zone Meetings 25.M.02—That the Federation zone meeting structure include the following minimum representation from locals: 1. the president of each local and sublocal 2. the bargaining chairperson for each local 3. the professional development chairperson for each local 4. a social justice contact for each local 5. a health and safety representative for each local 6 a teacher teaching on call representative for each local 7. a local contact for Aboriginal education and that the Executive Committee be authorized to include additional representatives as necessary. (05 AGM, p. 41) 25.M.04—That prior to each zone meeting, objectives for the meeting be approved by the Executive Committee. (March 10 Ex, p. 1) (May 10 Ex, p. 8)

25.M.06—That zone meetings be chaired by a member. (Sept 07 Ex, p. 13) (Jan 11 Ex, p. 7)

25.M.08—That locals in zones may choose to hold a zone meeting in a different community in the zone provided that such 116

ii. iii. iv. v.

change of venue does not unduly increase the cost of the zone meeting. (Jan 08 Ex, p. 11)

26. Pensions A.

Teachers’ Pension Plan

POLICIES 26.A.01—Pensions Policy A. Pension Goal That the goal be the attainment of a pension plan that is fully funded, jointly trusteed, service based, fully indexed and maintains the relative economic status of members of the pension plan and/or their designated beneficiaries following retirement, disability or death. B. Pension Design 1. Plan Members That all members of the BCTF bargaining unit, administrative officers, and superintendents in the BC public school system, and all recipients of a BC teacher pension be members of the pension plan, (hereinafter referred to as plan members). 2. The Pension Plan a. That the pension be: i. vested after 20 months of contributory service; ii. based on service and on highest average salary earned; iii. defined on a two percent formula integrated with the Canada Pension Plan; iv. indexed fully to the Canadian Consumer Price Index; v. payable at age 55, or later; b. That the pension plan recognize, as contributory service, up to five years of child rearing time. c. That contributions, when vested, be locked-in to the plan, to another registered pension plan, or to a locked-in RRSP. d. That subject to a spousal waiver, the plan member may name a beneficiary eligible to receive a refund, a guarantee of pension payment, or a pre-retirement death benefit. e. That there be no discrimination on the basis of gender or marital status in the eligibility for, or the calculation of, single life pensions or their equivalent. 3. Purchase of Service That there be provision for: a. reinstatement of refunds taken prior to January 1, 1996; b. purchase of periods of leave of absence; c. purchase of service in other jurisdictions; and d. purchase of service by plan members who were employed in a less than 50% assignment prior to January 1, 1993, provided that the plan member had not signed a waiver declining participation in the pension plan. 4. Portability a. That there be portability between pension plans provided that: i. transfers of service be cost neutral to the pension plan; ii. all service in the exporting plan be credited for eligibility in the importing plan; and iii. credited service for pension calculation be determined by the ratio of the actuarial liability in the exporting plan to the actuarial liability in the importing plan. b. That, if the actuarial liability in the exporting plan is less than the actuarial liability in the importing plan, the plan member be permitted to pay the difference to receive full service credit. 5. Pre-Retirement Death Benefit That, upon the death of a plan member prior to retirement, a benefit be payable to a spouse, the named beneficiary or estate. 6. Group Disability Plans That a plan member in receipt of benefits from an approved group disability plan be credited with service for that period, and that salary for pension calculation purposes be indexed. 7. Pension Options a. That the normal form of a pension be single life 10-year guarantee. b. That the following further options be available: i. single life no guarantee;

single life five-year guarantee; single life fifteen-year guarantee; joint life and last survivor; temporary annuity in the amount of the Old Age Security;

or vi. a combination of the above. c. That a plan member who has a spouse be required to select at least 60 percent of the pension on a joint life and last survivor basis, unless the spouse signs a waiver. C. Governance 1. That the pension plan be managed through a joint trust agreement between the BCTF as the plan member partner, and the BC government as the plan employer partner. 2. That the Pension Board of Trustees be at least 10 persons representing equally each of the plan partners, with the provision that an outside person may be appointed as a non-voting chair. 3. That the plan member partner trustees be nominated by and from the Teachers’ Pension Plan Advisory Committee and appointed for three years by the BCTF Executive Committee as follows: a. three active plan members who are members of the BCTF and/or BCTF staff; b. one excluded plan member; and c. one retired plan member. However, if an appointed trustee should retire during their term, the trustee may, at the discretion of the Executive Committee, complete the term and the objective set out in the preceding statement will be achieved in subsequent appointments. (09 AGM, p. 17)

4. That a plan member trustee shall remain a member of the Teachers’ Pension Plan Advisory Committee throughout the term of their trusteeship. D. Fund Financing 1. That the pension plan be fully funded to provide a basic pension and indexing. 2. That contributions required to maintain a fully funded pension plan be shared equally by the active plan members and the employers. (March 08 Ex, p. 8) E. Plan Changes That the following principles be followed in pursuing improvements to the pension plan: 1. improvements shall be equitable in that they apply or are available to a broad range of the plan members; 2. improvements shall be affordable in that they can be fully funded within the established contribution rates, or within increased contribution rates acceptable to the plan member partner; 3. accrued pensions for plan members and retired plan members shall be protected; and 4. social policy, as endorsed by the member organizations, shall be taken into consideration. F. Early Retirement/Severance Plan That any early retirement/severance plan be on a non-cost basis to the pension plan. G. Health Benefits That the Federation pressure government to eliminate MSP premiums for all British Columbians. (Dec. 07 Ex, p. 2) H. That the administration of the Pension Plan, including services and communications, be the best of any pension plan in Canada. (02 AGM, pp. 42–43) 26.A.07—That the BCTF oppose changes to the Canada Pension Plan which would raise the age level for eligibility, reduce benefits, and dramatically increase premiums in a short period of time. (96 AGM, p.9) 26.A.09—That there be no compulsory retirement age. (88 AGM, p. 22) (92 AGM, p. 25)

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26.A.11—That the Teachers’ Pension Board of Trustees enhance the recognition of Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) factors in investment decisions pursuant to the Teachers’ Pension Plan Statement of Investment Policies and Procedures. (06 AGM, p. 17)

PROCEDURES 26.A.04—Pension Appeals That the following be the BCTF pension appeals procedure: Pension Appeals 1. A member, dissatisfied with a response from the Teachers’ Pension Plan regarding the application of the Plan Rules, may formally appeal the response, in writing, to the Appeals Registrar, Teachers’ Pension Board of Trustees. (Step 1) 1.1 The member may request, and will receive, advice and assistance from the Income Security Division in the preparation of the appeal. 2. A member, dissatisfied with the response to their appeal at Step 1, may appeal the response to the Teachers’ Pension Board of Trustees. (Step 2) 2.1 The member may request, and will receive, advice and assistance from the Income Security Division in the preparation of the appeal. 3. A member, dissatisfied with the response to their appeal at Step 2, may appeal the response to an arbitrator. (Step 3) 3.1 The member may request advice and assistance from the Income Security Division. 3.2 Income Security staff, in consultation with the executive director and the full-time Table Officers, will determine the level of Federation support of the Step 3 appeal, based on the following criteria: a. the issue has significant merit regarding application of the Plan Rules, or b. the issue may affect a number of other plan members. 3.3 A decision by the Federation to support the appeal will include the provision of staff time and a commitment to pay the appellant’s cost of the arbitrator, and such other costs as may be approved by the Executive Committee. 3.4 If the Federation does not support the appeal, the member will be informed in writing of the reasons for the lack of support. (The member may proceed to arbitration on their own behalf and cost.) 3.5 A member who is denied Federation support may appeal the decision to the Executive Committee. (Dec. 03 Ex, p. 6) 4. The staff member assigned to assist with appeals will not be a member of the Teachers’ Pension Board of Trustees. (June 03 Ex, p. 11)

26.A.06—That there be a report from a BCTF-appointed member on the Teachers Pension Board of Trustees on every RA and AGM agenda. (Nov. 01 Ex, p. 6) (March 08 Ex, p. 8)

26.A.08—That prior to making decisions that significantly change the Teachers’ Pension Plan, particularly changes to plan benefits, group health benefits, or funding, BCTF-appointed trustees consult with the BCTF Executive Committee (Plan Member Partner). (Sept. 06 Ex, p. 1)

26.A.10—That the BCTF distribute information to each local president regarding BCTF Group RRSPs including a reminder of enrollment and the benefits of enrollment. (March 08 Ex, p. 8) B.

BCTF Staff Pension Plan

PROCEDURES 26.B.02—BCTF Staff Pension Plan Investment Policy A. Investment Objectives In order to meet the financial obligations of the Staff Pension Plan: 1. The principal investment objective is to earn over the longterm a return before fees of at least 1.0% higher than the Benchmark Portfolio subject to the constraints listed below. 2. The secondary investment objective is to earn over the long-term a target annual rate of return of at least 4% (net of investment manager fees) greater than the average annual rate of inflation. 118

B. Investment Constraints There are several constraints on the investment of the Pension Fund. These have been imposed by various parties as follows: Pension Benefit Standards Act (PBSA), AIMR, Income Tax Act and Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) 1. All investments must conform to the investment requirements of Schedule III of the Federal PBSA Regulations and Regulation 38 of the BCPBSA. 2. Investments are held in the Foyston, Gordon & Payne (FGP) Balance Fund which can be liquidated on short notice. 3. Investments provide no specific voting rights. The investment manager should vote proxies in the best interests of the plan. 4. Not more than the maximum allowed by CCRA of the fund's assets (based on cost) shall be "foreign property," as defined in Section 206 of the Income Tax Act. 5. No money is to be borrowed by the fund, except occasionally on a short-term basis, as provided in paragraph 12(c) of the CCRA Taxation's Information Circular 72-13R8 or successor document. 6. Related party transactions (if any) will comply with Section 17 of Schedule III under the Federal PBSA. 7. All investment activities will be made in accordance with the Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice of the Association of Investment Management and Research (AIMR). BCTF and Investment Manager 8. No investments are to be made directly in secondary markets eg., derivatives, options and futures. However, investments in the FGP Balanced Fund may include pooled funds which invest in such secondary securities provided that all such secondary securities are 100% backed by cash. Investment in derivative instruments may be used for hedging purposes to facilitate the management of risk or to facilitate an economical substitution for a direct investment. Under no circumstances will derivatives be used for speculative purposes or to create leveraging of the portfolio. 9. The lower and upper limits on the proportion of the total fund (based on market value) that may be invested, directly or indirectly, from time to time in the following classes of securities are: Class of Security Lower Upper Limit Limit Common stocks and convertible securities 30% 70% Bonds 30% 60% Cash or Short-term securities 0 15% This constraint has been established by the Federation in consultation with the Federation's consulting actuaries as an indication of the maximum exposure to the risk of fluctuation in overall rates of return that the Federation and the plan members are prepared to accept. The Federation recognizes that, even with the constraints listed above, the rates of return on the pension fund will vary significantly, upwards and downwards, from year-to-year, reflecting market and economic cycles, levels of inflation, government policies and many other factors. These fluctuations should not deter the investment manager from making his best efforts to achieve the long-term objectives of the fund. The investment manager has full authority, acting within the above constraints, to manage all aspects of the pension fund, including changes in the proportion of fund assets to be held in each of the classes of securities. This applies both to the distribution of existing pension fund assets and to the allocation of new contributions. 10. In exercising their responsibilities, the Finance Committee, Manager and any other agent or advisor shall adhere to the following guidelines: a. In the discharge of their duties and the exercise of their powers, whether the duty or power is created by law or a trust instrument, they shall exercise the degree of care, diligence and skill that a person of ordinary prudence would exercise in dealing with the property of another person. b. Without limiting the generality of (a), persons who possess, or because of their profession, business or calling, ought to possess,

a particular level of knowledge or skill relevant to their responsibilities to the fund, shall apply that particular knowledge or skill set to the administration of the fund. 11. No lending of cash and/or securities to any entity is permitted. 12. Investments in equity securities that are not regularly traded on a public stock exchange are not permitted. C. Evaluation The performance of the investment manager will be reviewed quarterly, but a period of three to five years will be utilized before any conclusive judgements are formed on the overall performance. The measures which will be used are as follows: Principal Measures a. The investment manager will add at least 1.0% before fees in value relative to the Benchmark Portfolio on a per annum basis. The Benchmark Portfolio is defined as a hypothetical portfolio invested as follows: 30% S&P/TSX 12.5% S&P 500 (in Canadian $) 12.5% MSCI EAFE (In Canadian $) 45% Scotia Capital Universe Bond Index 0% 30 Day Treasury Bills Asset Class Minimum Target Maximum Canadian Equities 20% 30% 40% Foreign Equities 10% 25% 40% Total Equities 30% 55% 70% Bonds 30% 45% 60% Cash & Short-term 0 0% 15% b. The rate of return is expected to be above the median in a peer group of comparable funds as measured by a recognized performance measurement survey. Secondary Measures a. the time-weighted rates of return on each category of investment as compared to the median performing pooled fund of that category, as measured by SEI's pooled balanced fund survey of pension trust funds. b. the average rate of interest on 30-day Treasury Bills. c. the average rate of inflation (as measured by the Consumer Price Index) plus 4 percent. D. Investment Reports and Meetings Meetings between the Finance Committee and the investment manager will normally be held semi-annually each year, or at such times as are mutually agreed by the committee and the investment manager. The investment manager will normally submit a written report to the treasurer of BCTF at least two weeks in advance of each meeting. The investment manager's report will normally include: • a brief review of the major investment decisions made since the last meeting, in the context of the forecasts and strategy outlined at the previous review meeting. • a discussion of the time-weighted rate of return of the total fund and of each of the major assets classes during the last year and over the three to five year period ended on a quarterly basis (both in absolute terms and, for the total fund only, relative to the two principal measures indicated in the preceding section of this statement). • the investment manager's outlook for the economy and for the capital markets both in the short-term (six months to one year) and the long-term (four years or more) and his resulting forecasts of rates of return for each of the relevant asset classes. • the investment strategy the investment manager intends to pursue up to the time of the next review meeting. • a sign-off (quarterly) by the investment manager on their compliance with the Staff Pension Plan Investment Policy. The treasurer is responsible for arranging the time and location of investment review meetings and for ensuring that all parties receive appropriate notice of each meeting. The investment manager shall notify the Federation in writing of any significant changes in investment philosophies and policies, personnel or organization and procedures. They shall also review the investment objectives and constraints regularly and recommend changes whenever they consider it to be appropriate.

The Federation shall notify the investment manager in writing of any significant changes in this Investment Policy Statement and of any significant anticipated liquidity requirements and shall provide the investment manager periodically when requested, with information concerning the plan and its membership. Such notification in writing shall normally be between the treasurer of BCTF and FGP (investment management firm) with a copy to AON Consulting Group (Actuary). (Jan 06 Ex, p. 4)

27. Political Action POLICIES 27.01—That teachers: 1. oppose the cuts in public services which are destroying the very fabric of what has been a caring, civil society. 2. reject the initiatives of privatization and commercialization that seek to create a new society based upon greater concentrations of wealth and power in the hands of a few at the expense of the protection of the many. 3. call for a return to democratic processes in this province where all citizens are heard and heeded with respect to the type of communities and society they wish to build. (Apr 02 Ex, p. 19) 27.05—1. That the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation call upon the provincial and federal governments to immediately implement the Romanow report. 2. That BCTF members be encouraged to join thousands of Canadians in signing the petition in support of the full implementation of the Romanow report. (03 AGM, p. 25) 27.07—That the BCTF call upon the Government of Canada and the provinces to fully implement the provisions of the Kyoto Protocol. (03 AGM, p. 25) 27.09—That the AGM encourage locals to support and, where appropriate, endorse candidates for MLA. (05 AGM, p. 40) 27.11—That the Federation and its locals become involved in school board and municipal elections by: 1. advocating for fully funded public education and public services and the restoration of full scope local collective bargaining rights for teachers. 2. supporting candidates committed to strong and stable publicly funded public education and public services. (05 AGM, p. 40)

27.13—That the Federation oppose the recruitment into armed conflict of children and youth under 19 and call for the prosecution of those who have committed crimes against children, particularly the crime of recruiting children into armed conflict. (May 11 RA, p. 13) PROCEDURES 27.04—That the BCTF continue its practice of commending or criticizing government education program and/or the educational programs of other political parties. (Dec 71 Ex, p. 7) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

27.06—That the BCTF and its locals take political action aimed at enhancing education program quality and equality of access to educational programs. (82 AGM, p. 17) 27.08—1. That locals be encouraged to develop political action programs so that the concerns of teachers on educational issues will be known to candidates and to those elected to local, provincial and federal governments. 2. That the political action program should be a responsibility of the local executive committee or of a special political action committee established by the association. (76 AGM, p. 30) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

27.10—That the role of the Executive Committee and staff will be to provide support in the form of research, assistance on tactics and strategies, organizational and administrative assistance, advice on publicity and any other support deemed necessary in each local. (Jan 89 Ex, p. 28)

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27.12—1. That on condition that no other organization or individual, including individual members, is permitted access to the information, locals be provided with member name and address lists and/or labels and/or email addresses free of charge for use in local, school board, provincial or federal elections or recall petitions or referenda. Member name and address lists and/or labels and/or email addresses shall be provided only for members of the local and members of other locals who live in the geographical area of the local, or for electoral areas that include all or part of the geographical area of the local. 2. Lists will not be provided to locals for use in supporting a candidate for nomination in any political party. (Sept 04 Ex, p. 11) (Oct 10 Ex, pp. 11–12)

27.16—That the BCTF encourage locals to sponsor questionnaires to school board, provincial and federal election candidates, such questionnaires being: 1. designed to elicit both the party and the personal attitude of candidates to educational matters; 2. delivered to the candidates as much in advance of the election as possible, so that candidates may give them mature consideration and so that locals may be enabled to distribute a public report on candidate responses. (June 67 Ex, p. 2) (Reviewed Nov 74 Ex, p. 4)

27.18—That the BCTF encourage locals to hold all-candidate meetings where attention may be drawn to educational matters. (June 67 Ex, p. 2) (Reviewed Nov 74 Ex, p. 4)

27.20—1. That locals be encouraged to urge qualified people to run for school board positions. (69 AGM, p. 16) (Reviewed Nov 74 Ex, p. 4)

2. That locals be encouraged to work for the election of school trustees committed to public education and to ensure that critical education issues are brought before the electorate during the election campaigns. (99 AGM, p. 2) 27.22—That during a provincial election campaign, the BCTF not postpone or cancel any pre-scheduled meetings of BCTF committees, or zone meetings, involving BCTF staff, without prior consultation with those affected. (87 AGM, p. 24) 27.24—That locals be encouraged to work with parents, support staff unions, local labour councils, community groups and other supporters of public education to ensure that trustees elected to schools boards: 1. actively advocate for adequate funding for public schools. 2. actively advocate for improved learning conditions for students. 3. oppose government-initiated measures that do not enhance learning opportunities for students. (Apr 02 Ex, p. 19) 27.26—That locals be encouraged to work with other unions, community groups, parents, and local coalitions to: 1. endorse and promote trustee candidates who will commit to actively promoting quality public education, and to regular, ongoing consultation on education issues with teachers and others in the community if they are successful in being elected. 2. endorse and promote candidates for municipal council who will commit to working to prevent the loss of, and privatization of, public services in the community. 3. publicly profile the issues of education funding, class size, and services for students with special needs during the election campaign. 4. profile with members and the public the need to prevent the privatization of public education and to elect candidates who will work for a strong and stable public education system. 5. ensure that there is a local election committee and/or contact in place to co-ordinate publicity, promote candidates, promote teacher participation in the election and in campaigning, provide candidate and voting information to members and to external groups and contacts, and ensure maximum turnout on November 16. (Aug. 02 Ex, p. 18)

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27.28—That the BCTF support locals in their election campaign work through: 1. school board/municipal election grants. 2. provision of lists of teachers residing in the local area. 3. online access to resources and forum for sharing of ideas during the campaign. 4. support materials, such as templates for ads, sample articles, speaking notes, organizational ideas. (Aug. 02 Ex, p. 18) (Jan 13 Ex, p. 15)

27.30—That locals be encouraged to plan for the next provincial election campaign by identifying local community groups, on a ridingby-riding basis, who would possibly share a common interest in electing a provincial government that is supportive of public education and adequate funding and meeting with these groups to discuss possible coalitions and electoral alliances and that the BCTF provide co-ordinating support. (03 AGM, p. 24) 27.32—That the BCTF endorse the call, by End Legislated Poverty and other community social action groups, for government action to eradicate poverty. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 8) 27.34—That the BCTF participate in the proposed Teachers’ Congress provided that: 1. all teachers participating in the congress are elected by teachers through locals, and that 2. all costs related to teacher participation in the congress are fully covered by government. (Aug. 05 RA, p. 3) (Nov. 07 RA, p. 11)

27.36—1. That Federation work with the BC Federation of Labour and interested community groups to undertake whatever legal and political actions necessary to restore the right of BC citizens and organizations to exercise the right to free speech including advertising on public policy issues in the period leading up to the provincial election. 2. That locals be encouraged to: a. discuss Bills 7 and 42 and their limitations on free speech with members, local labour councils and with other groups and organizations in their communities b. organize public events which demonstrate the negative impact of the legislation on free speech. (May 08 RA, p. 11) 27.38―That all locals be encouraged to establish a political action contact to work on political action activities between elections. (Aug. 09 Ex, p. 3)

27.40―That, in co-operation with the local president and executive committee, the political action contact could be responsible for: 1. planning for lobbying of trustees, MLAs, and MPs. 2. establishing and building long-term working relationships with elected officials. 3. promoting local media coverage of educational issues including earned media, communication plans, organizing letters to the editor, and op/ed pieces. 4. organizing local election related activities during board of education and provincial election campaigns. 5. informing and involving members in activities to promote the interests of teachers and public education. 6. establishing and supporting a network of staff reps using electronic and other communication (email and/or print). 7. chairing the local political action committee as appropriate. 8.. other local and provincial activities as determined by the local executive. (Aug. 09 Ex, p. 3) 27.42―That locals be encouraged to consider including or assigning the political action contact role on the executive committee. (Aug. 09 Ex, p. 3)

28. Post-Secondary Education POLICIES

28.01—That provision should be made for three basic kinds of institutions of higher learning in BC: (1) universities offering both undergraduate and graduate degree programs; (2) four-year colleges offering baccalaureate degree programs; (3) comprehensive twoyear colleges offering lower-division liberal arts and a wide variety of diploma and certificate programs. (69 AGM, p. 30) (Reviewed Mar 79 Ex, p. 9)

28.03—That two-year colleges should not be permitted to (63 AGM, pp. 3-4) prepare students for direct entry into teaching. (Feb 79 Ex, p. 11)

28.05—That the BCTF supports the position that entrance requirements to post-secondary educational institutions should be less restrictive. (June 79 Ex, p. 12) 28.07—That a wide variety of criteria, including academic, volunteer, and other life experience, be considered in adjudicating applications for admission into post-secondary programs. (Dec. 97 Ex, p. 10) (Jan 10 Ex, p. 22)

28.11—That the BCTF express to the provincial government its support for adequate funding of post-secondary programs in British Columbia and the continuation of the freeze on post-secondary tuition fees. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 10) 28.13—That the BCTF urge the BC government to adequately fund: women’s studies, Native Studies and university transfer programs. (85 AGM, p. 11) 28.15—That the BC government improve access to postsecondary education by: 1. increasing with new money the number of places in all public post-secondary institutions so that all BC students have the opportunity to be accepted. 2. reducing or eliminating tuition fees for all post-secondary education. 3. increasing financial grants to students to make postsecondary education accessible to all BC students. 4. providing core financial support to a full range of postsecondary programs, rather than depending on cost recovery as the basis for determining program offerings. (04 AGM, pp. 38–39) 28.17—That the Federation support and encourage BC universities and colleges to drop their requirement for students to write the optional Grade 12 provincial exams to gain entrance. (March 07 Ex, p. 2)

PROCEDURES 28.02—That post-secondary institutions should consult with and notify the BCTF and the Ministry of Education well in advance of any proposed changes in any entrance regulations. (63 AGM, p. 14) (Reviewed Dec. 77 Ex, p. 12)

28.04—That the BCTF believes that the disadvantages to students inherent in any plan of nationwide examinations far outweigh any possible advantages. (May 68 Ex, p. 7) (Feb. 79 Ex, p. 12)

28.06—That the BCTF seek to influence all post-secondary institutions in BC to stop using the English placement test as a condition of acceptance. (Feb. 86 RA, p. 13) 28.08—That the BCTF work with institutions offering TQS category 5+ post-secondary programs to have BCTF members deliver and instruct courses during the course of a two-year program. (Dec. 07 Ex, p. 8)

29. Privatization and Commercialization

POLICIES 29.01—That equity and opportunity for all through public education is essential to maintaining a democratic society and the privatization of education creates a two-tier education system and threatens democratic values and practices, as well as social equity. (05 AGM, p. 32)

29.03—That privatization produces inequities through forms that include charging fees for students to take part in aspects of the educational program, fundraising to support the educational program, and the sale of educational services, including international student fee programs. (05 AGM, p. 32) 29.05—That the commercialization of public education and a corporate presence in schools undermines the school as a public space aimed primarily at the social and personal development of students. (05 AGM, p. 32) 29.07—That the privatization of services related to public education creates a danger that public education will come under the provisions of international trade agreements that would open education to private companies from other countries. (05 AGM, p. 32)

29.09—That the Government of Canada should not make any international commitments to include education—K–12 or postsecondary—in trade agreements. (05 AGM, p. 34) 29.11—That the BCTF oppose "vouchers," "charter schools," and similar initiatives which privatize public schools and undermine the democratic principles upon which public schools are founded. (95 AGM, p. 34)

29.13—That the BCTF and its locals oppose any private educational and co-educational program offered during regular instructional hours which infringes upon the public school curriculum. (May 00 RA, p. 12)

29.15—That public funds should be used only for public education. Public funds should not be provided directly or indirectly, to private schools, denominational or otherwise. (90 AGM, pp. 26-32) 29.17—1. That all public school facilities should be publicly constructed, owned and operated. 2. That the BCTF express its opposition to government initiatives that allow the private sector to provide and operate public school facilities. 3. That locals be urged to seek support from other employee unions, parents and school boards to oppose the provision and operation of public school facilities by the private sector. (Nov 95 Ex, p.1)

29.19—That education services should not be contracted out. (90 AGM, pp. 26–32)

29.21—That the BCTF is opposed to the contracting out of teacher-psychology and teacher-counsellor services. (99 AGM, p. 20)

29.23—That the BCTF is opposed to any contracting out by the Ministry of Education of any aspect of curriculum development/implementation to private contractors. (95 AGM, p. 9) 29.25—That the BCTF endorse the need for drug and alcohol workers in the schools, but that these workers should be qualified BC certificated teachers, hired by a school district, and be members of the BCTF. (Jan 93 RA, p. 8) (May 97 RA, p. 11)

29.27—Education-business partnerships, informal or formal, should be entered into only when the following conditions are met: 1. programs of corporate involvement meet an identified educational purpose, not a commercial motive. 2. ethical standards developed by the BCTF, that protect the welfare of students and the integrity of the learning environment are agreed to and followed by all parties. 121

3. sponsored teaching resources and materials are evaluated for bias before they are used and members retain discretion in the use of the materials; sponsored and donated materials are held to the same standards used for the selection and purchase of curriculum materials. 4. corporate involvement does not require students to observe, listen to, or read advertising. Sponsor recognition and corporate logos are for identification rather than commercial purposes, and therefore must be kept to a minimum. 5. corporate involvement does not increase inequality in the education system. Monies and other kinds of donations should be made to school districts, to be administered carefully, not to individual schools. 6. partnership agreements are reached after full discussion involving participating school staff, parent representatives and the prospective partner and any agreements are open as public information. 7. partnership agreements are for a limited period of time. 8. all partnership agreements are systematically evaluated. 9. member and student participation in partnerships is voluntary. (95 AGM, p. 6) 29.29—Ethical Standards for Business/Education Partnerships 1. The partnership enhances the quality and relevance of education for learners. 2. The direct and indirect impact of the partnership does not exploit the school or the student for material, ideological or other advantage and has a positive impact on a student's school or personal life. 3. The partnership treats students fairly and equitably, including at-risk students and those who have less access to resources from family and community, and that business partnerships not reduce corporate obligations to pay their fair share of taxes to support public institutions. 4. The partnership does not increase inequality in the education system and that resources derived from partnerships be administered centrally. 5. The partnership provides opportunities for all partners to meet their shared social responsibilities toward education. 6. The partnership is free of stereotyping and discriminatory practices against women, ethnic groups, Aboriginal people, and members of other groups who have been subject to inequalities. 7. The partnership ensures that corporate logos do not appear in any educational materials, school buildings and grounds. 8. The partnership allocates resources to complement and not replace public funding for education. 9. The partnership is developed and structured in consultation with all partners and respects the policies, procedures and traditions operating in the school. 10. The partnership clearly defines roles and responsibilities for all partners and involves individual participants only on a voluntary basis. 11. The partnership does not conflict with members’ obligations under the BCTF Code of Ethics or provisions of a collective agreement. 12. Partnership performance is evaluated to make informed decisions on continuation of the partnership. (Oct 95 Ex, pp. 9 - 10) (Aug. 05 Ex, p. 2)

29.31—That the BCTF oppose the creation of School District Business Companies. (03 AGM, p. 13) 29.33—1. That the BCTF work toward the elimination of corporate funding in public schools by lobbying for full public funding of public education, and by promoting and fostering programs and structures to increase member and public awareness of the dangers of corporate involvement and privatization. 2. That the BCTF believes that many corporations increasingly target public schools and their students for present and future profit; e.g.: a. establishment of brand loyalty b. access to captive markets in a trusted environment c. diversion of public funds 122

3. That public education be publicly funded and not reliant on fundraising, donation, or corporate business sponsorship. 4. That corporations contribute to public education through the following: a. Tax structures. b. Support for increased public funding. c. A provincial foundation administered jointly by the Ministry of Education, the BCTF, and BCCPAC. 5. That all commercial contracts entered into by educational authorities be made publicly available in their entirety. 6. That teacher and student participation in commercial arrangements be voluntary. 7. That no commercial enterprise use the school to influence students to buy its products or services. 8. That all teaching resources and materials, whether purchased, sponsored, or donated, be evaluated for bias before they are used, and that members retain discretion in the use of materials. 9. That the BCTF oppose arrangements by the public education system to provide training programs specific to the products or needs of a single employer. (01 AGM p. 36) 29.35—1. That corporate partnership agreements not interfere with the ability of individual teachers, departments, or schools to offer learning experiences to students through preparing food or running school stores. 2. That corporate partnership agreements not interfere with the ability of school clubs, teachers, parent groups, or schools to raise funds through selling food or beverages. 3. That students writing exams mandated by the government not be exposed to advertising in any form, including the names of specific companies or brand names. 4. That no government-mandated exam require that students be familiar with a specific company or product. 5. That identifying and criticizing psychologically manipulative advertising techniques are essential life skills which should be taught and encouraged in elementary and secondary schools. (01 AGM p. 37) 29.37—That the BCTF express its opposition to the use of advertising and corporate logos on government-sponsored materials for display in schools. (Apr. 00 Ex, p.. 37) 29.39—That members should not be required to act as collecting agents for any commercial enterprise. (Jan 57 Ex, p. 7) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

29.41—That the School Act should be amended to provide penalties for business enterprises that endeavor, for their own gain, to induce students to be truant. (Oct 78 RA, p. 3) 29.43—That no teacher or student face discipline or sanction for voicing an opinion critical of corporate partners, agreements, products, or promotional activities of that partner. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 13) 29.45—That students have the right to enjoy school and concentrate on educational activities without facing psychologically manipulative advertising and other commercial pressure which treat them merely as sources of profit. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 13) 29.47—That the BCTF oppose in principle the intrusion of the Youth News Network, or any other commercial television broadcast service, into the public school system. (Jan 93. Ex, p. 3) 29.49—That the BCTF publicly call on the CRTC to prohibit the advertising of junk food and drinks specifically targeted at children and youth. (May 04 RA, p. 13) 29.51—That school districts that created school district business companies disband them. (05 AGM, p. 33) 29.53—That the BC government repeal the provisions for school district business companies and the existing School District Business Companies be disbanded. (05 AGM, p. 33)

29.55—That schools and school districts not enter into exclusive marketing contracts with soft drink companies or other fastfood vendors. (05 AGM, p. 33)

29.81—That the BCTF oppose the provision in Bill 22 which allows for reimbursement for K-12 public education services, programs, and/or activities purchased privately. (07 AGM, p. 10)

29.57—That school districts prohibit commercial advertising on all school district property. (05 AGM, p. 33)

PROCEDURES 29.02—That the BCTF encourage teachers to stop using their own funds to subsidize public education. (Feb. 02 RA, p. 7)

29.59—That the BC government prohibit advertising directed at children. (05 AGM, p. 33) 29.61—That BC students not be required to pay user fees in a public school. (Nov. 97 RA, p. 4) 29.63—That the BCTF is opposed to the charging or collecting fees from parents or students to support the prescribed learning outcomes. (05 AGM, p. 33) 29.65—1. That the province be responsible for funding the provincially determined fiscal framework from provincial sources of revenue. 2. That tax revenue for schools comes from taxes on income, consumption and property. The fiscal framework should be funded by a combination of grants from general revenue and from property taxes, 3. That public school education not be funded through direct or indirect subsidisation by members, by voucher plans, tuition tax credits, or by taxpayer referendum. 4. That taxpayer dollars not be used to fund private schools, and current indexing of private school contributions to public school funding levels be discontinued. 5. That the BCTF oppose the hiring of staff by schools or school districts for purposes of fundraising. 6. That BCTF members not participate in the charging or collecting of fees established at the school level to replace amounts cut from school board budgets. (March 02 Ex, p. 9) 29.67—That equity and access to full participation in public education by all elementary, secondary, and adult students be assured by: 1. increasing provincial funding for school districts so that services provided maximize the learning opportunities of students. 2. basing funding on needs, not on the ability of the school district to earn profits through operating businesses and marketing education. 3. eliminating fees and fundraising as methods of providing funding for services and resources. 4. eliminating funding to tuition schools. (04 AGM, p. 38) 29.69—That the BCTF reiterate our demand that the government fund public education appropriately and restore programs and resources that keep our public schools free and accessible. (04 AGM, p. 36) 29.71—That the Federation is opposed to the use of personal funds to provide materials to deliver curriculum or toward the implementation of curriculum change. (05 AGM, p. 33) (14 AGM, p. 9)

29.73—That financial statements on all aspects of financing of education should be open to public inspection and reported at school board meetings, including income and expenditures related to fundraising, fees for international students and all school accounts. (05 AGM, p. 33)

29.75—That the BCTF urge parent advisory councils not to raise funds to cover the costs of educational programs. (05 AGM, p. 34)

29.77—That locals be encouraged to raise privatization and commercialization as issues in school board elections. (June 05 Ex, p. 23)

29.79—That the BCTF continue its strong support of the Supreme Court decision on the elimination of school fees and vigorously lobby the government to provide adequate funding to replace any loss of revenue. (Feb. 07 RA, p. 16)

29.04—That in districts that have not created a School District Business Company, locals oppose the creation of a company through actions such as: 1. lobbying the school board. 2. raising a public issue if the board is considering creating a business company. 3. seeking allies who share concerns and who can pressure the board. 4. encouraging the board to hold a public meeting on the issues around SDBCs before the board votes on creating a company. 5. organizing a public meeting (if the board will not organize one) sponsored by the local and other concerned organizations. 6. identifying issues of concern to the public and to teachers; a. distractions from the main purpose of the school board and its employees and education of the students who live in the school district. b. further privatization of public institutions and services. c. inequities in resources available for students based on how well a board does in business. d. level of educational service being based on instability of profits of the company. e. lack of transparency of information. f. lack of public accountability. g. creating a structure that isn’t necessary if intent is primarily to bring fee-paying international students. h. uncertainties about employment relationships of people working for the school district. i. possible impact of the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) if public boards run private schools. (Nov. 03 RA, p. 17)

29.06—That in districts that have created a School District Business Company, locals monitor the company through actions such as: 1. creating a committee to carry out ongoing monitoring and reporting on the SDBC: a. If possible, have the committee include groups in addition to teachers, parents, CUPE, others in the community. b. Identify the principles on which the monitoring will take place. c. Get the board to adopt a policy on open access to information. d. Get information on the business plan, who works for the company, what are the subsidiary companies. e. Work with trustees who share concerns about the business company. f. Use public reports as a way of putting on pressure and maintaining accountability. 2. working with teachers to identify and resolve problems: a. Encourage members to report problems with the activities being carried out by the SDBC. b. Clarify employment relationship of teachers who work for the SDBC. Are they members of the Federation? What rights to employment with the SDBC do board employees have? c. Inform members about the employment situation of teachers working in schools run by a business company, either in Canada or in another country. (Nov. 03 RA, p. 18) 29.08—1. That the BCTF oppose the practice of students receiving private paid tutoring during school hours. 2. That the BCTF oppose the use of school facilities for private paid tutoring with the exception of use by “student tutors”. 3. That BCTF members not refer students or their parents to any particular private paid tutoring service, with the exception of “student tutors”. Upon request, information may be provided on several available services. (99 AGM, p. 31) 123

29.10—That BCTF members not release information about students to private companies or agencies, unless mandated by legislation which is intended to protect children from abuse or exploitation. (05 AGM, p. 32) 29.12—That BCTF members not refer students to private educational services to replace services that should be provided by the public schools. (05 AGM, p. 32) 29.14—That the BCTF work with a wide range of other organizations to carry out research and actions in support of public education and other public services and in opposition to privatization. (05 AGM, p. 34)

29.16—That the BCTF gather information and produce an annual report to the Annual General Meeting on the state of privatization in education. (05 AGM, p. 34) 29.18—That the BCTF make recommendations to the Canadian Teachers’ Federation on programs to oppose the privatization of education. (05 AGM, p. 34) 29.20—That the BCTF work with the labour movement through the BC Federation of Labour and labour councils in campaigns for public services and in opposition to privatization. (05 AGM, p. 34) 29.22—That the BCTF work with the Education International, the IDEA Network (Initiative for Democratic Education in the Americas), the Tri-national Coalition in Defence of Public Education and other international groups which promote public education and oppose privatization. (05 AGM, p. 34) 29.24—That the BCTF lobby the provincial government to: 1. take action on prohibiting advertising directed at children, repeal the provisions for school district business companies, and not use gambling proceeds to fund educational activities. 2. replace all funding foregone by the elimination of funding from private and commercial sources. (05 AGM, p. 33)

30. Professional Development A.

General

POLICIES 30.A.01—1. Definition of Professional Development Professional development is a process of ongoing growth, through involvement in programs, services, and activities designed to enable teachers, both individually and collectively, to enhance professional practice. 2. Purposes of Professional Development The purpose of professional development is to assist members in: a. building and strengthening themselves as a professional body. b. establishing and maintaining a professional relationship with students/parents. c. initiating curriculum and instructional reform directed to improve teaching and learning. d. developing, discussing, revising and applying educational theories. e. improving the quality of professional practice through career-long professional development. f. engaging in professional and collegial conversations. (00 AGM, p. 15) (June 06 RA, p. 8)

30.A.03—That the BCTF perspective of professional development may include: 1. advocacy for professional autonomy. 2. advocacy for the rights and responsibilities of members. 3. advocacy on social justice issues. 4. advocacy for public education. 5. ongoing examination of the purposes of public education. 6. workshops, seminars, conferences, and action research. 124

7.

teacher inquiry, mentorship, and others. (June 06 RA, p. 8) (Jan 10 RA, p. 10)

30.A.05—That a goal of the BCTF is to co-operate in the development and improvement of teacher education programs. (Oct 80 RA, p. 4) (June 06 RA, p. 8)

30.A.07—The BCTF promotes partnership with other groups involved in teacher education. This partnership should take the form of: 1. direct participation in program design and evaluation at all teacher education institutions; 2. significant representation on bodies with overall responsibility for teacher education or certification; 3. optional representation on less permanent groups or agencies seeking to influence decisions on teacher education; 4. a shared control over entry into the teaching profession. (Jan 95 Ex, p. 13) (June 05 Ex, p. 24)

30.A.09―Principles of Professional Development The following is a statement of policy representing collective professional opinion of members of the BCTF. It is based on values and principles that reflect a democratic perspective on public education and is intended to provide a provincial standard of professional development principles. These principles reflect understandings of professional development and the core values of teachers which are:  The primacy of continuing career-long professional development.  The necessity of teacher autonomy.  The importance of teaching-centred and teacher-directed PD.  The diversity of effective professional development needs and practices.  The value of teachers teaching teachers.  Recognition that teachers are learners. 1. Members have an ongoing responsibility to develop professionally. 2. Members have autonomy in making choices about their own professional development. 3. Professional development planning is guided by members’ needs. 4. Professional development informs teaching practice and encourages collegiality. 5. Professional development requires time and resources to meet members’ needs. 6. Professional development incorporates a wide repertoire of teacher collaboration, mentorship, action research, workshops, professional course work, professional reading, peer coaching, and reflection. 7 BCTF has a role in providing professional development services to individual members or groups. (85 AGM, p. 28) (05 AGM, p. 43)

30.A.11—That individual members, school teaching staffs, locals, PSAs, LSAs, and the BCTF are responsible for planning, structuring, organizing, and evaluating professional development programs and services for members. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 4) (June 05 Ex, p. 24)

30.A.13—That the BCTF encourage the provision of professional development through: 1. volunteer efforts of BCTF members. 2. paid work carried out by BCTF staff. 3. services funded by local school boards and/or the provincial government which are directed and performed by BCTF members. 4. services provided by universities and other agencies in cooperation with the BCTF. (June 86 Ex, p. 12) 5.

BCTF-sponsored leadership initiatives.

(June 05 Ex, p. 24) (Jan 10 Ex, p. 22)

30.A.15—That the BCTF affirm the importance of critical reflection and collaboration to the growth and development of knowledge, understandings and skills of teaching. Specifically, members need adequate resources (time, space, materials) for: 1. critical reflection on teaching; 2. individual and collaborative planning; 3. active research and development; 4. personal and professional development; 5. staff development 6. democratic decision-making within the schools. (Feb 90 Ex, p. 8) (Jan 10 RA, p. 15)

30.A.17—Members of the BCTF have the right to five professional development days within the school year book ends of the first working day after Labour Day, and the last Friday of June, and have the professional autonomy to plan those days. (Nov 84 RA, p. 3) (Jan 06 RA, p. 12)

30.A.19—That the member, as an autonomous professional, determines, in concert with BCTF colleagues and/or the local union, the content of professional development activities scheduled for professional development days, and further, that professional development days are not used for school goal setting and/or School Improvement Plans, marking accountability assessment tools, or voluntary activities (e.g., sports tournaments, science fairs, music festivals, drama productions.) (98 AGM, p. 30) (June 06 RA, p. 9)

30.A.21—That the Ministry of Education target funds for member-planned and member-led professional development. 30.A.23—That the Ministry of Education re-affirm its commitment to member professional development by designating five non-instructional days of the "days in session" for member planned and led professional development. 30.A.25—That the Ministry of Education and the BCTF investigate other ways to provide rural member equity of access to professional-development programs. 30.A.27—1. That the BCTF encourage teachers to voluntarily maintain a self-directed PD log. 2. That the BCTF implement strategies to promote the use of self-directed PD logs. (Feb. 04 Ex, p. 13) 30.A.29—That the BCTF continue to encourage teachers to participate in a wide variety of teacher-initiated ongoing professional development activities. (Feb. 04 Ex, p. 15) 30.A.31—That the BCTF encourage the development of inservice training that offers strategies for working with colour-visiondeficient students. Such pre-service and in-service education should also sensitize teachers to the needs of colour-vision-deficient students. (Nov 08 RA, p. 13) PROCEDURES 30.A.02—That BCTF PD support be available for those locals who had summer PD imposed upon them. (07 AGM, p. 12) 30.A.04—That the BCTF offer workshops, training and professional development consulting services through PD associates according to the following guidelines: 1. The PD associate will consult with the group in creating a workshop to meet their specific needs. This consultation is an integral part of the BCTF service. 2. Workshops should be booked at least one month prior to the date. 3. There will be at least 12 members who participate in a BCTF workshop, unless there are extenuating circumstances (e.g., small schools, department, or local). 4. Workshop facilitators should normally be PD associates. BCTF staff should only facilitate these workshops in exceptional circumstances.

5. No PD associate should be out of pocket for any expenses incurred in providing a BCTF workshop. 6. That any member who provides workshop services to BCTF members as a PD associate, through a Federation-recognized program or service should not receive an honorarium. (June 05 Ex, p. 25)

7. That release time for members be provided as required for workshop presentation preparation but that in lieu release time for work done on a member’s own time not be covered by this procedure. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 2) 30.A.06—That each local be encouraged to maintain a professional development committee to offer advice and to stimulate programs in professional development, and to work with other professional development committees at the local, regional and provincial levels. (May 75 RA, p. 14) (76 AGM, p. 55)

30.A.08—That locals be encouraged to ensure that all members, including teachers teaching on call, have equitable access to professional development. (Dec 79 Ex, p. 5) (Feb 16 Ex, p. 13)

30.A.10—That where circumstances permit, members of the public should be invited and encouraged to attend professional development day activities. (85 AGM, p. 27) 30.A.12—That in addition to the October PSA day, the BCTF encourage zones to establish one common professional development day within the regular work year. (95 AGM, p. 11) (10 AGM, 13)

30.A.14—That for the purpose of a province-wide PSA day, the BCTF supports the third Friday in October as the day on which all districts hold a professional day, except in years in which Thanksgiving Monday falls in the same week, in which case the fourth Friday would be the designated day. (Jan 96 Ex, p. 2) 30.A.16—1. That locals be encouraged to organize schoolbased or district-based PD days during the school year rather than during the summer. (June 99 Ex, p. 20) 2. That where the employer directs that PD days are to be held outside of the school year book ends of the first working day after Labour Day and the last working day in June, the BCTF will support members in exercising their right to choose not to participate. (Nov. 03 RA, p. 22)

30.A.18―That the BCTF advise locals not to promote or support the use of the October Provincial Day as a day in lieu for professional development undertaken during the summer. (June 10 Ex, p. 18)

30.A.20—That the BCTF continue to support members through their locals in their efforts to gain autonomy over their professional development. (May 94 RA) 30.A.22—Professional Growth Plans 1. That the BCTF encourage locals and teachers to utilize voluntary, self-directed professional development planning. 2. That locals which are seeking a means to eliminate cyclical teacher evaluation: a. negotiate mid-contract modifications which remove reference to cyclical evaluations from their collective agreements. b. not pursue administrator-driven professional growth plans as an alternative. 3. That members be advised of the potential pitfalls inherent in involving themselves in administrator-driven professional growth plans. (Aug. 99 Ex, p. 15-16) (Jan 10 Ex, p. 21)

30.A.24—Peer Support 1. That the BCTF establish a Peer Support Service (PSS) to assist active members. (Oct. 02 Ex, p.9) 2. That the Peer Support Service may be offered to a member only when their school district agrees that it shall not use any 125

information relating to the member’s involvement in the Peer Support Service against the member in any disciplinary proceedings or in any evaluation of the teaching performance of the member. (Apr 00 Ex, p. 3)

30.A.26—That members appointed to the BCTF Peer Support Service will be known as Peer Consultants and will comprise a balance of female and male teachers, a representative balance of elementary and secondary teachers, will preferably be fluent in French as well as English. Members appointed as peer consultants will have an extensive background in teaching strategies and training in planning, consultation, classroom observations, analysis, and feedback. BCTF members will be appointed to the Peer Support Service for a three-year term, and may be appointed to a maximum of three years. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 9 (Sept. 07 Ex, p. 3)

30.A.28—That an active member who is on a plan-ofassistance, or who needs assistance may request the services of the BCTF Peer Support Service by communicating with their Local President or designate, who may direct the request to the BCTF staff assigned to co-ordinate the service. (Apr 00 Ex, p. 4) 30.A.30—1. That the cost of the service to a member who is on a plan-of-assistance will be paid by their school district. 2. That the cost of the service to a member for whom the local president or designate requests assistance with their professional teaching practice will be paid by the Federation. (Apr 00 Ex, p. 6)

30.A.32—1. Normally, one peer consultant will be assigned to work with a member who is on a plan-of-assistance or who requests assistance with their teaching. 2. The staff member assigned to co-ordinate the service will screen requests for service from local presidents or designates and assign peer consultants in each case. 3. A peer consultant will not give reports to any person except as agreed to, in advance, among the member receiving the services, the local president or designate and the peer consultant. 4. Wherever possible, a peer consultant assigned to assist a member on a plan-of-assistance will participate in developing the plan-of-assistance. 5. Peer consultants may discuss information relating to their work with members of PSS and with appropriate BCTF staff on a privileged communication basis at any time. 6. In the event that a situation where a peer consultant provided assistance develops into a grievance, no information from the peer consultant will be requested nor will any be offered about the situation. 7. Members of the peer support service will be given adequate training and support by the Federation. (Apr 00 Ex, p. 4) 8. That the school district and the local will provide follow–up support, as needed, by the teacher who has received assistance from the Peer Support Service. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 9) 30.A.34—School Professional Development Representatives The BCTF recognizes the PD Representative as a union leader and encourages locals to adopt and promote the following description of the role and function of the school-based professional development representative, recognizing that each school situation is unique and adjustments to the model may be necessary. A. School Level 1. Organizer/Leader a. Ensures that an election for school professional development representative and members of the school professional development committee is held annually. b. Chairs the school professional development committee. c. Develops with the staff a job description of the school professional development representative and the committee. d. Encourages staff members to identify professional development needs and establish goals each year. e. Develops with the school professional development committee a professional development plan based on the needs and goals identified in part d. 126

f. Ensures that where school-based professional development funds exist, they are distributed equitably according to locally established policies and procedures. g. Carries out other duties and responsibilities within school professional development guidelines as assigned by the school professional development committee and the district professional development committee. 2. Communicator a. Receives and distributes relevant professional development and BCTF information. b. Attends staff meetings to report on school, local and BCTF professional development/BCTF education change oppor-tunities and information. c. Attends local meetings of school-based professional development representatives to provide liaison between the local* and school professional development committees. d. Participates in School Professional Development Representatives’ Training which provides the knowledge and skills to assist the school PD rep in performing their roles. 3. Advocate a. Is familiar with contract language and local* policies related to professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. b. Serves as school advocate for all teachers in any matters related to professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. c. Participates with other school-based professional development representatives in generating appropriate contract language and local* policies for professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. d. Participates with other school-based professional development representatives in generating appropriate contract language and local* policies for professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. e. Works collegially with staff representatives and school committees. B. Local Level 1. That locals ensure that each school in the district elects at least one school-based professional development representative each year. 2. That locals ensure that the role and function of schoolbased professional development representatives is included in local policies and professional development handbooks. 3. That locals ensure that training programs, provided at BCTF expense, be held each year for school-based professional development representatives. 4. That locals ensure that release time for this training is available. C. Provincial Level 1. That the BCTF Professional and Social Issues Division communicate to the schools through the school-based professional development representative on all matters related to professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. 2. That the BCTF promote and provide school professional development representative training for school-based professional development representatives. 3. That school professional development representative training contain a strong locally developed component to meet the specific needs of the schools and the local. 4. That school-based professional development representatives inform and advise teachers regarding BCTF policies and activities related to professional development, curriculum implementation and education change. *It is understood that local is meant to refer to local committees at the district level. 30.A.36―That the BCTF encourage locals to examine their fee structures and existing Federation grants such that release time for local PD chairs be made available to enhance professional issues in the local. (Jan 10 RA, p. 10)

30.A.38―That the BCTF fund a day(s) in lieu for BCTF Pro-D associates who provide professional development services outside the bookends of the school year by providing for a TTOC inside the bookends of the school year; and that the leave be taken at a time of the Pro-D associate’s choosing. (Jan 10 RA, p. 12)

31. Professional Ethics, Rights, and Standards A.

Professional Rights and Standards of Practice

PROCEDURES 31.A.02—Professional Rights and Standards of Practice  Centrality of Teaching Relationships with Students Teaching relationships are interactive, caring, and ethical. As such they take into account both the importance and the uniqueness of the individual; in particular, personal history, developmental (social, emotional, physical, cognitive) level, personal learning style.  Commitment to Collegial and Collaborative Relationships Teaching relationships with peers are based on professional qualifications, ethical conduct, trust, equality and collaboration.  Commitment to Democratic Processes Communication, interpersonal skills and decision-making in all professional interactions are based on the encouragement values of trust, mutual respect, equality, acceptance and co-operation.  Commitment to Community Building Community building involves developing a sense of belonging and honoring the uniqueness and diversity of each individual.  Commitment to Standards of Professional Practice Teaching as a planned process is based upon defined standards and practice. Teachers believe that it is through the knowledge, skills and example of teachers that public school education nurtures the growth of students, intellectually, socially, physically and emotionally, so that they may be and become self-reliant, self-disciplined, participating members with a sense of environmental and social responsibility within a democratic society. Teaching, as a planned process, is based upon a set of Standards of Professional Practice which incorporate principles of pedagogy, social responsibility, ethical practice, and collaborative relationships. 1. Pedagogical Principles Members, individually and collectively, have an obligation to maintain a standard of professional practice that reflects current knowledge, understanding and competence in the application of the following principles of pedagogy: a. Nature of Learner: i. the intellectual, social, emotional, physical and moral growth of students; ii. skills in diagnosing, assessing, reporting on the intellectual, physical, social and emotional needs and abilities of individual students; iii. diversity and need for equality and equity. b. Nature of the Structures of Knowledge and Curriculum Building: i. structures and content within the disciplines that are the foundations of curriculum building; ii. theories of learning; iii. processes related to curriculum development; iv. processes related to the integration of curriculum components. c. Nature of the Teaching/Learning Process: i. planning and organizing learning experiences that incorporates assessing the needs of individual students and/or groups of students; ii. establishing and communicating personalized learner objectives; iii. balancing cognitive, affective and psycho-motor learning objectives; iv. developing interpersonal relationships and social interactions needed for a nurturing and stimulating learning environment;

v. creating a classroom climate that recognizes every student’s right to dignity, safety, equality and equity of opportunity; vi. matching content, resources and instructional strategies to accommodate the learning needs of individual students or groups of students; vii. providing on-going feedback to the learner based on the principles of authentic assessment; viii. monitoring and adjusting teaching/learning strategies to meet classroom needs. (16 AGM, pp. 11)  2. Social Responsibility Members, individually and collectively, have an obligation to maintain a standard of professional practice that reflects knowledge, understanding and competence in the application of the following principles of social responsibility to ensure that: a. the purposes, goals and values of a public school education are consistent with those that foster the growth of students into autonomous, socially responsible citizens in a democratic society; b. global concerns and perspectives, and related social developments are incorporated into classroom activities; c. the array of resources and services within the community available to students, parents and teachers are appropriately utilized; d. communication with students, parents, colleagues and other members of the educational community are ongoing and effective; e. a sense of community in the school setting is established; f. interactions with students, parents and colleagues, and other members of the educational community are conducted in an ethical manner free from discrimination with regard to gender identity, age, race, nationality, religion, socio-economic status, physical ability, mental ability, marital status or sexual orientation. (94 AGM p. 29) (May 11 RA, p. 14)

3. Ethical Practice Members, individually and collectively, have an obligation to maintain a standard of professional practice that reflects knowledge, understanding and competence in the application of the following principles of ethical practice. Specifically, members have a professional responsibility to: a. model honesty, integrity, self-reliance, self-confidence, self-discipline and spirit of co-operation and encouragement that members seek to develop in students; b. engage in critical reflection, based on both research and experience, about professional practice; c. model a commitment to learning and personal and professional growth by engaging in a process of self-evaluation, and individual professional development; d. participate as an advocate for public education; e. adhere to the profession’s Code of Ethics. 4. Collaborative Practice Members, individually and collectively, have an obligation to maintain a standard of professional practice that reflects knowledge, understanding and competence in the application of the following principles of collaborative practice: a. Collegial Professional teachers are committed to relationships with colleagues that: i. encourage on-going programs of collegial professional development; ii. promote co-operation in the teaching/learning process which include planning, teaching, reflecting and evaluating; iii. reflects the commitment to expand the body of professional expertise; iv. Promote shared decision-making practice at the school and district level; v. demonstrate a commitment to accept and act in accordance with democratic principles; vi. contribute to the education, training and induction of preservice and novice professionals; vii. demonstrate a commitment to uphold standards of professional practice. b. Co-worker Professional teachers are committed to collaborative relationships with co-workers that: 127

i. provide for effective direction and supervision of auxiliary personnel who work directly with students; ii. promote effective interactions with associated professionals who work directly with students, e.g., speech language pathologists, physiotherapists, family and social workers, community workers; iii. promote effective interactions with administrative officers, clerical and custodial staff, and others who are part of the school’s educational setting, in the development of a sense of community within the school. 5. Professional Rights The responsibility of members, individually and collectively, to maintain the standards of professional practice articulated in sections 1–4 is contingent upon the recognition by society of the member’s right to: a. autonomy in establishing the teaching/learning environment; b. primary control in diagnosing learner needs, in planning curriculum and in determining appropriate methods of instruction to meet these needs; c. primary control over evaluation instruments and processes and the interpretation and communication of evaluation data in regard to students; d. significant influence over decision-making and policy formation through the school staff at the school level and through professional organizations at the district and provincial level; e. sufficient human and material resources to meet standards of professional practice. (90 AGM, pp. 53-56) 31.A.04—That: 1. it is the professional and social responsibility of members and the BCTF to act to ensure that classroom practices, school system structures and practices, and societal conditions are supportive of fostering the democratic values of citizenship, equality, equity, participation, and socialization for all students in public schools. 2. it is sound professional practice for members, individually and collectively, through their local and provincial organizations, to work in their community and in coalitions with other organizations toward the democratic goals of equality, equity, participation, and socialization. (90 AGM, pp. 56-57) (16 AGM, p. 12)

B.

Code of Ethics

PROCEDURES 31.B.02—That the following be the Code of Ethics of the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation: The Code of Ethics states general rules for all members of the BCTF for maintaining high standards of professional service and conduct toward students, colleagues and the professional union. Members are advised to contact local union officers or appropriate BCTF staff for advice on how to proceed with issues related to the BCTF Code of Ethics. (99 AGM, p. 23) (16 AGM, p. 5)

1. The member speaks and acts toward students with respect and dignity, and deals judiciously with them, always mindful of their individual rights and sensibilities. 2. The member respects the confidential nature of information concerning students and may give it only to authorized persons or agencies directly concerned with their welfare. The member follows legal requirements in reporting child protection issues. (06 AGM, p. 22) 3. A privileged relationship exists between members and students. The member refrains from exploiting that relationship for material, ideological, or other advantage. (16 AGM, p. 5) 4. The member is willing to review with colleagues, students, and their parents/guardians the practices employed in discharging the member’s professional duties. (16 AGM, p. 5) 5. The member directs any criticism of the teaching performance and related work of a colleague to that colleague in private. If the member believes that the issue(s) have not been addressed, they may, after privately informing the colleague in writing 128

of their intent to do so, direct the criticism in confidence to appropriate individuals who can offer advice and assistance. * It shall not be considered a breach of the Code of Ethics for a member to follow the legal requirements for reporting child protection issues. (06 AGM, p. 22) (16 AGM, p. 6)

6. The member acknowledges the authority and responsibilities of the BCTF and its locals and fulfills obligations arising from membership in their professional union. 7. The member adheres to the provisions of the collective agreement. (98 AGM, p. 40) 8. The member acts in a manner not prejudicial to job actions or other collective strategies of their professional union. 9. The member neither applies for nor accepts a position that is included in a Federation in-dispute declaration. 10. The member, as an individual or as a member of a group of members, does not make unauthorized representations to outside bodies in the name of the Federation or its locals. (06 AGM, p. 22) (15 AGM, p. 33)

*See 31.B.12 of the Members’ Guide to the BCTF 31.B.04—That the Code of Ethics be available in both official languages. (June 90 RA, p. 20) 31.B.06—Guide to professional practice These standards of professional conduct are: 1. a guide to professional relations and responsibilities. 2. a guide to professional practice. 3. a guide for interpersonal relations and personnel practices within the profession. The Code of Ethics stipulates those general rules of conduct particular to the teaching profession. The Standards of Professional Conduct are not rules but rather give further specific guidance for the conduct of all BCTF members. Observance of these standards should assist all members to uphold the Code of Ethics. The following constitute professional conduct. A. In relation to students The professional responsibility of members is for the intellectual, physical, social and emotional development of the students entrusted to their care. The member: 1. Assesses educational needs, prescribes and implements instructional programs and evaluates the progress of individual students, and shall not delegate these responsibilities to any person who is not employed as a teacher. The member seeks professional assistance in any of the above functions when such is required. 2. Directs and supervises the delegation of specific, limited aspects of learning activities to auxiliary personnel. 3. Is mindful of the student’s safety, the student’s right to equality of opportunity and successful learning experiences, and is considerate of the child’s personal circumstances. 4. Endeavors to provide for a range of fact and opinion when dealing with controversial matters in the curriculum. 5. Regards as confidential and does not divulge, other than to appropriate persons, any information of a personal nature concerning students. 6. Does not accept private payment for any additional teaching or tutoring of that member’s own students. (11 AGM, p.16) 7. Speaks constructively of students in the presence of students, members, officials, or other persons. 8. Must, if the member has reason to believe that a student has been, or is likely to be, physically harmed, sexually abused, or sexually exploited by a parent or other person, immediately report the matter to the appropriate authorities. (05 AGM, p. 41) B. In relation to parents or guardians The member co-operates with the home whenever possible. The member: 1. Respects the uniqueness of each student’s home. 2. Is receptive to the viewpoints of parents in regard to the educational needs of their children. 3. Seeks parental involvement in the educational processes designated for students. 4. Shares with the parents information that will assist in the growth and development of the students.

5. Takes appropriate steps to protect the rights of the student. C. In relation to the general public The member endeavors to improve the quality of education and to enhance the reputation of the teaching profession. The member: 1. Co-operates with and encourages the involvement of the community and other agencies in the examination of present and future educational needs of students. 2. Before accepting a position, becomes aware of the expectations the community holds with regard to the profession. 3. Understands that if there are reasons to seek additional employment, discretion should be used in doing so. 4. Refrains from using the teaching position to promote the sale of books or other teaching aids for personal gain. 5. Is cognizant of individual rights and responsibilities in the event of a strike of school district employees. D. In relation to school boards and the Ministry of Education The member is cognizant of the terms and conditions of employment. The member: 1. When considering accepting a position in a district with which the member is unfamiliar, should contact the Federation for information regarding teaching conditions. 2. Protests both the assignment of duties for which the member feels unqualified and any conditions that make it difficult to render professional service. 3. Refrains from attempting to influence individual school board members to further a personal career or to gain professional favor. 4. Is aware of the provisions of the School Act and Regulation and with the policies of the employing school board and where changes are deemed necessary, seeks revision through the Federation and/or local. E. In relation to the profession The member recognizes a responsibility toward both colleagues and the professional organization. The member: 1. Accepts as a professional and individual responsibility the duty of reporting in an appropriate manner all matters harmful to the welfare of the school. 2. Speaks constructively of other members in the presence of students, teachers, officials or other persons. 3. Exercises the right to privileged counselling and assistance from colleagues designated by the local. 4. Seeks the advice of the Federation concerning any problem of relationship with colleagues that cannot be resolved by personal discussions or with local assistance. 5. Does not undermine the students’ confidence in other members. 6. Is prepared to co-operate with colleagues seeking or providing professional assistance. 7. Communicates with any other member whose students the member proposes to tutor on a regular basis. 8. Recognizes a responsibility to assist in teacher education programs. 9. Regards it as a right and responsibility to examine and, if necessary, suggest changes in the conduct of the professional organization within the organization. 10. Recognizes service to the Federation at the local or provincial level as a professional responsibility. 11. Assumes responsibility for that member’s own personal professional growth. 12. Recognizes the need for personal professional growth and takes advantage of opportunities provided. (90 AGM, p. 5) 31.B.12—Advice on how to proceed with a concern respecting a colleague’s teaching and related work may be sought from Federation staff and/or local officers in good faith. Such discussion will not constitute a breach of clause 5. 'Appropriate individuals' in clause 5 of the Code of Ethics shall mean those persons who are able to offer advice and assistance on questions of teaching performance and related work. The first emphasis should at all times be on exploring means of assisting, educating, and maintaining professional relationships. (99 AGM, p. 24)

(9 AGM, p. 23)

31.B.14—It shall not be considered a breach of the Code of Ethics for a member to follow legal requirements in reporting child protection issues.” (09 AGM, p. 23) (16 AGM, p. 6)

31.B.16—That all members who indicate they may have a complaint of a possible breach of the Code of Ethics shall be referred to the designated staff member who is in a position to give full information on the code and its processes. (90 AGM, errata) 31.B.18—That members of the Executive Committee be excluded from membership on the Judicial Council. (90 AGM, errata) (13 AGM, p. 28)

31.B.20—That members continue to follow Clause 5 of the BCTF Code of Ethics in raising matters of teaching performance and professional conduct. (May 03 RA., p. 13) (09 AGM, p. 23)

31.B.22―Clause 5 of the Code of Ethics applies only to “teaching performance and related work of a colleague.” Related work is work that is closely tied to a member’s teaching (or closely tied to the work of an associated professional) and does not include those working or volunteering for the Federation or local. (16 AGM, p. 6)

C.

Judicial Council

31.C.02—That candidates for election to the Judicial Council be nominees who have been approved by a secret ballot of a local general meeting or a local delegate assembly. (Endorsement by other groups of members such as a local executive committee does not constitute a valid nomination.) (76 AGM, p. 62) 31.C.04—That the Judicial Council members be elected by secret ballot of the Representative Assembly, such election requiring in excess of a 50 percent majority. (76 AGM, p. 63) (90 AGM, errata memo)

31.C.06—That the terms of office of members of the Judicial Council shall expire on June 30 of the relevant year and that successors in office shall commence their terms on July 1, subject to the provision that any member is authorized to participate in decisions of cases heard prior to the expiration of the term and no newly-elected member will participate in any decision unless they have heard all evidence. (Oct 76 RA, p. 23) (90 AGM, errata memo)

31.C.10—That it is within the purview of the Judicial Council, when considering alleged breaches of the code or of conduct harmful or prejudicial to the Federation, to report on contingent matters for consideration by the Executive Committee. (June 80 Ex, p. 25) (March 09 Ex, p. 1)

31.C.12—That the following statements be adopted to govern the selection and proceedings of the Judicial Council and its panels: 1. The Representative Assembly shall elect at large and maintain an 18-member Judicial Council to implement the Code of Ethics. In addition to the 18 members, the Representative Assembly shall elect a Judicial Council chairperson whose term shall be three years. Initially council members’ terms shall be staggered, i.e., six three-year terms, six two-year terms and six one-year terms. In subsequent elections, terms for vacancies shall be set to maintain a balance of experience. There shall be no limit on the number of terms for which election to the Judicial Council may be sought but no term shall be more than three years. 2. Panels to screen, hear charges and hear appeals will be selected from the council by the chairperson in consultation with the designated staff member. Normally, panels will be assigned to cases on a rotation basis. 3. The Judicial Council shall establish procedures to be used by the Hearing and Appeal panels which reflect due process and natural justice. 129

4. Unless there are exceptional circumstances, the Judicial Council and/or panels will not utilize a lawyer nor a Federation advocate in the conduct of hearings. 5. The complainant(s) and respondent(s) will be responsible for providing evidence and presenting the facts; conduct at hearings will be as non-adversarial as possible. (09 AGM, p. 23) 6. The complainant(s) and respondent(s) may be accompanied by a friend/advocate who may assist in presenting their case. (09 AGM, p. 23) 7. Expenses (at standard BCTF rates) of the complainant(s) and respondent(s) in a hearing, their advocates, and allowed witnesses will be paid by the BCTF, but cost of any legal counsel will not be provided. (09 AGM, p. 23) 8. Notices of complaints, findings, reasons, and other correspondence containing sensitive materials will be by registered mail. (16 AGM, p. 6) 9. Dates and locations of hearings will be set by the panel concerned and normally will be according to reasonableness and balance of convenience of the participants. 10. When it orders a hearing, the Screening Panel shall state in writing the allegations to be examined and shall provide to the Hearing Panel, the complainant, and the respondent all documents provided to it. (16 AGM, p. 6) 11. In no event may any one person serve on more than one panel in dealing with the same case. (90 AGM, pp. 75-76) (91 AGM, p. 54)

31.C.14—That the Judicial Council be convened three times during the year; once between September and December, once between January and March, and once between April and June. (Nov. 99 Ex, p. 13)

D. Administration of the Code of Ethics (See also Section 44 Strikes and Job Actions) 31.D.02—That the following process be adopted for the implementation and administration of the Code of Ethics and By-law 16: 1. Receipt of Information or Complaint Information and/or complaints regarding conduct of members shall be received by a designated staff member who shall advise the chairperson of the Judicial Council of such receipt. 2. Reduction to Writing A formal complaint will be initiated by the submission of a written complaint form provided by the Federation. (07 AGM, p. 6) 3. Voluntary Resolution Depending on the nature of the complaint, the designated staff member may, in consultation with the chairperson of the Judicial Council, recommend an appropriate means of resolving such complaint. With agreement of the parties, resolution may be sought through: a. voluntary participation in the BCTF’s Internal Mediation Service; b. voluntary agreement to pursue a resolution through restorative practices; or c. another appropriate voluntary mechanism to resolve disputes. (16 AGM, p. 12) 4. Screening Panel In the event that the matter is not resolved through voluntary means, it shall be referred in writing to a three-member Screening Panel which may consult with the designated staff member and, after obtaining information from the complainant and respondent, may: a. engage the complainant and respondent in ethics advisory discussions; b. resolve the complaint through clarification, apology, retraction, or other appropriate steps; c. order a hearing by a Hearing Panel, articulate the allegations, and submit the matter to the panel; d. dismiss the complaint or part of the complaint on the grounds set out below and provide brief written reasons for such dismissal; or e. order such other resolution as the panel deems appropriate. (07 AGM, p. 6) (16 AGM, p. 12)

130

5 Screening Panel Dismissal of a Complaint a. The Screening Panel may, at any time after a complaint is filed, dismiss all or part of the complaint if that Screening Panel determines that any of the following apply: i. the complaint or that part of the complaint is not within the jurisdiction of the Judicial Council. ii. there is no evidence to support a finding of a breach of the Code of Ethics or that the member has engaged in conduct harmful or prejudicial to the interests of the Federation, or acted in a manner prejudicial to job actions or other collective strategies of the Federation. iii. there is no reasonable basis to justify referring the complaint or that part of the complaint to the Hearing panel for a hearing. iv. proceeding with the complaint or that part of the complaint would not further the interests of the Federation. v. the complaint or that part of the complaint was filed for improper motives or made in bad faith. vi. the substance of the complaint or that part of the complaint has been dealt with in another proceeding; or (16 AGM, p. 7) vii. the complaint occurred more than six months after the complainant knows of, or can reasonably be expected to know of, the events upon which the complaint is based. (07 AGM, p. 6) b. If the Screening Panel dismisses a complaint or part of a complaint under subsection (1), and the complainant presents new evidence which was not and could not be reasonably available to the Screening Panel, the complainant has the right to file a new complaint. (03 AGM, p. 34) (07 AGM, p. 6)

6. Hearing Panel a. In the event that the Screening Panel orders a hearing, a three-member Hearing Panel may seek written submissions, conduct a full oral hearing of evidence related to the complaint, or otherwise deal with the complaint in an appropriate manner. b. Guidelines for Hearing Panels i. Any member of the Judicial Council who has an actual or apparent conflict of interest with or a bias for or against the respondent or the complainant should excuse them self from the case. ii. There must be adequate notice of: (1) hearing place, time, and date; (2) allegations and grounds upon which they are based; (3) the Code of Ethics or procedures being relied upon; (4) basic procedural information; and (5) possible consequences of an adverse finding. iii. Hearings may be oral or through exchange of written submissions, but in every case both the complainant and the respondent must have: (1) all documentation and other relevant information provided to the Hearing Panel; and (2) a fair opportunity to give evidence, and to respond to evidence and arguments from the other side. iv. In all cases where credibility or facts are in issue, the hearing will be oral. v. The Hearing Panel must be seen to be fair and reasonable, not arbitrary or capricious, and to have made its decision solely on the basis of the evidence before the panel. c. Once written or oral submissions are provided, the panel shall deliberate in private to determine whether to: i. dismiss the complaint, in which case the respondent has the right to decide whether or not such finding is published; or ii. find the respondent has breached the Code of Ethics or has engaged in conduct harmful or prejudicial to the Federation’s interest, in which case the panel may: (1) publish the finding of the breach; (2) issue a warning to the member; (3) issue a reprimand to the member; (4) if the breach is by crossing a legal picket line, issue a levy in the amount up to the equivalent of the gross salary the member received from the employer, less any income tax and union dues deducted, for the days on which the picket line was crossed; (5) if the member has been in receipt of strike pay, issue a levy for the amount equivalent to the strike pay received;

(6) suspend the right of the member to hold office or receive specified benefits from the Federation and/or subsidiary bodies; or (7) impose a combination of the foregoing sanctions, commensurate with the gravity of the breach found by the Hearing Panel. iii. Each complainant and respondent should be informed promptly in writing of the disposition of their case. Note: Any sanction with regard to collective strategies shall be in accordance with the Procedure for collective strategies. (06 AGM, p. 21) (16 AGM, pp. 8–9

7. Appeal Panel a. Within 30 days of receipt of the decision and reasons of the Hearing Panel, a complainant or a respondent may appeal to an Appeal Panel of the Judicial Council. The findings and/or sanction may be appealed on the basis of one or more of the following grounds: i. that the appellant was denied a fair hearing process by the Hearing Panel; ii. that the Hearing Panel erred in its interpretation of a provision of the Code of Ethics, or in its interpretation of what is conduct harmful or prejudicial to the interests of the Federation; iii. that the Hearing Panel erred in the application of a provision of the Code of Ethics or of conduct harmful or prejudicial to the interests of the Federation to the facts as determined by the Hearing Panel; or iv. that the sanction imposed was not reasonably commensurate with the gravity of the breach found by the Hearing Panel. b. The appeal may be heard orally or by written submissions at the discretion of the Appeal Panel and consistent with procedural fairness. c. The Appeal Panel may confirm, reverse or modify the decision of the Hearing Panel, or may refer the matter back to the Hearing Panel for reconsideration in light of the Appeal Panel’s findings. d. If the complainant or respondent has new evidence that is relevant and that was not and could not have reasonably been available to the complainant or respondent at the hearing before the Hearing Panel, the Appeal Panel may remit the matter back to the Hearing Panel to reconsider the issue in light of the new evidence. e. The decision of the Appeal Panel is final and binding. (09 AGM, p. 24) (16 AGM, pp. 9–10)

Note: See also By-laws 7.6 and 7.7, Procedures 44.16(g) and 44.20.7.

32. Professional Relations PROCEDURES 32.02—Internal Mediation Service 1. That the BCTF maintain an Internal Mediation Service to mediate disputes that threaten good relationships among active members and others as appropriate. 2. The Executive Committee will appoint members to the Internal Mediation Service for three-year terms, normally to a maximum of three terms, and the members will comprise a balance of male and female, a balance of elementary and secondary members and shall include at least two mediators who are fluent both in French and English. (94 AGM p. 29) 3. That any member, group of members or local may obtain the services of the BCTF Internal Mediation Service by communicating with the executive director, the president, the staff assigned to co-ordinate the service or the chairperson of the mediation group. (94 AGM pp. 29-30) 4. That mediators appointed to the BCTF Internal Mediation Service will elect a chairperson each year from among the group. (94 AGM p. 30)

32.04—That the president of the BCTF be empowered to instruct the committee to act in any situation they deem to be urgent and/or emergent. (June 62 Ex, p. 18)

(Reviewed June 80 Ex, p. 25)

32.06—Procedures of the Internal Mediation Service 1. Two mediators will be assigned to a particular case. One of the two will act as chairperson. 2. Mediators appointed to the BCTF Internal Mediation Service will elect a chairperson each year from among the group who will, after consultation with the staff person assigned to the program, screen and assign cases. (95 AGM, p. 23) 3. The chairperson of the team responsible for the case, in consultation with the staff person assigned to the program, take responsibility for adequate follow-up. (June 95 Ex, p. 30) 4. Mediators will not submit reports about the content of cases mediated to anyone. 5. Records will be kept to an absolute minimum. 6. Cases may be discussed with members of the mediation group or with appropriate BCTF staff on a privileged communication basis at any time. 7. In the event that a mediation case develops into an ethics case, no information from the mediators will be requested by the Judicial Council, nor will any be offered. (90 AGM, errata memo) (94 AGM p. 30)

32.08—That any local have a member or members, appointed or elected as the association decides, named as a professional relations person(s) and that these people be given some training and/or guidance regarding procedures to be followed under various circumstances in the area of professional relations. (Where a local has a full-time president, it is recommended that this person be involved.) (May 81 Ex, p. 14) 32.10―That the BCTF Executive Committee advise locals that, when considering a local mediation program, they consider alternatives to a traditional mediation model such as: 1. Multifaceted professional development that promotes understanding and awareness by members, of the principles of effective, ethical communication, and conflict resolution so that members develop greater skill in mediating and resolving difficult issues through direct conversation among themselves. 2. Training that provides staff reps and other local representatives with an awareness of the range of options available to support teachers experiencing difficult relations at work. 3. The promotion of understanding and awareness among members of the availability and effectiveness of the BCTF Internal Mediation Service, including procedures for requesting the service. (Sept. 09 Ex, p. 8)

32.12―That the following principles be applied to local mediation programs: 1. Do no harm: Mediators commit to practices that assist members in resolving disputes that threaten good relationships. Mediators have a responsibility to carefully assess and avoid the potential for further harm. 2. Confidentiality: Mediators commit to explicit conditions of confidentiality for both participants and mediators. 3. Reporting: Mediators will not submit reports about the content of cases mediated to anyone. 4. Ethics: In the event that a mediation case develops into an ethics case, no information from the mediators will be requested by the Judicial Council, nor will any be offered. 5. Competency: Mediators commit to ongoing professional development in order to provide the best possible mediation service. 6. Neutrality: Mediators commit to only conducting cases where they can maintain neutrality in both appearance and action. 7. Program neutrality: Mediation programs should operate at arm’s length from the local. (Sept. 09 Ex, pp. 8–10)

33. Provincial Specialist Associations PROCEDURES 131

33.02—That the BCTF encourage and support the following provincial specialist associations: Aboriginal Education Association Association of BC Drama Educators Association for Educators of Gifted, Talented and Creative Children in BC Association Provinciale des Professeurs de l’Immersion et du Programme-Francophone BC Alternate Education Association BC Art Teachers’ Association BC Association of Mathematics Teachers BC Association of Teachers of Modern Languages BC Business Education Association BC Co-operative Learning Provincial Specialist Association BC Culinary Arts Specialist Association BC Dance Educators’ Association BC Early Career Teachers’ Association BC Educators for Distributed Learning Provincial Specialist Association BC Music Educators’ Association BC Primary Teachers’ Association BC Rural and Multi-grade Teachers’ Association BC School Counsellors’ Association BC Science Teachers’ Association BC Social Studies Teachers’ Association BC Teacher-Librarians’ Association BC Teachers for Peace and Global Education BC Teachers of English Language Arts BC Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages BC Technology Education Association Computer-Using Educators of BC Environmental Educators’ Provincial Specialist Association Learning Assistance Teachers’ Association Physical Education—British Columbia Provincial Intermediate Teachers’ Association Public Montessori Teachers of British Columbia Teachers of Home Economics Specialist Association Teachers of Inclusive Education, British Columbia. (Apr 16 Ex, p. 7) (June 16 Ex, p. 9)

33.04—Purposes of a PSA It shall be the right of each PSA to foster professional development through activities which may include: 1. Conducting in-service education. 2. Carrying out curriculum projects and disseminating the results. 3. Proposing appropriate learning and working conditions for the specialist area. 4. Proposing policy positions for BCTF adoption. 5. Through the BCTF, under the direction of the Executive Committee, influencing Ministry of Education policies and practices, including those relating to school programs, curriculum, assessment implementation, and school organization and operation. 6. Developing statements of standards of specialist qualifications and appropriate teacher training. 7. Developing statements of specifications for educational facilities for its specialist area. 8. Maintaining liaison with post-secondary faculty members in the specialist area. 9. Maintaining a system of communication with its members through journals and newsletters, the creation of local chapters, the holding of general meetings and maintaining a provincial structure with local-regional representatives or contacts. 10. Affiliating with national and international professional groups in the PSA’s area of specialty. 11. Other activities that are authorized by the BCTF. A PSA shall not carry out activities to influence the negotiation of salaries and bonuses and other bargaining objectives except through the BCTF Executive Committee or through local presentations to the appropriate local of the Federation. 33.06—Representation A. Representation Policy for PSAs 132

Outside representation is defined as communications aimed at influencing the decision-making of an external body. Outside representations may be categorized into one of two groups, those that require: 1. Authorization required, and must be reported. 2. No authorization required, but must be reported. (a) Authorization Required (i) Any proposal that relates to working and learning conditions, standards of specialist qualifications, teacher education and educational facilities. (ii) Any briefs or media releases. (iii) Actions to influence the Ministry of Education’s policies and procedures, including those of the Teacher Regulation Branch and those related to school programs, curriculum, assessment, implementation, and school organization and operations. (May 15 Ex, p. 3)

(iv) Representations to commissions/hearings. (v) Representations to the ministry on curriculum, assessment, policy, administrative matters. (vi) Representations to agencies or organizations such as universities, community colleges, vocational schools. (vii) Formal participation in public pressure groups or organizations. (viii) Representation on ministry, university or other outside committees. (ix) Representation on areas of general concern to education or affecting teacher education requirements. (x) Liaison with business and industry. (xi) Liaison with universities, community colleges, vocational schools other than articulation meetings. (xii) Informal discussions with ministry officials regarding ministry programs. (b) No Authorization Required i. Response to questions initiated by the media. i. Affiliation with other professional groups. iii. Articulation meetings with post-secondary institutions. B. Procedures for Authorization of PSA Representations 1. The BCTF and the local shall maintain procedures and practices that allow PSAs and PSA chapters to receive timely decisions on requests for authorization for representations to authorities and agencies outside the BCTF. 2. The BCTF president (or designate) may authorize representation by PSAs outside the BCTF if PSA proposals are consistent with existing BCTF policy; representations shall be reported to the BCTF executive, which may review and alter the decision of the president (or designate). 3. Guidelines for authorization by the president (or designate): a. A BCTF staff member shall provide advice on whether the proposal is consistent with BCTF policy; b. Proposals that relate to working and learning conditions, standards of specialist qualifications, and teacher education shall be authorized only after advice from the appropriate BCTF body; c. Briefs shall be authorized only after they have been distributed to the PSA Council or appropriate committees for advice, and a reasonable time for giving advice has elapsed; d. A decision to authorize or not authorize presentation of a brief or parts of a brief shall be made as soon as possible, but within three months of the brief being submitted to the BCTF. C. Local Representations 1. Local Representations: Those representations that must have prior authorization by both the local president and the BCTF president, or designate. i. Local decisions ii. Local policies and procedures D. Representation Policy for PSA Chapters and/or Local Specialist Associations 1. A PSA may organize and/or recognize local specialist associations as chapters of the PSA; such chapters shall be responsible to the PSA in regard to provincial issues and to the local on local issues. Responsibility to the local on local issues is mandatory.

2. No PSA chapter or local specialist association shall make representations to any authority or agency outside the BCTF without authorization from the local. (May 12 Ex, p. 5–6) (Feb. 99 Ex, p. 13-15)

33.08—Finance A. PSA Financing 1. The financing of PSAs shall be through: a. a PSA membership fee, which shall be equal to, or greater than, the BCTF per capita grant. b. a subscription fee, which shall be at least equal to the PSA fee for BCTF members plus the per capita grant and applicable taxes. c. a BCTF per capita grant as stated in statement 10.J.30– 10.J.38. d. income from conferences or workshops. e. income from the sale of PSA-produced materials and publications, including advertising in such publications. f. any special BCTF grants that may, from time to time, be authorized. g. grants, contracts, or fees for service from groups outside the BCTF (e.g., ministry, foundations), as authorized by the BCTF. 2. Grants, contracts, or fees for service from groups outside the BCTF, related to the organization of PSA conferences do not need prior approval as long as these grants, contracts, and fees for service are consistent with BCTF policy and do not compromise or restrict the ability of the BCTF to operate as an organization independent of the granting or contracting institution. Prior to pursuing all other grants, contracts or fees for service from groups outside the BCTF, approval must be sought from BCTF full-time table officers and notification provided to the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee. 3. Grants, contracts or fees for service, except those related to the organization of PSA conferences, shall be approved by the fulltime table officers following receipt of advice on their appropriateness from the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee. 4. Authorization shall be made on the basis of the following guidelines: a. Grants, contracts, or fees for service must be for a specified project consistent with BCTF policy. b. No terms of the grants, contracts, or fees for service shall compromise or restrict the ability of the BCTF to operate as an organization independent of the granting or contracting agency. c. All grants, contracts, or fees for service shall be processed through the BCTF Accounting Department (X programs) and subject to normal accounting and audit practices for grants, contracts, and fees for service. 5. Grants or contracts shall be approved by the BCTF Executive Committee following receipt of advice on their appropriateness from the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee. (Apr 11 Ex, pp. 4–6) 6. That all PSAs be requested to attach to their per capita grant application a one-page summary that briefly outlines the following: a. services the PSA provides to the members of the PSA, other than an annual or regional conference. b. processes in place to communicate with members of the PSA during the course of an individual’s one-year PSA membership. c. processes in place to engage new members of the PSA in order to retain them. (June 13 Ex, p. 14) B. Release time for PSA officers The following shall be the procedure for BCTF approval of release time for a PSA officer. This procedure applies to long-term release time (a full year or partial leave; full-time or part-time release from teaching duties). It does not apply to single day or other shortterm leave. Short-term leave is leave on an irregular basis throughout the year or full-time leave for less than one month. 1. PSA determines that it has a need for release time for an officer to work on behalf of the PSA. 2. The PSA develops a proposal that includes the following elements: a. A definition of the need. b. A description of the nature of the duties to be performed; c. A definition of how much release time is to be provided and the basis for pay (e.g., regular teaching salary).

d. A designation of which officer in the PSA to be released. e. A description of related requirements such as working space, equipment, clerical assistance, travel. f. A budget for the release time and related items; g. An explanation of the source of revenues to cover the budget. 3. The proposal is circulated to all members of the particular PSA before the annual meeting. 4. The PSA annual meeting approves the proposal. 5. The proposal goes to BCTF Executive Committee for approval. 6. The BCTF seeks approval from the affected school board to second the individual to the BCTF to work on behalf of the PSA. (Seconding is the best arrangement for maintenance of all employee benefits.) 7. The days may be used by the president, or their designate, who must be an active BCTF member and a member of the PSA. (Apr 14 Ex, p. 14)

8. Such an arrangement is not intended to be permanent, nor shall it be made a condition for eligibility as PSA president. 9. Release time arrangements must be renewed annually by the PSA’s annual general meeting. (Apr 15 Ex, p. 3) C. That PSA presidents’ release time be available to be used for PSA business as determined by the PSA president. (Mar 05 Ex, p. 6)

33.10—PSA Name Change 1. The PSA has followed all steps in accordance with its constitution regarding by-law changes. 2. A request for a name change is forwarded to the PSA Council chairperson. The request will contain a written statement that documents the steps taken by the PSA in pursuing the name change within the PSA. 3. The PSA Council chairperson will take the request to the PSA Council for discussion and recommendation to the BCTF Executive Committee. (Oct 02 Ex, p. 5) 4. The BCTF Executive Committee will consider the recommendation from the PSA Council. (Feb 90 Ex, p. 12)

33.12—PSA Conference Bank Accounts 1. The use of a Provincial Specialist Association conference bank account shall be restricted to depositing revenues and paying the expenses of any conference sponsored by the PSA. 2. The executive of any Provincial Specialist Association operating a conference bank account shall, by ordinary resolution, designate at least two and not more than four members of the PSA as co-signing officers of such a conference bank account, with access to the account provided to the treasurer of the PSA. 3. The co-signing officers for a Provincial Specialist Association conference bank account shall provide the executive of a PSA with a full financial accounting of the revenues and expenditures of any conference not more than one hundred and twenty (120) days after the conclusion of that conference. 4. The President or their designate of the Provincial Specialist Association shall provide the Federation and the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee with a copy of the financial accounting referred in paragraph 3 above forthwith upon its receipt. (June 91 Ex, p. 14) (Apr 11 Ex, pp. 5–6)

33.14—PSA Membership 1. Individual membership in a PSA will be on a 12-month basis commencing on the date the application is processed. 2. All members of a PSA shall be BCTF members. 3. PSAs may provide services to non-BCTF members for a designated fee. (88 AGM, p. 20) 33.16—PSA Organization 1. That all PSA constitutions and any changes that may from time to time be made to them, be submitted to the Executive Committee for approval. 133

2. A copy of the constitution of each recognized provincial specialist association shall be filed with the BCTF office. 3. The commencement and termination dates for each executive office will be set by each PSA in its constitution. 4. Any member of a PSA may hold office on the executive of the PSA, subject to the following: a. presidents/vice-presidents of PSAs shall be active BCTF members; b. PSA Council delegates shall be active BCTF members; c. representatives of PSAs within the BCTF and to outside authorities and agencies shall be active BCTF members; d. the majority of a PSAs executive shall be active BCTF members. (May 74 Ex, pp. 25-28) (88 AGM, p. 20)

33.18—Conditional BCTF Assistance to PSAs A. Services—Membership 1. Membership applications will be processed by the BCTF on the ‘’evergreen’’ plan basis. 2. The BCTF will provide free maintenance of PSA membership lists. 3. The BCTF will provide an electronic membership list monthly to each PSA. (Jan 13 Ex, p. 23) 4. The membership list will be available in alphabetical or school district order. 5. The BCTF will maintain a complimentary mailing list for each PSA. The size of the list will be determined by PSA size and need. B. Conditions of Membership Service 1. It is the responsibility of the individual PSA to: a. maintain a clear outline of the services and programs that the PSA provides, as per Procedure 33.04. b. initiate communication with new members of the PSA within the first few months of their membership. c. maintain regular, ongoing communication with its members. d. encourage members of the PSAs to renew their memberships. (May 15 Ex, p. 3) 2. The BCTF may require a standardized application form. C. Services—Financial Records 1. Free maintenance of financial records. 2. Monthly financial statements provided to each PSA treasurer and president. 3. An annual financial summary will be provided to each PSA. D. Conditions—Financial Records 1. PSA fee changes, which can be made only at annual general meetings, will be effective January 1 or July 1 following. 2. Fee information is to be submitted to the BCTF office no later than December 1 or June 1 respectively. (Jan 91 Ex, p. 3) E. Services and Conditions—Publishing 1. By September 1, PSA presidents will receive a request for scheduling information for their year’s publications. 2. Each PSA will co-ordinate schedules and publications through a single PSA officer in order to expedite communication. 3. By September 15, PSAs will provide the BCTF with the requested information and schedules for all their publications. 4. BCTF staff will review PSA schedules and integrate them into overall BCTF schedules to identify potential conflicts. These will be resolved through negotiation with the affected parties. 5. The BCTF will confirm, in writing, the finalized schedules. 6. a. PSAs may elect to use the BCTF services for any combination of the following: graphics, printing, binding, labelling, stuffing, mailing. b. The phrase “A provincial specialist association of the BC Teachers’ Federation” and the BCTF logo shall appear on the lead page of all PSA communications. (Apr 11 Ex, p. 13) 7. Provided copy is submitted on or before the agreed submission date and according to the agreed specifications, the BCTF will meet the deadlines and absorb any extra costs incurred in doing so. 8. When requested, the BCTF will supply an estimate of publishing or mailing costs.

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9. PSAs failing to meet submission requirements (deadlines and specifications) may elect to publish later than planned or to pay a premium for speedier service. 10. BCTF printing of PSA publications will be limited to 10 major publications (a major publication is any combination of number of pages and number of copies for a total of 6,000 pages) per PSA per year. 11. Unless the BCTF office is otherwise informed, publications will automatically be sent by third-class mail. 12. The BCTF will not be responsible for PSA mailings done outside the BCTF office. 13. All PSAs will use the BCTF’s mailing lists to distribute publications. 14. The BCTF will have the right to order, at BCTF expense, up to 80 copies of any PSA publication. 15. PSAs will refrain from using the title bulletin. 16. PSAs receiving publishing and mailing services will use BCTF accounting services. (May 74 Ex, pp. 26-30) (Apr 83 Ex, p. 9)

17. That any advertising in BCTF publications, including PSA journals, be consistent with Federation policies. (Apr 09 Ex, p. 4) 18. That PSAs refrain from publishing any article featuring independent schools. (May 15 Ex, p. 3) 33.20—Initial recognition as a PSA will be given to a group of members when: 1. It has established purposes as outlined in 33.04. 2. It has established a program: objectives, activities, related to the objectives and evaluative criteria. 3. It has held a general meeting to approve a constitution, to elect officers, and to establish a membership fee. 4. It has reviewed BCTF policies and procedures and accepts that they are binding on the PSA’s activities. 5. It has a minimum membership of 100 BCTF active members. 6. Existing PSAs have made a concerted effort to accommodate the new group, and the new group has made a concerted effort to have its needs met within an existing PSA. 7. The PSA Council has made a recommendation to the Executive Committee that a PSA be established. (Jan 84 RA, p. 8) (May 97 RA, p. 16)

33.22—Continuing recognition of a PSA will be given in accordance with 33.12. It shall be the responsibility of the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee to recommend annually continuing recognition of PSAs to the BCTF Executive Committee based on the following process: 1. Review programs and membership as of the April registration. 2. Review that membership has not fallen below 50 active BCTF members. 3. Inform a PSA of concerns arising from the review and request that the concerns be addressed by the April 15 membership count of the following year. 4. In the event that a PSA is unable to fulfill the criteria listed in 1. and 2. above within the one-year time period, removal of recognition will be recommended, with the following factors taken into consideration: a. the relevance of the focus of the PSA to BC curriculum or programs. b. the rate of decline of the PSA’s membership and/or the average April 15 membership count over the past five years. (June 10 Ex, p. 18) (May 12 RA, p. 15)

33.24—That if a PSA is alleged to have breached BCTF policy, the following process be followed: 1. Table officers of the BCTF will notify the PSA Council chairperson, the president of the PSA involved, and relevant others to arrange a meeting to: a. Detail specific concerns regarding alleged breaches of policy (outlining relevant policies and procedures), b. ask for an explanation, and c. outline further course of action, including possible sanctions or deciding that no further action is needed.

2. The PSA Council chairperson will report to the PSA Council. The PSA Council and/or the full-time table officers will then recommend to the BCTF Executive Committee appropriate action. 3. The BCTF Executive Committee will meet with the PSA president and the PSA Council chairperson prior to making its decision. a. That sanctions that may be applied against a PSA that breaches the terms of recognition be: i. reprimand; ii. withholding of the per capita grant; iii. suspension; iv. withdrawal of recognition. b. A PSA may appeal to the RA sanctions applied to it by the Executive Committee under section 33.24 3(b) The RA may confirm, reverse, or modify any decision referred to it under this policy. (Jan 84 RA, p. 8)

33.26—Delisting of a PSA with the BCTF will follow these procedures: 1. A PSA seeking delisting in the BCTF will: a. ensure that members, by a ballot or AGM have agreed to delisting. b. communicate in writing to PSA Council chairperson requesting that delisting proceed. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 5) 2. PSA Council chairperson will inform the Executive Committee of decision by the PSA to delist and recommend the EC remove recognition. (June 89 Ex, p. 6) (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 5)

33.28—That it shall not be the right of any provincial specialist association to make representations to any authority or agency outside the BCTF on any matter that is properly the concern of the BCTF. (May 63 Consultative, p. 8) (76 AGM, p. 56)

33.30—That organized groups within the BCTF that are considering establishing a new service, ensure that they not duplicate services offered by PSAs. (Jan 84 Ex, p. 16) 33.32—That PSAs participate fully in the development and implementation of BCTF curriculum strategies. (July 88 Ex, pp. 15-16) 33.34—That PSAs bringing forward to the Executive Committee any recommendations that might impact on other PSAs should present the matter first to the PSA Council chairperson for advice. (Aug 90 Ex, p. 2) (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 5)

33.36—Provincial Specialist Association Council The Provincial Specialist Association Council (PSA Council) of the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation (the Federation) shall operate in accordance with the following procedures. A. Composition of the PSA Council 1. The PSA Council shall be composed of the president of each PSA recognized by the Federation pursuant to 33.20 and 33.22. 2. PSA presidents are responsible to attend council meetings and represent the concerns of their respective PSAs. 3. A PSA vice-president or a past president if an active BCTF member, may attend and exercise the PSA’s vote only in the event that the council chairperson has been informed of the PSA president’s absence and the council chairperson is satisfied that the vice-president or past president has been authorized to attend. (June 10 Ex, p. 18)

4. There shall be a PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee, consisting of three members elected by PSA Council. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 6)

B. Elections 1. The PSA Council shall elect three members who shall act as the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee and serve as the representatives to the Professional Issues Advisory Committee. 2. The PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee shall be elected annually at the spring PSAC meeting from those currently serving as PSA presidents; they shall begin their PSAC duties on July 1 following the meeting. (June 12 Ex, p. 15) 3. The PSA Council shall first elect the chairperson of the PSA Council and then elect the two other PSAC SAC members.

4. The members of the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee may not serve more than four years. (Feb. 04 Ex, p. 12) 5. In the event that a person elected to the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee ceases to be an active member of the Federation, the PSA Council shall elect a member to complete the term. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 6) C. Duties of the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee 1. The PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee shall: a. act as the representatives to the Professional Issues Advisory Committee, attending all PIAC meetings. b. make recommendations to PSA Council and facilitate the business of PSAC. c. act as liaison, providing dialogue on professional issues, between PSAC and PIAC and bringing the perspectives of PSAs to PIAC. d. approve annual per capita grants for each PSA. e. receive notification and provide advice on grants, contracts and fees for service pursuant to Procedure 33.08 A.2 and 3. f. consult with BCTF staff regarding the preparation of the BCTF PSA program budget for the next fiscal year. (Apr 11 Ex, p. 6) 2. The PSA Council chairperson shall: a. preside at all meetings of the PSA Council, assisted by the two other members of the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee. b. act as an ex-officio member of any subcommittees, ad hoc committees, and other bodies established by the PSA Council to carry out its terms of reference. c. provide representation when it is required, at the Federation Executive Committee, Representative Assembly, or AGM, or arrange for a designate to do so if unavailable to perform that function in specific instances. d. in consultation with the other members of the PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee, act on behalf of the PSA Council between meetings of the council. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 6) D. Meetings 1. The council chairperson shall, prior to March in each year, design an annual calendar of meeting dates for the council to ensure timely representations to appropriate decision-making bodies. 2. With the agreement of BCTF staff, the council chairperson may reschedule a meeting date if at least three weeks written notice is given to all other members of the council; the Federation Executive Committee may require rescheduling in the event of conflict with other major events. 3. Fifteen members shall constitute a quorum at council meetings. 4. The year-end meeting shall be the last council meeting of each school year. Primary tasks of the year-end meeting will be: a. the election of the three PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee members. b. to review the council’s priorities for the current school year and to determine the council’s priorities for the next school year. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 7)

E. Voting 1. All members of the council are eligible to vote at council meetings. 2. Each PSA represented at the council may cast only one vote on any motion or in any election. 3. Voting at all meetings shall be by a show of hands, except when a ballot is demanded by at least one-third of the members present. (Jan 13 Ex, p. 23) 4. A simple majority of the votes cast is required for a motion to pass or for a candidate to be elected. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 7) F. Nominations 1. The nominations chairperson shall be elected at the February PSA Council meeting. (June 11 Ex, p. 13) 2. The terms of reference of the nominations chairperson are: a. to secure a minimum of one nomination for the PSA Council chairperson and for each of the two remaining PSA Council Steering and Agenda Committee members/PIAC representatives. b. to act as the chief scrutineer during elections held at the year-end meeting. 3. Nominations will be accepted from the floor of the year-end meeting. 135

4. Nominees should present a verbal biographical sketch outlining PSA and BCTF/local involvement and a position statement when standing for election. (June 11 Ex, p.13) 5. Nominees must have been elected as a president of a PSA for the subsequent school year at the time of the election. 6. Elections will be by secret ballot. A candidate is required to secure a simple majority of the votes to be declared a winner. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 7)

G. Parliamentary Procedure All meetings of the council shall be governed by the “Simplified Rules of Order” generally in use by the BCTF. Reference will be made to the latest version available of “Robert’s Rules of Order” in the event that the “Simplified Rules of Order” fail to offer a solution. (Oct. 02 Ex, p. 7)

H. PSAC Subcommittees 1. PSAC subcommittees, to discuss specific PSAC business, may be formed by a motion carried by PSAC. 2. At the point of formation of a subcommittee, a subcommittee chairperson must be appointed by PSAC. 3. The term of a PSAC subcommittee shall be limited to one year unless otherwise specified by PSAC. 4. The structure, membership, and function of each subcommittee shall be defined by the subcommittee chairperson in consultation with PSAC SAC. 5. The chairperson of a PSAC subcommittee shall be responsible for reporting out at each PSAC meeting on the progress of the work of the subcommittee for the whole of the term of the subcommittee. 6. The PSA Council chairperson shall be an ex-officio member of all PSAC subcommittees. (Jan 13 Ex, p. 23) 33.38—That the PSA Council advise the Professional Issues Advisory Committee on any matters relating to PSAs. (May 75 RA, p. 14) (76 AGM, p. 55)

33.40—That the BCTF and locals actively support PSAs in promoting teaching and learning through member participation in provincial and regional PSA conferences. (Feb. 04 Ex, p. 13) 33.42—That the BCTF actively encourage locals to establish policies that allow local PD funds to be used to pay for PSA membership fees. (Feb. 04 Ex, p. 13) 33.44—That the BCTF support PSAs in promoting members; knowledge of and involvement in PSAs and LSAs. (May 04 RA, p. 13) 33.46—That the BCTF encourage PSAs to locate their conferences in venues that are accessible to members throughout the province. (Apr 06 Ex, p. 7) 33.50—That PSA presidents be given access to PSA contact information for their members through the membership system. (Apr 08 Ex, p. 9)

33.52—1. That PSA Council presidents (or their designates) (Nov 08 Ex, p. 10) be regular participants at summer conference. 2. That local presidents be encouraged to promote PD chair attendance at Summer Conference. (June 12 Ex, p. 10) 3. PSA presidents who are unable to attend Summer Conference or who are attending in another capacity, be allowed to send alternates from their PSA executives, subject to alternates being active BCTF members.” (June 12 Ex, p. 15)

33.62—That the BCTF examine cost saving measures when producing publications and/or providing mailing services to PSAs. (Apr 09 Ex, p. 19)

33.64—That the Federation annually provide local presidents with a list of PSA presidents. (Apr 09 Ex, p. 20) 33.66―That PSA conferences not be held in private schools. (May 10 RA, p. 4) (Jan 12 RA, p. 6)

33.68―Amalgamating two or more PSAs That the process for amalgamating two or more PSAs be: 1. The PSAs concerned will follow all procedures in accordance with their current constitutions and BCTF Procedures 33.20 1.-5. and 33.26 1.-2. 2. The presidents of the PSAs wishing to amalgamate will be given a total of four release days for this work from the twenty release days allocated for PSA president release. 3. The presidents of the PSAs will decide on an interim executive for the new PSA, including a table officer from each PSA. 4. After these procedures are completed, the new PSA will forward to the ASC Steering and Agenda Committee: a. the new PSA’s purposes, objectives, and constitution. b. the minutes of the AGMs that approved the new constitution, the interim executive, and the delisting of the previous PSAs. c. documentation of a membership of 100 BCTF active members. 5. The ASC Steering and Agenda Committee will bring a recommendation to ASC PSAC for discussion and recommendation to the BCTF Executive Committee that the new PSA be established pursuant to 33.20.7 and the previous PSA be delisted pursuant to 33.26.2. 6. The BCTF Executive Committee will consider the recommendation to delist the previous PSAs and recognize the new PSA. (Apr 11 Ex, p. 12) (Apr 17 Ex, p. 8)

33.70―Account balance of amalgamated PSAs 1. That in the case of the amalgamation of two or more PSAs, the balance of their BCTF account and any outside accounts are transferred to the new PSA. 2. That in the case of the amalgamation of two or more PSAs, the per capita grant amount be adjusted as follows: In addition to the base per capita grant based on the April 15 count for the new PSA, the new PSA will receive an additional sum equal to 50% of the base grant for one year. (Apr 11 Ex, p. 13) 33.72―PSA complimentary memberships 1. That PSAs may offer complimentary PSA memberships subject to the PSA having a specific line item for complimentary memberships in the annual PSA budget that is approved by the PSA’s annual general meeting. 2. BCTF active members who receive complimentary memberships will not be counted towards the per capita grant in the April 15 count. (Apr 11 Ex, p. 13) (June 11 Ex, p. 2)

33.74―That local PD committees be encouraged to support the formation of new LSAs and memberships in PSAs. (June 12 Ex, p. 10)

(Apr 14 Ex, pp. 15–16) (May 15 Ex, p. 3)

33.76―That PSAs may confer honorary life memberships in their PSAs, subject to the provisions of their PSA constitutions. A PSA honorary life member’s eligibility to vote and hold office in the PSA will depend on their current BCTF membership status. Honorary PSA life membership does not confer the rights of honorary life membership in the BCTF, and is limited to the individual PSA only.

33.58—That the Federation, in consultation with the PSA Council, develop strategies to raise awareness of and promote membership in PSAs at BCTF Days on Campus and the New Teachers’ and Student Teachers’ Conference. (Apr 09 Ex, p. 18)

33.78―That an annual general meeting be held by each PSA during each school year and be advertised to all members of the PSA. (Apr 15 Ex, p. 2)

33.54—That the Federation provide a one-year PSA membership to new BCTF members on their attending: 1. their formal induction into a local, or 2. a SURT or BCTF workshop for newly hired teachers.

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(Feb 13 Ex, p. 4)

33.80―That when two or more PSAs hold a joint conference in which PSA membership is included in the conference registration fee: 1. participants will be able to clearly identify the one PSA to which they wish that membership to be applied. 2. the number of memberships granted through the conference fee cannot exceed the number of eligible conference participants. (Sept 16 Ex, pp. 4–5)

34. Public Affairs

34.25—That the BCTF support efforts of unemployed members and other unemployed working people to create organizations to defend their rights to gainful employment, a secure standard of living and adequate social services. (Jan 83 Ex, p. 23) 34.27—That, for policy purposes, the definition of pornography be: material that exploits those it portrays by depicting them as sexual objects, or as the victims of sexual abuse, humiliation, domination, mutilation or murder, for the sexual stimulation of the consumer. (83 AGM, p. 15)

POLICIES 34.01—That the BCTF is opposed to nuclear weapons testing. (62 AGM, p. 44) (Oct 80 RA, p. 5)

34.03—That the BCTF openly condemn all or any practice of discrimination on the basis of race in the communities and schools of this province. (May 75 RA, p. 28)

34.29—That the BCTF condemn the manufacture, distribution, sale and public display of all pornographic material. (83 AGM, p. 15)

34.31—That the BCTF urge the federal and provincial governments to endorse and/or develop laws that prohibit the manufacture, distribution, sale and public display of pornographic material. (83 AGM, p. 15)

(Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 18)

34.05—That the BCTF condemn the racist doctrine of white supremacist organizations, and support efforts within the educational system and in our broader school communities to challenge and eradicate racism, hate speech, and acts of discrimination towards marginalized and minority communities. (Feb 82 RA, p. 17)

34.33—That the BCTF support the concept of a guaranteed yearly income. (85 AGM, p. 45)

(17 AGM, p. 11)

34.35—That the BCTF affirm and support the principle of universal social programs (medical care, family allowance) and strongly oppose any attempt to limit/restrict/undermine such programs. (85 AGM, p. 45)

34.11—That the BCTF support the provision of family planning information and services for all who want them in Canada.

34.37—That the BCTF is opposed to any federal or provincial tax on books or other educational materials. (87 AGM, p. 24)

(Nov 75 Ex, p. 29)

34.13—That the BCTF recognize and support the right of the BC Aboriginal people to demand that the federal and provincial governments negotiate with them the issue of Aboriginal land claims. (Jan 76 RA, p. 19)

34.15—That the BCTF voice its opposition to any further uranium mine site developments in British Columbia until such activities have been proven completely safe. (Jan 78 RA, p. 13) (81 AGM, p. 20)

34.17—That the provincial government should provide total funding for the educational programs of Options for Sexual Health. (Mar 80 Ex, p. 6) (Dec 09 Ex, p. 21)

34.39—That the BCTF demand that the BC government provide the financial support and services needed for welfare recipients with families to participate in educational programs and employment training that will enable them to be employed. (89 AGM, p. 23) 34.43—That the BCTF strenuously oppose wage controls for teachers and all public sector employees. (Feb 91 RA, p. 2) 34.45—That the BCTF support a social security system that: 1. includes a commitment to full employment; 2. maintains universal programs that serve the basic social needs of all citizens regardless of their income or geographical location in this country; and 3. provides adequate income support for those people who are either excluded from the job market or are unable to work. (95 AGM, p. 36)

34.19—1. That the BCTF supports the practice of full coverage of the cost of medical care through Medicare. (Mar 81 Ex, p. 2)

2. That the BCTF support the maintenance of the five basic principles of Medicare: universality, comprehensiveness, accessibility, portability and public administration. (96 AGM p. 8) 34.21—That: 1. deficit reductions by government not be pursued through more cuts in social spending; and 2. government be called upon to develop a strategic plan for rebuilding Canada's public financing capacities through: a. a systematic approach to job creation b. a policy of reduction in interest rates c. ensuring that corporations pay their fair share of taxes d. debt repatriation e. increased taxes on wealth f. regulation of cross-border capital transfers. (95 AGM, p. 36)

3. That the BCTF oppose the cuts in federal transfer payments that threaten the availability of access to post-secondary education and universal Medicare. (96 AGM p. 8) 34.23—That the Ministry of Education, in conjunction with the Ministry of the Attorney-General, should establish an in-service program for corrections staff that outlines the nature and purpose of the education programs in the youth detention centres.

34.51—That the BCTF oppose any attempts of the government of British Columbia to limit Pharmacare benefits, privatize health care, introduce user fees or freeze health funding. (Sept. 01 Ex, p. 3)

34.53—1. That the BCTF oppose elimination of any current coverage under Medicare. 2. That the BCTF call upon the government to consult with the citizens of the province prior to any decisions to eliminate any legislative regulations. 3. That the BCTF call upon the Minister of State for Deregulation to make public those regulations that government has targeted for elimination or revision. 4. That BCTF oppose any introduction of a two-tiered minimum wage. (Oct. 01 Ex, p. 7) 34.55—That the BCTF express its opposition to the recent decision of the BC government to place the MASSH (Municipalities, Academic Institutions, Schools, Social Service Agencies and Health) sectors under the Internal Trade Agreement. (Dec. 01, Ex, p. 8) 34.57—That the Federation support the work of the Human Rights Tribunal and oppose any weakening of the human rights protections and procedures in BC. (June 02 Ex, p. 17) (Oct 10 Ex, p. 12)

(June 82 Ex, p. 22)

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34.63—That the BCTF endorse the eight point principles of “Standing Together for Medicare.” (Note: The eight point statement came out of the Canadian Health Coalition—Canadian Labour Congress Conference on the Future of Health Care, October 12, 2001, Ottawa.) The peoples of Canada believe that health care is a fundamental right of every human being without distinction of race, gender, age, religion, sexual orientation, political belief, economic or social condition. Organizations representing millions of Canadians will mobilize to defend this right and to ensure that the following principles shape the future direction of the health care system: 1. The recognition of the highest attainment of health as a fundamental right throughout life and the necessity of preserving public health through active measures of promotion, prevention, and protection including such determinants as housing, food safety, income, education, environment, employment and peace. 2. The recognition of health care as a public good in which the few must not profit at the expense of the many. We affirm the need for a system of public health care which is organized on the basis of public administration, public insurance and the delivery of services on a public, not-for-profit basis. 3. Opposition to any commercialism and privatization of health. Therefore the federal government must negotiate a general exclusion of health services and health insurance all trade agreements. 4. The need for the federal government to fully assume its responsibilities in respect to health, particularly by restoring and increasing federal transfers to levels sufficient to secure the integrity and enforcement of the Canada Health Act, 1984. 5. The reaffirmation of the original vision of a truly comprehensive public health care system for Canadians providing a continuum of services. The next steps are the expansion of the public system to include a universal system of home and long-term care services and pharmacare. 6. The need to move away from a fee-for-service model towards a community-based, multi-disciplinary approach to the management, organization and delivery of services and care. Levels of services must be sufficient so that the burden of care does not fall on families, mainly women. 7. An accountable health care system through democratic participation and governance at all levels. 8. The recognition that health care workers are critical to the effective operation of the health care system and that decent wages, working conditions and training opportunities are essential to high quality care and the retention of health care workers.

34.73—That the BC Teachers’ Federation call on the federal government to reinstate a comprehensive social housing program to ensure all Canadians their constitutional right to shelter. (Oct. 03 Ex, p 4)

34.75—That the BCTF: 1. oppose the elimination and/or reduction of services to children and families in British Columbia, including but not limited to the closure of women’s centres, courthouses, and schools; the reduction of services to students with special needs, foster care, and child care; and the cuts to social services, BC family bonus, shelter support, and welfare. 2. call upon the provincial government to fully restore social equity programs and in particular the community LINK: funding for inner city schools, school meals programs, community schools, and home-school liaison programs. (04 AGM, p. 37) (Nov. 03 RA, p. 17)

34.77—That the BCTF: 1. actively oppose the deregulation of child labour laws and seek to have Bill 37 rescinded. 2. Engage in an active campaign to monitor and lodge complaints, if warranted, on behalf of children aged 12 to 15 who are working. (04 AGM, p. 37) 34.79—That the BCTF condemn the government for dismantling programs that contribute to a just society and for introducing programs that increase hardship for the most vulnerable people in our province. (04 AGM, p. 37) 34.81—That the BCTF urge the federal and provincial governments to initiate and fund campaigns to raise the proportion of the population who are physically active. (May 04 RA, p. 13) 34.83—That locals urge their respective city councils and regional districts to waive their admission fees during school days for all students at parks and recreation facilities. (June 05 RA, p. 11) 34.85—That the BCTF support the allocation of Canadian government expenditures on foreign aid to a level equivalent to 0.7% of the Canadian Gross Domestic Product. (Aug. 05 Ex, p. 2) 34.87—That the BCTF entreat the Government of Canada to ratify conventions C98 Right to Organize and Collective Bargaining Convention, 1949 and C138 Minimum Age Convention, 1973 of the International Labour Organization (ILO). (Nov. 05 RA, p. 9)

(Nov. 01 Ex, p. 2)

34.69—That the BCTF call upon the Government of Canada to: 1. seek to eliminate the root causes of conflict and find solutions by peaceful means for the common good of all 2. reject a military approach to problem solving conflicts between states 3. work with all countries, through the United Nations, to reduce and eliminate “weapons of mass destruction.” (Jan/Feb. RA 03 p. 10)

4. reverse its current military strategy in Afghanistan and ensure that any future international Canadian military intervention occur only as a part of a United Nations peace-keeping force. (Nov. 06 RA, p.14)

34.71—That the BCTF: 1. call on the government to immediately rescind the BC legislation which subjects welfare recipients to elimination or reduction of their social assistance based on time limits. 2. oppose changes in welfare that have the effect of causing further hardship and economic insecurity for the poorest and most vulnerable people in British Columbia. 3. actively oppose the imposition of a 24-month time limit on eligibility for welfare in BC. 4. call on government to allow those on social assistance to earn a wage up to the poverty line without decreasing social assistance payments. (Oct. 03 Ex, p 4) (04 AGM, p. 36)

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34.89—That the BCTF demand that the federal and provincial governments create a national child care system available to all children in Canada that incorporates: 1. a Child Care Act that guarantees standards and includes the principles of: equality, universality, accessibility, developmental programming, and inclusiveness. 2. a publicly funded, non-profit system. 3. a process of accountability which includes: goals, timelines, and a means of measuring real progress. (89 AGM, p. 57) (Nov. 05 RA, pp. 10-11)

34.91—That the BCTF express its support for raising the age of consent in Canada from 14 to 16. (Feb. 06 Ex, p. 10) 34.93—That the BCTF call for the Canada Pension Plan to stop investing in the tobacco industry. (June 06 RA, p. 12) 34.95—That the BCTF support the call to change Canada’s visitor visa legislation so that all Canadians—regardless of ethnic origin—are entitled—and equally entitled—to bring their loved ones to Canada for a visit. (June 06 RA, p. 13) 34.97—That the BCTF oppose the construction of coal-fired power generation plants. (Nov. 06 RA, p. 3) 34.99—That the BCTF lobby the government to change the regulations to allow EI recipients to enrol in basic education and upgrading courses. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 19)

34.103—That the BCTF endorse the goals of the Raise the Rates campaign and call upon the provincial government to: 1. raise welfare rates by 50% and index them to inflation. 2. let all people on welfare keep at least $500/month of their earnings. 3. remove the arbitrary barriers to accessing welfare. 4. raise the minimum wage for all workers to at least $15 per hour. (May 14 RA, p. 11))

for discrimination within the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Criminal Code. (Nov 13 Ex, p. 5) (Apr 17 Ex, p. 7)

PROCEDURES 34.04—That the BCTF continue to assist the appropriate locals in monitoring and improving the working conditions of members assigned to teach in the youth detention centres. (June 82 Ex, p. 22)

(Jan 15 RA, p. 13)

34.105—That the BCTF lobby government to implement measures to ensure that foreign workers: 1. are given the right to apply for citizenship or landed immigrant status. 2. be able to have spouses and families accompany them. 3. are paid current market wages and benefits for their occupation. 4. are required to take the same tests as workers from other provinces. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 13) 34.107—That the BCTF press the federal and provincial governments to fund an in-depth scientific and social study on the cost/benefit of government distributing drugs to addicts on an ability to pay basis, and further that the BCTF press the opposition parties to commit to such a study should they form government.

34.06—That the BCTF encourage members and retired members to participate in the activities of Amnesty International. (Sept 82 Ex, p. 11)

34.08—That in addition to traditional services commemorating all war casualties, and those who served in various capacities as part of the War efforts an appropriate way to commemorate Remembrance Day in the schools is to promote the concept of world peace. (83 AGM, p. 13) (95 AGM, p. 27)

34.10—That the BCTF supports the recommendation of the BC Royal Commission on Education, that school boards provide flexible employment positions for parenting members and that the BCTF recognizes that these working conditions should extend to other working groups. (89 AGM, p. 55)

(Feb. 08 RA, p. 14)

34.109—That the BCTF urges the Canadian government to promote a peace settlement in the Middle East which will advance the struggle of the people of Palestine for national sovereignty and human rights, and protect the citizens of both Israel and Palestine from further violence. (Mar 08 Ex, p. 14) 34.113—That the BCTF endorse the concept that water resources be kept public and free. (08 AGM, p. 25) 34.115—That the BCTF support the demand for a free Tibet, and ask the Canadian government to condemn the Chinese government’s brutal suppression of Tibetan freedom protesters in Tibet and in many parts of Canada. (08 AGM, p. 27) 34.117―That child soldiers should be seen primarily as victims of conflict; and that, in the rare cases where it is in the interests of justice to prosecute a child soldier, the individual who is undergoing a criminal investigation or trial for acts committed as a child soldier must be treated with dignity and respect with the aim of the criminal process is to increase that individual’s respect for human rights of others and to promote their reintegration into society.(Oct 08 Ex, p. 11) (Nov 10 Ex, p. 5)

34.119―1. That the BCTF opposes the proposed CanadaColombia Free Trade Agreement. 2. That the BCTF condemns the repression of the indigenous movement in Colombia that is campaigning against the CanadaColombia Free Trade Agreement and the US-Colombia Free Trade Agreement. 3. That the BCTF inform the leaders of the political parties in Parliament that it opposes the Canada-Colombia Free Trade Agreement negotiated by Canada with a Colombian government that is repressing the trade union and indigenous movements. (Oct. 08 Ex, p. 11)

34.121―That the BCTF oppose privatized and commercialized health care. (Nov 08 Ex, p. 7) 34.123—That the BCTF actively oppose any federal government move to criminalize abortion or limit abortion access. (Dec 08 Ex, p. 3)

34.129―That the BCTF condemn and actively oppose the BC government’s unilateral move from local-based crisis lines to a centralized 1-800 line. (Jan 10 RA, p. 4) 34.131―That the BCTF call upon:the federal government to add gender identity and gender expression to the prohibited grounds

34.12—That the BCTF support a moratorium on any centralized toxic waste facility until the following objectives are met: 1. legislation and funding is in place to reduce the production of toxic wastes, including a program of recycling; 2. a full public inquiry is instituted to examine the management of hazardous waste in BC.; 3. that prior to any permits being granted for toxic waste incineration or disposal, a full referendum be conducted of all people living or working within at least a 200 kilometre radius of any proposed toxic waste plant. (89 AGM, p. 56) 34.18—That the BCTF endorse the following statements on national unity: 1. We advocate a sovereign, united Canada, with a strong, federal system of government. 2. The Constitution should be amended, with the consent of Aboriginal peoples, to include the inherent right of Aboriginal peoples to self-government. 3. We recognize Quebec as the home of a nation and the right of its people to self-determination. 4. We encourage Quebec to remain in Canada and become full partners in the constitutional process. 5. If Quebec chooses to remain in Canada, we affirm the right as well as the legislative authority of Quebec to protect and promote its historic roots, language and culture. 6. The Constitution should be amended to include a social charter affirming the right to social benefits including education, health and social services, and social assistance. 7. The Constitution should protect minority language rights. 8. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms should be amended to: a. specify that freedom of association encompasses the right to bargain collectively and to strike. b. include the Rights of Children consistent with the United Nations Declaration. c. full equality rights for all citizens. (92 AGM, p. 44) 34.20—That the BCTF condemn homophobic acts. (93 AGM, p. 13)

34.22—That the BCTF oppose the Multilateral Agreement on Investment. (Nov. 97 RA, p. 11) 34.24—That the BCTF oppose the treaty referendum and that members be urged to: 1. Support the position taken by the Aboriginal community or communities in their area on the treaty referendum process.

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2. Send letters to their MLAs and MPs, objecting to a process that is an injustice to Aboriginal people and urging them to stop the referendum process. 3. Work through labour and community groups to object to a process which is an injustice to Aboriginal people and urging them to take action to stop the referendum process. 4. Appeal to the United Nations about the injustice of the Aboriginal referendum process. (02 AGM, p. 24)

34.46―That the BCTF affirm that freedom of speech is a foundation of democracy, and that we recognize that satire is an important element of free speech, and that the BCTF oppose the use of SLAPP suites, as they are a tactic used by the powerful to silence public debate and discussion. (Jan 10 RA, p. 9) 34.48―That locals be encouraged to use International Literacy Day (September 8) to raise awareness around adult literacy. (June 12 Ex, p. 17)

34.30—That the BCTF seek out and offer solidarity to those joint Israeli/Palestinian organizations that have as their stated objectives to work for the non-violent and peaceful resolution of disputes in the region and to work for peace, dignity and understanding for all. (June 05 RA, p. 15)

34.32—That the BCTF call upon the new parliament and the BC legislature to support a national Child Care program that upholds existing agreements and builds upon them with the goal of a national program of universal, affordable, high quality, non-profit and accessible, early learning and child care across Canada. (Apr 06 Ex, p. 8)

34.34—That the BCTF work with human rights groups to oppose the use of government-sanctioned torture. (June 06 RA, p. 13)

34.36—That the BCTF endorse campaigns and petitions that aim to seek peaceful negotiated solutions to conflicts between nations of the Middle East, with a focus on Israel and Palestine. (Aug. 06 Ex, p. 13) (June 17 Ex, p. 15)

34.38—That the BCTF work to address the conditions contributing to the sex trade by promoting and supporting: 1. programs to support children and women. 2. government action to address poverty. 3. the prosecution of users. 4. sex education of boys and girls to raise awareness of the abusive nature of survival sex. 5. real harm reduction programs that are locally initiated. 6. alliances with immigrant women’s groups. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 3)

34.40—That the BCTF support the community network events organized to commemorate the March 21 International Day for the Elimination of Racism. (March 08 Ex, p. 11) 34.42—1. That the BCTF oppose any move towards the normalization of sexual exploitation. 2. That the BCTF support: a. the enforcement of laws designed to prosecute those who purchase adults and children for purposes of sexual exploitation and/or for profit. b. the education of students and parents about the prevention of sexual exploitation including trafficking and prostitution rings. c. public programs and public funding for exit strategies. d. programs and policies that provide a fair living wage for all. e. police training, programs, and policies that strengthen enforcement of laws designed to protect every individual from all forms of assault. f. full access to legal aid for victims of violence. (08 AGM, p. 26)

34.44—December 6 Day of Reflection 1. That December 6 be a day of reflection within the BCTF and that no Federation or local meetings be scheduled except for gatherings to: a. commemorate the memory of women who died because of violence against women. b. develop strategies to stop such violence, and that such meetings co-ordinate with community organized events about violence against women. (Jan 09 RA, p. 14) 2. That the BCTF promote the annual commemoration in schools of the December 6 day of action to oppose violence against women. (June 12 Ex, p. 8) 140

34.50―That the BCTF work to achieve government policy that guarantees single parents receiving income assistance, with a child under the age of 13, the right to: 1. enrol in full- or part-time secondary or post-secondary education programs. 2. receive educational bursaries or scholarships with no penalty to their income assistance. (13 AGM, p. 9)

35. Public Relations POLICIES 35.01—That the long-range goals of the BCTF public relations programs be: 1. to develop and maintain a positive public image of teachers as responsible, involved, dedicated individuals who have a concern for the welfare of students. 2. to gain public recognition for the BCTF as a responsible and socially involved organization interested in the advancement of public education. 3. to increase public understanding and support for public education. (Reviewed Nov 77 Ex, p. 15) (March 10 Ex, p. 5)

35.03—That the Ministry of Education should inform the public on the existing education system and on changes in the system before they are put into effect. (54 AGM, p. 24) (Reviewed Nov 76 Ex, p. 8)

PROCEDURES 35.02—That all members and officials of the BCTF take great care that they issue no press release that could in any way be construed as being contrary to established BCTF policy, or that could be interpreted in such a way as to be detrimental to the interests of the membership. (62 AGM, p. 37) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

35.04—That the BCTF encourage and assist locals to: 1. offer assistance to school boards in efforts to promote public understanding of the public education system. 2. develop programs to use the media and other means to promote understanding and support of the public education system. (Jan 76 Ex,. 30) (Mar 10 Ex, p. 5)

36. Publications of the BCTF PROCEDURES 36.02—That the Members’ Guide to the BCTF be distributed on the following basis: 1. to all Local Presidents, Local Representatives, the Executive Committee, and all schools on a one-per-staffroom basis 2. to AGM delegates, distributed through locals of one per five, AGM delegates or proportion thereof. 3. up to 10 additional copies per local on request and that the Federation be notified of the request for the subsequent year by the end of June. And that the online version be promoted to all members (Aug 12 Ex, p. 11) (Dec 16 Ex, p. 11)

36.04—That locals and delegates to the Annual General Meeting have at least four full weeks prior to the opening of the Annual General Meeting in which to examine Reports and Resolutions. (June 72 Ex, pp. 7-8)

(Oct 78 Ex, p. 9)

36.06—That Reports and Resolutions be distributed to AGM delegates, local presidents, local representatives, Executive Committee members, BCTF staff and one to each staffroom and that the document be posted online and promoted to members. (May 82 Ex, p. 17) (May 08 Ex, p. 5)

36.08—1. That the minutes of RA and Executive Committee meetings be distributed to individual members who request them. 2. That the group distribution of minutes of Executive Committee meetings be restricted to the Executive Committee, local representatives, presidents and secretaries of locals, members of the Finance Committee and the chairpersons of other committees and task forces. (Jan 68 RA, p. 12) (Jan 81 RA, p. 13)

36.10—That the minutes of the Annual General Meeting be posted on the BCTF website and promoted to members. (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19) (May 08 Ex, p. 5)

36.12—That, as a general rule, minutes of BCTF committee meetings be restricted to those entitled to attend the meetings, corresponding members and, where appropriate, to officers and members of local committees and/or PSAs. (Sept 65 Ex, p. 3)

professional ethics or confidentiality shall be decided by the editor in consultation with the FTTOs as needed. (Nov 12 Ex, p. 2) (Dec 15 Ex, p. 6)

8. Any member of the BCTF or its staff, or any group within the Federation who or that is criticized in the Magazine shall have the opportunity to respond. 9. When the editor decides that a particular issue has been discussed sufficiently in the Magazine, they shall exercise closure and so inform the Editorial Advisory Board. (Apr 79 Ex, pp. 15-16) (Oct 81 Ex, p. 9)

10. That the BCTF’s PD Calendar not publish PD events by outside agencies scheduled for the provincial PSA Day. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 21)

11. That when the Teacher Magazine considers advertisements from colleges or universities it accept only advertisements from non-profit colleges and/or universities. (Oct 14 Ex, p. 14) (Nov 15 Ex, p. 8)

36.32—That the BCTF, where appropriate, consult with members who represent racial, religious or ethnic communities for the purpose of accurate and respectful presentation of communities and beliefs portrayed in Federation publications. (Jan 98 Ex, p. 10) 36.34—That BCTF school mailings include commercial advertising only if it is an integral part of Federation publication. (Jan 01 Ex, p. 9)

(Reviewed Jan 76 Ex, p. 23)

36.18—That all publications that are distributed to members via the schools be addressed to the staff representative. (Jan 89 Ex, p. 19)

36.22—That articles printed in any newsmagazine, and PSA newsletters and journals should bear the name of the author.

36.36—That in-committee minutes of matters related to BCTF strategy in bargaining or other campaigns remain with restricted access for 10 years. Following that period, if in the opinion of the President and Executive Director such information is no longer highly sensitive, the minutes may be released to any member or staff person on the understanding that it is not for use external to the BCTF. (Jan 12 Ex, p. 3) (Dec 12 Ex, p. 14)

(Aug 76 Ex, p. 13) (Jan 89 Ex, p. 20)

36.24—That whenever the third person singular pronoun occurs in present and future BCTF-funded publications, and when the pronoun may refer to both sexes, both male and female forms of the pronoun shall be used. (77 AGM, p. 30) 36.26—That wherever reference is made, in BCTF activities or publications, to the person chairing a meeting or a group, the word ‘’chairperson’’ shall be used. (Jan 78 Ex, p. 14) 36.28—That the term “teacher” as used in BCTF by-laws, policies and procedures in the Members’ Guide be interpreted to include all active members of the BC Teachers’ Federation, including those with teaching certificates and those without teaching certificates such as some adult educators and associated professionals. (Apr 06 Ex, p. 8) 36.30—Magazine guidelines 1. The Magazine shall be supportive of the goals, objectives, policies, and procedures of the Federation. 2. The Magazine editor shall place the interests of the membership as a whole before those of any individual, body or interest group within the Federation. 3. In its reporting the Magazine shall present information comprehensively, accurately and fairly, and acknowledge mistakes when they occur. 4. The Magazine shall provide a forum for the exchange of members’ views. 5. All members of the Federation shall have access to the Letters to the Editor section but none shall have unlimited access. 6. All letters to the editor and articles shall conform to the normal restrictions imposed by any responsible publication as to brevity, clarity, legality, and taste. Any submission which does not meet these standards may be edited to conform or returned to the author for revision. 7. If the editor decides not to publish a letter or contributed article submitted by a member, or to change it significantly, the writer shall be so notified. Inclusion of articles or letters involving

36.38—That any advertising in BCTF publications, including PSA journals, be consistent with Federation policies. (Apr 09 Ex, p. 4)

36.40―That the Teacher Magazine feature teacher awards and acknowledge recipients who are BCTF members, when such awards are not contrary to BCTF policies and values. (Nov 14 Ex, p. 2) (Nov 15 Ex, p. 8) 36.42―That the Teacher Magazine not accept any ads that promote the privatization of public education. (Nov 09 Ex, p. 9) (Nov 15 Ex, p. 8) 36.44―That the BCTF publish the AGM and RA resolutions, decisions, and minutes online with each document remaining online for a five-year period. (Apr 10 Ex, p. 9) 36.46―That the Teacher Magazine not accept advertisements from financial consultants that might encourage members to take a commuted value of their pension rather than retiring with their defined-benefit pension. (June 10 Ex, p. 13)

37. Research POLICIES 37.01—That the Ministry of Education should contribute a substantial amount to educational research. (70 AGM, p. 18) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

38. Retired Teachers PROCEDURES 38.04—That locals be encouraged to contact the retired teachers living in their area and invite them to attend meetings and participate in local activities. (Feb 76 Ex, p. 16) 38.10—That the BCTF give support and encouragement to the retirement planning program of the Retired Teachers’ Association. 141

(Nov 76 Ex, p. 7)

39. School Buildings, Grounds, and Facilities

39.15—That the size, design, number, and utilization of all school facilities should be determined through a process that includes consultation with the local school board, teachers’ association, school community, site-based health and safety committee, and staff. (Oct 80 RA, p. 7) (Nov 12 RA, p. 5)

POLICIES 39.01—The BCTF believes that: 1. The stated broad aims for education go beyond any narrowly defined core curriculum. School buildings, grounds, and facilities should be designed to enable students to achieve these aims. 2. School buildings and equipment should provide optimum physical conditions for active learning. 3. In the design and construction of school buildings the possibility of alterations and additions to meet changing needs must be anticipated. 4. Inadequacies in existing school buildings and equipment should be overcome. 5. Members, especially the site-based health and safety committee, should be closely involved in the planning of new buildings and of alterations to existing buildings. (Jan 77 Ex, p. 32) (Nov 12 RA, p. 5)

6. That construction protocols must be in place before any renovations or alterations, including painting, start. 7. That a new school be commissioned before it is opened for students and members. (Jan 03 Ex, p. 28) 39.05—That the Ministry of Education should adopt a more generous policy in the sharing of costs of new school grounds. (60 AGM, p. 26) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

39.07—That the Ministry of Education should review its structure of financial assistance, to ease the burden on school districts undertaking renovations and modernization programs. (Nov 61 Consultative, p. 6) (Jan 77 Ex, p. 32)

39.09—That every school should be provided with dedicated, spacious, comfortable, properly heated and ventilated, and adequately furnished staffrooms that include: 1. outside windows. 2. enough floorspace to accommodate the number of staff in the building. 3. sinks that are connected to a source of hot and cold water. 4. tables with impervious surfaces and chairs equipped with back rests. 5. appliances for heating or cooling of drinks and food. 6. sufficient waste and recycle receptacles with self-closing lids. 7. dishwasher. (01 AGM, p. 27)

39.17—That where portable classrooms have been purchased by a school district to provide temporary classroom space, such classrooms should not be counted as available classrooms when capital plans are being prepared. (75 AGM, p. 90) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

39.19—That the Ministry of Education’s area allotment per student for general instructional space should be sufficient to meet the needs of a school’s functional program. (June 74 Ex, p. 4) (Dec 78 Ex, p. 17)

39.23—That the ministry should provide funds to local districts to upgrade facilities to be more energy efficient, and that planners should be encouraged to become more energy conscious in their planning and designing of school buildings. (Dec 78 Ex, p. 17) 39.25—That priority should be given to day care facilities when space becomes available in schools and is considered for alternative uses. (May 80 RA, p. 24) 39.29—That the Ministry of Education should determine optimum heating, lighting, ventilation, acoustical, or other school building systems by undertaking research in this area. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8)

39.31—That the Ministry of Education should encourage, through its facilities manual, the design, construction, and operation of school facilities that will also serve community needs. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8)

39.35—That a school site should be developed in such a way as to maintain the natural environment as far as possible. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8)

39.37—That when a local school board wishes to provide housing for members in a community where accommodation is not readily available, the cost of construction or acquisition should be shareable. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8) 39.39—That resource centres and teacher centres should be recognized as approved instructional facilities for the purpose of sharing building costs or renovations. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8) 39.41—That the shareable equipment allowances should be revised annually to reflect current costs and true inflation rate. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8)

(June 06 RA, p. 10)

39.11—1. That the Ministry of Education should ensure that all new schools in British Columbia should meet or exceed the federal guidelines for being barrier free for persons with disabilities or impairments. 2. That the Ministry of Education should develop a plan that will effectively renovate all schools in BC to be barrier free. (Jan 92 Ex, p. 11)

39.13—1. That all schools that are provided with a general administrative office should also be provided with a separate principal’s office. 2. That all schools of four rooms or more should be provided with a full-size activity room with at least a 20-foot ceiling. 3. That, wherever an activity room is provided, dressing rooms with shower facilities should also be provided. 4. That wherever activity rooms are built without permanent stages, adequate storage space should be provided for portable stages and equipment. (75 AGM, p. 90) (May 77 RA, pp. 5-6)

142

39.43—That sufficient funds should be allocated to ensure that all school facilities are provided with minimum equipment to reflect curriculum changes, developments in technology and school needs based on unusual circumstances. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8) 39.47—That in schools where a proportion of students must remain at school during lunch hour, suitable space should be provided for those students to eat their lunch. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8) 39.49—That the following facilities should be considered the essential minimum facilities for all schools: • A general administrative office with a separate principal’s office. • Medical dental room near the office. • Book and paper storage room near the office. • Members’ preparation room containing reproduction equipment. • Multi-purpose seminar room (this may be used by itinerant specialists). (If one or more of the above rooms must be combined in a very small school, the presence of one must not adversely affect the other. For example, noisy reproduction equipment should not be situated next to the office phone.)

• Separate washrooms for students and members. • Single-user washrooms and change rooms. (Oct 16 Ex, pp. 4–5)

• A comfortable and adequately furnished staffroom. • Coat and boot space in a safe secure area. • Custodial room and custodial storage areas situated around the school. • A full-sized activity room or gymnasium with at least a 6-metre ceiling with adjoining shower facilities and adequate storage space for portable stages and sports equipment. • A kitchen area adjacent to the activity room. • Library and teacher-librarian’s workroom. (Oct 16 Ex, pp. 4–5) • Audio-visual storage room adjacent to the library. • Multi-purpose, instruction-sized room that may serve as a lunchroom, music room, extra classroom, etc. • Learning assistance room. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8) • A properly equipped fine arts complex for the instruction of music, art, drama and dance. • Fully equipped facilities of adequate size, primarily for the teaching of music and that they reflect the educational needs of the music students. (Jan 89 Ex, p. 28) • Self-contained Child Care facilities appropriate to the needs of the students, staff and community. (Jan 91 Ex, p. 9) • An ESL centre (where numbers warrant). (Jan 98 Ex, p. 11) • All classrooms, including portables have 2-way communication with the office and have 911 emergency capabilities. • All student and staff washrooms and classroom sinks be equipped with faucets that allow water to remain running, warm water, soap and paper towels for hand washing purposes. (01 AGM, p. 15)

39.51—That instruction in hand washing be given in schools.

39.63—That all new public schools be constructed or upgraded and all existing schools be upgraded to mitigate earthquake damage and that: a. adequate provincial funding for these upgrades be provided. b. the government fully fund this urgent imperative as a public safety concern, rather than as an additional pressure one education budgets. c. that a concrete plan be put in place and adhered to in order that all upgrades be completed no later than 2025. (Feb. 03 Ex, p. 5) (Oct 16 Ex, p. 4)

39.65—That every school should have an adequate number of plumbed, properly ventilated, staff-only washrooms, that there be separate washrooms for women and men, that the washrooms include sinks that are connected to a source of hot and cold water, and that the walking distance from any working areas in the school be on the same floor and no more than 60 metres from a staff washroom. (June 06 RA, p. 10) 39.67—That the legislated class-size limits and the provisions of class size in the Area Standards for new schools or renovations, agree with each other. (June 06 RA, p. 11) 39.69—That all worksites/areas with BCTF members be equipped with emergency communication devices at the cost of the employer (i.e., intercoms, phones). (08 AGM, p. 17) 39.71—That all school sites have appropriate lighting outside the buildings for employee safety after dark so that employees are able to enter and exit their buildings and get to their transportation in a safe, well-lit manner. (08 AGM, p. 18)

(01 AGM, p. 15)

39.53—That no staffroom be used as a classroom or first-aid (01 AGM p. 27) room. 39.55—1. That when new secondary schools are being planned or when existing secondary schools are being renovated, self-contained Child Care facilities be incorporated into the design of the buildings. 2. That in-school Child Care facilities shall consider enrolling children in the following order of priority: a. children of students enrolled in the school, b. children of school district employees, c. children of the residents of the school’s community. 3. That operational funding for the provision of Child Care services in school buildings be provided through government grants. (91 AGM, p. 21)

39.57—That the School Act or regulations should contain a provision that states that all portable units leased or purchased as temporary classrooms must be equipped with the utilities and other physical facilities necessary to provide a safe and hygienic instructional environment. (Jan 82 Ex, p. 20) (Jan 97 Ex, p. 20)

39.59—That custodial staff be provided at all times that schools are in session and that sufficient custodial time be provided each day for thorough cleaning of school facilities and work sites. (01 AGM, p. 27)

39.61—1. That there be in each school district a plan for the eventual removal of all installed carpeting. 2. That work site area rugs, or their equivalent, be provided to teachers upon request. 3. That there be a regular cleaning schedule for all carpeting 4. That replacements for carpeting meet teacher concerns for health and safety, flexibility of learning activities, time for daily cleaning, and noise abatement before carpeting is removed and before plans for new building/renovations are finalized. (01 AGM, p. 14)

39.73—That the ANSI (American National Standards Institute) standards for classroom acoustics be implemented whenever a school is being built or renovated, and That the BCTF demand that the BC government ensure that the ANSI standards for classroom acoustics be used in all new school construction and all classroom renovations. (08 AGM, p. 18) 39.75—That the BCTF demand that the minister of education revise the funding regulations to ensure that all classrooms can be maintained to conform or exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) standards on indoor air temperature and quality. (08 AGM, p. 18)

39.77—That uncarpeted primary classrooms be provided with a cushioned surface at least nine square meters in size, if requested by the teacher. (08 AGM, p. 18) 39.79―1. That power transmission lines should not be placed adjacent to schools. 2. That where power lines are located near schools, they should be buried at a depth of at least three metres and should be enclosed within a shielded pipe. (Sept. 08 Ex, p. 5) 39.81—That the BCTF oppose the use, sale, rental, or lease of closed public school buildings (or unused classrooms) to organizations that provide educational services that are in competition with public schools. (Nov 08 RA, p. 13) 39.83―That all locals be requested to inform their site-based joint health and safety committees that employers must have current and accurate asbestos management plans to be followed in all worksites prior to undergoing renovation or construction and that locals should request a copy of these plans. (Nov 09 Ex, p. 6) 39.85—That the Federation oppose the sale of bottled water in schools, and promote policies that ensure free safe drinking water access for every school. (08 AGM, p. 26) PROCEDURES

143

39.02—That the BCTF encourage its members to be involved at the district level in the planning and modification of school facilities. (Feb 82 Ex, p. 8) (Jan 92 Ex, p. 8)

39.04―That if teachers are requested to, and/or provided with materials to, clean classroom furniture, they should refuse and local presidents should contact the president of the support staff union with the information. (Nov 09 Ex, p. 6) 39.06―That locals be encouraged to adopt policies that would eliminate provision of bottled water at local activities. (Nov 09 RA, p. 7)

39.08―That the BCTF urge the Ministry of Education to ensure access in all schools and worksites to clean, safe, and freely accessible tap water and the infrastructure for the refilling of reusable water bottles. (Nov 10 Ex, p. 3)

40.08—That the BCTF and locals be encouraged to develop processes that allow complaints of sexual harassment between members to be resolved in a sensitive, timely and confidential manner, and that these processes be widely advertised to members. These processes need to include: 1. acknowledgement of the victim's right to pursue sexual harassment complaints through the collective agreement; 2. recognition of the need for confidentiality; 3. provisions for same gender representation; 4. provision for referral to either the collective agreement or to the BC Human Rights Branch if the victim feels the matter has not been satisfactorily resolved through the local process. (94 AGM p. 37)

40.10—That in member-to-member harassment complaints: 1. presidents or designates be encouraged to maintain the role of “process” advisor. 2. the president not represent either member. (May 00 Ex, p. 5)

40. Sexual Harassment/ Harassment—General

40.12—That presidents ensure that in member-to-member harassment complaints, each member has individual union representation. (May 00 Ex, p. 5)

POLICIES 40.01—That students and teachers have the right to a learning and working environment free from sexual harassment. (82 AGM, p. 29) (94 AGM)

40.03—That sexual harassment should be defined as: 1. any unwelcome or unwanted sexual comment, look, suggestion or physical contact made by a person who knows or ought reasonably to know that such attention is unwelcome or unwanted; 2. real or implied actions which are sexually oriented and which create an uncomfortable working or learning environment for the recipient; 3. implied or expressed promise of reward for complying with a sexually oriented request; 4. any clearly expressed or implied threat of reprisal, actual reprisal or the denial of an opportunity which would otherwise be granted or available, for refusal to comply with a sexually oriented request or advance; and 5. the display or use of sexually explicit or pornographic materials beyond the norms of accepted professional practice. (94 AGM p. 36)

PROCEDURES 40.02—That the BCTF take all necessary steps to ensure that no member is a victim of harassment, including sexual harassment, in their teaching situation. (Oct 80 RA, p. 17) (Jan 81 RA, p. 14)

40.04—That locals be encouraged to negotiate clauses that define sexual harassment, outline specific pre-grievance procedures, and state that grievance procedures may be used in cases of sexual harassment. (82 AGM, p. 29) (May 92 RA, p. 16)

40.06—That locals be encouraged to develop and implement joint programs with school boards on the issues of sexual harassment including: 1. comprehensive policy statements covering all employees, administrators and students; 2. contract language protecting the rights of the victim, including acknowledgement of the victim's right to request that the perpetrator be transferred, to choose transfer or remaining in the same worksite after intervention takes place; 3. comprehensive in-service plans for all district employees covering both the rights and responsibilities of employees and administrators; 4. comprehensive student education programs that include peer involvement components. (94 AGM p. 37)

41. Social Justice A.

Racism

POLICIES 41.A.01—Racism—A set of implicit or explicit beliefs, assumptions and actions based on an ideology of inherent superiority of one racial or ethnic group over another and evident within organizational or institutional structures and programs, as well as within individual thought and behaviour patterns. While different racial groups can be prejudiced against each other, racism implies that one racial group is in a position of power in relation to other groups. Racism equals prejudice and power. Racist Slurs—Are insulting and disparaging statements directed towards a particular racial or ethnic group. Racist Incidents—Express racist assumptions and beliefs through banter, racist jokes, name-calling, teasing, discourteous treatment, graffiti, stereotyping, threats, vicious insults, physical violence or genocide. The term racist refers to an individual, institution or organization whose beliefs, actions or programs imply or state that certain races have distinctive negative or inferior characteristics determined by hereditary factors. Racist behaviour connotes aggressive, abusive or dangerous acts directed towards racial or ethnic minorities. (Sept 94 Ex, p. 5) 41.A.03—Human Rights—An official doctrine and corresponding set of policies and practices in which cultural, racial, ethnic, physical, mental, and family differences are formally promoted and incorporated as an integral component of the political, social and symbolic order. Public education should include administrative policies and procedures, curriculum and learning activities, that recognizes the experiences and contributions of diverse cultural groups. One of the aims of public education is to promote understanding of and respect for cultural and human rights. Antiracist education—An approach to education that integrates the perspective of Aboriginal and racial minority groups into an educational system and its practices. The aim of antiracist education is the elimination of racism in all its forms. Antiracist education seeks to identify and change educational policies, procedures and practices that foster racism, as well as the racist attitudes and behaviour that underlie and reinforce such policies and practices. Antiracist education provides teachers and students with the knowledge and skills to examine racism critically in order to understand how it originates and to identify and challenge it. (Sept 94 Ex, p. 6) (May 15 Ex, p. 4)

41.A.05—That the BCTF foster and promote educational and social policies that counter racism and welcome multiculturalism. (85 AGM, p. 6)

144

41.A.07—That the BCTF provide, and encourage other authorities to provide the necessary in-service programs, resources and materials to prepare members and employees for work in a multicultural environment. (85 AGM, p. 6) 41.A.09—That the BCTF: 1. assist in identifying ethnically offensive material and racism in all its forms. 2. assist members through in-service programs and the identification of multicultural materials in countering racially and ethnically offensive items. (85 AGM, p. 6) 41.A.11—That the BCTF develop suggested criteria and encourage the Ministry of Education’s permanent revision committee to use these in identifying ethnically offensive materials, through an ongoing review of all curricular materials. (85 AGM, p. 6) 41.A.13—That the BCTF openly condemn all or any practice of discrimination on the basis of race or ethnic origin in the communities and schools of this province. Affirmative action programs which are established to ameliorate the effects of past injustice or systemic inequity shall not be considered to be discrimination. (85 AGM, p. 6) (Jan 92 Ex, p. 11)

41.A.15—That the BCTF seek to achieve adequate physical and professional provisions for students in ESL classes. (85 AGM, p. 6)

41.A.17—That the Federation state its opposition to any form of “slave auction,” “slave day,” or “student for hire” activities that are patterned in such a way as to offer the service of human beings through a bidding process or mimic a slave auction process. (01 AGM, p. 31) (17 AGM, p. 9)

41.A.19—1. That the BCTF urge the Ministry of Education and the Ministry Responsible for Multiculturalism and Human Rights to pass legislation that will require school districts, in partnership with the community, to develop and implement anti-racist, multicultural policies and programs that will better meet the needs of students within their pluralistic communities. 2. That the BCTF urge the Ministry of Education and the Ministry Responsible for Multiculturalism and Human Rights to support anti-racist, multicultural education programs with adequate funding and human resources. (93 AGM, p. 13) 41.A.21—That local teacher unions work with school districts to develop or review antiracism policy and ensure that these policies include a requirement that all racist incidents at school be reported to the district and that action be taken on these incidents. (06 AGM, p. 34)

PROCEDURES 41.A.02—That the BCTF: 1. Recognizes that racism does exist in BC schools and is committed to eliminating racism. 2. Recognizes that some racism is individual and some systemic and institutional, and that some racism is conscious and intentional, and some unconscious; further, that all these forms of racism must be opposed. (Feb 99 Ex, p. 22) 3. Condemn any expression of racial, religious, or ethnic bias (85 AGM, p. 26) by any of its members or employees. 4. Ensure that its stand on all forms of discriminatory behavior on grounds of race, color or creed is communicated to its members and employees. (87 AGM, p. 26) 5. Develop and publicize procedures, to be followed by members and employees in dealing with racial, religious or ethnic incidents. These procedures must preserve the dignity and integrity of the victims. (87 AGM, p. 26) 6. a. Work to ensure that those involved in the production of Federation publications and materials monitor them for racial, religious or ethnic bias prior to publications. b. Work to ensure that there is a systematic and ongoing program to revise, upgrade and broaden Federation publications, audio-visual aids, and other supplementary materials, so that they reflect and promote a multicultural society. (87 AGM, p. 26) 7. Develop in-service programs to assist members and employees in:

a. b. c.

dealing effectively with racial/ethnic incidents; working in a multicultural milieu; and identifying and countering racist materials and language. (87 AGM, p. 26)

8. Work with and provide assistance to the larger community in race and ethnic relations. (87 AGM, p. 26) 9. Try to ensure that the composition of BCTF committees reflects the diversity of the organization and its clients. (87 AGM, p. 26)

10. Provide support and assistance for members who work in multi-ethnic environments when intercultural conflict becomes a potential threat to the effectiveness of those members. (85 AGM, p. 26) (87 AGM, p. 12)

B.

Status of Women

POLICIES 41.B.01—That the federal government should be concerned with the image of women that the media portray, and should take steps through the Canadian Radio and Television Commission to eliminate programs and advertisements that are derogatory to women, or promote violence against women. (Reviewed Dec 78 Ex, pp. 16-17) (Jan 94 Ex, p. 8)

41.B.03—That the BCTF not maintain membership in any organization that limits its membership by sex, race or creed. (Sept 74 Ex, p. 18) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

41.B.05—That the BCTF support the right of females regardless of age, marital status, income or geographical location to: 1. have access to a full range of information, counselling and medical services with respect to their health and well-being; 2. decide whether or when to have children. (81 AGM, p. 17) 41.B.09—Gender equity is concerned with the promotion of personal, cultural, and economic equality for all who participate in the education system of BC The term ‘’gender equity’’ arose out of a growing recognition in society of a systematic and pervasive gender inequity. A continuing tradition of stereotypical conceptions and discriminatory practices resulted in the systematic devaluation of attitudes, activities, and abilities traditionally attributed to and associated with girls and women. Gender equity, as distinct from ‘’sex equity,’’ is not attainable solely by a quantitative balance of females and males in all aspects of the existing system. It must also entail a qualitative reworking of gender assumptions within all aspects of the present system. Concretely, this means promoting gender equity in respect of: 1. curriculum, 2. social relations, 3. institutional structures and conditions, and 4. the social-cultural context of public education. (91 AGM, p. 22)

41.B.11—That a non-sexist environment shall be defined as that in which: 1. there is no discrimination against females and males by portraying them in stereotyped or degrading roles or by omitting their contributions to particular areas; 2. people treat each other with respect; and 3. no sexist comments/anecdotes are delivered under the guise of humour or otherwise. (Jan 95 Ex, p. 19) 41.B.13—That the BCTF recommend to the Ministry of Education that they collect data annually on students’ choices by gender as well as teachers’ subjects by gender which would allow for a longitudinal study. (Nov. 01 RA, p. 13) 41.B.15—That the BCTF condemn the decision of the BC government to divert rather than prosecute alleged spousal assaulters in contravention of the BC government’s Violence Against Women in Relationships Policy. (Aug. 02 Ex, p. 10)

145

41.B.17—That the BCTF condemn the trafficking of young girls in Bountiful as wives, and the use of public funds to support the independent schools in Bountiful. (Sept. 04 Ex, p. 8)

41.C.01—That the BCTF state that the underlying principles behind our work in social justice, as teachers, are universality of access, opportunity, and justice for all. (05 AGM, p. 49)

41.B.19—That the BCTF is opposed to the introduction of a Sharia Court in Canada. (Jan 05 Ex, p. 16)

41.C.03—1. That the BCTF actively support the establishment of Gay/Straight Alliance (GSA) support groups in middle and high schools throughout BC; 2. That the BCTF actively encourage local leaders to facilitate the establishment of Gay/Straight Alliance (GSA) student support groups in middle and high schools in their locals. (00 AGM, p. 18)

41.B.21—That the BCTF demand that the federal government restore funding to Status of Women Canada and that the mandate of Status of Women Canada include the goal of equality for all women in Canada. (Feb. 08 RA, p. 13) PROCEDURES 41.B.02—That each local be encouraged to elect one person to act as a contact with the Status of Women Committee and the BCTF staff member, and to assist them in working toward an improvement in the status of women in the government of the BCTF and in education in BC. (73 AGM, p. 22) (Reviewed Dec 77 Ex, p. 12)

41.B.04—That the BCTF investigate any discrimination in the public education system of BC.

cases

of

(May 73 Ex, p. 3) (May 80 Ex, pp. 9-10)

41.C.05—That locals of the BCTF be encouraged to work with school boards to develop and implement policies that will facilitate the use of learning materials that convey inclusive and positive portrayals of same-sex families. (Jan/Feb. RA 03 p. 19) 41.C.07—That members of the BCTF be encouraged to address same-sex family issues in their classrooms in the context of relevant curriculum. (Jan/Feb. RA 03 p. 19) 41.C.09—That in consideration of the implications of the Supreme Court decision, the Ministry of Education undertake a progressive leadership role in addressing the issues of same-sex families and sexual minority students. (Jan/Feb. RA 03 p. 19)

41.B.06—That the BCTF encourage women to increase their participation in the decision-making bodies of the Federation and the education system. (May 80 Ex, pp. 9-10)

41.C.11—That the local social justice contacts and committees are the driving force in developing the Federation’s priorities and actions in social justice, and that the social justice work of the Federation be premised on this tenet. (Feb. 04 Ex, p. 8)

41.B.08—That locals should include status of women contact persons as voting members of their executive committees.

41.C.13—That the BCTF encourage locals to lobby school boards to adopt ethical purchasing policies and procedures.

(Jan 75 Ex, p. 26) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 19)

41.B.10—That local professional development committees, in liaison with status of women committees, be encouraged: 1. to develop in-service education programs to make teachers, students and parents more aware of sex stereotyping and other gender equity issues; (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15) (Jan 94 Ex, p. 8)

2. to include a component in all training programs to make teachers, students and parents more aware of gender equity issues such as gender socialization and sex stereotyping. (94 AGM p. 35) 41.B.12—That BCTF representatives on local and provincial curriculum revision committees work to ensure that, where applicable, the history of women’s struggles, their contributions to society, and their present status be included in revised curricula. (75 AGM, pp. 34–35) (Reviewed Dec. 79 Ex, p. 15)

41.B.14—That locals be encouraged to establish status of women standing committees, with appropriate funding. (77 AGM, pp. 29–30)

41.B.16—That the BCTF defend the right of women, regardless of marital status or age, to be employed on the same basis as men. (78 AGM, pp. 12–13) (90 AGM, p. 40)

41.B.18—That in order to achieve working and learning conditions free of sexism, locals develop appropriate procedures that outline specific actions for members to follow in: 1. reporting materials and activities they consider sexist; 2. evaluating materials and activities alleged to be sexist; and 3. removing materials and discontinuing activities judged to be sexist. (92 AGM, p. 23) 41.B.20—That the BCTF oppose violence against women. (93 AGM, p. 13)

C.

Social Justice

POLICIES

(05 AGM, p. 49)

41.C.15—That the BCTF encourage locals to include a social justice budget line when building their annual budgets. (June 05 Ex, p. 20)

41.C.17—That local unions work with school districts to develop or review antihomophobia policy to ensure that these policies include a requirement that all homophobic incidents at schools and other worksites be reported to the district and that action be taken on these incidents. (June 06 RA, p. 14) 41.C.19—That locals work with school districts to develop or revise antidiscrimination and equity policies and education practices to ensure they are consistent with the BC Human Rights Act and School Act. (June 06 RA, p. 15) 41.C.21—1. That the BCTF actively lobby Canadian authorities to enforce human trafficking legislation. 2. That the BCTF encourage law enforcement agencies to investigate persistent rumours of physical and emotional abuse of the members of Bountiful. 3.That the BCTF support the creation of an independent task force under the terms of reference outlined at the roundtable on Bountiful. (Sept. 06 Ex, p. 4) 41.C.23—1. That the BCTF support the investigation of the advisability of creating a Province of BC program similar to Utah’s Safety Net, which assists people in leaving polygamous relationships that are abusive and helps people coping with the aftermath of abuse. 2.That the BCTF press government to institute an independent review of the schools in Bountiful, on a yearly basis and at random times and until such a review is complete, the schools of Bountiful not be eligible to receive public funding. (Sept. 06 Ex, p. 4) 41.C.25—That the BCTF urge the provincial and federal governments to take immediate steps to prevent prostitution and the trafficking of women, men, and children including, but not limited to that associated with, the 2010 Olympics. (08 AGM, p. 25) 41.C.27―That the BCTF urge all school districts to ensure that Social Justice 12 is offered as a course option in all secondary schools. (Oct 08 Ex, p. 11) 41.C.29―That the BCTF support the development of learning resources for Social Justice 12 that will provide teachers with a

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balanced approach to teaching about peace and justice in the relationship between Israel and Palestine. (May 10 RA, p. 3)

superannuation, training, retraining, and access to jobs; and that the self-identification with these groups be made on a voluntary basis. (06 AGM, p. 34)

PROCEDURES 41.C.02—That locals have autonomy to create a local social justice structure that meets the needs of the local. (Feb. 04 Ex, p. 8) 41.C.04—That members of the Social Justice Advisory Committee shall be responsible for: 1. liaising with locals and local social justice contacts in their appointed zones. 2. facilitating the work of the social justice zone and the social justice action groups through zonal meetings. 3. taking feedback from the zones and social justice action groups to the Social Justice Advisory Committee. (Feb. 04 Ex, p. 9) 41.C.06—That the BCTF and its locals actively lobby school boards to develop and implement policies designed to protect teachers from harassment based upon their real or perceived sexual orientation and/or gender identity. (Jan 07 Ex, p. 2) 41.C.08—That the BCTF publicize with the membership that antiLGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning) comments and slurs and/or homophobic or transphobic incidents directed towards teachers by their colleagues are a form of harassment. (07 AGM, p. 22) (10 AGM, p. 8) 41.C.10—That the BCTF encourage locals to consider using a SURT day for social justice representative/contact training. (Nov 08 Ex, p. 10) 41.C.12―That the BCTF identify ways to promote the use of the social justice lens in schools to evaluate the suitability of any partnership, sponsorship, promotion, resources or capital expenditure. (Nov 09 Ex, p. 15) 41.C.14―That the BCTF add a “green/sustainability” component to its social justice program in order to provide information and support to teachers and students concerned about a sustainable world. (Jan 10 RA, p. 16) 41.C.16―That the BCTF mark the International Day of Pink on the second Wednesday of April each year and continue to pressure government to take steps to prevent homophobic and transphobic bullying, and encourage others to do the same. (Apr 13 Ex, p. 7) (June 13 Ex, p. 1)

41.C.18―That the BCTF encourage members to recognize every February as Child Poverty Awareness Month and take steps individually and/or as part of their Social Justice network to help eliminate child poverty in BC. (15 AGM, p. 5) D.

41.D.05—That the provincial government should enact gender equity legislation that will lead to full equality between male and female public school students in all aspects of education including curriculum, guidance, counselling, and co-educational courses and programs. (90 AGM, p. 37) 41.D.07—That school boards and the Ministry of Education should develop an equal employment opportunity policy that will ensure that hiring and promotional practices reflect the multicultural composition of society. (78 AGM, p. 38) 41.D.09—That each school board in the province should examine the status of female students and teachers in the school district, and develop and implement a program to eliminate sex discrimination and achieve gender equity in that district. (78 AGM, pp. 37-38) (90 AGM, p. 40)

41.D.11—That a more equitable distribution of women and men should be included in school staffs at all levels. (Jan 75 Ex, p. 28)

41.D.13—That the School Act should be amended to ensure that no student be denied, on the basis of sex, access to any course offered by a public school. (76 AGM, p. 51) 41.D.15—That the counsellors shall not be assigned to students on the basis of sex, but that counsellors of both sexes shall be available. (75 AGM, p. 33) (Reviewed Dec 79 Ex, p. 15)

41.D.17—That, in accordance with the BC Human Rights Code, all courses, programs, activities and clubs sponsored by schools should be open to all students, regardless of sex. (75 AGM, p. 32) 41.D.19—That textbooks and all other resource materials that consistently show women and men in stereotype roles should not be condoned and should be replaced by more realistic materials in curriculum areas where such deficiencies are detrimental to the optimum development of young people. (73 AGM, p. 23) (Reviewed Dec 77 Ex, p. 12)

41.D.21—That the BCTF promote and foster, through integrated physical activity programs, the acquisition by all students of lifetime physical fitness skills. Definition: integrated physical activity programs are those in which a student will learn and develop activities that will foster good physical health throughout a lifetime and that may become an integral part of an individual’s lifestyle. (76 AGM, p. 51)

Affirmative Action/Employment Equity

41.D.23—That the Ministry of Education, local school boards, and teachers should develop and implement Practical Life Skills courses, fully integrated, for Grade 8 male and female students, to encompass various aspects of home economics and industrial education. (78 AGM, p. 38)

POLICIES 41.D.01—That the federal government should implement an employment equity plan that will enforce the equal treatment of women: The employment equity plan: 1. means any program, scheme, or schedule that leads to a full equality between men and women in all aspects of employment and education, including hiring, promotion, superannuation, training and retraining, and access to jobs. 2. is a recognition by the recipient of federal government monies that the onus of responsibility for ending sexual inequality in society rests fully upon these institutions, organizations, government departments, crown corporations, government commissions, boards and agencies, people or companies, not on the individual.

41.D.27—That the BCTF, through its locals, lobby each school board in the province to examine the composition of their teaching, support, administrative and managerial staff to ensure the increased presence, inclusion and an equitable representation of Aboriginal and minority groups in all sectors of the educational establishment.

(June 74 Ex, p. 7)

(June 06 RA, p. 10)

41.D.03—That the provincial government enact employment equity legislation that will lead to full equality between men and women and equity of inclusion of Aboriginal and minority groups in all aspects of employment and education including hiring, promotion,

41.D.29—That the BCTF lobby both the provincial government to enact employment equity legislation and school boards to implement employment equity policies that will lead to full employment equality and increased inclusion of Aboriginal and minority groups in all aspects of employment and education including

41.D.25—That the BCTF support any public school physical activity program that encourages the participation of all students, regardless of sex or skill level. (76 AGM, p. 52)

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hiring, superannuation, training, retraining, and access to jobs; and that self identification with these minorities be made by individuals on a voluntary basis. (June 06 RA, p. 11) 41.D.31―That the BCTF condemn the Public Sector Equitable Compensation Act, and work through the CLC and others to urge the implementation of the 2004 recommendations of the Pay Equity Task Force. (09 AGM, p. 25) 41.D.33―That the BCTF request the First Nations Summit, the Union of BC Indian Chiefs, and the Assembly of First Nations to support employment equity for Aboriginal teachers through encouraging school trustees and school boards to implement employment equity programs in all school districts in BC. (Nov 09 Ex, p. 9) PROCEDURES 41.D.02—That the BCTF encourage an equitable distribution of males and females throughout the education system. (May 80 Ex, pp. 9–10)

41.D.04—That the Federation include information regarding em