student handbook student handbook - Texarkana Independent School

student handbook student handbook - Texarkana Independent School

2017-2018 OPTIONS ACADEMIC ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT HANDBOOK & CODE OF CONDUCT Texarkana Independent School District The Place To Be! OPT...

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2017-2018

OPTIONS ACADEMIC ALTERNATIVE HIGH SCHOOL

STUDENT HANDBOOK & CODE OF CONDUCT

Texarkana

Independent School District

The Place To Be! OPTIONS

Academic Alternative High School

Student Handbook & Code of Conduct 2017-2018

Table of Contents Introductory Information...................................................................... i Handbook Purpose and Organization District Personnel District Mission Statement, 5-Year Vision, Beliefs Campus Personnel

Campus Information and Requirements .......................................... A-1 Schedules and Calendars ........................................................................ A-1 School Opening/Closing Information Office Hours School Day Schedule

Admission and Attendance ..................................................................... A-2 Documents Required for Admission General Admission Requirements Attendance Requirements Driver License Attendance Verification Absences Make-Up Hours Due to Absences Truancy Tardies Completion of the OPTIONS Program

Student Resources, Fees, and Services ...................................................... A-5 Student Supplies Textbooks Free and Reduced Price Meals Guidance and Counseling

Student Conduct.................................................................................... A-6 Student Expectations and Responsibilities Academic Dishonesty/Cheating Bullying Dating Violence, Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation Personal Items and Materials at School Money at School Food, Candy, and Drinks Portable (Cellular) Telephones Electronic Devices Distribution of Non-School Materials Care of School Property Dress and Grooming Educational Technology and Acceptable Use

Discipline Management ......................................................................................A-14 Student Management Plan Severe Clause Video/Audio Monitoring Gang Free Zones

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District General Information and Requirements .............................. B-1 Emergency Information ......................................................................... B-1 Communications – Automated for Emergency and Nonemergency Emergency School Closing Information Emergency Procedures Fire Drills Tornado Drills Secure Our Schools (SOS) Drills Shelter-in-Place

Rights and Responsibilities of Students .................................................... B-2 Student Rights Student Rights as Citizens Prayer and Meditation Pledges of Allegiance, Minute of Silence, Declaration of Independence Student Responsibility to Teachers and All District Personnel Student Responsibility to Substitutes

Rights of Parents................................................................................... B-4 Academic Programs Teacher Qualifications Teaching Materials Requesting Classroom Assignment for Multiple Birth Siblings Providing Assistance to Students Who Have Learning Disabilities Request for the Use of a Service/Assistance Animal Students with Physical or Mental Impairments Protected Under Section 504 Records and Other Information Video and Audio Recording Surveys “Opting Out” of Surveys and Activities Psychological Examinations Exemption from Instruction Non-custodial Parents School Safety Transfers Homeless Students Accommodations for Children of Military Families Prohibiting the Use of Corporal Punishment Parents of Students Who Speak a Primary Language Other than English Displaying a Student’s Artwork, Projects, Photos, and Other Original Works Requesting Notices of Certain Student Misconduct

Student/Family/School Success Agreement .............................................. B-9 Problem-Solving Processes ..................................................................... B-10 Solutions to Eliminate Problem Situations (STEPS)

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act .............................................. B-11 Student Records Directory Information

Family and Visitor Information......................................................................... B-13 Communication to Parents Partners in Education/Parent Organizations/Volunteer Opportunities Parents and Visitors on Campuses

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Communication and Deliveries during the School Day ............................. B-14 Communications from Students at School Communications to Students at School Delivering Lunches to Students on Campuses

Distribution of Published Materials or Documents ................................... B-15 Non-school Materials from Students Non-school Materials from Others

Health Information ............................................................................. B-16 Health Services on Campuses Tiger Clinic Illness/Injury at School Insurance Coverage Medications Prescription Medication Non-prescription Medication Steroids Psychotropic Drugs Food Allergies Immunizations Communicable Diseases Bacterial Meningitis Physical Activity for Students in Elementary and Middle School Human Sexuality Instruction School Health Advisory Council Vending Machines Tobacco Prohibited Physical Examination/Health Screening Substance Abuse Prevention and Intervention Suicide Awareness Sunscreen at School

Transportation....................................................................................................B-21 Buses Student Conduct on Buses Bus Rules Bus Regulations Severe Clause Procedures Regarding Bus Rules Violations Video/Audio Monitoring on Buses Vehicles and Parking Bicycles and Motor-driven Vehicles Vehicle Registration and Parking Permits Vehicles and Parking Lots Procedures for Parking Lots Enforcement of Parking Lot Regulations Visitor Parking

Law Enforcement Issues ...................................................................... B-25 Police Intervention Disruptions Alcohol, Drugs, Tobacco, and Weapons Questioning Students at School Students Taken Into Custody Notification of Law Violations Searches of Students, Lockers, Desks, and Other Property Use of Oleoresin Capsicum Spray iii

Sexual Harassment/Sexual Abuse .................................................................... B-28 Suspected Child Abuse ......................................................................... B-30 Building Maintenance and Management ................................................ B-31 Asbestos Management Plan Use of Pesticides

Nondiscrimination .............................................................................. B-32 Nondiscrimination in Career and Technology Education Programs

District Academic Information and Requirements ........................... C-1 Grading Information ............................................................................. C-1 Pre-kindergarten Kindergarten Grades 1-5 Grades 6-8 Grades 9-12 OPTIONS

Testing and Assessment Programs ........................................................ C-16 State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) in Grades 3-8 STAAR End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments for Students in Grades 9-12 Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Assessment Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) Preparation for College Entrance Tests Credit by Examination Semester Exams Physical Fitness Assessment

Special Programs and Coursework ........................................................ C-21 Gifted and Talented Program Special Education Accelerated Instruction Students with Disabilities Dyslexia Limited English Proficient Students Summer School Pre-Advanced Placement Program (Pre-AP) Advanced Placement Program (AP) Dual Credit Courses Correspondence Courses Independent Research Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Academy (STEM)

Graduation ........................................................................................ C-24 Degree Plans Class Rank Calculation Cum Laude System Graduation Ceremonies Texas High School Graduation Ceremony OPTIONS Graduation Ceremony

Student Code of Conduct................................................................... D-1 iv

Handbook Purpose and Organization The purpose of this student handbook is to give Texarkana Independent School District students and their parents an understanding of the general rules and guidelines for attending and receiving an education in TISD schools. The handbook is organized in the following sections: Section A: Section B: Section C: Section D:

Campus Information and Requirements District General Information and Requirements District Academic Information and Requirements Student Code of Conduct

When the handbook uses the term “parents,” it means the parents, the legal guardian, or the person who has accepted responsibility for the student, at least in regard to school matters. Both parents and students should become familiar with the Texarkana ISD Student Code of Conduct, which is a document adopted by the board and is intended to promote school safety and an atmosphere for learning. That document can be found as an attachment to this handbook. The Student Handbook is designed to be in harmony with board policy and the Student Code of Conduct. Please be aware that the handbook is updated yearly, while policy adoption and revision may occur throughout the year. This student handbook is not a contract between the school and parents or students. It may be amended at any time at the discretion of the District. If the District makes changes to the student handbook during a school year, the administration of the District and the campus will communicate those changes in ways that are designed to inform parents and students of the new or revised information. The rules and standards set forth in this handbook apply to conduct on school premises, to conduct on school buses, to conduct off school premises that directly affects other students of the school, to conduct at school functions of any kind, and to conduct involving school property. This school handbook does not define all types and aspects of student behavior; however, the Board of Trustees has the responsibility to set forth policies, rules and regulations to help all students conduct themselves in a proper manner as good citizens of the school community.

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Texarkana Independent School District

Board of Trustees Fred Norton, Jr. President Wanda Boyette

Gerald Brooks Vice President

Bill Kimbro

Amy Bower Secretary

Bryan DePriest

Paul Miller

Administration Paul Norton Superintendent of Schools Autumn Thomas Deputy Superintendent George E. Moore Assistant Superintendent of Alternative Education

Joann Rice Assistant Superintendent of Student & Community Development

4241 Summerhill Road Texarkana, Texas 75503 Phone: 903-794-3651 Fax: 903-792-2632 http://www.txkisd.net

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Texarkana Independent School District Mission Statement The mission of Texarkana Independent School District, an innovative learning community strengthened by its diversity, is to provide a superior education in a caring environment that inspires challenges and engages each student through a wide range of opportunities.

Parameters  We will always focus on students while valuing all people in the education process.  We will always strive for excellence  We will always promote a culture of personal accountability and mutual respect.

Beliefs We believe… 

All students are capable of success!



It is our responsibility to inspire students to believe in themselves.



Care and compassion create an environment that fosters hope and intrinsic motivation.



Every student should be provided an education that will prepare him or her for a successful future.



Diverse educational experiences best serve unique, individual needs.



Showing love and compassion to students, staff, parents and community members is essential.



The highest quality educators are necessary for the best results.



It is our responsibility to grow people.



Positive relationships with families are key to the success of the child.



Educating children is the job of everyone in the community.

Strategic Objectives  We will commit to providing a relevant, challenging curriculum that rapidly responds to the diverse needs of the students, community and global workforce.  All students will take ownership in their personal learning in a trusting, supportive and mutually respectful environment.  We will develop a highly qualified and diverse staff that will promote high expectations for all.  We will facilitate family and community involvement in the growth and success of the student.

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OPTIONS Academic Alternative High School Administration Amy Doss Principal

Purpose The purpose of the OPTIONS Academic Alternative High School is to serve the area youth in grades 9—12 by providing them with the opportunity to graduate with a high school diploma from Texarkana ISD and be postsecondary ready as productive members of the community.

Goals To provide direction and opportunities for students to become competent in developing academic proficiency while completing a high school diploma. To provide opportunities for students to develop positive character and to become leaders in the school and the community.

Mission Statement To provide a learning environment that both supports and encourages high expectations, a sound academic foundation, and a strong belief in the abilities of the non-traditional student to achieve success

Texarkana College –Physical Science Building Corner of Johnson & Tucker Streets Texarkana, Texas 75503 Phone: 903-793-5632 Fax: 903-798-2131 http://www.txkisd.net

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Campus Information and Requirements OPTIONS Schedules and Calendars School Opening/Closing Information: The building will be open at 7:45 a.m. Students are not permitted in the building before this time unless they have permission from a teacher or administrator. Students must leave campus immediately after their session has ended. An exception will be made for students who are taking dual credit courses with Texarkana College or Southern Arkansas University-Tech. Office Hours: The office hours for OPTIONS are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. School Day Schedule: OPTIONS offers two daily sessions. The first session begins at 8:15 a.m. and ends at 12:30 p.m.; the second session begins at 11:15a.m. and ends at 3:35 p.m. Sessions are conducted Monday through Friday. All students are expected to be on time for each session.

A-1

Admission and Attendance Documents Required for Admission:  An official city, county or state birth certificate  An up-to-date immunization record signed by a physician or by public health personnel  Social Security card  The most recent student transcript (Note: This preliminary transcript will be used for placement purposes only. An official transcript with the sending school’s seal must be sent directly from the sending school to Texas High School.)  Proof of TISD residence General Admission Requirements: In District Students  A TISD student in grades 9-12 who wishes to enroll in OPTIONS must supply the documents listed above, must complete an application, and must complete an on-site writing sample. Completion of the application and the required essay does not guarantee enrollment.  Application reviews and acceptance determinations will be conducted each Tuesday. To determine acceptance at Options, the Options principal will review the following: o Application o Writing sample (essay) o Student transcript o Student’s academic needs o TAKS scores o Discipline record o Attendance record  Students who meet the initial requirements for enrollment must schedule the first in a series of intake meetings and assessments (if applicable). o Initial academic planning meeting with the principal o Benchmark testing (may be required for acceptance of 9th grade students and out of state students) o Meeting with the counselor/academic advisor for graduation plan and for post-secondary and career planning o Final meeting with the principal, counselor/academic advisor, and parent o Note: It is important to be on time for each appointment and to bring any required paperwork. Students who are late to appointment may be asked to reschedule. Out of District Students ▪ Students who reside out of district will be considered for admission if the district in which they reside has entered into an interlocal agreement for these services. ▪ Students should contact the OPTIONS campus to enroll. The OPTIONS academic advisor will meet with the student to determine the academic schedule and to assign the appropriate session. ▪ Students transferring into the District will be classified according to the documented number of credits earned by the date of transfer and by the number of years in attendance in an accredited high school as listed above. If no official transcript is available by the date of enrollment, a transfer student will be enrolled as a freshman and will be placed in freshman-level classes pending receipt of the official transcript. Attendance Requirements: Regular attendance in OPTIONS is critical to timely course completion. Students cannot meet graduation requirements if they are not in attendance. The 90 percent attendance requirement applies to all students in kindergarten through grade 12. The following requirements will be in effect for the program:

A-2

Admission and Attendance (continued) 1)

2) 3)

Students are required to attend their assigned session. Failure to do so will place the student on probationary status. Parents/guardians will be called when a student is absent. After three absences within five school days, the truant officer will be notified. Students who are seventeen years old or older can be charged personally with truancy. Attendance is taken each hour by the classroom instructor. Students will be assigned to either the first or to the second session. Once students are assigned to their session, they must attend during that time period. Students may not attend the other daily session unless the principal has given prior permission.

Driver License Attendance Verification: For a student between the ages of 16 and 18 to obtain a driver license, written parental permission must be provided for the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) to access the student’s records and, in certain circumstances, for a school administrator to provide the student’s attendance information to DPS. A verification of enrollment (VOE) form may be obtained from the office, which the students will need to submit to DPS upon application for a driver license. Absences: Students are required to attend all assigned sessions. If a student misses a session, those hours must be made up. Make-Up Hours Due to Absences: Students have one week to make up missed hours. For example, if a student is absent on Monday of one week, he/she has until the following Monday to make up the absence. The student must complete the make-up hours in addition to the normal hours of instruction required from the student. Failure to make up the additional hours will result in the student being placed on probationary status and could result in possible termination from the program. All absences must be made up, even if there is a doctor’s note. Students should schedule appointments so that attendance requirements may be met. Make-up hours will be assigned and completed by attending full days from 8:15-3:35 p.m. Truancy: Truancy, the absence from school without the knowledge and consent of the student’s parent or guardian, is prohibited. Truancy includes an unexcused absence for one or more periods of the school day. Major changes to the truancy law were made by the 77th Legislature, and the District is required to notify all parents at the beginning of school concerning the new truancy law as defined by Senate Bill 1432. Requirements regarding truancy are as follows: 1. If a student is absent from school 10 or more days, OR 2. If a student is absent 10 or more partial days in a 6 month period in the same school year, OR 3. If a student is absent from school 3 or more days or 3 or more partial days in a 4-week period, THEN 4. The student’s parents or person standing in parental relation to a student are subject to prosecution for the offense of Parent Contributing to Truancy (formerly Thwarting Compulsory Attendance Law), and the child is also subject to prosecution or referral to the Juvenile Court for the offense of Failure to Attend School. In OPTIONS, parents will be called when a student is absent. After 3 absences within 5 school days, the Truant Officer will be notified. For truancy offenses, disciplinary action will be taken in accordance with District policy. Previous offenses will be considered in the determination of consequences. Further acts of truancy will continue to be classified as discipline violations and may result in assignment to the Alternative Education Program or may result in more severe disciplinary measures.

A-3

Admission and Attendance (continued) If any parent or person standing in parental relation to a student fails to require the child to attend school, that person will be warned in writing by the District that attendance is immediately required. If, after this warning, a parent or person standing in parental relation intentionally, knowingly, or with criminal negligence fails to comply, that person will be subject to punishment as provided by law unless inability to compel the child to attend school can be established. In that case, the student will be subject to action by the juvenile court. Family Code, Section 54.021, states that a justice of the municipal court may suspend a student’s driver’s license if the student has engaged in truant conduct. Tardies: Students are expected to be on time and ready for instruction at the beginning of each session. Students who are tardy to the first session will be required to remain in the session for an extra class period. Students who are tardy to the second session will be required to remain in the session from 3:15 to 4:00. Completion of OPTIONS Transferring from Options to Texas High School BEFORE Completion of the Four-Year Plan: 1) Transfers from OPTIONS to Texas High School may take place only at the beginning of the school year (fall semester). 2) In order to be eligible for transfer,  A student must have completed a minimum of six credits.  A student must have completed both the first and second semesters of grade level courses.  A student who did not comply with the OPTIONS Student Contract may not be eligible to return to OPTIONS the following school year.  A student assigned to SDAEP may not be eligible to return to OPTIONS the following year.

A-4

Student Resources, Fees, and Services Student Supplies: Students are required to bring paper, pencils, pens, and other items as required by teachers for specific subjects. A list of required supplies will be provided during the first week of admission. Textbooks: Textbooks are the property of the State of Texas and are issued to students at no charge for use while enrolled in the District. Each book is issued to the Texarkana Independent School District by the State at the new or original price, regardless of the age of the book. Textbooks must be paid for in full if they are lost or damaged extensively (Board Policy FNCB-L). At the time books are issued, each student must fill out a book card and make detailed notes regarding the condition of each book. At the close of each semester, books will be checked and fines assessed according to an established schedule for damage other than routine wear. Students are responsible for the return or replacement of all instructional materials and textbooks issued. Textbooks must be covered at all times and must be maintained in the same condition as issued. Replacement cost will be charged for lost or defaced textbooks or instructional materials. Fines are assessed for damage to textbooks or instructional materials. Textbooks and instructional materials should not be loaned or shared. Students failing to return or pay for a book will lose the privilege of being issued textbooks. A textbook will be provided for classroom use only. Textbooks are issued by serial number and TISD number. Returned textbooks and instructional materials must reflect the serial number and/or TISD number issued to the student. Free and Reduced-Price Food Program: TISD schools participate in the federal Child Nutrition Programs, which provide free and reduced price breakfast and lunch programs to students based on family income levels. Households that have difficulty in paying for school meals should contact the TISD Foodservice Department and apply for free or reduced price meals. The District maintains strict confidentiality as to whether students participate in the program. Parents who would like more information about the program or an application should contact Beth Carson, Director of Child Nutrition, at 1600 Waterall, 903-792-2231. Guidance and Counseling: An academic advisor located on the Options campus will serve as a resource for educational planning. Four-year degree plans will be developed for each student and will guide the OPTIONS staff in assigning students to courses.

A-5

Student Conduct Student Expectations and Responsibilities: In order for any school to be successful, the environment must be one conducive to learning. Successful schools have clearly defined rules of operation, consistent application of those rules, and a conscientious attitude on the part of their students, staff, and community in complying with those rules. As is the case in any community, “abiding by the law” must come from the individual. The atmosphere sought in TISD schools is one in which respect from one person to another is readily observed and in which a proper balance exists between each person’s right to be an individual and his responsibilities to function as a member of a larger community. Each individual must recognize that his/her personal rights do not extend beyond other’s rights, and compliance with reasonable rules of behavior takes priority over self-interest. For a more detailed description concerning discipline, please refer to the Student Code of Conduct. Student responsibilities for achieving a positive learning environment at school and at school-sponsored activities include:  Attending all classes, daily and on time  Being prepared for each class with appropriate materials and assignments  Being properly attired in order that the appearance does not cause a disruption or create a health or safety hazard  Exhibiting an attitude of respect toward others  Conducting oneself in a responsible manner  Seeking changes in school policies and regulations in an orderly and responsible manner through appropriate channels  Obeying all school rules Students in OPTIONS are expected to abide by the following general rules of conduct: 1)

OPTIONS participants are expected to maintain a high level of respect for faculty, staff, and other students. This includes students’ possessions and their right to learn without disruption. Student behavior during sessions will be positive and productive. Excessive talking, off-task behavior, or sleeping will not be tolerated. Students will be given one warning to return to work. Students who choose to remain unproductive will be sent home or will be removed from their area, and no credit will be issued for that session. Make-up hours will be issued. OPTIONS is a closed campus during the scheduled shifts, and students must remain in the OPTIONS area only at all times. Certain areas of the campus are classified as off limits to the OPTIONS students. Students should not return to their cars during a session without receiving permission from the front office. Students enrolled at OPTIONS may not visit any other TISD school campus or facility during regular school hours. OPTIONS students will follow the same regulations and procedures as the general public when attending any TISD event or function held after school hours. Failure to follow these rules will result in a disciplinary action. Options students must sign the OPTIONS Student Contract and must abide by it.

2)

3)

4)

5)

Academic Dishonesty/Cheating: Students found to have engaged in academic dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary penalties. Broadly defined, academic dishonesty/cheating occurs any time that a student knowingly submits work under his/her own name that was obtained through the efforts of someone else. Common examples would include, but are not limited to, the following:      

Copying from another student’s paper Using unauthorized information while taking a test (cheat sheet) Paraphrasing someone else’s homework Giving information to another student to complete assignments Obtaining or giving answers during a test Securing a copy of a test to study and/or using the information on a test

A-6

Student Conduct (continued)     

Talking during a test Knowingly checking another student’s work incorrectly during routine class procedures Copying book jacket summaries for book reports (plagiarism) Submitting work completed by someone else (parents, other adults, other students) Using information obtained through the Internet or other resources without appropriate documentation

Bullying: Bullying occurs when a student or group of students engages in written or verbal expression, expression through electronic methods, or physical conduct against another student on school property, at a school-sponsored or school-related activity, or in a district operated vehicle, and the behavior:   

Results in harm to the student or the student's property, Places a student in reasonable fear of physical harm or of damage to the student's property, or Is so severe, persistent, and pervasive that it creates an intimidating, threatening, or abusive educational environment.

This conduct is considered bullying if it exploits an imbalance of power between the student perpetrator(s) and the student victim and if it interferes with a student’s education or substantially disrupts the operation of the school. Bullying is prohibited by the district and could include hazing, threats, taunting, teasing, confinement, assault, demands for money, destruction of property, theft of valued possessions, name-calling, rumor-spreading, and ostracism. In some cases, bullying can occur through electronic methods, called "cyberbullying." If a student believes that he or she has experienced bullying or has witnessed bullying of another student, it is important for the student or parent to notify a teacher, counselor, principal, or another district employee as soon as possible to obtain assistance and intervention. The administration will investigate any allegations of bullying or other related misconduct. If the results of an investigation indicate that bullying has occurred, the administration will take appropriate disciplinary action. Disciplinary or other action may be taken even if the conduct did not rise to the level of bullying. The district will also contact the parents of the victim and of the student who was found to have engaged in the bullying. Available counseling options will be provided to these individuals, as well as to any students who have been identified as witnesses to the bullying. Any retaliation against a student who reports an incident of bullying is prohibited. The principal may, in response to an identified case of bullying, decide to transfer a student found to have engaged in bullying to another classroom at the campus. In consultation with the student’s parent, the student may also be transferred to another campus in the district. The parent of a student who has been determined by the district to be a victim of bullying may request that his or her child be transferred to another classroom or campus within the district. [Also see School Safety Transfers.] A copy of the district’s policy is available in the principal’s office, superintendent’s office, and on the district’s Web site. A student or parent who is dissatisfied with the outcome of an investigation may appeal through policy FNG(LOCAL). Dating Violence, Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation: The district believes that all students learn best in an environment free from dating violence, discrimination, harassment, and retaliation and that their welfare is best served when they are free from this prohibited conduct while attending school. Students are expected to

A-7

Student Conduct (continued) treat other students and district employees with courtesy and respect, to avoid behaviors known to be offensive, and to stop those behaviors when asked or told to stop. Dating Violence: Dating violence occurs when a person in a current or past dating relationship uses physical, sexual, verbal, or emotional abuse to harm, threaten, intimidate, or control the other person in the relationship. Dating violence also occurs when a person commits these acts against a person in a marriage or dating relationship with the individual who is or was once in a marriage or dating relationship with the person committing the offense. This type of conduct is considered harassment if the conduct is so severe, persistent, or pervasive that it affects the student's ability to participate in or benefit from an educational program or activity; creates an intimidating, threatening, hostile, or offensive educational environment, or substantially interferes with the student's academic performance. Examples of dating violence against a student may include, but are not limited to, physical or sexual assaults, name-calling, put-downs, threats to hurt the student or the student's family members or members of the student's household, destroying property belonging to the student, threats to commit suicide or homicide if the student ends e relationship, threats to harm a student's current dating partner, attempts to isolate the student from friends and family, stalking, or encouraging others to engage in these behaviors. Discrimination: Discrimination is defined as any conduct directed at a student on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, disability, or any other basis prohibited by law, that negatively affects the student. Harassment: Harassment, in general terms, is conduct so severe, persistent, or pervasive that it affects the student's ability to participate in or benefit from an education program or activity; creates an intimidating, threatening, hostile, or offensive educational environment; or substantially interferes with the student's academic performance. Examples of harassment may include, but are not limited to, offensive or derogatory language directed at a person's religious beliefs or practices, accent, skin color, or need for accommodation; threatening or intimidating conduct; offensive jokes, name-calling, slurs, or rumors; physical aggression or assault; graffiti or printed material promoting racial, ethnic, or other negative stereotypes; or other kinds of aggressive conduct such as theft or damage to property. Retaliation: Retaliation against a person who makes a good faith report of discrimination or harassment, including dating violence, is prohibited. Retaliation against a person who is participating in an investigation of alleged discrimination or harassment is also prohibited. A person who makes a false claim or offers false statements or refuses to cooperate with a district investigation, however, may be subject to appropriate discipline. Reporting Procedures: Any student who believes that he or she has experienced dating, violence, discrimination, harassment, or retaliation should immediately report the problem to a teacher, counselor, principal, or other district employee. The report may be made by the student's parent. See policy FFH(LOCAL) for the appropriate district officials to whom to make a report. Personal Items and Materials at School: Students are responsible for all their personal possessions while at school or while at any school-sponsored or school-related event. Parents are strongly urged to discourage their children from wearing or from bringing to school expensive or irreplaceable electronics, jewelry, watches, sunglasses, toys or personal clothing (other than items such as coats or jackets) that may be removed during the day. The District is not responsible for any personal items that are lost, damaged, or stolen at school or at a school-related activity. The following regulations are in effect concerning other personal belongings or materials.

A-8

Student Conduct (continued) Money at School: When it is necessary to send money to school, it should be placed in an envelope with the child’s name, teacher’s name, amount of money, and purpose. If the money is lost, it is easier to return to the owner if the information is available. Students should not bring large sums of money to school. Food, Candy, and Drinks: Food, candy and drinks are not permitted in school buildings. Food and drinks must be consumed only in the cafeteria and designated area during the scheduled student lunch. Careless disposal of gum and food in drinking fountains, on furniture, or on floors presents sanitation and cleaning problems and requires costly repairs. Students who disregard rules concerning food, candy and drinks will receive disciplinary action. Portable (Cellular) Telephones: The District prohibits students from displaying, turning on, or using a paging device, including a cellular phone, a pager, or other telecommunication device, on school property during the school day. The District recognizes the desire of many parents to provide their students with the security of a cellular telephone while attending after hours events; however, students must recognize the type of event they are attending and use good judgment in utilization of such a device. For example, the use of a cellular telephone at a softball game may not be disruptive when used with courtesy; however, using a cellular telephone during a theatrical performance would be totally inappropriate. During state testing, cellular telephones or other electronic devices are prohibited on campus. Cell phones displayed, turned on, or used during the school day will be taken up and given to an administrator. The first time a telecommunications device is confiscated, the student’s parent/guardian will have to come to the school and pick it up. If the device is confiscated a second time, it will be held by the campus administrator until the end of the school year. At that time, the parent may pick up the device. Students who violate this policy will be subject to established disciplinary measures. Electronic Devices (other than cell phones): Electronic devices are not to be brought into the classroom, unless they are required for classroom instruction. Distribution of Non-School Materials: Students are not permitted to distribute non-school publications or materials in the classroom or hallways. Before non-school materials or publications are made available to students in the designated area, they must be submitted to the principal or designee for review and approval. The principal or designee will make a decision as to whether or not the material is approved within 24 hours of the time the materials are submitted. Failure to act within that time is interpreted as disapproval. If the materials are disapproved, students may appeal to the Superintendent, who will decide within three days. The Superintendent’s failure to respond is interpreted as disapproval. Students may appeal to the Board by making a written request for the Board to consider the Superintendent’s decision at the next regular Board meeting. Care of School Property: The taxpayers of the community have made a sustained financial commitment for the construction and upkeep of school facilities. Littering, defacing, or damaging school property is not tolerated. Students will be required to pay for damages they cause and will be subject to disciplinary consequences in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. Dress and Grooming: Cleanliness, neatness, appropriateness, modesty, and effect on the learning environment are the criteria that should dictate the student’s choice of school dress and grooming on any given day. A student is not appropriately dressed if he/she is a disturbing influence in class or school because of his/her mode of dress. No attempt will be made to dictate fashion styles as long as they are in keeping with school District

A-9

Student Conduct (continued) guidelines and/or policies. Students and their parents/guardians are charged with the responsibility of ensuring that modesty, appropriateness, and neatness of dress are maintained. If a student comes to school wearing clothes that violate the dress code or in any other way violate the dress and grooming standards, the student may be placed in in-school suspension until he/she is in compliance. The school will make efforts to notify the parent as soon as possible of this assignment. If the student comes into compliance with the dress and grooming standards, he/she will return to regular classes immediately. IN ADDITION TO THE EXAMPLES OF UNSUITABLE SCHOOL DRESS AND GROOMING LISTED BELOW, THE PRINCIPAL WILL MAKE THE FINAL DETERMINATION ON ANY OTHER CLOTHING THAT IS DEEMED INAPPROPRIATE. Examples of unsuitable school dress and grooming include but are not limited to the following: Tattoos and Piercings Hairstyles Hats Shoes Shirts

Shorts/Pants

Dresses/Skirts

All Clothing Items

                           

Jewelry requiring body piercing except in the ears Exposed obscene tattoos or body drawings Any hairstyle that is not neat, clean, and well-groomed Any hairstyle or hair color that is distracting Hair combs or hair picks Headgear of any kind at any time in the buildings or hallways Lack of shoes House slippers Shoe skates Spaghetti straps, tank/tube tops, halters, and midriff tops Sagging pants of any kind Spandex, body fitting, or tight fitting shorts or pants, including yoga pants or fitness pants Pajama Pants Athletic shorts Short-shorts, including athletic shorts (must be mid-thigh length or longer) Cut-offs Dresses or skirts shorter than mid-thigh length Sunglasses Clothing with slits or tears or pants with unpatched holes above mid-thigh length Tight or revealing clothing See-through clothing Visible undergarments Dressing without appropriate undergarments Dance clothes or tights Any clothing that advertises or depicts tobacco products, alcoholic beverages, drugs, or any other substance that students are prohibited from having or using at school Any clothing that is lewd, offensive, vulgar, or obscene Any clothing or grooming that depicts crime, violence, or gang association Any clothing that inappropriately exposes the body

Educational Technology and Acceptable Use Practices: The following is a summary of acceptable practices regarding the use of technology resources provided by the Texarkana Independent School District. By using the technology resources provided by the district, individuals implicitly agree to follow these guidelines.

A-10

Student Conduct (continued) Definition of Technology Resources: The terminology “technology resource(s)” refers to any configuration of software and hardware provided by the district. Hardware includes, but is not limited to: desktop computers, laptops, network connectivity devices, wireless connectivity devices, printers, phones, network servers, and network storage devices. Software includes, but is not limited to: internet access, electronic mail, operating system software, application software, local and external databases, and data files. The Superintendent, or designee, is authorized to monitor the activity of the district’s technology resources as well as any technology resource present on district property. This monitoring can take place without notice, whether written or verbal, to the technology user. System Access: Students will be granted access to technology resources for class assignments and research. Employees will be granted access for teaching, administrative functions, and as job duties dictate. Individuals will be issued one or more username(s) and password(s) to gain access to technology resources. This information is not to be shared with other employees or students without prior written approval from the Superintendent or designee. Technology users are responsible for keeping this information in a safe place where it cannot be accessed by other technology users. The technology user will be held responsible for the proper use of his or her username(s) and password(s). Student Login: Students will be given a district username and password upon enrollment in the district. Within two weeks after initial enrollment and subsequently at the beginning of the school year, the parent/guardian of the student must sign and return the appropriate Student Handbook form in order for the student to retain internet access. If internet access is removed from the student's login for this reason, it will be reinstated upon receipt of the Student Handbook form. Personal Web System: The district-provided personal Web system shall be considered an extension of the classroom and is to be used for educational purposes only. All content will be monitored. All rules and regulations which apply to electronic communication and the classroom will apply. Acceptable Use: Technology resources are for learning, teaching, and administrative use at school and for school-related purposes. Commercial use is strictly prohibited. Individuals are expected to use the technology resources in a responsible, ethical, and polite manner. Students are prohibited from possessing, sending, forwarding, posting, accessing, or displaying electronic messages that are abusive, obscene, sexually oriented, threatening, harassing, damaging to another's reputation, or illegal. This prohibition also applies to conduct off school property, whether the equipment used to send such messages is district-owned or personally owned, if it results in a substantial disruption to the educational environment. Any person taking, disseminating, transferring, possessing, or sharing obscene, sexually oriented, lewd, or otherwise illegal images or other content, commonly referred to as "sexting," will be disciplined according to the Student Code of Conduct, may be required to complete an educational program related to the dangers of this type of behavior, and, in certain circumstances, may be reported to law enforcement. Because engaging in this type of behavior can lead to bullying or harassment, as well as possibly impede future endeavors of a student, we encourage you to review with your child ‘Before You Text’ Sexting Prevention Course, a state-developed program that addresses the consequences of engaging in inappropriate behavior using technology. Other uses of technology resources that are classified as unacceptable under district policy and this AUP user agreement are listed in the General Conduct Violations of the Student Code of Conduct. Individuals found using resources in an unacceptable manner may be denied access to technology resources and may face further disciplinary action.

A-11

Student Conduct (continued) Internet Safety Policy: In accordance with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA), the district will install the appropriate technology resources to protect students and employees from inappropriate Internet content. This system will restrict access to electronic systems which contain information pertaining to pornography, hacking, unauthorized chat rooms, and any other content considered harmful to minors. This system will also restrict access to sites which seek to solicit personally identifiable information. Students and employees who wish to appeal restricted access to certain sites must submit this request to their instructor or supervisor. If the instructor or supervisor determines the restricted content is appropriate for school use, he or she must submit a formal request to the Information Technology department for further inspection. Classification of Inappropriate Material: The categories of material considered inappropriate and to which access will be blocked will include, but will not be limited to the following: pornography, images or descriptions of sexual acts, promotion of violence, illegal use of weapons, drug use, discrimination, participation in hate groups, instructions for performing criminal acts and on-line gambling. The Director of Information Technology reserves the right to block use of additional sites which can unduly burden the District’s computer, network, or staff resources. Also included in this category is content determined to be harmful to minors as prescribed by legal policy. Termination or Revocation of Access: The District may suspend or revoke a technology user’s access to the District’s system upon violation of the District’s acceptable use policy. Termination of a student’s access will be effective on the date the Director of Technology Services receives notice of student withdrawal or of revocation of system privileges or on a future date if so specified in the notice. Enforcement: Misuse of the educational technology system will be classified in two levels: Level 1-General Misuse and Level 2-- Damaging or Destructive Misuse." Actions in Level 2 may be viewed not only as violations of administrative regulations and district policy, but also as criminal activity under applicable state and federal laws (Texas Penal Code, Computer Crimes, Chapter 33). These actions also may require restitution for costs associated with system restoration, hardware, or software costs. Types of general misuse include but are not limited to the following:  using inappropriate or inflammatory language  viewing non-educational content without prior written permission  attaching unauthorized devices to district technology resources Types of damaging or destructive misuse include but are not limited to the following:  use of proxies or encryption  endangering the network by manipulating software or hardware  knowingly placing a computer virus or any other destructive computer code on a computer or the network  bypassing district security monitoring  using another user's login  accessing secure and/or confidential information without authorization  divulging passwords  causing system malfunction  developing programs that harass other users  attempting to infiltrate a computer or computing system  harming or destroying district equipment, materials, or data  attempting to degrade or disrupt system performance Disclaimer: The District’s system is provided on an “as is, as available” basis. The District does not make any warranties, whether expressed or implied, including, without limitation, those of merchantability

A-12

Student Conduct (continued) and fitness for a particular purpose with respect to any services provided by the system and any information or software contained therein. The District does not warrant that the functions or services performed by the system or that the information or software contained on the system will meet the system user’s requirements. The District does not warrant that the system will be uninterrupted or error free or that defects will be corrected. Opinions, advice, services, and all other information expressed by system users, information providers, service providers, or other third-party individuals in the system are those of the providers and not the District. The District will cooperate fully with local, state, or federal officials in any investigation concerning or relating to misuse of the District’s electronic communications system.

A-13

Discipline Management Campus and District rules and procedures have been established to ensure student safety and to promote student learning. In general, discipline is designed to correct misconduct and to encourage all students to adhere to their responsibilities as citizens of the school community. The Student Code of Conduct provides information to parents regarding expectations for behavior, consequences of misconduct, and procedures for administering discipline. Teachers and principals may impose campus or classroom rules in addition to those found in the Student Code of Conduct. These rules may be posted in classrooms or given to the student and may or may not also constitute violations of the Student Code of Conduct. Parents will not necessarily be informed of classroom infractions, but they will be informed of any Code of Conduct violation. The Student Code of Conduct contains standards for student conduct, general misconduct violations, and procedures for removal from the regular educational setting. TISD alternatives to the regular educational setting include In-School Suspension (I.S.S), Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP), suspension, and expulsion. Student Management Plan: The following Student Management Plan will be used by OPTIONS for students in all grade levels who violate classroom, campus, or district rules of behavior. 

First Offense:

Conference with student and instructor; phone call to parent by instructor



Second Offense:

Conference with student, instructor, and OPTIONS principal; phone call to parent by instructor; written documentation mailed home by principal



Third Offense:

Placement in ISS for five days (8:30 a.m. – 3:15 p.m.)



Fourth Offense:

Placement in ISS for ten days (8:30 a.m. – 3:15 p.m.)



Fifth Offense:

Placement in DAEP for 20 days



Sixth Offense:

Placement in DAEP for 45 days

Students who are assigned to DAEP from OPTIONS will not be allowed to return to OPTIONS until completing a semester without discipline referrals at Texas High School. OPTIONS students who have severe conduct violations, attendance violations, or appearances before the truancy court will not be eligible to return to OPTIONS the following school year. Severe Clause: It is the policy of OPTIONS to avoid unwarranted termination; however, it is necessary to enforce program rules and regulations. The following major discipline violations are grounds for immediate removal/expulsion from OPTIONS:       

Fighting Academic dishonesty Being disrespectful to staff members and/or other students Falsifying the sign-in sheet Possession or use of drugs or alcohol Damage to school property Any behavior that harms the reputation of OPTIONS

A-14

Discipline Management (continued) Video/Audio Monitoring: Video/audio equipment shall be used for safety purposes to monitor student behavior on buses and in common areas on District campuses. Students and parents shall be notified regarding the use of video cameras on school buses and on campuses. Signs stating that students may be videotaped shall be posted in District buildings and on buses. Students shall not be notified when the equipment is turned on. Tapes shall be reviewed on a routine basis by the principal, and evidence of student misconduct shall be documented. A student found to be in violation of the District's Student Code of Conduct shall be subject to appropriate discipline. Tapes shall remain in the custody of the campus principal and shall be maintained as required by law. Video recordings of students made by security cameras on school buses or in common areas of a campus are treated as directory information unless they are used to impose discipline. In that case, the tapes become an educational record of the student or students who are disciplined and are subject to the same restrictions on access and disclosure as any other student education record. Both federal and state laws safeguard student records from unauthorized inspection or use and provide parents and eligible students certain rights of privacy. FERPA generally prohibits the improper disclosure of personally identifiable information derived from education records. Therefore, a parent may view a video recording only if the parent’s child is the only student in the video. If the video reveals other students, the video cannot be viewed by any parent. The Texas Attorney General has determined that videotapes made on school buses on which the driver addresses some students by name and which “show the faces, bodies, and behavior of students of the district” are education records under FERPA and are exempted from disclosure. [See also “FERPA” in handbook section B.] Gang-Free Zones: Certain criminal offenses, including those involving organized criminal activity such as gangrelated crimes, will be enhanced to the next highest category of offense if they are committed in a gang-free zone. For purposes of the district, a gang-free zone includes a school bus and a location in, on, or within 1000 feet of any district-owned or leased property or campus playground.

A-15

District General Information and Requirements Emergency Information COMMUNICATIONS – AUTOMATED Emergency The district will rely on contact information on file with the district to communicate with parents in an emergency situation, which may include real-time or automated messages. An emergency purpose may include early dismissal or delayed opening because of severe weather or another emergency, or if the campus must restrict access due to a security threat. It is crucial to notify your child’s school when a phone number previously provided to the district has changed. Nonemergecy Your child’s school will request that you provide contact information, such as your phone number and e-mail address, in order for the school to communicate items specific to your child, your child’s school, or the district. If you consent to receive such information through a landline or wireless phone, please ensure that you notify the school’s administration office immediately upon a change in your phone number. The district or school may generate automated or pre-recorded messages, text messages, or real-time phone or e-mail communications that are closely related to the school’s mission, so prompt notification of any change in contact information will be crucial to maintain timley communication with you. Standard messaging rates of your phone carrier may apply. If you have specific requests or needs related to how the district contacts you, please contact your child’s principal. Emergency School Closing Information: Notice of changes in regular school days and regular school hours brought about by emergency situations such as severe weather will be released from the Office of the Superintendent at the earliest possible time to the local newspaper, radio, and television stations. Because it is important that school telephone lines remain open during emergency situations, the District strongly encourages parents to refer to these media announcements rather than to telephone the campus. Emergency Procedures: In case of an emergency, it is essential for all persons to obey promptly and to follow the prescribed procedures as quickly as possible. Teachers will give students instructions and will supervise the students during the drill or emergency. Students are to cooperate and to follow instructions given by school officials. Severe Weather Drills: A weather alert system is in operation on every campus. School officials will advise students and staff of storm warnings. In the event of a tornado watch or warning, students and staff should follow the procedures listed below:  Remain calm and do nothing to excite or create panic;  Move from classrooms to designated areas; and  Remain inside the building until an all-clear bell is signaled. Lock Down Drills: In the unlikely event that the campus must be secured from an intruder or possibility of intrusion, the lockdown procedure will be implemented. Students will be directed to their designated safe spots and should remain in a safe area using ALICE protocol for student safety.

B-1

Emergency Information (continued) Shelter-In-Place: If public health or safety officials announce that a dangerous chemical leak has occurred in the community and that it poses a threat to students during the school day, the District would do the following:  All students and staff members, including those in portables, would be moved indoors,  All heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems would be shut down;  All doors and windows would be closed and secured. Evacuation/Reverse Evacuation/Fire Drill  Announcement will be made for Evacuation/Fire Drill through the intercom system/bullhorns.  Staff will lead students who will follow the evacuation routes listed on the wall in the classroom for Evacuation/Fire Drills.  An “ All Clear” announcement will be made when it is safe to return to the building

B-2

Rights and Responsibilities of Students Student Rights: Each student is expected to respect the rights and privileges of other students, teachers, and the District staff. All administrators and other District personnel are expected to respect the rights and privileges of students. The District’s rules of conduct and discipline are established to achieve and maintain order in the schools and to prepare and instruct students for life in a society in which rules of discipline and conduct abound. Students who violate the rights of others or who violate rules and regulations of the District or of their school are subject to disciplinary action designed to correct their own misconduct and to promote adherence by them and by other students to the responsibilities of citizens in the school community. Student Rights as Citizens: All students are entitled to enjoy the basic rights of citizenship recognized and protected by law for persons of their age and maturity. Each student is obligated to respect the rights of classmates, teachers, and other school personnel. District schools shall foster a climate of mutual respect for the rights of others. Prayer and Meditation: Each student has a right to individually, voluntarily, and silently pray or meditate in school or at any school activity in a manner that does not disrupt or interfere with the delivery of instruction or other activities in the school. No school employee can or will require, encourage, or coerce a student to engage in or to refrain from such prayer or meditation during any school activity. Pledges of Allegiance, Minute of Silence, and Declaration of Independence: Texas law requires students to recite the Pledge of Allegiance to the United States flag and the Pledge of Allegiance to the Texas State flag every day. A minute of silence will follow recitation of the pledges. The student may choose to reflect, pray, meditate, or engage in any other silent activity, so long as the silent activity does not interfere with or distract others. In addition, state law requires that each campus provide for the observance of one minute of silence at the beginning of the first class period when September 11 falls on a regular school day in remembrance of those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. Texas law also requires that students in social studies classes in grades 3-12 recite a portion of the text of the Declaration of Independence during Celebrate Freedom Week each year. Student Responsibility to Teachers and All District Personnel: Fundamental to the process of education is the expectation that students will obey District personnel. This basic relationship between students and District personnel exists not only in the classroom but also in any school-related contact on or off the campus. The responsibility of District personnel is to provide supervision and direction; the responsibility of students is to respond in a cooperative manner. Students are expected to identify themselves promptly in any situation when asked to do so. Refusal or reluctance to give proper identification (Student ID Card) and showing improper identification are serious conduct violations. Student Responsibility to Substitutes: Students are to accord the same respect to substitute teachers as to regular teachers. Any student failing to maintain a proper relationship with a substitute teacher will be dealt with according to the Student Code of Conduct. The student is responsible for treating a substitute with the respect and courtesy that is due all persons on the campus.

B-3

Rights of Parents This section of the Student Handbook includes information related to the rights and responsibilities of parents as specified in state or federal law and provides parental notices required by law. Academic Programs: Parents may request a schedule change for their child from the principal. The principal is not required to make the reassignment and will not do so ordinarily if the change would affect the assignment or reassignment of another student. Parents may request that the Board of Trustees add a specific academic course to the schedule and offerings. If the administration and the Board determine that the course is among those included in the State Board of Education approved curriculum and there is sufficient interest in the class to make it economically practical to offer the class, the request will not be unreasonably denied. Permission for a student to attend a class for credit above his/her grade level may be requested. If the counselor/academic advisor and child’s current and prospective teacher expect the child can perform satisfactorily in the class, the request will not be unreasonably denied. Teacher Qualifications: Parents may request information regarding the professional qualifications of their child’s teachers, including whether the teacher has met state qualification and licensing criteria for the grade levels and subject areas in which the teacher provides instruction; whether the teacher has an emergency permit or other provisional status for which state requirements have been waived; and undergraduate and graduate degree majors, graduate certifications, and the field of study of the certification or degree. Parents also have the right to request information about the qualifications of any paraprofessional who may provide services to their child. Teaching Materials: Parents may review all teaching materials, textbooks, and other teaching aids used in their child’s classroom and may review all tests administered to the child, after the test is given. To review these materials during regular school hours, the parents should contact the principal for access. Requesting Classroom Assignment for Multiple Birth Siblings: As a parent, if your children are multiple birth siblings (e.g., twins, triplets, etc.) assigned to the same grade and campus, you may request that they be placed either in the same classroom or in separate classrooms. Your written request must be submitted no later than the 14th day after the enrollment of your children. [See FDB(LEGAL).] Providing Assistance to Students Who Have Learning Difficulties or Who Need Special Education Services: If a student is experiencing learning difficulties, his or her parent may contact the person listed below to learn about the district’s overall general education referral or screening system for support services. This system links students to a variety of support options, including making a referral for a special education evaluation. For those students who are having difficulty in the regular classroom, schools must consider tutorial, compensatory, and other academic or behavior support services that are available to all students, including a process based on Response to Intervention (RtI). The implementation of RtI has the potential to have a positive impact on the ability of districts to meet the needs of all struggling students. A parent may request an evaluation for special education services at any time. If a parent makes a written request to a school district’s director of special education services or to a district administrative employee for an initial evaluation for special education services, the school must, not later that the 15th school day after the date the school receives the request, either give the parent prior written notice of its proposal to evaluate the student, a copy of the Notice of Procedural Safeguards, and the opportunity for the parent to give written consent for the evaluation or must give the parent prior written notice of its refusal to evaluate the student and a copy of the Notice of Procedural Safeguards. If the school decides to evaluate the student, the school must complete the initial evaluation and the resulting report no later than 45 school days from the day the school receives a parent’s written consent to evaluate the student. However, if the student is absent from school during the evaluation period for three or more school days, the evaluation period must be extended by the number of school days equal to the number of school days that the student is absent.

B-4

Rights of Parents (continued) There is an exception to the 45 school day timeline. If the school receives a parent’s consent for the initial evaluation at least 35 but less than 45 school days before the last instructional day of the school year, the school must complete the written report and provide a copy of the report to the parent by June 30 of that year. However, if the student is absent from school three or more days during the evaluation period, the June 30th due date no longer applies. Instead, the general timeline of 45 school days plus extensions for absences of three or more days will apply. Upon completion, the school must give you a copy of the evaluation report at no cost. Additional information regarding special education is available from the school district in a companion document titles Parent’s Guide to the Admission Review and Dismissal Process. The following web sites provide information to those who are seeking information and resources specific to students with disabilities and their families:  

Texas Project First Partners Resource Network

The designated person to contact regarding options for a child experiencing learning difficulties or a referral for evaluation for special education is Shawn Davis, 3413 Summerhill Road, 903-793-7561, extension 1307. If a student is receiving special education services at a campus outside his or her attendance zone, the parent or guardian may request that any other student residing in the household be transferred to the same campus, if the appropriate grade level for the transferring student is offered on that campus. Request for the Use of a Service/Assistance Animal: A parent of a student who uses a service/assistance animal because of the student’s disability must submit a request in writing to the principal at least ten district business days before bringing the service/assistance animal on campus. Students with Physical or Mental Impairments Protected under Section 504: A child determined to have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity, as defined by law, and who does not otherwise qualify for special education services, may qualify for protections under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 504 is a federal law designed to prohibit discrimination against individuals with disabilities. When an evaluation is requested, a committee will be formed to determine if the child is in need of services and supports under Section 504 to receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE), as this is defined in federal law. The designated person to contact regarding a referral for evaluation applicable to Section 504 is the campus counselor. For additional information, parents may contact Sherry Young, Section 504 Coordinator, at 3413 Summerhill Road, 903-793-7561 extension 1305. Records and Other Information: Parents have an access right to all written educational records the District maintains concerning their child. Parents also may receive full information about any and all school activities in which their child is involved. However, as explained in the section on “Questioning Students at School,” the District must comply with a request or directive from a Child Protective Services investigator regarding contact with or information to parents about an investigation. Video and Audio Recording: The District will obtain written consent from parents before any school employee makes an audio or video recording of their child. State law permits the school to make a video or voice recording without parental permission for the following circumstances:  safety purposes, including maintaining order and discipline in common areas of the school or on school buses;  a purpose related to a co-curricular or extracurricular activity;  a purpose related to regular classroom instruction;  media coverage of the school.

B-5

Rights of Parents (continued) Surveys: Parents may inspect a survey created by a third party before the survey is administered or distributed to their child. Students will not be required to participate without parental consent in any survey, analysis, or evaluation—funded in whole or in part by the U.S. Department of Education—that concerns the following:  Political affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent;  Mental or psychological problems of the student or the student’s family;  Sexual behavior or attitudes;  Illegal, antisocial, self-incriminating, or demeaning behavior;  Critical appraisals of individuals with whom the student has a close family relationship;  Relationships privileged under law, such as relationships with lawyers, physicians, and ministers;  Religious practices, affiliations, or beliefs of the student or parents;  Income, except when the information is required by law and will be used to determine the student’s eligibility to participate in a special program or to receive financial assistance under such a program. Parents will be able to inspect the survey or other instrument and any instructional materials used in connection with such a survey, analysis, or evaluation. “Opting Out” of Surveys and Activities: Parents have a right to receive notice and opt their child out of participating in the following:  Any survey concerning the private information listed above, regardless of funding;  School activities involving the collection, disclosure, or use of personal information collected from your child for the purpose of marketing or selling that information; Student participation in the daily recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance to the United States flag and the Pledge of Allegiance to the Texas State flag. The request must be in writing. State law does not allow a child to be excused from participation in the required minute of silence or silent activity that follows.  Student participation in the recitation of a portion of the Declaration of Independence during Celebrate Freedom Week. State law requires student participation in this activity unless o Parents provide a written statement requesting that their child be excused; o The District determines that the student has a conscientious objection to the recitation; or o One of the parents is a representative of a foreign government to whom the United States government extends diplomatic immunity.  Any non-emergency invasive physical examination or screening required as a condition of attendance, administered and scheduled by the school in advance, and not necessary to protect the immediate health and safety of the student. Exceptions are hearing, vision, or scoliosis screenings or any physical exam or screening permitted or required under state law.  Any display of your child’s artwork, special projects, photographs taken by your child, and the like on the district’s Web site, in printed material, by video, or by any other method of mass communication. Psychological Examinations: The District will obtain written consent from parents before conducting any psychological examination, test, or treatment of their child, unless the examination is part of an investigation by Child Protective Services in response to a report of known or suspected child abuse or neglect. Exemption from Instruction: Parents may temporarily remove their child from a class or other school activity which conflicts with their religious or moral beliefs. The parents must provide to the child’s teacher a written statement authorizing the removal; however, the parents are not entitled to remove their child from class or activity to avoid taking a test or to prevent the child from taking a subject for an entire semester. The child will be required to satisfy grade level or graduation requirements, regardless of any periods of temporary removal based on religious or moral beliefs. Non-custodial Parents: Non-custodial parents have the right to request a copy of any written notice usually provided to a parent related to misconduct that may involve placement in a disciplinary alternative education program

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Rights of Parents (continued) (DAEP) or expulsion. The parent may request that the information be provided for the remainder of the school year. The parent request must be made in writing. School Safety Transfers: As a parent, you may:  Request the transfer of your child to another classroom or campus if your child has been determined by the district to have been a victim of bullying as the term is defined by Education Code 37.0832. Transportation is not provided for a transfer to another campus.  Consult with district administrators if your child has been determined by the district to have engaged in bullying and the district decides to transfer your child to another campus. Transportation is not provided in this circumstance.  Request the transfer of your child to attend a safe public school in the district if your child attends school at a campus identified by TEA as persistently dangerous or if your child has been a victim of a violent criminal offense while at school or on school grounds. [See policy FDE.]  Request the transfer of your child to another campus if your child has been the victim of a sexual assault by another student assigned to the same campus, whether the assault occurred on or off campus, and that student has been convicted of or placed on deferred adjudication for that assault. [See policy FDE.] Homeless Students You are encouraged to inform the district if you or your child are experiencing homelessness. District staff can share resources with you that may be able to assist you and your family. Please also check the campus website for information related to services available in the area that can help families who are homeless. For more information on services for homeless students, contact the district’s homeless education liaison, Stacy Courson, at 903-793-7561. Accommodations for Children of Military Families: Children of military families will be provided flexibility regarding certain district requirements, including:  Immunization requirements,  Grade level, course, or educational program placement,  Eligibility requirements for participation in extracurricular activities,  Graduation requirements. In addition, absences related to a student visiting with his or her parent related to leave or deployment activities may be excused by the district. Additional information may be found at Military Family Resources at the Texas Education Agency. Prohibiting the Use of Corporal Punishment: Corporal punishment—spanking or paddling the student—may be used as a discipline management technique in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct and policy FO(LOCAL) in the district’s policy manual. If a parent does not want corporal punishment to be administered to his/her child as a method of student discipline, the parent must submit a signed statement to the principal for the current school year prohibiting the use of corporal punishment with his/her child. The parent may reinstate permission to use corporal punishment at any time during the school year by submitting a signed statement to the principal. Parents of Students Who Speak a Primary Language Other than English: A student may be eligible to receive specialized support if his or her primary language is not English, and the student has difficulty performing ordinary class work in English. If the student qualifies for these extra services, the Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) will determine the types of services the student needs, including accommodations or modifications related to classroom instruction, local assessments, and state-mandated assessments. Displaying a Student’s Artwork, Projects, Photos, and Other Original Work: Teachers may display students’ work in classrooms or elsewhere on campus as recognition of student achievement. However, the district B-7

Rights of Parents (continued) will seek parental consent before displaying students’ artwork, special projects, photographs taken by students, and other original works on the district’s Web site, on any campus or classroom Web site, in printed material, by video, or by any other method of mass communication. The district also will seek consent before displaying or publishing an original video or voice recording in this manner. Requesting Notices of Certain Student Misconduct: A noncustodial parent may request in writing that he or she be provided, for the remainder of the school year, a copy of any written notice,, usually provided to a parent related to his or her child’s misconduct that may involve placement in a disciplinary alternative education program (DAEP) or expulsion.

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Student/Family/School Success Agreement Success comes from an atmosphere of mutual respect and cooperation. The following plan is designed for all parties involved to review, discuss and agree upon so that students can learn, teachers can teach, parents can parent, and success can be achieved by all. At the beginning of the school year, this agreement will be distributed and signatures will be obtained. Student: I will work and achieve to the best of my ability. Therefore, I agree to do the following:  Attend school regularly and be on time to class  Share notes, assignments, and other school information with my family  Complete homework on time  Show respect for my school, other people, and myself  Obey the code of conduct and other rules and follow procedures while on school grounds, on the bus, and at all school-sponsored activities  Do my best in my work and in my behavior  Work cooperatively with my classmates to have a positive and safe school  Make reading a daily habit  Dress appropriately School: We want all our students to achieve academically and socially. Therefore, we agree to do the following:  Communicate regularly with students and families regarding attendance and student performance  Treat each student with respect and help each student to reach his/her fullest potential  Provide appropriate and effective instruction in a positive and safe learning environment  Be a positive role model  Seek ways to involve families in the school's activities  Encourage reading activities for the family  Enforce appropriate dress Family: We want our child to be successful, achieve academically and behave appropriately at school. Therefore, we agree to encourage him/her by doing the following:  Assure that my child attends school regularly, is on time, and has the necessary supplies  Communicate regularly with my child's teachers and school staff  Check daily for notes, assignments, homework or other school information and monitor for completion  Know and support all district/school policies and rules  Support the school in its efforts to provide a safe and positive learning environment  Encourage good study habits at home  Volunteer time and/or support activities at my child's school  Read with my child and let him/her see me read  Promote and ensure appropriate dress

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Problem-Solving Processes When parents see a problem developing, they should assist the school in dealing with it before it reaches a critical stage. The District urges parents to contact the appropriate teacher, sponsor, coach, counselor, or administrator at the earliest possible time. These early contacts set a cooperative mood and can prevent serious problems. Solutions to Eliminate Problem Situations (STEPS): The District’s general problem solving process is referred to as “Solutions to Eliminate Problem Situations,” or STEPS. The procedures listed below should be followed sequentially. 1. 2.

3. 4.

Contact the appropriate staff member (usually a teacher or counselor) immediately. The most direct route to resolving a concern is to confer directly with the person involved. If not satisfied, contact the appropriate administrator (usually an associate/assistant principal or principal) in charge of the campus and responsible for concerns that may arise from the school’s operation. Explanations of policies and procedures, various clarifications and all types of campus information are available in the Principal’s Office. Contact the appropriate central office administrator within a week. This may be a director, assistant superintendent or the Superintendent. This step should be taken only when steps one and two have not resolved the concern. If the issue has still not been resolved, request in writing to the Superintendent to be on the agenda of the next meeting of the Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees serves as the final appeal body in resolving disputes.

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Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Student Records: Both federal and state laws safeguard student records from unauthorized inspection or use and provide parents and eligible students certain rights of privacy. Before disclosing any personally identifiable information from a student’s records, the district must verify the identity of the person, including a parent or the student, requesting the information. For purposes of student records, an “eligible” student is one who is 18 or older or who is attending an institution of postsecondary education. Virtually all information pertaining to student performance, including grades, test results, and disciplinary records, is considered confidential educational records. Release is restricted to: 



  

The parents—whether married, separated, or divorced—unless the school is given a copy of a court order terminating parental rights or the right to access a student’s education records. Federal law requires that, as soon as a student becomes 18, is emancipated by a court, or enrolls in a postsecondary institution, control of the records goes to the student. The parents may continue to have access to the records, however, if the student is a dependent for tax purposes and under limited circumstances when there is a threat to the health and safety of the student or other individuals. District school officials who have what federal law refers to as a “legitimate educational interest” in a student’s records. School officials would include trustees and employees, such as the superintendent, administrators, and principals; teachers, school counselors, diagnosticians, and support staff; a person or company with whom the district has contracted or allowed to provide a particular service of function (such as an attorney, consultant, auditor, medical consultant, therapist, or volunteer); a parent or student serving on a school committee; or a parent or student assisting a school official in the performance of his or her duties. “Legitimate educational interest” in a student’s records includes working with the student; considering disciplinary or academic actions, the student’s case, or an individualized education program for a student with disabilities; compiling statistical data; reviewing an educational record to fulfill the official’s professional responsibility; or investigating or evaluating programs. Various governmental agencies, including juvenile service providers and Child Protective Services (CPA) caseworkers or other child welfare representatives, in certain cases. Individuals or entities granted access in response to a subpoena or court order. A school or institution of postsecondary education to which a student seeks or intends to enroll or in which he or she is already enrolled.

Release to any other person or agency—such as a prospective employer or for a scholarship application—will occur only with parental or student permission as appropriate. The principal is custodian of all records for currently enrolled students at the assigned school. The superintendent or designee is the custodian of all records for students who have withdrawn or graduated. Records may be inspected by a parent or eligible student during regular school hours. The records custodian or designee will respond to reasonable requests for explanation and interpretation of the records. A parent or eligible student who provides a written request and pays copying costs may obtain copies. If circumstances prevent inspection during regular school hours and the student qualifies for free or reduced-price meals, the district will either provide a copy of the records requested or make other arrangements for the parent or student to review these records. A parent or eligible student may inspect the student’s records and request a correction if the records are considered inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights. A request to correct a student’s record should be submitted to the principal. The request must clearly identify the part of the record that should be corrected and include an explanation of how the information in the record is inaccurate. If the district denies the request to amend the records, the parent or eligible student has the right to request a hearing. If the records are not amended as a result of the hearing, the parent or eligible student has 30 school days to exercise the right to place a statement commenting on the information in the student’s record. Although improperly recorded grades may be challenged, contesting a student’s grade in a course is handled through the general complaint process found in policy FNG(LOCAL). A grade issued by a classroom teacher can be changed only if, as determined by the board of trustees, the grade is arbitrary, erroneous, or inconsistent with the district’s grading policy. B-11

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (continued) The parent’s or eligible student’s right of access to and copies of student records do not extend to all records. Materials that are not considered educational records—such as a teacher’s personal notes about a student that are shared only with a substitute teacher—do not have to be made available to the parents or student. Directory Information: The District will release directory information about students to any person who submits a written request for the information. “Directory information” means information that would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. It includes the student’s name; address; telephone number; e-mail address; photograph; date and place of birth; major field of study; degrees, honors, and awards received; dates of attendance; grade level; most recent school previously attended; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; and weight and height of members of athletic teams. If parents do not want the school to release directory information about their child, they must notify the principal in writing of the category or categories of information not to be released. Parents have 10 school days after the first day of their child’s attendance to notify the principal in writing designating the information parents do not want released. Audio and video recordings of extracurricular and cocurricular performances, such as band, orchestra, and choir concerts; marching band performances; and performances of plays, musicals, or skits are treated as directory information. Video recordings of students made by security cameras on school buses or in common areas of a campus are treated as directory information unless they are used to impose discipline. In that case, the tapes become an educational record of the student or students who are disciplined and are subject to the same restrictions on access and disclosure as any other student education record. Both federal and state laws safeguard student records from unauthorized inspection or use and provide parents and eligible students certain rights of privacy. FERPA generally prohibits the improper disclosure of personally identifiable information derived from education records. Therefore, a parent may view a video recording only if the parent’s child is the only student in the video. If the video reveals other students, the video cannot be viewed by any parent. The Texas Attorney General has determined that videotapes made on school buses on which the driver addresses some students by name and which “show the faces, bodies, and behavior of students of the district” are education records under FERPA and are exempted from disclosure. The District must comply with a request by a military recruiter or an institution of higher education for students’ names, addresses, and telephone listings, unless parents have advised the District not to release their child’s information without prior written consent. If parents want to review the District’s entire policy regarding student records, they should contact the campus principal, who will provide a copy and will answer questions about the policy or this notice. Board policy also may be accessed online at http://www.txkisd.net. If parents believe the District is not following the law regarding student records, they have the right to file a complaint with the United States Department of Education. THE INFORMATION IN THIS NOTICE, UPON REQUEST, WILL BE TRANSLATED FOR OR EXPLAINED TO THE PARENTS OF STUDENTS WHOSE PRIMARY OR HOME LANGUAGE IS NOT ENGLISH.

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Family and Visitor Information Communication to Parents: Campuses and the District may use the following vehicles for communication to parents: press releases to local media, campus newsletters, student planners, marquee announcements, notes and letters to home, the CableOne TEACH Channel 22, and the TISD website at www.txkisd.net. Specific campus information is located through the District website. Partners in Education/Parent Organizations/Volunteer Opportunities: Each campus in the District participates in the TISD Partners In Education program and has active parent organizations. Partners In Education enables a business or community organization to become a partner with a specific campus or District program. Possible projects include rewarding students for academic achievement, donating equipment, displaying student work, honoring outstanding teachers, supplying volunteers or funding special programs. Each campus in the District has an active parent organization (Volunteers In Public Schools). The District encourages all parents to actively participate in VIPS and to volunteer in TISD schools. All volunteers, including Band Boosters, Athletic Booster Clubs, and other booster organizations, must complete an application form. The District will obtain a Criminal History Report on all applicants for volunteer programs. Approved volunteers will participate in a training and orientation program before they are permitted to assist in school programs and activities. Those interested in becoming a Partner In Education or in volunteering on a campus should contact Jo Ann Rice, Assistant Superintendent, at 903-794-3651, extension 1011. Parents and Visitors on Campuses: The district promotes parent participation and involvement on campuses and encourages parents or guardians to visit their child's campus or classroom. In order to protect the security of district students and staff, the learning environment, and students' privacy rights, all visitors, including parents or guardians, shall be required to conform to the following: All visitors shall: 1) First report to the main office, present a valid driver license or other acceptable identification, sign in and state the reason for the campus visit, and obtain a visitor's name badge. 2) Wear the visitor's name badge so that it is visible during the entire visit to the campus. 3) When planning to visit a classroom, make arrangements in advance with the principal and the teacher. A parent or guardian may suggest a date and time for a classroom visit. Unless the visit is prohibited as provided below, the teacher or principal may either agree to the suggested date and time or offer an alternative date and time. Classroom visits shall not be permitted if: a. the visitor has been disruptive to the normal school or learning environment; b. the duration or frequency of the visits interferes with the delivery of instruction or disrupts the normal school environment; c. the requested visit involves a third party, other than a school official, parent or guardian, observing a classroom occupied by student; or d. the requested visit would occur during an assessment or during another classroom or campus activity that would infringe upon the privacy of students. 4) Proceed directly to the approved visit location. Visitors shall not be permitted to go to any other portion of the campus without prior approval. To ensure the safety of all students, no visitors will be allowed on school playgrounds. 5) Obtain prior approval from the Superintendent or designee before being permitted to disseminate information to students or staff while on district property. Visitors shall not be permitted to solicit, proselytize, or recruit for fund-raising activities, religious groups, youth groups, or political causes while on school property. 6) Wear appropriate attire when visiting district schools. Such attire shall generally conform to the dress code outlined in district policy and administrative regulation for students and staff. 7) Avoid inappropriate physical contact with students. 8) Consent to a criminal history background check if regular visits to schools or direct interaction with students is anticipated or requested. B-13

Communication and Deliveries during the School Day In order to ensure that classroom instruction is not disrupted and that students have the opportunity to concentrate on coursework, interruptions of the school day will be kept to a minimum. The arrangement of meals, personal schedules, after-school activities, and student transportation should be made before the student arrives on the campus. Deliveries or distribution of items such as flowers, balloons, or candy at school is prohibited. Communication from Students at School: Office telephones are for school business and may be used by students only in cases of emergency or illness. Communication to Students at School: Critical messages and deliveries from home during the school day will be held in the office until the principal or designated staff member determines an appropriate time to contact students. Students will be called out of class only for emergencies. Delivering Lunches to Students on Campuses: Parents are encouraged to join their student for lunch in the cafeteria. According to state guidelines, parents are only allowed to provide lunch for their own child. After parents report to the front office for a visitor’s pass, parents should then deliver the lunch according to campus procedures. Parents are strongly encouraged to continually monitor their child’s meal balance. When a student’s meal account is depleted, the district will notify the parent. The student will be allowed to continue purchasing meals for up to 1 day or up to $4.50, whichever occurs first, and the district will present the parent with a schedule of repayment for any outstanding account balance. If the district is unable to work out an agreement with the student’s parent on replenishment of the student’s meal account and payment of any outstanding balance, the student will receive an alternate meal. For the safety and welfare of all students, parents will be permitted to take only their child off campus for lunch. The student must be signed out by the parent in the office. Parents should make sure that the student is returned to school at the end of the thirty minute lunch period so that he or she will not miss any instructional time.

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Distribution of Published Materials or Documents Non-school Materials from Students: Students must obtain prior approval from the principal before posting, circulating, or distributing written materials, handbills, photographs, pictures, petitions, films, tapes, posters, or other visual or auditory materials that were not developed under the oversight of the school. To be considered, any nonschool material must include the name of the sponsoring person or organization. The decision regarding approval will be made in two school days. A student may appeal a principal’s decision in accordance with policy FNG(LOCAL). Any student who posts nonschool material without prior approval will be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. Materials displayed without the principal’s approval will be removed. Non-school Materials from Others: Written or printed materials, handbills, photographs, pictures, films, tapes or other visual or auditory materials not sponsored by the district or by a district-affiliated school-support organization will not be sold, circulated, distributed, or posted on any district premises by any district employee or by persons or groups not associated with the district, except as permitted by policies at GKDA. To be considered for distribution, any non-school material must meet the limitations on content established in the policy, include the name of the sponsoring person or organization, and be submitted to the superintendent or designee for prior review. The superintendent or designee will approve or reject the materials within two school days of the time the materials are received. The requestor may appeal a rejection in accordance with the appropriate district complaint policy. [See policies at DGBA, FNG, or GF.] Prior review will not be required for:  Distribution of materials by an attendee to other attendees of a school-sponsored meeting intended for adults and held after school hours;  Distribution of materials by an attendee to other attendees of a community group meeting held after school hours in accordance with policy GKD(LOCAL) or a noncurriculum-related student group meeting held in accordance with FNAB(LOCAL);  Distribution for electioneering purposes during the time a school facility is being used as a polling place, in accordance with state law. All non-school materials distributed under these circumstances must be removed from district property immediately following the event at which the materials are distributed.

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Health Information Health Services on Campuses: TISD nurses or health aides are either on campuses or on call at all times during the school day. Tiger Clinic: Immunizations for TISD students and their siblings are available at Tiger Clinic, located on the Texas Middle School campus, 2100 College Drive. The administration fee of an immunization is $5.00. Parents may call for an appointment at 903-792-6594. Illness or Injury at School: A student who becomes ill during the day may leave class with permission from the teacher after obtaining a hall pass. Any student who needs to go home because of health reasons should check out in the nurse’s office or on the alternative campuses with the principal. The school will promptly attempt to notify the parent or the parent’s designated contact if the school has knowledge that the student has been injured at school or has become ill at school. School nurses/licensed vocational nurses/trained aides are available, and a secluded area is provided where the student can stay if he/she is injured or becomes ill. At the beginning of each school year, parents are asked to complete a form authorizing designated school employees to consent to medical treatment in case their child is injured at school or at a school-related activity and requires emergency treatment. The school will attempt to notify parents in such a situation and also will call for emergency medical assistance. Unless a student injury arises from a District employee’s operation or use of a motor vehicle, the District does not bear responsibility for any injury or for the cost of medical treatment or services provided after an injury. Insurance Coverage: The District cooperates in a program to offer low-cost accident insurance for students. At the beginning of the school year, parents will have an opportunity to purchase student accident insurance with an option for insurance coverage for the student while at school and with an option for 24-hour coverage. Parents should carefully review the insurance application forms and decide whether or not to purchase this insurance coverage. If parents decide to purchase this insurance, the transaction and the contract of insurance will be between parents and the insurance company and will not involve the District. TISD receives no money from the purchase of insurance coverage. As permitted by law, the District purchases accident insurance only for injuries sustained by students while training for or while engaging in UIL competition. By declining the insurance offer or by failing to respond to it, parents accept full responsibility for costs associated with any student injury. In the event parents do not receive the insurance application forms and wish to purchase this insurance, they should contact the campus administration or the District administration. Medications: The District does not provide medication for students, unless the medication is provided on an emergency basis consistent with protocols of the District’s medical advisor or through parental consent given on the emergency treatment form. For non-emergency situations, only medication provided by and requested by a parent/guardian will be dispensed. Only authorized employees shall be allowed to give any student prescription medication, nonprescription medication, herbal substances, anabolic steroids, or dietary supplements of any type. Students may self-administer medication only if the District has received written permission from the student's parent or guardian and a written physician's note stating the critical need for self-medication. The student must selfadminister the medication in the presence of appropriately authorized District employees. Prescription Medication: Often, students have to take prescription medication for a certain period of time as treatment for a medical condition. If at all possible, parents should schedule the timing of the doses so that the child takes the medicine at home. Medication given three times a day can be scheduled to be given before school, after school, and at bedtime. If children have to take medicine at school, the parent must make a written request for administration of medication and provide only the doses to be administered at school in the original prescription bottle as State law requires. Only the nurse or other authorized school employees are permitted to administer prescription medicines at school. A written request from a physician is required

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Health Information (continued) if the medication is to be administered for more than ten days. A separate request form is to be completed for each medication. Students are not permitted to carry their own medications. A student with asthma who has written authorization from his or her parent and physician or other licensed health care provider may be permitted, at the student’s discretion, to possess and use prescribed asthma medication at school or school-related events. The student and parents should see the school nurse or principal if the student has been prescribed asthma medication for use during the school day. Nonprescription Medication: Only the nurse or other authorized school employees are permitted to administer nonprescription medicines at school. Nonprescription medications may be administered upon a parent's written request, when properly labeled and in the original container, for a maximum of 15 school days. Nonprescription medication may be administered for more than 15 school days only when accompanied by a physician's written note stating the need for long-term use of nonprescription medication. Steroids: State law prohibits students from possessing, dispensing, delivering, or administering an anabolic steroid. Anabolic steroids are for medical use only, and only a physician can prescribe use. Body-building, muscle enhancement, or the increase of muscle bulk or strength through the use of an anabolic steroid or human growth hormone by a healthy student is not a valid medical use and is a criminal offense. Students participating in UIL athletic competition will be subject to random steroid testing. Mandated by Senate Bill 8, passed by the 80th Texas Legislature, the UIL Anabolic Steroid Testing Program will affect student athletes in grades 9-12, regardless of sport, gender, or participation level. The UIL has been directed to test a statistically significant number of student-athletes in grades 9-12 at approximately 30% of UIL member high schools. The selection process of schools and student-athletes will be random, and approximately 40,000-50,000 student athletes state-wide will be tested for anabolic steroids by the end of the school year. All testing dates will be unannounced, in keeping with the nature of the random steroid testing process. More information may be found at www.uil.utexas.edu. Psychotropic Drugs: A psychotropic drug is a substance used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or as a component of a medication. It is intended to have an altering effect on perception, emotion, or behavior and is commonly described as a mood- or behavior-altering substance. Teachers and other district employees may discuss a student’s academic progress or behavior with the student’s parents or another employee as appropriate; however, they are not permitted to recommend use of psychotropic drugs. A district employee who is a registered nurse, an advanced nurse practitioner, a physician, or a certified or credentialed mental health professional can recommend that a student be evaluated by an appropriate medical practitioner, if appropriate. [For further information, see policies at FFAC.] Food Allergies: The district requests to be notified when a student has been diagnosed with a food allergy, especially those allergies that could result in dangerous or possibly life-threatening reactions either by inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact with the particular food. It is important to disclose the food to which the student is allergic, as well as the nature of the allergic reaction. Please contact the school nurse or campus principal if your child has a known food allergy or as soon as possible after any diagnosis of a food allergy. The district has developed and annually review a food allergy management plan, which addresses employee training, dealing with common food allergens, and specific strategies for dealing with students diagnosed with severe food allergies. When the district receives information that a student has a food allergy that puts the student at risk for anaphylaxis, individual care plans will be developed to assist the student in safely accessing the school environment. The district’s food allergy management plan can be accessed http://pol.tasb.org/Policy/Download/206?filename=FFAF(LOCAL).pdf

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Health Information (continued) Immunizations: A student must be fully immunized against certain diseases or must present a certificate or statement that, for medical or reasons of conscience, including a religious belief, the student will not be immunized. For exemptions based on reasons of conscience, only official forms issued by the Texas Department of Health, Immunization Division, can be honored by the District. The immunizations required are: diphtheria, rubeola (measles), rubella (German measles), mumps, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis (polio), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, varicella (chicken pox), and meningococcal. The school nurse can provide information on ageappropriate doses or on an acceptable physician-validated history of illness required by the Texas Department of Health. Proof of immunization may be personal records from a licensed physician or public health clinic with a signature or rubber-stamp validation. If a student should not be immunized for medical reasons, the student or parent must present a certificate signed by a U.S. licensed physician stating that, in the doctor's opinion, the immunization required poses a significant risk to the health and well-being of the student or any member of the student's family or household. This certificate must be renewed yearly unless the physician specifies a life-long condition. Entering college students must now, with limited exception, furnish evidence of having received a bacterial meningitis vaccination prior to attending classes at an institution of higher education. A student wanting to enroll in a dual credit course taken off campus may be subject to this requirement. Communicable Diseases: Although student attendance is extremely important, a student should not attend school if he/she has a communicable disease or is running a fever of 100° or more. Under State and local Health Department regulations, if a student has certain medical conditions, he/she must be excluded from school for a period of time. These diseases include, but are not limited to, the following: chicken pox, common cold with fever, viral gastroenteritis, hepatitis, impetigo, influenza, measles, meningitis, mumps, pink eye, polio, ringworm of the scalp, salmonellosis, scabies, shigellosis, strep throat, tuberculosis, and whooping cough. The principal or nurse can provide a complete list of these and other conditions and periods of exclusion. Bacterial Meningitis What is Meningitis? Meningitis is an inflammation of the covering of the brain and spinal cord. It can be caused by viruses, parasites, fungi, and bacteria. Viral meningitis is most common and the least serious. Bacterial meningitis is the most common form of serious bacterial infection with the potential for serious, long-term complications. It is an uncommon disease, but it requires urgent treatment with antibiotics to prevent permanent damage or death. What are the symptoms? Someone with meningitis will become very ill. The illness may develop over one or two days, but it can also rapidly progress in a matter of hours. Not everyone with meningitis will have the same symptoms. Children (over 2 years old) and adults with meningitis may have a severe headache, high temperature, vomiting, sensitivity to bright lights, neck stiffness or joint pains, and drowsiness or confusion. In both children and adults, there may be a rash of tiny, red-purple spots. These can occur anywhere on the body. The diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is based on a combination of symptoms and laboratory results. How serious is Bacterial Meningitis? If it is diagnosed early and treated promptly, the majority of people make a complete recovery. In some cases it can be fatal, or a person may be left with a permanent disability. How does Bacterial Meningitis spread? Fortunately, none of the bacteria that cause meningitis are as contagious as diseases like the common cold or the flu, and they are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. The germs live naturally in the back of our noses and throats, but they do not live for long outside the body. They are spread when people exchange saliva (such as kissing; sharing drinking containers, utensils, or cigarettes).

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Health Information (continued) The germ does not cause meningitis in most people. Instead, most people become carriers of the germ for days, weeks or even months. The bacteria rarely overcome the body’s immune system and causes meningitis or another serious illness. How can Bacterial Meningitis be prevented? People should not share food, drinks, utensils, toothbrushes, or cigarettes and should limit the number of persons they kiss. While there are vaccines for some other strains of bacterial meningitis, they are used only in special circumstances. These vaccines are used when there is a disease outbreak in a community or when people travel to a country where there is a high risk of getting the disease. Also, some groups recommend a vaccine for college students, particularly freshmen living in dorms or residence halls. It can cause mild side effects, such as redness and pain at the injection site lasting up to two days. Immunity develops within 7 to 10 days after the vaccine is given and lasts for up to 5 years. A person should seek prompt medical attention if there is reason to believe that he/she has Bacterial Meningitis or that a friend might have the disease. Where can you get more information? Your school nurse, family doctor and the staff at your local or regional health department office are excellent sources for information on all communicable diseases. You may also call your local health department or Regional Department of State Health Services office to ask about a meningococcal vaccine. Additional information may also be found at the websites for The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of State Health Services, Department of State Health Services. NOTE: DSHS requires at least one meningococcal vaccination on or after the student’s 11th birthday, unless the student received the vaccine at age 10. Also not that entering college students must show, with limited exception, evidence of receiving a bacterial meningitis vaccination within the five-year period prior to enrolling in and taking courses at an institution of higher education. Please see the school nurse for more information as this may affect a student who wishes to enroll in a dual credit course taken off campus. Physical Activity for Students in Elementary and Middle School: The district will ensure that students in full day prekindergarten through grade five engage in moderate or vigorous physical activity for at least 30 minutes per day or 135 minutes per week. Students in middle or junior high school shall engage in 30 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity per day for at least four semesters OR at least 225 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity within a two-week period for at least four semesters. Human Sexuality Instruction: As a part of the district’s curriculum, students receive instruction related to human sexuality. The School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) is involved with the selection of course materials for such instruction. State law requires that any instruction related to human sexuality, sexually transmitted diseases, or human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immune deficiency syndrome must:  Present abstinence from sexual activity as the preferred choice of behavior in relationship to all sexual activity for unmarried persons of school age;  Devote more attention to abstinence from sexual activity than to any other behavior;  Emphasize that abstinence is the only method that is 100 percent effective in preventing pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and the emotional trauma associated with adolescent sexual activity;  Direct adolescents to a standard of behavior in which abstinence from sexual activity before marriage is the most effective way to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases; and  If included in the content of the curriculum, teach contraception and condom use in terms of human use reality rates instead of theoretical laboratory rates. The district’s curriculum is in accordance with state law as noted above. As a parent, you are entitled to review the curriculum materials. In addition, you may remove your child from any part of this instruction with no academic, disciplinary, or other penalties. You also may choose to become more involved with the development of curriculum used for this purpose by becoming a member of the district’s SHAC. Please see the campus principal for additional information. B-19

Health Information (continued) School Health Advisory Council: During the preceding year, the district’s School Health Advisory Council held four meetings. The duties of the SHAC range from recommending curriculum to developing strategies for integrating curriculum into a coordinated school health program encompassing issues such as school health services, counseling services, a safe and healthy school environment, recess recommendations, improving student fitness, mental health concerns, and employee wellness. Additional information regarding the district’s School Health Advisory Council is available from Jamie Friday, Coordinator of Instructional Services, 903-793-7561. Vending Machines: The district has adopted and implemented the state and federal policies and guidelines for food service, including the guidelines to restrict student access to vending machines. For more information regarding these policies and guidelines, contact the TISD Food Services Department. Tobacco Prohibited: The district and its staff strictly enforce prohibitions against the use of tobacco products by students and others on school property and at school-sponsored and school-related activities. [See the Student Code of Conduct and policies at FNCD and GKA.] Physical Examination/Health Screenings: A student who wishes to participate in, or continue participation in, the district’s athletics program governed by the UIL must submit certification from a health-care provider authorized under UIL rules that the student has been examined and is physically able to participate in the athletic program. This examination is required to be submitted annually to the district. Substance Abuse Prevention and Intervention: If you are worried that your child may be using or is in danger of experimenting, using, or abusing illegal drugs or other prohibited substances, please contact the school counselor. The school counselor can provide you with a list of community resources that may be of assistance to you. The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) maintains information regarding children’s mental health and substance abuse intervention services on its website: Services for Children and Adolescents. Suicide Awareness: The district is committed to partnering with parents to support the healthy mental, emotional, and behavioral development of its students. If you are concerned about your child, please access Texas Suicide Prevention or contact the school counselor for more information related to suicide prevention services available in your area. Sunscreen at school: Students whose regular schedules provide for regular time spends outdoors, including for recess and physical education classes, should apply sunscreen before coming to school. For students at the elementary level, the student’s teacher or other district personnel will apply sunscreen to a student’s exposed skin if the student brings the sunscreen to school and requests assistance with the application of the sunscreen. Nothing prohibits a student at this level from applying his or her own sunscreen if the student is capable of doing so. For students at the secondary level, a student may possess and apply sunscreen when necessary. If the student will need assistance with this application, please address the need for assistance with the school nurse. Whether a student is at the elementary or secondary level, if sunscreen needs to be administered to treat any type of medical condition, this should be handled through communication with the school nurse so that the district is made aware of any safety and medical issues.

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Transportation Buses: The District provides transportation on school buses to and from school for those children who live more than two miles away from the school they attend. Transportation is not provided to transfer students attending a school outside of their attendance zone. Student Conduct on Buses: Students are required to comply with rules for conduct on school buses and to comply with the Student Code of Conduct while at authorized school bus stops waiting for the bus. Students who misbehave or violate the Code of Conduct while on the bus will be disciplined according to the Code of Conduct and may be suspended from the bus for a period of time. The rules of conduct for bus passengers are in place for everyone’s safety. Offenses will carry the same punishment as similar offenses at school and may result in loss of transportation privileges. Bus Rules: Any person who intentionally disrupts, prevents, or interferes with the lawful transportation of students to and from school or school-sponsored activities on a vehicle owned and/or operated by a county or independent school district shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction may be subject to receive a citation from the TISD Police Department and/or be suspended from riding the bus. The following rules will be implemented to ensure the safety of all bus riders. 1. Instructions and directions given by the bus driver must be followed at all times. 2. When students are waiting for their bus after school, they must stay in the appointed area until the bus arrives. 3. Students must sit in the seat facing forward with feet on the floor. 4. Students should talk quietly. 5. Eating is not allowed on the bus. 6. Students will not be allowed to get off of the bus at a stop that is other than the assigned stop unless the student has a note from the parent. Students also must have the campus principal sign the note. The bus driver will keep the note. 7. Students must not place any part of their bodies or any object outside of the bus. 8. The following items are contraband on the bus: food or drink (outside of the back pack or lunch box), weapons of any kind, matches, lighters, explosives of any kind, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, animals, radios, stereos or CD players. 9. Profanities, obscenities, sexual language, gestures, and racial slurs of any type will not be tolerated. Bus Regulations: In addition to the rules listed above, the following regulations will be in place: 1. An adult must meet all pre-kindergarten and kindergarten riders. 2. All middle school and high school riders will be required to have a bus pass. Students must present this pass every time they board a route bus. 3. Any damages caused by the student to the bus will be billed to the student. Severe Clause: Any student who brings a weapon on a school bus or is involved in a fight on a school bus is subject to immediate suspension from the bus regardless of the previous number of write-ups. This suspension will last a minimum of six weeks and could last as long as a year.

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Transportation (continued) Procedures Regarding Bus Rules Violations: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Upon the first offense, the driver will issue a verbal warning that will be documented using the driver documentation system. The bus driver will complete Form A: Bus Conduct Report. A copy of this form will be sent to the principal of the campus where the student is assigned. Copies will be filed in the TISD Transportation Coordinator’s office and the bus driver’s folder. The principal will notify the parent/guardian that the child has been warned of this first offense and will be removed for a minimum of five school days upon the next infraction. Upon the second offense the driver will complete Form A: Bus Conduct Report and send it to the campus principal. The principal will conference with the student and notify him/her of the five-day suspension. The principal also will notify the parent of the suspended student either by phone call or by written notification, which will be delivered by the student. Copies of Form A for the second offense will be filed in the Transportation Director’s office and the bus driver’s folder. Upon the third offense, the bus driver will complete Form A: Bus Conduct Report and send it to the campus principal. The principal will conference with the student and notify him/her that riding privileges have been suspended for the remainder of the semester. The principal will notify the parents either by phone call or by written notification using Form E, which will be mailed. Should the third offense occur during the last six weeks of the semester, the suspension will extend through the following semester. Copies of all suspension forms will be filed in the Transportation Director’s office and the bus driver’s folder. Discipline steps may be circumvented due to severity of incident or action.

Video/Audio Monitoring on Buses For information concerning the use of video or audio devices to monitor student safety and conduct on buses, see “Discipline Management” in section A of this handbook. Vehicles and Parking Bicycles and Motor-Driven Vehicles: Bicycles, scooters, skate boards, roller blades, roller shoes, and motor-driven vehicles are to be parked upon arrival at school and not used until the end of the school day unless the office gives permission. Bicycles should be locked with chains outside in designated areas. The school does not assume responsibility for theft. Bicycle, Vehicle Registration and Parking Permits: All students, staff, and faculty members who park bicycles or motor vehicles within the controlled area of the campus must register their vehicles on or before the date that a vehicle is to be operated or parked on the campus. Any changes affecting the registration information for which a parking permit was issued must be reported promptly. Failure to report such changes may result in the same consequences as other violations. The parking permits are made to hang on the rear view mirror of the vehicle. If that mirror is not available, the permit must be placed on the dash of the vehicle so that it may easily be seen. Operators of bicycles or motorcycles must affix the permit to a location that will easily be seen. Students are not allowed to drive their vehicles and park while they are assigned to DAEP. All students assigned to DAEP will be transported by the DAEP bus or by parents.

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Transportation (continued) Texas High & OPTIONS Vehicle Registration Procedures: 1) Obtain the TISD Registration Form from the front desk. 2) Complete the application and provide a secondary contact person in case of emergency. 3) Present the application, along with a valid driver's license with picture ID, proof of insurance, and vehicle registration information to the THS bookkeeper or OPTIONS in the main office. Any change in vehicles must be reported to the bookkeeper. The first vocational and student parking permits will be issued at no charge. Any replacement parking permit will cost $5.00. Vehicles and Parking Lots: Vehicles parked on school property are under the jurisdiction of the school. Students have full responsibility for the security of their vehicle and must make certain they are locked and that the keys are not given to others. The school reserves the right to search any vehicle if reasonable cause exists to do so with or without the presence of the student. Students will be held responsible for any prohibited objects or substances such as alcohol, drugs, or weapons that are found in their cars and will be subject to disciplinary action by the District, as well as referral for criminal prosecution. (See “Law Enforcement Issues – Searches of Students, Lockers, and Property” for additional information.) Procedures for Parking Lots: All drivers are expected to abide by the following rules pertaining to the parking areas on campus.  Each student is responsible for safe and courteous driving around the campus.  Students are responsible for parking appropriately in the assigned STUDENT PARKING LOT.  Student parking in any other areas of the campus is prohibited.  Drivers must not exceed a 10-MPH speed limit when operating a vehicle on campus.  Students leaving campus during the school day and all work or early-release students must at all times have a school identification card and an authorized pass with them before leaving the campus. This card MUST always be carried by the student. All students are required to come to a complete stop and show their card to the parking attendant on the Texas High campus. Below is a list of additional parking lot violations that can result in disciplinary action:  Driving recklessly  Disobeying traffic signs  Parking in any unauthorized areas  Taking up more than one parking space  Failing to stop at the gate and show proper I.D. (Texas High) Due to the nature of their job, and the necessity for immediate access to the buildings of the campus, it is necessary to exempt the TISD Maintenance and Police Departments from these regulations. Enforcement of Parking Lot Regulations: Violation of any parking lot regulation will result in parking privileges being revoked for an extended period of time, and may result in any or all of the penalties listed below. Violations of these regulations may be enforced by TISD Police Officers, TISD Security Officers, and any TISD Administrator. Violations of the Texas Transportation Code may be enforced by the TISD Police Officer through a Justice or Municipal Court, in conjunction with, or separate from, school discipline.  A TISD citation which results in an enforcement and administrative fee: The fee (fine) will be assessed at $15.00. If a student receives a citation for no parking permit, and it is his/her first offense, then the fine may be waived in lieu of vehicle registration and a parking permit. If a fine is not paid within ten school days, the fine is increased to, but does not exceed $20.00. If the fines are not paid, then consideration will be given to holding the student’s grades, transcript and schedule, and limiting their participation in extra-curricular activities. The Principal or his designee has the option to substitute days of detention, ISS, or other suitable discipline for the fine, especially if the student can document a significant financial need.  Vehicle immobilization “boot”: A “boot” is a locking device that attaches to one of the wheels of a vehicle so as to disable the vehicle from being removed unless authorized to do so. If a “boot” is placed on a vehicle, then a notice is also placed on the vehicle. This notice will have a phone B-23

Transportation (continued) number the violator can call to get the vehicle released. During school hours, a violator should contact an officer through the school office. An officer will then meet the violator and release the vehicle after identifying information is obtained. A vehicle will only be released to students if they are with their parent or guardian. Vehicles that are still immobilized at 5:00 p.m. are subject to being towed to a storage facility at the expense of the owner/violator.  Towing of the vehicle: Vehicles that are parked in such a manner as to hinder the flow of traffic, vehicles parked in an unauthorized space, or vehicles which have received excessive violations or violations that the TISD Police may deem as hazardous may be towed and impounded at the expense of the owner/violator. School disciplinary measures may not be substituted for expenses resulting in the towing of a violator’s vehicle.  School Discipline such as Detention, ISS, etc. Visitor Parking: A visitor is defined as a person who is neither a student nor an employee of the District. Certain areas of the campuses have been reserved for visitor parking and are identified by signs. Visitors to the campus should park in the designated visitor parking only. Under no circumstances are students or employees to park in the visitor parking areas. When groups of visitors are involved, arrangements must be made with the principal or the Chief of Police.

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Law Enforcement Issues Police Intervention: Certain situations/violations are likely to result in the police being called. When this occurs, parents will be informed as soon as possible. The following situations/violations are likely to result in police intervention:  Theft (dollar value usually determines seriousness)  Physical assaults  Fire, explosives, and weapons violations  Criminal mischief or vandalism  Drug and alcohol violations  Disorderly conduct (i.e. offensive language, fighting, etc.)  Other appropriate investigations Disruptions: In order to ensure student safety and sustain an educational program free from disruption, state law permits the District to take action against any person--student or non-student--who:  Interferes with the movement of people in an exit, an entrance, or a hallway of a District building without authorization from an administrator.  Interferes with an authorized activity by seizing control of all or part of a building.  Uses force, violence, or threats in an attempt to prevent participation in an authorized assembly.  Uses force, violence, or threats to cause disruption during an assembly.  Interferes with the movement of people at an exit or an entrance to District property.  Uses force, violence, or threats in an attempt to prevent people from entering or leaving District property without authorization from an administrator.  Disrupts classes while on District property or on public property that is within 500 feet of District property. Class disruption includes making loud noises; trying to entice a student away from, or to prevent a student from attending, a required class or activity; entering a classroom without authorization and disrupting the activity with profane language or any misconduct.  Interferes with the transportation of students in District vehicles. Alcohol, Drugs, Tobacco, and Weapons: Under state and federal law, a student is not allowed to possess, sell, give away, or use alcohol, illegal drugs, tobacco products, guns, or other weapons on school property or at a schoolrelated or school-sanctioned activity, on or off school property. Having one of these items in a privately owned vehicle that the student may have driven to school and parked on District property is also prohibited. A more detailed description concerning discipline may be found in the Student Code of Conduct. Questioning Students at School: School officials have the right to question a student about his or her own conduct at school and, in the investigation of alleged misconduct by other students, to question him or her about the conduct of others. The school expects students to cooperate in this process, and the refusal to cooperate will be treated as a serious conduct violation. The school will not ordinarily contact the parent before questioning a student about his or her own conduct or about the conduct of other students, but school personnel will contact the parent promptly if the investigation shows that the student has violated school conduct rules. The Code of Conduct provides a complete explanation of the discipline processes and an explanation of when a parent will be contacted. The investigation of possible violations of the Code of Conduct is not a criminal proceeding. The option of “taking the Fifth” (or a student’s right not to incriminate himself or herself) does not apply in a school discipline investigation. Sometimes law enforcement officials or investigators from Child Protective Services (CPS) ask to interview students at school. In the case of an investigator from Child Protective Services conducting a child abuse or neglect investigation, the District is required by state law to permit the investigator to talk to the child at school. The District also will make every effort to cooperate with law enforcement officials conducting an investigation that requires talking to students.

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Law Enforcement Issues (continued) Students Taken Into Custody: State law requires the District to permit a student to be taken into legal custody:  To comply with an order of the juvenile court;  To comply with the laws of arrest;  By a law enforcement officer if there is probable cause to believe the student has engaged in delinquent conduct or conduct in need of supervision;  By a probation officer if there is probable cause to believe the student has violated a condition of probation imposed by the juvenile court;  To comply with a properly issued directive to take a student into custody;  By an authorized representative of Child Protective Services, Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, a law enforcement officer, or a juvenile probation officer, without a court order, under the conditions set out in the Family Code relating to the student’s physical health or safety. Before a student is released to a law enforcement officer or other legally authorized person, the principal will verify the officer’s identity and, to the best of his or her ability, will verify the official’s authority to take custody of the student. The principal will immediately notify the superintendent and will ordinarily attempt to notify the parent unless the officer or other authorized person raises what the principal considers to be a valid objection to notifying the parents. Because the principal does not have the authority to prevent or delay a custody action, notification will most likely be after the fact. Notification of Law Violations: The District also is required by state law to notify:  All instructional and support personnel who have responsibility for supervising a student who has been taken into custody, arrested or referred to the juvenile court for any felony offense or for certain misdemeanors.  All instructional and support personnel who have regular contact with a student who is thought to have committed certain offenses or who has been convicted, received deferred prosecution, received deferred adjudication, or was adjudicated of delinquent conduct for any felony offense or certain misdemeanors.  All appropriate district personnel in regards to a student who is required to register as a sex offender. Searches of Students, Lockers, Desks, and Other Property:  Students will be searched and certain items seized when a reasonable suspicion exists that a student is in possession of certain items that might be in violation of the laws of the State of Texas and/or harmful to the well-being to persons at the school (drugs and weapons). The principal or other school administrator may search a student's outer clothing, pockets, or property if he/she has a reasonable basis to suspect that the search will reveal evidence that the student has violated a school rule. The scope of the search will be related to the suspected violation.  Lockers and student desks are the property of the school, and when sufficient cause exists, they will be searched. Students are fully responsible for the contents of the assigned lockers and desks. Students must be certain that the locker is locked and that the combination is not available to others.  Classrooms and other common areas may be inspected with the use of trained dogs any time students are not present.  Vehicles parked on school property also are subject to search by the principal or other school administrators if the administrator has a reasonable basis to suspect that there may be contraband of any kind, such as weapons, alcohol, drugs, or any other prohibited substance, in the car.  The school will periodically inspect vehicles parked on school property or within 300 feet of school property with the use of trained dogs. If the trained dog alerts to a vehicle, that alert provides a reasonable basis to search the car. School officials always will ask the student for permission to search when a dog alerts or when a reasonable basis exists, such as a reliable tip, to search the vehicle. If the student does not consent, the school will contact a parent and local law enforcement and turn the matter over to the police. Students are responsible for any contraband that is found in a vehicle they have parked on school property and will be subject to disciplinary action by the District as well as referral for criminal prosecution. B-26

Law Enforcement Issues (continued) 



Students are subject to metal detector searches that may occur periodically during the school year. School officials, including principals, teachers, or security officers, may conduct searches using handheld metal detectors or walk-through metal detectors on any property under the control of the District. Metal detectors will be used at extra-curricular events. Students also may be subjected to a breathalyzer test to determine if alcohol has been used. These tests are used when reasonable cause exists.

Use of Oleoresin Capsicum Spray: The Texarkana ISD Police Department intends to provide district personnel the necessary tools to perform their job responsibilities in a productive, effective, and safe manner, and to protect students, themselves, and others. Designated staff members may be issued Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) spray approved by the TISD police chief. Sprays that mix with CS, CN, or other chemical agents will not be approved. The use of OC spray is classified as a use of force and will be governed by this regulation. OC should be used only when the staff member reasonably believes the force is necessary to maintain discipline and to successfully defend themselves and others from combative or violent individuals while reducing the risk of inflicting or receiving injury. OC spray routinely may be carried by trained staff members within the performance of their duties. OC may be used when the staff member reasonably believes the force is necessary to maintain discipline and to successfully defend himself/herself and others from combative or violent individuals while reducing the risk of inflicting or receiving injury, when verbal direction is ineffective or inappropriate for crowd control, and when the staff member’s use of open handed control techniques would increase the risk of injury to the individual or to the staff member.

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Sexual Harassment/Sexual Abuse Sexual harassment or abuse may occur through student to student, student to adult, or adult to student interaction. Sexual harassment of a student by another student includes unwanted and unwelcome verbal or physical conduct of sexual nature, whether by word, gesture, or any other sexual conduct, including requests for sexual favors. Sexual harassment of a student by an employee includes any welcome or unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal (oral or written), physical, or visual conduct of a sexual nature. It also includes such activities as engaging in sexually oriented conversations for purposes of personal sexual gratification, telephoning a student at home or elsewhere to solicit inappropriate social relationships, physical contact that would be reasonably construed as sexual in nature, and enticing or threatening a student to engage in sexual behavior in exchange for grades or other school-related benefit. Sexual abuse is defined as “illegal sex acts performed against a minor.” It may include but is not limited to fondling, sexual assault, or sexual intercourse. Sexual abuse is a form of child abuse that must be reported to appropriate law enforcement authorities. Students shall not engage in unwanted or unwelcome verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature directed toward another student or a District employee. This prohibition applies whether the conduct is by word, gesture, or any other sexual conduct, including requests for sexual favors. All students are expected to treat other students and District employees with courtesy and respect, to avoid any behaviors known to be offensive, and to stop these behaviors as directed. Any District employee who receives information about sexual harassment or sexual abuse of a student that may reasonably be characterized as known or suspected child abuse or neglect shall make the reports to appropriate authorities, as required by law. The District shall notify the parents of all students involved in sexual harassment by student(s) when the allegations are not minor. The District shall notify parents of all incidents of sexual harassment or sexual abuse by a District employee. All reports of sexual harassment that are not minor shall be referred to the Title IX coordinator. Oral complaints shall be reduced to writing to assist in the District's investigation. To the greatest extent possible, complaints shall be treated as confidential. Limited disclosure may be necessary to complete a thorough investigation. The District shall not retaliate against a student who in good faith reports perceived sexual harassment or sexual abuse. Sexual harassment or abuse of students by District employees may constitute discrimination on the basis of sex and is prohibited by Title IX (the federal law prohibiting gender-based discrimination by schools that receive federal funds). Students and/or parents are encouraged to discuss requests or concerns with the principal or Autumn Thomas, Director of Human Resources, who serves as the District Title IX Coordinator for students. A complaint alleging sexual harassment by another student or sexual harassment or sexual abuse by a staff member may be presented by a student and/or parent in a conference with the principal or with the District Title IX Coordinator. A person of the same gender as the student ordinarily will hold the first conference with the student. The conference will be conducted within five (5) days of the request. The principal or Title IX Coordinator will coordinate an appropriate investigation, which ordinarily will be completed within ten (10) days. The student and/or parent will be informed if extenuating circumstances delay completion of the investigation. The student will not be required to register a complaint to a person who is the subject of the complaint. If the resolution of the first complaint is not satisfactory to the student or parent, the student or parent within seven (7) days may request a conference with the superintendent or designee who shall schedule and hold a conference. Prior to the conference, the student or parent should submit a written statement that includes a description of the complaint, any evidence in its support, the resolution sought, the student’s and/or parent’s signature, and the date of the first conference with the principal or Title IX Coordinator.

B-28

Sexual Harassment/Sexual Abuse (continued) If the resolution of the second complaint is not to the student’s or parent’s satisfaction, the student or parent may present the complaint to the Board of Trustees at the next regular meeting. The complaint shall be included as an item on the agenda posted with notice of the meeting. Lack of official action by the Board of Trustees upholds the administrative decision at the second complaint. Announcing a decision in the student’s or parent’s presence constitutes communication of the decision. The Board of Trustees shall hear complaints alleging sexual harassment or abuse in a closed meeting, unless otherwise required by the Open Meetings Act. After exhausting District remedies, a complaint also may be filed separately with the Office of Civil Rights, Region VI, 1200 Main Tower Building, Dallas, Texas 75202. For further information, students or parents should contact Autumn Thomas, Assistant Superintendent and Title IX Coordinator, 4241 Summerhill Road, Texarkana, Texas, 903-794-3651, extension 1012. Child Sexual Abuse and Other Maltreatment of Children: The district has established a plan for addressing child sexual abuse and other maltreatment of children, which may be accessed through the campus counselor. As a parent, it is important for you to be aware of warning signs that could indicate a child may have been or is being sexually abused. Sexual abuse in the Texas Family Code is defined as any sexual conduct harmful to a child's mental, emotional, or physical welfare as well as a failure to make a reasonable effort to prevent sexual conduct with a child. A person who compels or encourages a child to engage in sexual conduct commits abuse. It is illegal to make or possess child pornography or to display such material to a child. Anyone who suspects that a child has been or may be abused or neglected has a legal responsibility, under state law, for reporting the suspected abuse or neglect to law enforcement or to Child Protective Services (CPS). Possible physical warning signs of sexual abuse could be difficulty sitting or walking, pain in the genital areas, and claims of stomachaches and headaches. Behavioral indicators may include verbal references or pretend games of sexual activity between adults and children, fear of being alone with adults of a particular gender, or sexually suggestive behavior. Emotional warning signs to be aware of include withdrawal, depression, sleeping and eating disorders, and problems in school. A child who has experienced sexual abuse should be encouraged to seek out a trusted adult. Be aware as a parent or other trusted adult that disclosures of sexual abuse may be more indirect than disclosures of physical abuse, and it is important to be calm and comforting if your child, or another child, confides in you. Reassure the child that he or she did the right thing by telling you. As a parent, if your child is a victim of sexual abuse, the campus counselor or principal will provide information regarding counseling options for you and your child available in your area. The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) also manages early intervention counseling programs. [To find out what services may be available in your county, see Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, Programs Available in Your County.] The following websites might help you become more aware of child abuse and neglect: Child Welfare Information Gateway Factsheet Kids Health, For Parents, Child Abuse Texas Association Against Sexual Assault, Resources Texas Attorney General, What We Can Do About Child Abuse Part 1 Texas Attorney General, What We Can Do About Child Abuse Part 2 Reports of abuse or neglect may be made to: The CPS division of the DFPS (1-800-252-5400 or on the web at Texas Abuse Hotline Website).

B-29

Suspected Child Abuse Each staff member having cause to believe that a child has been abused or neglected shall immediately make a report to Department of Family and Protective Services, 800-252-5400, and Texarkana ISD Police 903-792-4658. The report should assert the belief that one or more of the following acts has occurred: • • • •

a child has been or will be abused or neglected a child has died of abuse or neglect a child has violated the compulsory school attendance laws on three or more occasions a child, on three or more occasions, has been voluntarily absent from the home without the consent of his parent or guardian for a substantial length of time or without the intent to return.

In addition to making the report, the staff member suspecting abuse shall contact the school principal and the counselor or nurse. Contacting the principal, nurse or counselor does not relieve the staff member of the obligation to report to Bowie County CPS or the Police. The staff member making the initial report shall be given feedback on action taken by the school administration. The staff member shall cooperate with Bowie County CPS or Police in their investigation. Staff members shall tell no one other than those listed above that a referral was made or the nature of that referral. Principal’s Responsibilities: 1. The principal, nurse, and/or counselor shall consult with Children’s Protective Services (CPS) or the Police for instruction regarding appropriate and immediate action. 2. Upon presentation and verification of identification, authorized officials of Bowie County CPS shall be given access to the child while at school for interviews related to the investigation of reported child abuse. 3. Staff members shall leave investigation and contact with the parents to Bowie County CPS. 4. The principal will review the management guidelines for child abuse with the staff periodically. The confidential nature of the fact that a report has been made and any content of the report shall be reviewed. Reporting Procedures: 1. If there is imminent danger to a child as a result of abuse or neglect, the situation shall be reported to the Texarkana ISD Police 903-792-4658 who will notify the Superintendent’s Office. 2. Reports shall also be made by telephone to Bowie County CPS (800) 252-5400 within 48 hours. 3. A written report shall follow the phone report within five days. 4. A copy of the written report and all supporting documentation shall be sent to the Special Services office for central filing. 5. Reports shall also be filed with the Texarkana ISD Police when there is an incident of sexual contact or intercourse by students. Sexual contact means any touching of the anus, breast, or any part of the genitals of another person. Record Keeping: 1. No copies of referrals for abuse or neglect to Bowie County CPS shall be kept in the schools. 2. No photographs of injuries shall be taken. 3. The student records shall only be accessible to administrators and CPS workers. The files may be helpful when reaching decisions on child abuse referral.

B-30

Building Maintenance and Management Asbestos Management Plan: The district works diligently to maintain compliance with federal and state law governing asbestos in school buildings. A copy of the District's Asbestos Management Plan is available in the superintendent's office. If you have any questions or would like to examine the district's plan in more detail, please contact Casey Nichols, 903-793-7561. Pest Management Plan: The district is required to follow integrated pest management (IPM) procedures to control pests on school grounds. Although the district strives to use the safest and most effective methods to manage pests, including a variety of non-chemical control measures, pesticide use is sometimes necessary to maintain adequate pest control and ensure a safe, pest-free school environment. All pesticides used are registered for their intended use by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and are applied only by certified pesticide applicators. Except in an emergency, signs will be posted 48 hours before indoor application. All outdoor applications will be posted at the time of treatment, and signs will remain until it is safe to enter the area. Parents who have further questions or who want to be notified prior to pesticide application inside their child's school assignment area may contact the TISD Maintenance Office, 11th and Della Street, Texarkana, Texas 75503, 903-794-7191.

B-31

Nondiscrimination In its efforts to promote nondiscrimination, Texarkana ISD does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, gender, disability, or any other basis prohibited by law, in providing education services, activities, and programs, including vocational programs, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. Nondiscrimination in Career and Technology Education (Vocational) Programs: The district offers Career and Technical Education programs in sixteen career cluster areas. Admission to these programs is based on age and/or grade level as put forth by the Texas Education Agency. The district will take steps to ensure that lack English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all educational and CTE programs. It is the policy of Texarkana Independent School District not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or handicap in its employment practices or in its vocational programs, services, or activities as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; by the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended; and by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. Texarkana Independent School District will take steps to ensure that lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all educational and vocational programs. For information about rights or grievance procedures, contact the following district staff members: Title IX Coordinator: Autumn Thomas 4241 Summerhill Road Texarkana, TX 75503 903-794-3651

Section 504 Coordinator: Sherry Young 3413 Summerhill Road Texarkana, TX 75503 903-793-7561

B-32

District Academic Information and Requirements Grading Information

Pre-Kindergarten Grading Information A developmental report shall be used to indicate progress at prekindergarten levels. The reports reflect the Texas Prekindergarten Guidelines for this grade level. Documentation of observable skills shall be kept in the grade book. Prekindergarten parents shall receive a progress report each six weeks, either in the form of a parent conference or as a written report card. Parent conferences shall be scheduled for parents of prekindergarten students at the end of the first and fourth six weeks grading periods. Written report cards shall be issued at the end of the second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth six weeks grading periods. The following marking system shall be used: Marking System Pre-Kindergarten

Subject Early Literacy Mathematics Science Social Studies Fine Arts Physical Education Social Development/Work Habits

M = Mastery D = Developing L = Lacking E = Excellent S = Satisfactory N = Needs Improvement U = Unsatisfactory

Make-Up Work Students will make up assignments and performance assessments after absences, including absences as a result of suspension. Students will have one day plus the number of days absent to make up work following the students’ return to school. Students will receive a zero for any assignment or test not made up within the allotted time period. Students with Disabilities Decisions regarding grading procedures for a student with a disability who is receiving services under IDEA or Section 504 may be made by the Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team. The IEP Team will ensure that the annual goals and instructional objectives of the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP) are met. The classroom teacher will ensure the success of the student through implementation of the specified modifications. If the student does not demonstrate success, it is the responsibility of the classroom teacher to document implementation of the modifications and to initiate an IEP meeting.

C-1

Kindergarten Grading Information In kindergarten, student progress is reported using a developmental continuum representing the knowledge and skills appropriate for the grade level of the student according to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). In the areas of language arts, reading, mathematics, science, and social studies, teachers shall track student performance and progress through the use of 5-point scales, rubrics, checklists, student/teacher conferences, and many other means for demonstration of student progress toward mastery of the standards. Documentation of skills progression will be kept in an individual student portfolio. In fine arts, teachers shall evaluate at least one performance and/or product during each six weeks period in which the students participate in the class. Students may be evaluated in a variety of areas, including visual arts, music, theatre arts or dance. The students shall be evaluated based on the completion of the components leading to the performance/product. The expectation of the students is to perform satisfactorily. Those exceeding or falling short of the normal expectation may be noted on the report card. Progress Reports Kindergarten parents shall receive a progress report each six weeks, either in the form of a parent conference or as a written report card. Parent conferences shall be scheduled for parents of kindergarten students at the end of the first and fourth six weeks grading periods. Written report cards shall be issued at the end of the second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth six weeks grading periods. Six Weeks Progress and Report Card The Kindergarten Report Card is a standards-based continuum, meaning that, progress is reported on the knowledge and skills the student is expected to master at the kindergarten level. The continuum is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) and ranges from Performance Level 0 to Performance Level 4 for core content areas: English Language Arts, Reading, Science and Social Studies. • • • • •

Performance Level 0 – student does not attempt tasks. Performance Level 1 – student meets few requirements for skills, demonstrates little knowledge and understanding. Performance Level 2 – student meets some requirements for skills, demonstrates some knowledge and understanding. Performance Level 3 – student regularly meets requirements for proficient skills, demonstrates acceptable level of knowledge and understanding. Performance Level 4 – student exceeds requirements for proficient skills, demonstrates solid level of knowledge and understanding.

It is important to note that for each indicator on the report card, it is the Performance Level 3 that is the goal and indicates “end-of-year” mastery for that concept of skill. Performance Indicator Descriptions Each indicator on the report card is fully defined in a document title Performance Indicator Descriptions. For every indicator, there may be three to ten bulleted statements that describe what students need to know and be able to do. We encourage you to view all the descriptors for Level 0 – 4 on the TISD website (www.txkisd.net).

C-2

Kindergarten Grading Information (continued) The Kindergarten Report Card will also include performance indicators for physical education, fine arts, citizenship and work habits. These are evaluated with the following indicators: E = Excellent

S = Satisfactory

N = Needs Improvement

In addition to the six-week report card, parents of students with disabilities will receive a report detailing the following:  the student’s progress toward annual goals specified in the Individualized Education Program;  the extent to which that progress is sufficient to enable the child to achieve the goals by the end of the year.  The student’s progress toward goals specified in the Behavior Intervention Plan for citizenship and work habits. The campus principal will designate the personnel responsible for these reports. Promotion Standards In order to be promoted to the next grade, the student’s final column on the report card shall reflect the following: 1) No More than four standards marked below a Level 3 in reading. 2) No more than two standards marked below Level 3 in language arts. 3) No more than four standards marked below Level 3 in mathematics. Make-Up Work Students will make up tasks, assignments and performance assessments after absences, including absences as a result of suspension. Students will have one day plus the number of days absent to make up work following the students’ return to school. The classroom teacher will schedule opportunities for the student to complete the missed items and communicate with parents/guardians as appropriate. Students with Disabilities Decisions regarding grading procedures for a student with a disability who is receiving services under IDEA or Section 504 may be made by the Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team. The IEP Team will ensure that the annual goals and instructional objectives of the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP) are met. The classroom teacher will ensure the success of the student through implementation of the specified modifications. If the student does not demonstrate success (as documented by an average of N or above), it is the responsibility of the classroom teacher to document implementation of the modifications and to initiate an IEP meeting. Resource Materials In the event that TISD is unable to provide appropriate resources (i.e. textbooks, graphing calculators), the student shall not suffer an academic penalty.

C-3

Grades 1-5 Grading Information In grades 1-5, all grades shall reflect student performance in the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). In the areas of language arts, mathematics, science/health, and social studies, teachers shall record in the grade book a minimum of one to two grades per week per subject. Grades shall be determined from a composite of the following: daily papers; notebooks; quizzes; homework assignments; teacher observations of participation, skills, demonstrations, or performances; short compositions; unit, chapter, or skills tests; projects; major reports/compositions; journals; and portfolios. Documentation of observable skills will be kept in a grade book. A six weeks grade that is determined from only one student product is not acceptable. In fine arts, teachers shall evaluate at least one performance and/or product during each six weeks period in which the students participate in the class. Students may be evaluated in a variety of areas, including visual arts, music, theatre arts or dance. The students shall be evaluated based on the completion of the components leading to the performance/product. The expectation of the students is to perform satisfactorily. Those exceeding or falling short of the normal expectation may be noted on the report card. Language arts include written and oral communication, the writing process, and spelling. Science and health shall be combined. Progress Reports In the areas of reading, language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies, a written progress report shall be sent at least once during the grading period to parents of students with an average grade of less than 75. Parents shall also receive written notification if the professional educator notes a substantial change in a student's performance at any point during the six weeks period. Six Weeks Averages and Report Cards Students shall receive numerical scores in reading, language arts, mathematics, science/health, and social studies. Letter grades shall be used in fine arts and physical education. The following marking system shall be used on the students' work, in the grade book, and on the report card: Subject Reading Language Arts Mathematics Science/Health Social Studies Fine Arts Physical Education

Social Development/ Work Habits

Marking System 90-100 = A 80-89 = B 70-79 = C 0-69 = Failure E = Excellent S = Satisfactory N = Needs Improvement U = Unsatisfactory E = Excellent S = Satisfactory N = Needs Improvement U = Unsatisfactory G = Satisfactory/BIP* H = Needs Progress/BIP* * These symbols will be used for students with disabilities working under Behavior Intervention Plans.

C-4

Grades 1-5 Grading Information (continued) In addition to the six-week report card, parents of students with disabilities will receive a report detailing the following:  the student’s progress toward annual goals specified in the Individualized Education Program  the extent to which that progress is sufficient to enable the child to achieve the goals by the end of the year The campus principal will designate the personnel responsible for these reports. Semester and Yearly Averages Yearly averages shall be computed in the areas of reading, language arts, mathematics, science/health, and social studies. The yearly average shall be computed as follows: Grading Period

Portion of Yearly Average

First Six Weeks

1/3 of first semester average

Second Six Weeks

1/3 of first semester average

Third Six Weeks

1/3 of first semester average

First Semester

1/2 of yearly average

Fourth Six Weeks

1/3 of second semester average

Fifth Six Weeks

1/3 of second semester average

Sixth Six Weeks

1/3 of second semester average

Second Semester

1/2 of yearly average

YEARLY AVERAGE

1st and 2nd semester grades averaged

Promotion Standards In order to be promoted to the next grade, students must demonstrate the proficiencies listed below: 1) Grade Requirements:  An overall average of “70” or above, computed by averaging yearly grades for reading, language arts, mathematics, science/health, and social studies  A yearly average of “70” or above in mathematics  A yearly average of “70” or above in reading  A yearly average of “70” or above in language arts 2) Testing Requirements:  Grade 5: Successful completion of the state assessments in reading and math 3) In addition to district and state requirements, campus principals may consider assessment data in making recommendations to parents regarding retention. Redo a Class Assignment or Test Students shall be allowed a reasonable opportunity to redo an assignment or retake a test according to the following criteria:     

The student earned a failing grade on an assignment or test. The student shall be permitted one opportunity to redo an assignment or test if the assignment or test is eligible for redo. The student shall be permitted to redo one assignment or test in each subject during a six week period. Six week Curriculum-Based Assessments are not eligible for redo. A redo will not be permitted the last week of the grading period. C-5

Grades 1-5 Grading Information (continued)   

The student may be required to complete an alternative assignment for the redo opportunity. The recorded grade will be an average of the two grades unless the average exceeds 70%. The new grade will not exceed 70%. (For example: Student earned a 65% on the first attempt, and the student earned a 95% on the redo. The average is 80%. The recorded grade will be 70%.) Campuses may determine additional and more specific criteria.

Make-Up Work Students will make up assignments and performance assessments after absences, including absences as a result of suspension. Students will have one day plus the number of days absent to make up work following the students’ return to school. Students will receive a zero for any assignment or test not made up within the allotted time period. Classwork/Homework for Students in the Gifted/Talented Academy Students shall not be required to complete every classwork or homework assignment for the home base classroom. Instead, students should be asked to complete only the portion of the assigned work that is necessary to ensure that they have mastered the knowledge and skills required for their classes. Teachers either should furnish assignments to students the day prior to GT Academy or should allow extra time for completion of assignments after returning to the home-based classroom. When making assignments or setting timelines for completion of work, teachers should consider the time required for students to complete classwork/homework for all subjects and the time required for GT Academy projects. Students with Disabilities Decisions regarding grading procedures for a student with a disability who is receiving services under IDEA or Section 504 may be made by the Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team. The IEP Team will ensure that the annual goals and instructional objectives of the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP) are met. The classroom teacher will ensure the success of the student through implementation of the specified modifications. If the student does not demonstrate success (as documented by an average of 70 or above), it is the responsibility of the classroom teacher to document implementation of the modifications and to initiate an IEP meeting. Resource Materials In the event that TISD is unable to provide appropriate resources (i.e. textbooks, graphing calculators), the student shall not suffer an academic penalty.

C-6

Grades 6-8 Grading Information In grades 6-8, all grades shall reflect student performance in the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Teachers in every subject area shall record a minimum of six individual daily grades and two test grades per grading period. Grades shall be determined from a composite of the following: daily papers; notebooks; quizzes; homework assignments; teacher observations of participation, skills, demonstrations, or performances; short compositions; unit, chapter, or skills tests; projects; major reports/compositions; journals; and portfolios. Documentation of observable skills will be kept in a grade book. A six weeks grade that is determined from only one student product is not acceptable. Progress Reports A written progress report shall be sent at least once during the grading period to parents of students with an average grade of less than 75 in any subject. Parents shall also receive written notification if the professional educator notes a substantial change in a student's performance at any point during the six weeks period. Six Weeks Averages and Report Cards Students shall receive numerical scores in all subjects. The six weeks average will be computed by using one of the following formulas: Formula 1

Formula II

50% Daily Average

75% Daily Average

50% Test Average and/or Major Projects

25% Test Average and/or Major Projects

Courses in English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, LOTE, Fine Arts, and Technology

Courses in Athletics, PE, Cheerleading, Band, and SPED

The following marking system shall be used on the students’ work, in the grade book, and on the report card: Subject Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies All Elective Courses

Social Development/Work Habits

Marking System 90-100 = A 80-89 = B 70-79 = C 0-69 = Failure E = Excellent S = Satisfactory N = Needs Improvement U = Unsatisfactory G = Satisfactory/BIP* H = Needs Progress/BIP* * These symbols will be used for students with disabilities working under Behavior Intervention Plans.

In addition to the six-week report card, parents of students with disabilities will receive a report detailing the following:  the student’s progress toward annual goals specified in the Individualized Education Program;  the extent to which that progress is sufficient to enable the child to achieve the goals by the end of the year. The campus principal will designate the personnel responsible for these reports.

C-7

Grades 6-8 Grading Information (continued) Semester and Yearly Averages The semester and yearly averages shall be computed as follows: Courses Taken for Middle School Credit

Courses Taken for High School Credit

Grading Period

Portion of Yearly Average

Grading Period

Portion of Semester Average

First Six Weeks

2/7 of first semester average

First Six Weeks

2/7 of first semester average

Second Six Weeks

2/7 of first semester average

Second Six Weeks

2/7 of first semester average

Third Six Weeks

2/7 of first semester average

Third Six Weeks

2/7 of first semester average

First Semester Exam

1/7 of first semester average

First Semester Exam

1/7 of first semester average

Fourth Six Weeks

2/7 of second semester average

Fourth Six Weeks

2/7 of second semester average

Fifth Six Weeks

2/7 of second semester average

Fifth Six Weeks

2/7 of second semester average

Sixth Six Weeks

2/7 of second semester average

Sixth Six Weeks

2/7 of second semester average

Second Semester Exam

1/7 of second semester average

Second Semester Exam

1/7 of second semester average

First Semester

1/2 of yearly average

No yearly average (See credit requirement below.)

n/a

Second Semester

1/2 of yearly average

n/a

Note: A yearly grade will not be given in one-semester courses. Credit Earned for High School Level Courses Credit for all high school level courses will be awarded by semester. To receive credit for a course, a student must maintain an average of 70% or above for the semester. Course Changes and Grading If a student transfers from an advanced level course (Pre-Advanced Placement, Accelerated Math, etc.) to a regular level course during the semester, the grades that the student earned in the advanced course will be transferred to the regular level course. If a student transfers from a regular level course to an advanced level course, the student will make up the advanced level work that was missed prior to the transfer. Transfers from a regular level course to an advanced level course can only occur at the end of the semester and will not be allowed after the first week of the semester that classes have begun.

C-8

Grades 6-8 Grading Information (continued) Promotion Standards In order to be promoted to the next grade, students must demonstrate the proficiencies listed below: 1) Grade Requirements:  An overall average of “70” or above, computed by averaging yearly grades for English Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies  A yearly average of “70” or above in mathematics  A yearly average of “70” or above in English Language Arts 2) Testing Requirements:  Grade 8: Successful completion of the state assessment in reading and mathematics Summer School State assessments and core student requirements for summer school, grades 6-8. 6th Grade: Summer school requirements are based on the core subject areas and state assessment (STAAR). Core subject areas consist of Math, Reading, Science, and Social Studies. STAAR assessments for 6th grade consist of Math and Reading. If a student yearly average falls below 85% in any core subject area and does not meet the passing standards for one of the two state assessments, he/she will be required to attend summer school. If a student does not meet passing standards on two of the state assessments, he/she will be required to attend summer school. 7th Grade: Summer school requirements are based on the core subject areas and the state assessment (STAAR). Core subject areas for 7th grade summer school requirements consist of Math, Reading, Science, and Social Studies. STAAR assessments for 7th grade consist of Math, Reading and Writing. If a student’s yearly average falls below 85% in any core subject area and does not meet the passing standard for one of the two state assessments, he/she will be required to attend summer school. If a student does not meet passing standards on two of the state assessments, he/she will be required to attend summer school. 8th Grade: Summer school requirements are based on the core subject areas and the state assessment (STAAR). Core subject areas for 8th grade summer school requirements consist of Math, Reading, Science, and Social Studies. STAAR assessments for 8th grade consist of Math, Reading, Science, and Social Studies. If a student does not meet passing standards on any of the Math or Reading STAAR assessment for 8th grade, he/she will be required to attend summer school. If a student does not meet passing standard on Science or Social Studies, and a student’s yearly average falls below 85% on either of the two subjects, they will be required to attend summer school. Notification will be sent home to the parents of all students who are required to attend summer school, prior to the start of summer school. Redo a Class Assignment or Test Students shall be allowed a reasonable opportunity to redo an assignment or retake a test according to the following criteria:  The student earned a failing grade on an assignment or test.  The student shall be permitted one opportunity to redo an assignment or test if the assignment or test is eligible for redo.  The student shall be permitted to redo one assignment or test in each subject during a six week period.  Six week Curriculum-Based Assessments are not eligible for redo.  A redo will not be permitted the last week of the grading period.  The student may be required to complete an alternative assignment for the redo opportunity. C-9

Grades 6-8 Grading Information (continued)  

The recorded grade will be an average of the two grades unless the average exceeds 70%. The new grade will not exceed 70%. (For example: Student earned a 65% on the first attempt, and the student earned a 95% on the redo. The average is 80%. The recorded grade will be 70%.) Campuses may determine additional and more specific criteria.

Make-Up Work Students will make up assignments and performance assessments after absences, including absences as a result of suspension. Students will have one day plus the number of days absent to make up work following the students’ return to school. Students will receive a zero for any assignment or test not made up within the allotted time period. Plagiarism Plagiarism is the use of another person's original ideas or writing as one's own without giving credit to the true author. Plagiarism shall be considered cheating and the student shall be subject to disciplinary action that may include confiscation of any or all documents or assignments related to the act of plagiarism. Credit will not be given for any document confiscated as a result of plagiarism. Students with Disabilities Decisions regarding grading procedures for a student with a disability who is receiving services under IDEA or Section 504 may be made by the Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team. The IEP Team will ensure that the annual goals and instructional objectives of the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP) are met. The classroom teacher will ensure the success of the student through implementation of the specified modifications. If the student does not demonstrate success (as documented by an average of 70 or above), it is the responsibility of the classroom teacher to document implementation of the modifications and to initiate an IEP meeting. Resource Materials In the event that TISD is unable to provide appropriate resources (i.e. textbooks, graphing calculators), the student shall not suffer an academic penalty.

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Grades 9-12 Grading Information In grades 9-12, all grades shall reflect student performance in the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Teachers in every subject area shall record a minimum of six individual daily grades and two test grades per grading period. Grades shall be determined from a composite of the following: daily papers; notebooks; quizzes; homework assignments; teacher observations of participation, skills, demonstrations, or performances; short compositions; unit, chapter, or skills tests; projects; major reports/compositions; journals; and portfolios. Documentation of observable skills will be kept in a grade book. A six weeks grade that is determined from only one student product is not acceptable. Progress Reports A written progress report shall be sent at least once during the grading period to parents of students with an average grade of less than 75 in any subject. Parents shall also receive written notification if the professional educator notes a substantial change in a student's performance at any point during the six weeks period. The District will make such information available to sponsors of extracurricular activities in which the student participates. This notice will stipulate that the student will have the remainder of the six-weeks to achieve the grade of 70 or above and that the student will be suspended from extracurricular activities if the grade is below 70 at the end of the six-week period. The District may require any student with a grade lower than 70 to attend tutorial sessions. Six Weeks Averages and Report Cards Students shall receive numerical scores in all subjects. The six weeks average will be computed by using one of the following formulas: Formula 1

Formula II

50% Daily Average

75% Daily Average

50% Test Average and/or Major Projects

25% Test Average and/or Major Projects

Courses in English Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, LOTE, Fine Arts, and CTE

Courses in Athletics, PE, Cheerleading, Drill Team, Band, and SPED (TILC, Applied, ADL)

The following marking system shall be used on the students' work, in the grade book, and on the report card: Subject

Marking System

Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies All Elective Courses

90-100 = A 80-89 = B 70-79 = C 0-69 = Failure

Social Development/ Work Habits

E = Excellent S = Satisfactory N = Needs Improvement U = Unsatisfactory G = Satisfactory/BIP* H = Needs Progress/BIP* * These symbols will be used for students with disabilities working under Behavior Intervention Plans.

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Grades 9-12 Grading Information (continued) Semester Averages The semester average shall be computed as follows: Grading Period

Portion of Semester Average

First Six Weeks

2/7 of first semester average

Second Six Weeks

2/7 of first semester average

Third Six Weeks

2/7 of first semester average

First Semester Exam

1/7 of first semester average

Fourth Six Weeks

2/7 of second semester average

Fifth Six Weeks

2/7 of second semester average

Sixth Six Weeks

2/7 of second semester average

Second Semester Exam

1/7 of second semester average

Enrichment Grading Enrichment classes will be graded as pass or fail and will not be weighted. Course Changes and Grading Schedule changes can only be made for advanced level courses after Friday, June 23, 2017. Advanced Placement and Dual Credit Regular courses are designed to meet both state and local expectations for all students while equipping them for a variety of pursuits after high school, including college. Students are not required to take advanced level courses in order to pursue any diploma type. Advanced courses are designed to challenge students significantly and typically require more higher-order thinking and application of skills and concepts. These courses are recommended for students who have performed at a high level academically in the past and who are willing to push themselves when confronted with rigorous course work. Students enrolling dual credit courses must satisfy the college entrance requirements set forth by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Parents and students are encouraged to consider the decision to take advanced courses carefully. Schedule changes are in no way guaranteed for students who struggle in an advanced course. If a student transfers from an advanced level course (Advanced Placement, Dual Credit, etc.) to a regular level course during the semester, the grades that the student earned in the advanced course will be transferred to the regular level course. If a student has met requirements for semester exam exemptions in a course, the semester average for the course will be determined by the average of the three six weeks grades. If a student transfers from a regular level course to an advanced level course, the student will make up the advanced level work that was missed prior to the transfer. Transfers from a regular level course to an advanced level course can only occur at the end of the semester and will not be allowed after the first week of the semester that classes have begun. If a student transfers into the district after the third week of the 2nd and 5th six weeks grading cycle, the student will not receive credit for a course unless the student was enrolled in an equivalent course at the previously attended school. The student's transferred grades and grades earned after enrollment in TISD must average 70% or above. C-12

Grades 9-12 Grading Information (continued) Awarding Credit Effective with the 2016-2017 school year, when a student earns a passing grade in only one semester of a twosemester course and the combined (average) grade for the two semesters is at least a 70 on a scale or 100, the District shall award credit for the course. However, the student must have earned at least a 60 in order for the District to average the semester grades. The District shall also not average the semester grades when a student fails to earn credit due to excessive absences. [see FEC] If the combined grade for the two semesters is lower than 70,when the student’s grade for a semester is lower than 60, or when the student has failed to earn credit due to excessive absences, the District shall award the student credit for the semester with the passing grade as long as the student has also met the attendance requirements. The student shall be required to retake only the semester in which he or she earned the failing grade or failed to earn credit. Credit Earned for High School Level Courses Credit for all high school level courses will be awarded by semester. To receive credit for a course, a student must maintain an average of 70% or above for the semester. Grade Level Classification On the Texas High School campus, changes in grade level classification will be made prior to the beginning of the fall semester. On the Options campus, changes in grade level classification will be made on October 1, February 1, and May 1. Students will be classified according to the following criteria: Sophomore Junior Senior

(10th) (11th) (12th)

-

6 – 11.5 credits earned and entering second year in an accredited high school 12 – 17.5 credits and entering third year in an accredited high school 18 or above credits, entering at least third year in an accredited high school, declaring intent to graduate during the current school year

Students transferring into the District will be classified according to the documented number of credits earned by the date of transfer and by the number of years in attendance in an accredited high school as listed above. If no official transcript is available by the date of enrollment, a transfer student will be enrolled as a freshman and will be placed in freshman-level classes, pending receipt of the official transcript. Promotion standards, as established by the Individual Education Plan (IEP), or grade-level classification of students eligible for special education shall be determined by the ARD committee. Graduation Requirements In order to obtain a high school diploma, students must demonstrate the successful completion of the proficiencies listed below:  All course work requirements  All state assessment requirements Redo a Class Assignment or Test Students shall be permitted a reasonable opportunity to correct or redo an assignment or retake a test for which the student received a failing grade. The course syllabus will state the policy for correcting and redoing an assignment and retaking a test. Make-Up Work In all high school courses, students will make up assignments and performance assessments after absences, including absences as a result of suspension, with the following requirements. If the assignment was made prior to the student's absence, the assignment will be due the first day that the student returns to the campus. If the assignment was made during the student's absence, the student will have the same number of days to complete the work as other students had who were present on the day that the assignment was made.

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Grades 9-12 Grading Information (continued) Late Work Policy Regular 1 class day late = max 80 2 class days late = max 70 3 or more class days late = max 50 End of grading period = 0 for all un-submitted work

Pre AP 1 class day late = max 75 2 class days late = max 60 3 or more class days late = max 50 End of grading period = 0 for all unsubmitted work

AP/DC 1 class day late = max 70 2 class days late = max 50 End of grading period = 0 for all unsubmitted work

Turnitin.com Usage: Assignments submitted via Turnitin must also be emailed to teachers to confirm submission time and content. PreAP, AP, and DC = only one time per 6 weeks grading period Plagiarism Plagiarism is the use of another person's original ideas or writing as one's own without giving credit to the true author. Plagiarism shall be considered cheating and the student shall be subject to disciplinary action that may include confiscation of any or all documents or assignments related to the act of plagiarism. Credit will not be given for any document confiscated as a result of plagiarism. Students with Disabilities Decisions regarding grading procedures for a student with a disability who is receiving services under IDEA or Section 504 may be made by the Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team. The IEP Team will ensure that the annual goals and instructional objectives of the student's Individualized Education Program (IEP) are met. The classroom teacher will ensure the success of the student through implementation of the specified modifications. If the student does not demonstrate success (as documented by an average of 70 or above), it is the responsibility of the classroom teacher to document implementation of the modifications and to initiate an IEP meeting. STAAR Alternate 2, is available for eligible students receiving special education services who meet certain stateestablished criteria as determined by the student’s ARD committee. A student’s ARD committee for students receiving special services will determine whether successful performance on the EOC assessments will be required for graduation within the parameters identified in state rules and the student’s personal graduation plans. Resource Materials In the event that TISD is unable to provide appropriate resources (i.e. textbooks, graphing calculators), the student shall not suffer an academic penalty. Extra Credit In some classes and courses extra credit may be awarded, based upon the discretion of the teacher. However, the highest grade that may be earned cannot exceed 100 points on a 100 point scale. Incomplete Grade Policy Teachers may record an incomplete if…. • Student has been absent for extended periods of time when the assignment was made and /or due. • Student has an IEP with modifications allowing extra time but had an excused absent within the allotted time window of completion. • Timeline • Students must have all incompletes cleared within 7 days of returning to school or at the approval of the campus principal for unforeseen situations that may require additional time. C-14

OPTIONS Academic Alternative High School Grading Information The purpose of OPTIONS is to serve the area youth in grades 9—12 by providing them with the opportunity to earn course credits while completing on grade level academic coursework. Students must demonstrate mastery of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in order to receive credit for a course. All state and district course requirements must be completed to earn a diploma. OPTIONS Grading Procedures 1) The Options principal will review the student’s four-year plan and will assign the courses which the student will need to complete. 2) The student may complete coursework as outlined in the course assignment sheet. 3) Each course has a syllabus, listing activities and testing requirements. The student must complete all unit activities before testing for that unit. The instructor will evaluate the student’s work and will assign a numerical grade for each activity. The student must earn an average of “70” or above for the unit activities before taking the unit test. In order to receive credit for that unit, the student must score “70” or above on the unit test. 4) If a student is not successful on the unit test, the student may retest, taking a different test form. OPTIONS Grade Reporting A written progress report will be sent to parents at the end of each six-week grading period. In addition to these progress reports, parents also will be notified each time a student completes a semester credit. OPTIONS Testing Procedures The student will test in designated areas only and may not leave the testing area until the test is completed. Upon completion of the test, the student will turn in the test and answer document to the testing coordinator, who will document the completion. Failure to comply with testing instructions will result in disciplinary action. OPTIONS Unit Grades Students will receive numerical scores in all units. The final unit grade will be computed using the following formula: 75% Unit Activities 25% Unit Test* *Note: For courses which are offered through a computerized program which records only the unit test grade, the test grade will represent the final unit grade. The following marking system will be used on the student’s work, in the grade book, and on the report card: Numerical Grade 90 - 100 80 - 89 70 - 79 0 - 69

Letter Grade A B C F

OPTIONS Semester Average The semester average for the course will be determined by averaging all final unit grades required for the course. OPTIONS Credit Earned for High School Level Courses Credit for all high school level courses will be awarded by semester. To receive credit for a course, a student must earn an average of 70% or above for the semester. Students must earn three credits per semester for a total of six credits per school year to remain in OPTIONS.

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Testing and Assessment Programs State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) Grades 3-8 In addition to routine tests and other measures of achievement, students at certain grade levels will take statemandated assessments, such as the STAAR, in the following subjects:  Mathematics, annually in grades 3-8  Reading, annually in grades 3-8  Writing, including spelling and grammar, in grades 4 and 7  Science in grades 5 and 8  Social Studies in grade 8 Successful performance on the reading and math assessments in grades 5 and 8 is required by law, unless the student is enrolled in a reading or math course intended for students over the student’s current grade level, in order for the student to be promoted to the next grade level. STAAR Alternate 2 is available for eligible students receiving special education services who meet certain stateestablished criteria as determined by the student’s ARD committee. STAAR Spanish is available for eligible students for whom a Spanish version of STAAR is the most appropriate measure of their academic progress. STAAR End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments for Students in Grades 9-12 Beginning with students who entered grade 9 in the 2011-2012 school year, end-of-course (EOC) assessments are administered for the following courses:  Algebra I  English I and English II  Biology  United States History Satisfactory performance on the applicable assessments will be required for graduation, unless otherwise waived or substituted as allowed by state law and rules. There are three testing windows during the year in which a student may take an EOC assessment, which will occur during the fall, spring, and summer months. If a student does not meet satisfactory performance, the student will have additional opportunities to retake the assessment. The exit-level test, for which satisfactory performance is required as a condition for graduation of any student who is in grade 12 during the 2013-2014 school year, covers English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies and requires knowledge of Algebra I and Geometry; Biology and Integrated Chemistry and Physics; English III; and early American and United States History, World History, and World geography. If a student in grade 12 did not pass all sections while in grade 11, there will be opportunities to retake each applicable subject area test. STAAR Alternate 2 is available for eligible students receiving special education services who meet certain criteria established by the state as determined by the student’s ARD committee. These particular EOC assessments may be different testing windows than the general assessments, and the ARD committee will determine whether successful performance on the assessments will be required for graduation.

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Testing and Assessment Programs (continued) An ARD committee for a student receiving special education services will determine whether successful performance on the EOC assessments will be required for graduation within the parameters identified in state rules and the students personal graduation plan. Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Assessment Prior to enrollment in a Texas public college or university, most students must take a standardized test called the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) assessment. The purpose of the TSI assessment is to assess the reading, mathematics, and writing skills that entering freshmen-level students should have if they are to perform effectively in undergraduate certificate or degree programs in Texas public college and universities. This assessment may be required before a student enrolls in a dual-credit course offered through the district, as well. Achieving certain benchmark scores on this assessment for college readiness may also waive certain end-of-course assessment requirements in limited circumstances. Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) is offered to Grade 10 and Grade 11 students and is administered in the fall. Students must register in advance through the academic advisors. The 11th grade test is the first step in the National Merit Scholar Program and Outstanding African-American and Hispanic Scholars Program. Preparation for College Entrance Tests Computerized study programs to prepare students to take the SAT, ACT, and PSAT are available. In addition, study booklets and sample tests designed to help students ready themselves for the college entrance tests are available in the office of College and Career Readiness. The SAT/ACT testing preparation course is offered as an elective through the regular academic program. Tutorial sessions may be available on the Texas High campus the week prior to ACT testing. Notification of dates and times of sessions will be posted in advance. Credit by Examination The District will give a student in grades 1-12 credit for an academic subject in which the student has received no prior instruction if the student scores 80 percent or above on a criterion-referenced examination for acceleration for the applicable course. If such credit is given, the District will enter the examination score on the student’s transcript. If the student has received prior instruction for an academic subject, a score of 70 or higher is required to earn credit. Semester Exams – Texas High School The purposes of semester exams are to evaluate knowledge and skills of course standards and to prepare students for college and career readiness. All students are required to take semester exams in each course assigned during the fall semester and will follow the semester exam schedule. All students will have an opportunity to receive exemptions from spring semester exams if the exemption criteria are met. Semester exams will not be administered before the scheduled date and time of the exams.

Texas High Semester Exam/Exemption Policy 2017-2018 Purpose for Semester Exams/Exemptions:      

To evaluate knowledge and skills on content subject specific. To prepare for college and career readiness To provide an incentive for academic endeavor To encourage good citizenship and punctuality To improve school attendance To foster teacher-student rapport and responsibility

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Fall 2017 Semester •

Students will be required to take exams in all courses.

Fall Semester Exam Schedule 2017 th

Monday, December 18 8:25-9:50 A1/B1 Exam 9-12 9:57-11:03 A2 11:10-1:04 A3 1st Lunch 11:10-11:40

1:11-2:18 2:25-3:50

2nd Lunch

11:52-12:22

3rd Lunch

12:34-1:04 A4 A5/B5 Exam 9-12

th

th

Tuesday, December 19 Wednesday, December 20 8:25-9:45 B2 Exam 9-12 8:25-9:45 A2

Exam 9-12

9:52-11:12

B3

Exam 9-12

9:52-11:12

A3

Exam 9-12

11:20-12:40

B4

Exam 9-12

11:20-12:40

A4

Exam 9-12

Spring Semester Exam Schedule 2018 st

Monday, May 21 8:25-9:45 A1/B1 Ex 12 9:52-10:57 B2 Ex 12 11:04-12:56 B3 Ex 12 1st Lunch 11:04-11:34 11:45-12:15 2nd Lunch 3rd Lunch 12:26-12:56 1:03-2:23 B4 Ex 12 2:30-3:50 A5/B5 Ex 12

nd

Tuesday, May 22 8:25-9:45 A1/B1 Ex 9-11 9:52-10:57 A2 Ex 12 11:04-12:56 A3 Ex 12 1st Lunch 11:04-11:34 2nd Lunch 11:45-12:15 3rd Lunch 12:26-12:56 1:03-2:23 A4 Ex 12 2:30-3:50 A5/B5 Ex 9-11

rd

th

Wednesday, May 23 8:25-9:45 B2 Ex 9-11

Thursday, May 24 8:25-9: 45 A2 Ex 9-11

9:52-11:12 B3 Ex 9-11

9:52-11:12 A3 Ex 9-11

11:20-12:40 B4 Ex 9-11

11:20-12:40 A4 Ex 9-11

Spring Exam/Exemption Information 2018 Freshmen, Sophomores, JuniorsFreshmen, Sophomores, Juniors

Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors

• • • • • • •

Must have taken final exam in the fall. Must be present in class on the day of spring final exam. Must have a completed exam exemption form to teacher on date due. 75 average or higher in the class for the semester and an average of 70 for both semesters. 4 or less absences in the course 3 tardies or less in the course Students will receive 4 exemptions total. o Students who have “0” absences and “0” tardies and have a minimum of 75 average/70 for year, may be exempt from all courses. C-18



• • •

Students who meet at least approaching on EOC exam may use 1 extra exemption for the course currently enrolled. (Example: meet approaching on Biology, Algebra I and ELA I. Can only use 1 extra exemption and must decide which course the exemption will be used.) Students scoring at the Meets Grade level or Masters Grade level on EOC exam may use an additional 1 exemption. No ISS,OSS, or DAEP for Spring Semester No Delinquencies and/or fines Seniors



Seniors will receive exemptions from each course (except for DC courses) if the following criteria are met: o Average of 70 or higher for the semester and for the year o Met passing standard on all Mandatory State Assessments o No make-up hours are owed for the class (meet the 90% rule for the course) o No DAEP Placements 45 Days or longer or Multiple Disciplinary Offenses as determined by the campus principal. o Attained 26 credits and eligible for graduation



Seniors will use the following schedule to satisfy the attendance requirement: o May 21-Graduation Meeting o May 22-Senior Assembly o May 23-Spring Olympiad o May 24 or 25- Graduation practice, meet at 8:30 in front of Tiger Center. o Or other deemed appropriate by Texas Compulsory Attendance Guidelines

Attendance for 9th-12th students not counted against exemptions Doctor’s visit during part of the school day, in class the rest of the day.

Funeral for immediate relative

Religious Holiday as defined by TEA.

UIL Sanctioned competition

School-Sponsored/School related field trip

No more than 2 college visits (Seniors & Juniors Only)

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Testing and Assessment Programs (continued) Semester Blitz/Exam Exemptions – Texas Middle School The purpose of the exemption plan is as follows:  To provide an incentive for academic endeavor  To encourage good citizenship and punctuality  To improve school attendance  To foster teacher-student rapport and responsibility Eligibility for Exemption – Texas Middle School Eligibility for semester exemptions is based on the semester course grade average, semester attendance, and semester tardies. For the purposes of counting absences, the following will apply:  School-sponsored absences do not count against a student for exemption purposes.  All other absences, whether excused or unexcused, will count toward exemption status unless a doctor's excuse is provided.  Unusual circumstances will be determined by the TMS Attendance Committee. The following chart contains the grade, attendance, and tardy requirements per course for semester exam exemptions. Semester Grade 90 or above 85-89 80-84 75-79

Accumulates no more than this many absences: 4 3 2 1

Accumulates no more than this many tardies: 3 2 1 0

Physical Fitness Assessment: Annually, the district will conduct a physical fitness assessment (FitnessGram) of students in grades 3-12 who are enrolled in a physical education course or in a course for which physical education credit is awarded. Parents may request in writing their child’s physical fitness assessment results at the end of the school year. Questions regarding physical fitness assessments and reports should be directed to Sherry Young, Coordinator of Assessment, 903-793-7561.

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Special Programs and Coursework Gifted and Talented Program: It is the goal of the Texarkana Independent School District to provide a quality education and to ensure appropriate learning opportunities that will foster maximum mental, physical, and emotional development of each student. To assist students in this personal development, the Gifted and Talented Program is provided in addition to the regular curriculum. Some children demonstrate or show a potential for demonstrating a remarkably high level of accomplishment when compared to other children of similar age, experience, or environment. These children may perform at a very high level in an intellectual, creative, or artistic area, showing an unusually high capacity for leadership, or excel in a particular academic field. A variety of programs, activities, and learning opportunities are offered. Special Education: Texarkana ISD provides special education and related services for students with disabilities according to individualized plans developed by teachers, parents, counselors, and other professionals. The District determines whether a student needs special education after completing a comprehensive assessment. Accelerated Instruction: TISD provides tutorial programs and intensive or accelerated instruction in subjects in which students are showing special difficulty. The District also may provide specially-focused instruction to improve students’ language and math skills. Students in grades 3-8 who do not perform satisfactorily on staterequired exams are required to participate in accelerated instruction. This instruction may be held before or after normal school hours or outside of the normal school year. Students with Disabilities: Decisions regarding grading procedures for a student with a disability who is receiving services under IDEA or Section 504 may be made by the Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) Team. The IEP Team will ensure that the annual goals and instructional objectives of the student’s Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) are met. Dyslexia: Texarkana ISD provides a program for students identified with the characteristics of Dyslexia. The instructional program is offered in a small class setting and includes reading, writing, and spelling as appropriate. The major instructional strategies utilize individualized, intensive, and multi-sensory methods. Limited English Proficient Students: A student with limited English proficiency (LEP) is entitled to receive specialized services from the district. To determine whether the student qualifies for services, a Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) will be formed, which will consist of both district personnel and at least one parent representative. The student's parent must consent to any services recommended by the LPAC for a LEP student. However, pending the receipt of parental consent or denial of services, an eligible student will receive the services to which the student is entitled and eligible. In order to determine a student's level of proficiency in English, the LPAC will use information from a variety of assessments. If the student qualifies for services and once a level of proficiency has been established, the LPAC will then designate instructional accommodations or additional special programs the student will require to eventually become proficient at grade level work in English. Ongoing assessments will be conducted to determine a student's continued eligibility for the program. The LPAC also will determine whether certain accommodations are necessary for any state-mandated assessments. The STAAR Spanish may be administered to a LEP student for a student up to grade 5. In limited circumstances, a student's LPAC may waive certain graduation requirements related to the English I and II end-ofcourse (EOC) assessments. The Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System (TELPAS) also will be administered to LEP students who qualify for services. If a student is considered LEP and receives special education services because of a qualifying disability, the student's ARD committee will make instructional and assessment decisions in conjunction with the LPAC. Summer School: TISD offers a summer school program for students who require additional instruction beyond the regular academic year. In the high school program, tuition is assessed for each semester unit course. Summer school information is made available through the campus principal or through the Texas High Academic Advisors prior to the end of the school year. C-21

Special Programs and Coursework (continued) Pre-Advanced Placement Program (Pre-AP): Courses are offered for students in grades 6-12 who benefit from more advanced and in-depth studies. Pre-AP courses focus on higher learning thinking skills and prepare students for success in the high school Advanced Placement program. Advanced Placement Program (AP): The Advanced Placement Program allows high school students the opportunity to enroll in a college-level course and to possibly earn college credit for that course while still in high school. Although the program is administered by the College Board of New York, secondary schools have the flexibility to establish the curriculum, to select materials and resources, and to determine the instructional methods. Students may show mastery in these courses by taking the AP exams that are administered in May of each school year. A complete list of courses and weights can be found in the Texas High Program of Studies and Course Description Guide. Dual Credit Courses: The Dual Credit Program allows high school students the opportunity to enroll in college-level courses and to earn high school as well as college credit for the completed coursework. The program provides a continuum of learning from high school to college for those students who choose to pursue a post-secondary degree or certificate after high school graduation. This continuum will increase opportunities for students to progress through their programs of study at an accelerated pace. Students pay costs associated with taking college courses. These costs may include tuition and fees and will be in accordance with the cost-per-hour charges assessed by the college. Students must meet college entrance requirements (including passing the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) assessment or earning an exemption). Depending on the student’s grade level and the course, an end-of-course assessment may be required for graduation. Correspondence Courses: Students in Grades 9-12 may earn a maximum of two units of credit by correspondence. Credit toward state or local graduation requirements may be granted for correspondence courses only under the following conditions:  Prior to enrolling in the correspondence course(s), a student must make a written request to the principal or designee for approval to enroll in a course.  The student must enroll in a course offered through the University of Texas at Austin, Texas Tech University, or other public institutions of higher education as approved by the Commissioner of Education.  The correspondence course must include the state-required TEKS for such a course (19 TAC 74.23). Additional information is available through the Academic Advisors.  The student must earn a grade of 70 or higher in the approved course.  Depending on the student’s grade level and the course, an end-of-course assessment may be required for graduation and, if so, will affect a student’s final course grade. Independent Research: The Independent Research Program is an individualized study supervised by an instructor in a specific area as an extension of regular classroom curriculum. This program is designed for eleventh and twelfth grade students who are enrolled in a class that is not offered for Pre-AP or AP level credit. Students may complete the Independent Research Program to receive additional weighted credit for that class. The scope and complexity of students’ work will clearly demonstrate a level of performance beyond high school standards. To participate in Independent Research, students must follow specific procedures and timelines. Students may participate in one independent research project per semester and is designed for eleventh and twelfth grade students. Twelfth grade students who have previously participated will be given the opportunity to complete two per semester of their senior year due to the grandfathering of the new plan. Beginning 2017-2018, all students are only allowed to participate in one independent research course per semester. The maximum independent research course weight allowed per semester will be for ½ credit, even in a one credit per semester course.

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Special Programs and Coursework (continued) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Academy (STEM Academy): The Ross Perot STEM Academy is a small learning community located on the Texas High School campus that offers students the opportunity to focus on science, technology, engineering and math course content that is integrated within all core subject areas. It operates as a school-within-a-school and has as curriculum that is rigorous, innovative and collegefocused with instruction on inquiry, problem-solving, decision making, discovery, and project based learning. The purpose of the Academy is to increase student achievement, while creating a new workforce of problem solvers, innovators, and inventors who are self-reliant and able to think logically. The high degree of interactive involvement, the energized environment of the classroom, and the small school setting with quality relationships between student and teachers creates an environment for success.

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Graduation Degree Plans: The district offers the graduation programs listed below. All students entering grade 9 are required to enroll in the Recommended High School Program or Advanced/Distinguished Achievement Program. Permission to enroll in the Minimum Graduation Program will be granted only if a written agreement is reached among the student, the student’s parent or person standing in parental relation, and the counselor or appropriate administrator. In order for a student to take courses under the Minimum Program, the student must be at least 16 years of age; have completed at least two credits each in English language arts, math, science, and social studies courses that are required for graduation; or have failed grade 9 one or more times. Students are encouraged to discuss the choices available with their academic advisors and parents. The Texas High Program of Studies and Course Description Guide has been prepared to explain in depth the degree plans and requirements for graduation. This information has been developed to help students make a successful transition from high school to post-secondary education, training, and/or a career. Students should take advantage of the information available in this guide to investigate career options, to choose a degree plan, to develop a fouryear plan, and to choose courses of study. Academic advisors are available to students and to parents to assist in planning and in answering questions. Class Rank Calculation: A course weighting system has been established in TISD to encourage and recognize academic achievement. The weighting system is used to determine the valedictorian, salutatorian, and cum laude graduates and to designate the top ten percent of the graduating class. Students graduating in the top ten percent are eligible for automatic admission into a four-year Texas college or university. (See academic advisor for more information.) Class rank will be calculated by averaging semester grades earned in grades 9-12 and any high school level course taken in eighth grade. The numeric semester average will earn grade points according to the District weighted grade point scale. All courses completed at OPTIONS will receive weighted ranking points of 1.1. A complete list of courses and weights can be found in the Texas High Program of Studies and Course Description Guide. Cum Laude System: TISD recognizes at graduation those students with weighted GPAs at or above specific benchmarks. Benchmarks may require occasional adjustments as changes in curriculum dictate. Currently, graduates are recognized as follows: Valedictorian Salutatorian Summa Cum Laude Magna Cum Laude Cum Laude

Highest weighted GPA Second highest weighted GPA Weighted average of exactly 155.0 or higher Weighted average of exactly 150.0 or higher Weighted average of exactly 143.0 or higher

Students should refer to the class rank policies in effect for Texas High School as presented in the Texas High Program of Studies and Course Description Guide. Graduation Ceremonies: Students completing the Texarkana Independent School District and State of Texas requirements for graduation will be granted a high school diploma. TISD annually sponsors five graduation ceremonies for students who have completed requirements established by both the District and the State. Ordering graduation cap and gown, announcements, or other senior memorabilia does not guarantee a student’s participation in graduation ceremonies. Graduation announcements are not invitations to the graduation ceremony. Texas High School Graduation Ceremony: At graduation practice, a limited number of tickets are distributed to graduating seniors for their family members. The following requirements are in place for students who wish to participate in the Texas High School graduation ceremony.

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Graduation (continued) THS Requirements: ▪ The student must have successfully completed all local graduation credit requirements. ▪ The student must have successfully completed all state graduation credit requirements. ▪ Depending on the year in which the student is scheduled to graduate, pass a statewide exit-level exam or achieve passing scores on certain end-of-course (EOC) assessments. ▪ Students identified and served under provisions of IDEA shall graduate in accordance with their Individualized Education Program (IEP). THS Ineligibility: ▪ If a student has been expelled from all services in the District during the spring semester of the senior year or is continuing an expulsion during the spring semester of the senior year, the student is ineligible to participate in the THS graduation ceremony. ▪ If a student has been assigned to a DAEP after the last day of the first semester of the senior year or is continuing a DAEP assignment during the spring semester of the senior year, the student is ineligible to participate in the THS graduation ceremony. ▪ If a senior student transfers to OPTIONS, the student is ineligible to participate in the THS graduation ceremony. ▪ If a student does not attend and does not participate in the graduation ceremony practice, the student is ineligible to participate in the THS graduation ceremony. Students with Disabilities: ▪

ARD Committees for students with disabilities who receive special education services and who are subject to the foundation graduation program will make instructional and assessment decisions for these students in accordance with state law and rules. In order to earn an endorsement under the foundation program, a student must perform satisfactorily on the EOC assessments and receive no modified curriculum in the student’s chosen endorsement area. A student may still be awarded an endorsement when the student fails to perform satisfactorily on no more than two EOC assessments but meets the other requirements for graduation under state law.

OPTIONS Graduation Ceremonies: Students who have completed the graduation requirements under the following programs are eligible to participate in the graduation ceremony sponsored by the OPTIONS campus. OPTIONS Requirements: ▪ The student must have successfully completed all local graduation credit requirements. ▪ The student must have successfully completed all state graduation credit requirements. ▪ Depending on the year in which the student is scheduled to graduate, pass a statewide exit-level exam or achieve passing scores on certain end-of-course (EOC) assessments. ▪ Students identified and served under provisions of IDEA shall graduate in accordance with their Individualized Education Program (IEP). ▪ OPTIONS students wishing to participate in the graduation ceremony must contact Amy Doss, Principal, at 903-793-5632, extension 1740.

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The Place To Be! Student Code of Conduct 2017-2018

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT Accessibility

If you have difficulty accessing the information in this document because of disability, please contact: Deputy Superintendent: Autumn Thomas 4241 Summerhill Road Texarkana, Texas 75503 903-794-3651

Purpose

The Student Code of Conduct is the district’s response to the requirements of Chapter 37 of the Texas Education Code. The Code provides methods and options for managing students in the classroom and on school grounds, disciplining students, and preventing and intervening in student discipline problems. The law requires the district to define misconduct that may—or must—result in a range of specific disciplinary consequences including removal from a regular classroom or campus, suspension, placement in a disciplinary alternative education program (DAEP), placement in a juvenile justice alternative education program (JJAEP), or expulsion from school. This Student Code of Conduct has been adopted by the Texarkana Independent School District Board of Trustees and developed with the advice of the district-level committee. This Code provides information to parents and students regarding standards of conduct, consequences of misconduct, and procedures for administering discipline. It remains in effect during summer school and at all school-related events and activities outside the school year until an updated version adopted by the board becomes effective for the next school year. In accordance with state law, the Code shall be posted at each school campus or shall be available for review at the office of the campus principal. Additionally, the Code shall be available at the office of the campus behavior coordinator and will be posted on the district's Web site. Parents shall will be notified of any conduct violation that may result in a student being suspended, placed in a DAEP or a JJAEP, expelled, or taken into custody by a law enforcement officer under Chapter 37 of the Education Code. Because the Student Code of Conduct is adopted by the district’s board of trustees it has the force of policy; therefore, in case of conflict between the Code and the student handbook, the Code shall prevail. Please Note: The discipline of students with disabilities who are eligible for services under federal law (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973) is subject to the provisions of those laws.

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School District Authority and Jurisdiction Campus Behavior Coordinator

As required by law, a person at each campus must be designated to serve as the campus behavior coordinator. The designated person may be principal of the campus or any other campus administrator selected by the principal. The campus behavior coordinator is primarily responsible for maintaining student discipline. The district maintains a current list of the persons serving as a camps behavior coordinator in the Student Handbook. School rules and the authority of the district to administer discipline apply whenever the interest of the district is involved, on or off school grounds, in conjunction with or independent of classes and school-sponsored activities. The district has disciplinary authority over a student: 1. During the regular school day and while the student is going to and from school on district transportation; 2. During lunch periods in which a student is allowed to leave campus; 3. While the student is in attendance at any school-related activity, regardless of time or location; 4. For any school-related misconduct, regardless of time or location; 5. When retaliation against a school employee or volunteer occurs or is threatened, regardless of time or location; 6. When a student engages in cyberbulling, as provided by Education Code 37.0832; 7. When criminal mischief is committed on or off school property or at a school-related event; 8. For certain offenses committed within 300 feet of school property as measured from any point on the school’s real property boundary line; 9. For certain offenses committed while on school property or while attending a schoolsponsored or school-related activity of another district in Texas; 10. When the student commits a felony, as provided by Education Code 37.006 or 37.0081; and 11. When the student is required to register as a sex offender. The district has the right to search a vehicle driven to school by a student and parked on school property whenever there is reasonable cause to believe it contains articles or materials prohibited by the district. The district has the right to search a student’s locker or desk when there is reasonable cause to believe it contains articles or materials prohibited by the district.

Reporting Crimes Participating in Graduation Activities

The principal or campus behavior coordinator and other school administrators as appropriate shall report crimes as required by law and will call local law enforcement when an administrator suspects that a crime has been committed on campus. The district has the right to limit a student’s participation in graduation activities for violating the district’s Code. Participation might include a speaking role, as established by district policy and procedures. Students eligible to give the opening and closing remarks at graduation shall be notified by the campus principal. Notwithstanding any other eligibility requirements, in order to be considered

2

as an eligible student to give the opening or closing remarks, a student shall not have engaged in any misconduct in violation of the district’s Code resulting in an out-of-school suspension, removal to a DAEP, or expulsion during the semester immediately preceding graduation. The valedictorian and salutatorian may also have speaking roles at graduation. No student shall be eligible to have such a speaking role if he or she engaged in any misconduct in violation of the district’s Code resulting in an out-of school suspension, removal to a DAEP, or expulsion during the semester immediately preceding graduation. See DAEP—Restrictions during Placement for information regarding a student assigned to DAEP at the time of graduation. Unauthorized Persons

In accordance with Education Code 37.105, a school administrator, school resource officer (SRO), or district police officer shall have the authority to refuse entry or eject a person from district property if the person refuses to leave peaceably on request and: 1. 2.

The person poses a substantial risk of harm to any person; or The person behaves in a manner that is inappropriate for a school setting, and the person persists in the behavior after being given a verbal warning that the behavior is inappropriate and may result in refusal of entry or ejection.

Appeals regarding refusal of entry or ejection from district property may be filed in accordance with FNG(LOCAL) or GF(LOCAL), as appropriate.

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Standards for Student Conduct Each student is expected to: •

Demonstrate courtesy, even when others do not.



Behave in a responsible manner, always exercising self-discipline.



Attend all classes, regularly and on time.



Prepare for each class; take appropriate materials and assignments to class.



Meet district and campus standards of grooming and dress.



Obey all campus and classroom rules.



Respect the rights and privileges of students, teachers, and other district staff and volunteers.



Respect the property of others, including district property and facilities.



Cooperate with and assist the school staff in maintaining safety, order, and discipline.



Adhere to the requirements of the Student Code of Conduct.

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General Conduct Violations The categories of conduct below are prohibited at school, in vehicles owned or operated by the district, and at all school-related activities, but the list does not include the most severe offenses. In the subsequent sections on Out-of-School Suspension, DAEP Placement, Placement and/or Expulsion for Certain Offenses, and Expulsion, certain offenses that require or permit specific consequences are listed. Any offense, however, may be severe enough to result in Removal from the Regular Educational Setting as detailed in that section. Disregard for Authority

Mistreatment of Others

Students shall not: •

Fail to comply with directives given by school personnel (insubordination).



Leave school grounds or school-sponsored events without permission.



Disobey rules for conduct on school buses.



Refuse to accept discipline management techniques assigned by a teacher or principal.



Agitate, tease, or harass a police canine at any time. This prohibited conduct includes but is not limited to barking, jumping at the canine, offering the canine food or any other substance (edible or non-edible).

Students shall not: •

Use profanity or vulgar language or make obscene gestures.



Fight or scuffle. (For assault see DAEP Placement and Expulsion.)



Threaten a district student, employee, or volunteer, including off school property if the conduct causes a substantial disruption to the educational environment.



Engage in bullying, cyberbullying, harassment, or making hit lists. (See glossary for all four terms.)



Release or threaten to release intimate visual material of a minor or a student who is 18 years of age or older without the student’s consent.



Engage in conduct that constitutes sexual or gender-based harassment or sexual abuse, whether by word, gesture, or any other conduct, directed toward another person, including a district student, employee, or volunteer.



Engage in conduct that constitutes dating violence. (See glossary.)



Engage in inappropriate or indecent exposure of private body parts.



Participate in hazing. (See glossary.)



Cause an individual to act through the use of or threat of force (coercion).



Commit extortion or blackmail (obtaining money or an object of value from an unwilling person).



Engage in inappropriate verbal, physical, or sexual conduct directed toward another person, including a district student, employee, or volunteer.



Record the voice or image of another without the prior consent of the individuals being recorded or in any way that disrupts the educational environment or invades the privacy of others.

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General Conduct Violations

Property Offenses

Possession of Prohibited Items

Students shall not: •

Damage or vandalize property owned by others. (For felony criminal mischief see DAEP Placement or Expulsion.)



Deface or damage school property—including textbooks, technology and electronic resources, lockers, furniture, and other equipment—with graffiti or by other means.



Steal from students, staff, or the school.



Commit or assist in a robbery or theft, even if it does not constitute a felony according to the Texas Penal Code. (For felony robbery, aggravated robbery, and theft see DAEP Placement and Expulsion.)

Students shall not possess or use: •

Fireworks of any kind, smoke or stink bombs, or any other pyrotechnic device;



A razor, box cutter, chain, or any other object used in a way that threatens or inflicts bodily injury to another person;



A “look-alike” weapon that is intended to be used as a weapon or could reasonably be perceived as a weapon;



An air gun or BB gun;



Ammunition;



A location-restricted knife;



A hand instrument designed to cut or stab another by being thrown;



*A firearm;



A stun gun;



A pocketknife or any other small knife;



Mace or pepper spray;



Martial arts objects;



Pornographic material;



Tobacco products; cigarettes; imitation tobacco products, e- cigarettes: and any component, part or accessory for an e-cigarette device or any tobacco-related products



Matches or a lighter;



A laser pointer for other than an approved use;



Stereo headsets, CD players, cassette players, electronic games without permission; or



Any articles not generally considered to be weapons, including school supplies, when the principal or designee determines that a danger exists.

*For weapons and firearms, see DAEP Placement and Expulsion. In most circumstances, possession of these items is punishable by mandatory expulsion under federal or state law.

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General Conduct Violations Possession of Telecommunications or Other Electronic Devices

Students shall not:

Illegal, Prescription, and Over-theCounter Drugs

Students shall not:

Misuse of Technology Resources and the Internet



Use a telecommunications device, including a cellular telephone, or other electronic device in violation of district and campus rules.



Possess, use, give or sell alcohol or an illegal drug. (Also see DAEP Placement and Expulsion for mandatory and permissive consequences under state law.)



Possess or sell seeds or pieces of marijuana in less than a usable amount.



Possess, use, give, or sell paraphernalia related to any prohibited substance. (See glossary for “paraphernalia.”)



Possess, use, give, or sell synthetic marijuana



Possess, use, abuse, or sell look-alike drugs or attempt to pass off items as drugs or contraband.



Abuse the student’s own prescription drug, give a prescription drug to another student, or possess or be under the influence of another person’s prescription drug on school property or at a school-related event. (See glossary for “abuse.”)



Abuse over-the-counter drugs. (See glossary for “abuse.”) Be under the influence of prescription or over-the-counter drugs that cause impairment of the physical or mental faculties. (See glossary for “under the influence.”)



Have or take prescription drugs or over-the-counter drugs at school other than as provided by district policy.

Students shall not: •

Violate policies, rules, or agreements signed by the student or the student’s parent regarding the use of technology resources.



Attempt to access or circumvent passwords or other security-related information of the district, students, or employees or upload or create computer viruses, including off school property if the conduct causes a substantial disruption to the educational environment.



Attempt to alter, destroy, or disable district technology resources including, but not limited to, computers and related equipment, district data, the data of others, or other networks connected to the district’s system, including off school property if the conduct causes a substantial disruption to the educational environment.



Use the Internet or other electronic communications to threaten district students, employees, or volunteers, including off school property if the conduct causes a substantial disruption to the educational environment or infringes on the rights of another student at school



Send, post, deliver or possess electronic messages that are abusive, obscene, sexually oriented, threatening, harassing, damaging to another’s reputation, or illegal, including cyberbullying and “sexting,” either on or off school property if the conduct causes a substantial disruption to the educational environment or infringes on the rights of another student at school.



Use the Internet or other electronic communication to engage in or encourage illegal behavior or threaten school safety, on or off school property if the

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General Conduct Violations conduct causes a substantial disruption to the educational environment or infringes on the rights of another student at school.

Safety Transgressions

Miscellaneous Offenses



Use any software and/or hardware to undermine or circumvent security measures implemented by the district.



Attach unauthorized devices to district computers or network systems.



Use technology resources for financial gain or for political activity.



Access non-educational content without prior written permission from the Superintendent or designee.



Send or post electronic messages under a false identify.



Distribute personal information about self or others by means of technology without approval from the supervisor or instructor.



Possess published or electronic material that is designed to promote or encourage illegal behavior or that could threaten school safety.



Install, download, or place any software or external data on district computers or network systems without prior written consent from the Superintendent or designee.

Students shall not: •

Possess published or electronic material that is designated to promote or encourage illegal behavior or that could threaten school safety.



Engage in verbal (oral or written) exchanges that threaten the safety of another student, a school employee, or school property.



Make false accusations or perpetrate hoaxes regarding school safety.



Engage in any conduct that school officials might reasonably believe will substantially disrupt the school program or incite violence.



Throw objects that can cause bodily injury or property damage.



Discharge a fire extinguisher without valid cause.

Students shall not: •

Violate dress and grooming standards as communicated in the student handbook.



Cheat or copy the work of another.



Gamble.



Falsify records, passes, or other school-related documents.



Engage in actions or demonstrations that substantially disrupt or materially interfere with school activities.



Repeatedly violate other communicated campus or classroom standards of conduct.

The district may impose campus or classroom rules in addition to those found in the Code. These rules may be posted in classrooms or given to the student and may or may not constitute violations of the Code.

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Discipline Management Techniques Discipline shall be designed to improve conduct and to encourage students to adhere to their responsibilities as members of the school community. Disciplinary action shall draw on the professional judgment of teachers and administrators and on a range of discipline management techniques including restorative discipline practices. Discipline shall be correlated to the seriousness of the offense, the student’s age and grade level, the frequency of misbehavior, the student’s attitude, the effect of the misconduct on the school environment, and statutory requirements. Because of these factors, discipline for a particular offense, including misconduct in a district vehicle owned or operated by the district, unless otherwise specified by law, may bring into consideration varying techniques and responses. Students with Disabilities

The discipline of students with disabilities is subject to applicable state and federal law in addition to the Student Code of Conduct. To the extent any conflict exists, state and/or federal law will prevail. In accordance with the Education Code, a student who receives special education services may not be disciplined for conduct meeting the definition of bullying, cyberbullying, harassment, or making hit lists (see glossary) until an ARD committee meeting has been held to review the conduct. In deciding whether to order suspension, DAEP placement, or expulsion, regardless of whether the action is mandatory or discretionary, the district shall take into consideration a disability that substantially impairs the student’s capacity to appreciate the wrongfulness of the student’s conduct.

Techniques

The following discipline management techniques may be used alone, in combination, or as part of progressive interventions for behavior prohibited by the Student Code of Conduct or by campus or classroom rules: •

Verbal correction, oral or written.



Cooling-off time or “time-out.”



Seating changes within the classroom. or vehicles owned or operated by the district.



Temporary confiscation of items that disrupt the educational process.



Rewards or demerits.



Behavioral contracts.



Counseling by teachers, school counselors, or administrative personnel.



Parent-teacher conferences.



Behavior coaching.



Anger management classes.



Mediation (victim-offender).



Classroom circles.



Family group conferencing.



Grade reductions for cheating, plagiarism, and as otherwise permitted by policy.



Detention, including outside regular school hours.

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Discipline Management Techniques

Notification



Sending the student to the office or other assigned area, or to in-school suspension.



Assignment of school duties such as cleaning or picking up litter.



Withdrawal of privileges, such as participation in extracurricular activities, eligibility for seeking and holding honorary offices, or membership in schoolsponsored clubs and organizations.



Penalties identified in individual student organizations’ extracurricular standards of behavior.



Restriction or revocation of district transportation privileges.



School-assessed and school-administered probation.



Corporal punishment, unless the student’s parent or guardian has provided a signed statement prohibiting its use.



Formal removal from class by the teacher.



Out-of-school suspension, as specified in the Suspension section of this Code.



Placement in a DAEP, as specified in the DAEP section of this Code.



Placement and/or expulsion in an alternative educational setting, as specified in the Placement and/or Expulsion for Certain Offenses section of this code.



Expulsion, as specified in the Expulsion section of this Code.



Referral to an outside agency or legal authority for criminal prosecution in addition to disciplinary measures imposed by the district.



Citation and/or arrest.



Other strategies and consequences as determined by school officials.

The campus behavior coordinator shall promptly notify a student’s parent by phone or in person of any violation that may result in in–school or out-of-school suspension, placement in a DAEP, placement in JJAEP, or expulsion. The campus behavior coordinator shall also notify a student’s parent if the student is taken into custody by a law enforcement officer under the disciplinary provisions of the Education Code. A good faith effort shall be made on the day the action was taken to provide to the student for delivery to the student’s parent written notification of the disciplinary action. If the parent has not been reached by telephone or in person by 5:00 p.m. on the first business day after the day the disciplinary action was taken, the campus behavior coordinator shall send written notification by U.S. Mail. If the campus behavior coordinator is not able to provide notice to the parent, the principal or designee shall provide the notice. Before the principal or appropriate administrator assigns a student under 18 to detention outside regular school hours, notice shall be given to the student’s parent to inform him or her of the reason for the detention and permit arrangements for necessary transportation.

Appeals

Questions from parents regarding disciplinary measures should be addressed to the teacher, campus administration, or campus behavior coordinator, as appropriate. Appeals or complaints regarding the use of specific discipline management techniques and should be addressed in accordance with policy FNG(LOCAL). A copy of the policy may be obtained from the principal’s office, the campus behavior coordinator’s office, or the central administration office or through Policy On Line at the following address: http://www.tasb.org/policy/pol/private/019907/

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Discipline Management Techniques Consequences shall not be deferred pending the outcome of a grievance.

Removal from the School Bus

A bus driver may refer a student to the principal’s office or the campus behavior coordinator’s office to maintain effective discipline on the bus. The principal or campus behavior coordinator must employ additional discipline management techniques, as appropriate, which can include restricting or revoking a student’s bus riding privileges. Since the district’s primary responsibility in transporting students in district vehicles is to do so as safely as possible, the operator of the vehicle must focus on driving and not have his or her attention distracted by student misbehavior. Therefore, when appropriate disciplinary management techniques fail to improve student behavior or when specific misconduct warrants immediate removal, the principal or the campus behavior coordinator may restrict or revoke a student’s transportation privileges, in accordance with law.

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Removal from the Regular Educational Setting In addition to other discipline management techniques, misconduct may result in removal from the regular educational setting in the form of a routine referral or a formal removal. Routine Referral

A routine referral occurs when a teacher sends a student to the campus behavior coordinator’s office as a discipline management technique. The campus behavior coordinator shall employ alternative discipline management techniques, including progressive interventions. A teacher or administrator may remove a student from class for a behavior that violates this Code to maintain effective discipline in the classroom.

Formal Removal

A teacher may also initiate a formal removal from class if: 1. The student’s behavior has been documented by the teacher as repeatedly interfering with the teacher’s ability to teach his or her class or with the student’s classmates’ ability to learn; or 2. The behavior is so unruly, disruptive, or abusive that the teacher cannot teach, and the students in the classroom cannot learn. Within three school days of the formal removal, the campus behavior coordinator or appropriate administrator shall schedule a conference with the student’s parent; the student; the teacher, in the case of removal by a teacher; and any other administrator. At the conference, the campus behavior coordinator or appropriate administrator shall inform the student of the misconduct for which he or she is charged and the consequences. The student shall have an opportunity to give his or her version of the incident. When a student is removed from the regular classroom by a teacher and a conference is pending, the campus behavior coordinator or other administrator may place the student in: •

Another appropriate classroom.



In-school suspension.



Out-of-school suspension.



DAEP.

A teacher or administrator must remove a student from class if the student engages in behavior that under the Education Code requires or permits the student to be placed in a DAEP or expelled. When removing for those reasons, the procedures in the subsequent sections on DAEP or expulsion shall be followed. Returning a Student to the Classroom

When a student has been formally removed from class by a teacher for conduct against the teacher containing the elements of assault, aggravated assault, sexual assault, aggravated sexual assault, murder, capital murder, or criminal attempt to commit murder or capital murder, the student may not be returned to the teacher’s class without the teacher’s consent. When a student has been formally removed by a teacher for any other conduct, the student may be returned to the teacher’s class without the teacher’s consent, if the placement review committee determines that the teacher’s class is the best or only alternative available.

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Out-of-School Suspension Misconduct

Students may be suspended for any behavior listed in the Code as a general conduct violation, DAEP offense, or expellable offense. The district shall not use out-of-school suspension for students in grade 2 or below unless the conduct meets the requirements established in law. A student in grade 2 or below shall not be placed in out-of-school suspension unless, while on school property or while attending a school-sponsored or school related activity on or off school property, the student engages in: •

Conduct that contains the elements of a weapons offense, as provided in Penal Code Section 46.02 or 46.05;



Conduct that contains the elements of assault, sexual assault, aggravated assault, or aggravated sexual assault, as provided by the Penal Code; or



Selling, giving, or delivering to another person or possessing, using, or being under the influence of any amount of marijuana, an alcoholic beverage, or a controlled substance or dangerous drug as defined by federal or state law.

The district shall use a positive behavior program as a disciplinary alternative for students in grade 2 or below who commit general conduct violations instead of suspension or placement in a DAEP. The program shall meet the requirements of law. Process

State law allows a student to be suspended for no more than three school days per behavior violation, with no limit on the number of times a student may be suspended in a semester or school year. Before being suspended a student shall have an informal conference with the campus behavior coordinator or the appropriate administrator, who shall advise the student of the conduct of which he or she is accused. The student shall be given the opportunity to explain his or her version of the incident before the administrator’s decision is made. The number of days of a student’s suspension will be determined by the campus behavior coordinator, but shall not exceed three school days. In deciding whether to order out-of-school suspension, the campus behavior coordinator shall take into consideration: 1.

Self-defense (see glossary),

2.

Intent or lack of intent at the time the student engaged in the conduct,

3.

The student’s disciplinary history or

4.

A disability that substantially impairs the student’s capacity to appreciate the wrongfulness of the students’ conduct.

The appropriate administrator will determine any restrictions on participation in schoolsponsored or school-related extracurricular and co-curricular activities.

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Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP) Placement The DAEP shall be provided in a setting other than the student's regular classroom. An elementary school student may not be placed in a DAEP with a student who is not an elementary school student. For purposes of DAEP, elementary classification shall be kindergarten through grade 5, and secondary classification shall be grades 6 through 12. Summer programs provided by the district shall serve students assigned to a DAEP in conjunction with other students. A student who is expelled for an offense that otherwise would have resulted in a DAEP placement does not have to be placed in DAEP in addition to the expulsion. In deciding whether to place a student in a DAEP, regardless of whether the action is mandatory or discretionary, the campus behavior coordinator shall take into consideration: 1. Self-defense (see glossary), 2. Intent or lack of intent at the time the student engaged in the conduct, 3. The student’s disciplinary history, or Discretionary Placement: Misconduct that May Result in DAEP Placement Misconduct Identified in State Law

4. A disability that substantially impairs the student’s capacity to appreciate the wrongfulness of the student’s conduct A student may be placed in a DAEP for behaviors prohibited in the General Conduct Violations section of this Code. In accordance with state law, a student may be placed in a DAEP for any one of the following offenses: •

Engaging in bullying that encourages a student to commit or attempt to commit suicide.



Inciting violence against a student through group bullying.



Releasing or threatening to release intimate visual material of a minor or a student who is 18 years of age or older without the student’s consent.



Involvement in a public school fraternity, sorority, or secret society, including participating as a member or pledge, or soliciting another person to become a pledge or member of a public school fraternity, sorority, secret society, or gang. (See glossary.)



Involvement in criminal street gang activity. (See glossary.)



Any criminal mischief, including a felony.



Assault (no bodily injury) with threat of imminent bodily injury



Assault by offensive or provocative physical contact.

In accordance with state law, a student may be placed in a DAEP if the superintendent or the superintendent’s designee has reasonable belief (see glossary) that the student has engaged in conduct punishable as a felony, other than aggravated robbery or those

14

DAEP Placement listed as offenses in Title 5 (see glossary) of the Texas Penal Code, that occurs off school property and not at a school-sponsored or school-related event, if the student’s presence in the regular classroom threatens the safety of other students or teachers or will be detrimental to the educational process. The campus behavior coordinator may, but is not required to, place a student in a DAEP for off-campus conduct for which DAEP placement is required by state law if the administrator does not have knowledge of the conduct before the first anniversary of the date the conduct occurred. Mandatory Placement: Misconduct That Requires DAEP Placement

A student must be placed in a DAEP if the student: •

Engages in conduct relating to a false alarm or report (including a bomb threat) or a terroristic threat involving a public school. (See glossary.)



Commits the following offenses on school property or within 300 feet of school property as measured from any point on the school’s real property boundary line, or while attending a school-sponsored or school-related activity on or off school property: o

Engages in conduct punishable as a felony.

o

Commits an assault (see glossary) under Texas Penal Code 22.01(a)(1). Sells, gives, or delivers to another person, or possesses, uses, or is under the influence of marijuana, a controlled substance, or a dangerous drug in an amount not constituting a felony offense. A student with a valid prescription for low-THC cannabis as authorized by Chapter 487 of the Health and Safety Code does not violate this provision. (School-related felony drug offenses are addressed in the Expulsion section.) (See glossary for “under the influence”)

o

o

Sells, gives, or delivers to another person an alcoholic beverage; commits a serious act or offense while under the influence of alcohol; or possesses, uses, or is under the influence of alcohol, if the conduct is not punishable as a felony offense. (School-related felony alcohol offenses are addressed in the Expulsion section.)

o

Behaves in a manner that contains the elements of an offense relating to abusable volatile chemicals.

o

Behaves in a manner that contains the elements of the offense of public lewdness or indecent exposure.



Engages in expellable conduct and is between six and nine years of age.



Commits a federal firearms violation and is younger than six years of age.



Engages in conduct that contains the elements of the offense of retaliation against any school employee or volunteer on or off school property. (Committing retaliation in combination with another expellable offense is addressed in the Expulsion section of this Code.)



Engages in conduct punishable as aggravated robbery or a felony listed under Title 5 (see glossary) of the Texas Penal Code when the conduct occurs off school property and not at a school-sponsored or school-related event and: o

The student receives deferred prosecution (see glossary),

o

A court or jury finds that the student has engaged in delinquent conduct (see glossary), or

15

DAEP Placement o The superintendent or designee has a reasonable belief (see glossary) that the student engaged in the conduct. Sexual Assault and Campus Assignments

If a student has been convicted of continuous sexual abuse of a young child or children or convicted of or placed on deferred adjudication for sexual assault or aggravated sexual assault against another student on the same campus, and if the victim or victim's parents or another person with the authority to act on behalf of the victim requests that the board transfer the offending student to another campus, the offending student shall be transferred to another campus in the district. If there is no other campus in the district serving the grade level of the offending student, the offending student will be transferred to a DAEP. Removals to a DAEP will be made by the campus behavior coordinator.

Process

Conference

When a student is removed from class for a DAEP offense, the campus behavior coordinator or appropriate administrator shall schedule a conference within three school days with the student’s parent, the student, and the teacher, in the case of a teacher removal. At the conference, the appropriate administrator will inform the student, orally or in writing, of the reasons for the removal and will give the student an explanation of the basis for the removal and an opportunity to respond to the reasons for the removal. Following valid attempts to require attendance, the district may hold the conference and make a placement decision regardless of whether the student or the student’s parents attend the conference.

Consideration of Mitigating Factors

In deciding whether to place a student in a DAEP, regardless of whether the action is mandatory or discretionary, the campus behavior coordinator shall take into consideration: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Placement Order

Self-defense (see glossary), Intent or lack of intent at the time the student engaged in the conduct The student’s disciplinary history, or A disability that substantially impairs the student’s capacity to appreciate the wrongfulness of the student’s conduct.

After the conference, if the student is placed in the DAEP, the campus behavior coordinator shall write a placement order. A copy of the DAEP placement order will be sent to the student and the student’s parent. Not later than the second business day after the conference, the board’s designee shall deliver to the juvenile court a copy of the placement order and all information required by Section 52.04 of the Family Code. If the student is placed in the DAEP and the length of placement is inconsistent with the guidelines included in this Code, the placement order shall give notice of the inconsistency.

Coursework Notice

The parent or guardian of a student placed in DAEP shall be given written notice of the student’s opportunity to complete a foundation curriculum course in which the student was enrolled at the time of removal and which is required for graduation, at no cost to the student. The notice shall include information regarding all methods available for completing the coursework.

16

DAEP Placement

Length of Placement The duration of a student’s placement in a DAEP will be determined by the campus behavior coordinator. The duration of a student’s placement will be determined on a case-by-case basis. DAEP placement shall be correlated to the seriousness of the offense, the student’s age and grade level, the frequency of misconduct, the student’s attitude, and statutory requirements. The maximum period of DAEP placement shall be one calendar year, except as provided below. Unless otherwise specified in the placement order, days absent from a DAEP shall not count toward fulfilling the total number of days required in a student DAEP placement order. The district shall administer the required pre- and post-assessments for students assigned to DAEP for a period of 90 days or longer in accordance with established district administrative procedures for administering other diagnostic or benchmark assessments. Exceeds One Year

Placement in a DAEP may exceed one year when a review by the district determines that the student is a threat to the safety of other students or to district employees. The statutory limitations on the length of a DAEP placement do not apply to a placement resulting from the board’s decision to place a student who engaged in the sexual assault of another student so that the students are not assigned to the same campus.

Exceeds School Year

Students who commit offenses requiring placement in a DAEP at the end of one school year may be required to continue that placement at the start of the next school year to complete the assigned term of placement. For placement in a DAEP to extend beyond the end of the school year, the campus behavior coordinator or the board’s designee must determine that: 1. The student’s presence in the regular classroom or campus presents a danger of physical harm to the student or others, or 2. The student has engaged in serious or persistent misbehavior (see glossary) that violates the district’s Code.

Exceeds 60 Days

Appeals

For placement in a DAEP to extend beyond 60 days or the end of the next grading period, whichever is sooner, a student’s parent will be given notice and the opportunity to participate in a proceeding before the board or the board’s designee. Questions from parents regarding disciplinary measures should be addressed to the campus administration. Student or parent appeals regarding a student’s placement in a DAEP should be addressed in accordance with policy FNG (LOCAL). A copy of this policy may be obtained from the principal’s office, the campus behavior coordinator’s office, the central administration office, or through Policy On-Line at the following address: http://www.tasb.org/policy/pol/private/019907/ Appeals shall begin at Level One with the Disciplinary consequences shall not be deferred pending the outcome of an appeal. The decision to place a student in a DAEP cannot be appealed beyond the board.

17

DAEP Placement Restrictions during Placement

The district does not permit a student who is placed in a DAEP to participate in any school-sponsored or school-related extracurricular or co-curricular activity, including seeking or holding honorary positions and/or membership in school-sponsored clubs and organizations. The district shall provide transportation to resident students in a DAEP, provided the student lives two or more miles away from the alternative campus. For seniors who are eligible to graduate and are assigned to a DAEP at the time of graduation, the placement in the program shall continue through graduation, and the student shall not be allowed to participate in the graduation ceremony and related graduation activities.

Placement Review

A student placed in a DAEP shall be provided a review of his or her status, including academic status, by the campus behavior coordinator or the board’s designee at intervals not to exceed 120 days. In the case of a high school student, the student’s progress toward graduation and the student’s graduation plan shall also be reviewed. At the review, the student or the student’s parent shall be given the opportunity to present arguments for the student’s return to the regular classroom or campus. The student may not be returned to the classroom of a teacher who removed the student without that teacher’s consent.

Additional Misconduct

If during the term of placement in a DAEP the student engages in additional misconduct for which placement in a DAEP or expulsion is required or permitted, additional proceedings may be conducted, and the campus behavior coordinator may enter an additional disciplinary order as a result of those proceedings.

Notice of Criminal Proceedings

When a student is placed in a DAEP for certain offenses, the office of the prosecuting attorney will notify the district if: 1. Prosecution of a student’s case was refused for lack of prosecutorial merit or insufficient evidence and no formal proceedings, deferred adjudication (see glossary), or deferred prosecution will be initiated; or 2. The court or jury found a student not guilty, or made a finding that the student did not engage in delinquent conduct or conduct indicating a need for supervision, and the case was dismissed with prejudice. If a student was placed in a DAEP for such conduct, on receiving the notice from the prosecutor, the superintendent or designee will review the student’s placement and schedule a review with the student’s parent not later than the third day after the superintendent or designee receives notice from the prosecutor. The student may not be returned to the regular classroom pending the review. After reviewing the notice and receiving information from the student’s parent, the superintendent or designee may continue the student’s placement if there is reason to believe that the presence of the student in the regular classroom threatens the safety of other students or teachers. The student or the student’s parent may appeal the superintendent’s decision to the board. The student may not be returned to the regular classroom pending the appeal. In the case of an appeal, the board shall, at the next scheduled meeting, review the notice from the prosecutor and receive information from the student, the student’s parent, and the superintendent or designee, and confirm or reverse the decision of the superintendent or designee. The board will make a record of the proceedings. If the board confirms the decision of the superintendent or designee, the student and the student’s parent may appeal to the Commissioner of Education. The student may not be returned to the regular classroom pending the appeal.

18

DAEP Placement

Withdrawal during Process

When a student violates the district’s Code in a way that requires or permits the student to be placed in a DAEP and the student withdraws from the district before a placement order is completed, the campus behavior coordinator may complete the proceedings and issue a placement order. If the student then reenrolls in the district during the same or a subsequent school year, the district may enforce the order at that time, less any period of the placement that has been served by the student during enrollment in another district. If the campus behavior coordinator or the board fails to issue a placement order after the student withdraws, the next district in which the student enrolls may complete the proceedings and issue a placement order.

Newly Enrolled Students

The district shall continue the DAEP placement of a student who enrolls in the district and was assigned to DAEP in an open-enrollment charter school or another district. A newly enrolled student with a DAEP placement from a district in another state shall be placed as any other newly enrolled student if the behavior committed is a reason for DAEP placement in the receiving district. If the student was placed in a DAEP by a school district in another state for a period that exceeds one year, this district, by state law, shall reduce the period of the placement so that the total placement does not exceed one year. After a review, however, the placement may be extended beyond a year if the district determines that the student is a threat to the safety of other students or employees or the extended placement is in the best interest of the student.

Emergency Placement Procedure

When an emergency placement is necessary because the student’s behavior is so unruly, disruptive or abusive that it seriously interferes with the classroom or school operations, the student will be given oral notice of the reason for the action. Not later than the tenth day after the date of the placement, the student will be given the appropriate conference required for assignment to a DAEP.

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Placement and/or Expulsion for Certain Offenses This section includes two categories of offenses for which the Education Code provides unique procedures and specific consequences. Registered Sex Offenders

Upon receiving notification in accordance with state law that a student is currently required to register as a sex offender, the administration must remove the student from the regular classroom and determine appropriate placement unless the court orders JJAEP placement. If the student is under any form of court supervision, including probation, community supervision, or parole, the placement shall be in either DAEP or JJAEP for at least one semester. If the student is not under any form of court supervision, the placement may be in DAEP or JJAEP for one semester or the placement may be in a regular classroom. The placement may not be in the regular classroom if the board or its designee determines that the student’s presence: 1. Threatens the safety of other students or teachers. 2. Will be detrimental to the educational process, or 3. Is not in the best interests of the district’s students.

Review Committee

At the end of the first semester of a student’s placement in an alternative educational setting and before the beginning of each school year for which the student remains in an alternative placement, the district shall convene a committee, in accordance with state law, to review the student’s placement. The committee shall recommend whether the student should return to the regular classroom or remain in the placement. Absent a special finding, the board or its designee must follow the committee’s recommendation. The placement review of a student with a disability who receives special education services must be made by the ARD committee.

Newly Enrolled Student

If a student enrolls in the district during a mandatory placement as a registered sex offender, the district may count any time already spent by the student in a placement or may require an additional semester in an alternative placement without conducting a review of the placement.

Appeal

A student or the student’s parent may appeal the placement by requesting a conference between the board or its designee, the student, and the student’s parent. The conference is limited to the factual question of whether the student is required to register as a sex offender. Any decision of the board or its designee under this section is final and may not be appealed.

Certain Felonies

Regardless of whether placement or expulsion is required or permitted by one of the reasons in the DAEP Placement or Expulsion sections, in accordance with Education Code 37.0081, a student may be expelled and placed in either DAEP or JJAEP if the board or campus behavior coordinator makes certain findings and the following circumstances exist in relation to aggravated robbery or a felony offense under Title 5 (see glossary) of the Texas Penal Code. The student must: •

Have received deferred prosecution for conduct defined as aggravated robbery or a Title 5 felony offense;



Have been found by a court or jury to have engaged in delinquent conduct for conduct defined as aggravated robbery or a Title 5 felony offense;

20

Placement and/or Expulsion •

Have been charged with engaging in conduct defined as aggravated robbery or a Title 5 felony offense;



Have been referred to a juvenile court for allegedly engaging in delinquent conduct for conduct defined as aggravated robbery or a Title 5 felony offense; or



Have received probation or deferred adjudication or have been arrested for, charged with, or convicted of aggravated robbery or a Title 5 felony offense.

The district may expel the student and order placement under these circumstances regardless of: 1. The date on which the student’s conduct occurred, 2. The location at which the conduct occurred, 3. Whether the conduct occurred while the student was enrolled in the district, or 4. Whether the student has successfully completed any court disposition requirements imposed in connection with the conduct. Hearing and Required Findings

The student must first have a hearing before the board or its designee, who must determine that in addition to the circumstances above that allow for the expulsion, the student’s presence in the regular classroom: 1. Threatens the safety of other students or teachers, 2. Will be detrimental to the educational process, or 3. Is not in the best interest of the district’s students. Any decision of the board or the board’s designee under this section is final and may not be appealed.

Length of Placement

The student is subject to the placement until: 1. The student graduates from high school, 2. The charges are dismissed or reduced to a misdemeanor offense, or 3. The student completes the term of the placement or is assigned to another program.

Newly Enrolled Students

A student who enrolls in the district before completing a placement under this section from another school district must complete the term of the placement.

21

Expulsion In deciding whether to order expulsion, regardless of whether the action is mandatory or discretionary, the campus behavior coordinator shall take into consideration:

Discretionary Expulsion: Misconduct That May Result in Expulsion Any Location

At School, Within 300 Feet, or at School Event

1.

Self-defense (see glossary),

2.

Intent or lack of intent at the time the student engaged in the conduct,

3.

The student’s disciplinary history, or

4.

A disability that substantially impairs the student’s capacity to appreciate the wrongfulness of the student’s conduct.

Some of the following types of misconduct may result in mandatory placement in a DAEP, whether or not a student is expelled. (See DAEP Placement) A student may be expelled for: •

Engaging in bullying that encourages a student to commit or attempt to commit suicide.



Inciting violence against a student through group bullying.



Releasing or threatening to release intimate visual material of a minor or a student who is 18 years of age or older without the student’s consent.



Conduct that contains the elements of assault under Penal Code 22.01(a)(1) in retaliation against a school employee or volunteer.



Criminal mischief, if punishable as a felony.



Engaging in conduct that contains the elements of one of the following offenses against another student: o

Aggravated assault.

o

Sexual assault.

o

Aggravated sexual assault.

o

Murder.

o

Capital murder.

o

Criminal attempt to commit murder or capital murder.

o

Aggravated robbery.



Breach of computer security. (See glossary.)



Engaging in conduct relating to a false alarm or report (including a bomb threat) or a terroristic threat involving a public school.

A student may be expelled for committing any of the following offenses on or within 300 feet of school property, a measured from any point on the school’s real property boundary line, or while attending a school-sponsored or school-related activity on or off school property: •

Selling, giving, or delivering to another person, or possessing, using, or being under the influence of marijuana, a controlled substance, or a dangerous drug, if the conduct is not punishable as a felony. A student with a valid prescription for low-THC cannabis as authorized by Chapter 487 of the Health and Safely Code does not violate this provision. (See glossary for "under the influence.")

22

Expulsion

Within 300 Feet of School



Selling, giving, or delivering to another person, or possessing, using, or being under the influence of alcohol; or committing a serious act or offense while under the influence of alcohol, if the conduct is not punishable as a felony.



Engaging in conduct that contains the elements of an offense relating to abusable volatile chemicals.



Engaging in conduct that contains the elements of assault under Section 22.01(a)(1) against an employee or a volunteer.



Engaging in deadly conduct. (See glossary)

A student may be expelled for engaging in the following conduct while within 300 feet of school property, as measured from any point on the school’s real property boundary line: • Aggravated assault, sexual assault, or aggravated sexual assault. •

Arson. (See glossary.)



Murder, capital murder, or criminal attempt to commit murder or capital murder.



Indecency with a child, aggravated kidnapping, manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, or aggravated robbery.



Continuous sexual abuse of a young child or children.



Felony drug- or alcohol-related offense.



Carrying on or about the student’s person a handgun, a location-restricted knife, or a club, as these terms are defined by state law. (See glossary)



Possessing, manufacturing, transporting, repairing or selling a prohibited weapon, as defined by state law. (See glossary.)



Possession of a firearm, as defined by federal law. (See glossary.)

Property of Another District

A student may be expelled for committing any offense that is a state-mandated expellable offense if the offense is committed on the property of another district in Texas or while the student is attending a school-sponsored or school-related activity of a school in another district in Texas.

While in DAEP

A student may be expelled for engaging in documented serious misbehavior that violates the district’s Code, despite documented behavioral interventions while placed in a DAEP. For purposes of discretionary expulsion from a DAEP, serious misbehavior means: 1. Deliberate violent behavior that poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others; 2.

Extortion, meaning the gaining of money or other property by force of threat;

3.

Conduct that constitutes coercion, as defined by Section 1.07, Penal Code; or

4.

Conduct that constitutes the offense of: a.

Public lewdness under Section 21.07, Penal Code;

b.

Indecent exposure under Section 21.08, Penal Code;

c.

Criminal mischief under Section 28.03, Penal Code;

23

Expulsion

Mandatory Expulsion: Misconduct That Requires Expulsion Under Federal Law

d.

Personal hazing under Section 37.152, Penal Code; or

e.

Harassment under Section 42.07(a)(1), Penal Code, of a student or district employee.

A student must be expelled under federal or state law for any of the following offenses that occur on school property or while attending a school-sponsored or school-related activity on or off school property: Bringing to school or possessing at school, including any setting that is under the district’s control or supervision for the purpose of a school activity, a firearm, as defined by federal law. (See glossary.) Note: Mandatory expulsion under the federal Gun Free Schools Act does not apply to a firearm that is lawfully stored inside a locked vehicle, or to firearms used in activities approved and authorized by the district when the district has adopted appropriate safeguards to ensure student safety.

Under the Texas Penal Code



Carrying on or about the “student’s person, the following, as defined by the Texas Penal Code: o

A handgun defined by state law as any firearm designed, made, or adapted to be used with one hand. (See glossary.) Note: A student may not be expelled solely on the basis of the student’s use, exhibition, or possession of a firearm that occurs at an approved target range facility that is not located on a school campus, while participating in or preparing for a school-sponsored, shooting competition or a shooting sports educational activity that is sponsored or supported by the Parks and Wildlife Department, or a shooting sports sanctioning organization working with the department. [See policy FNCG (LEGAL).]

o

A location-restricted knife, as defined by state law. (See glossary.)

o

A club, as defined by state law. (See glossary.)



Possessing, manufacturing, transporting, repairing or selling a prohibited weapon, as defined in state law. (See glossary.)



Behaving in a manner that contains elements of the following offenses under the Texas Penal Code: o

Aggravated assault, sexual assault, or aggravated sexual assault.

o

Arson. (See glossary.)

o

Murder, capital murder, or criminal attempt to commit murder or capital murder.

o

Indecency with a child.

o

Aggravated kidnapping.

o

Aggravated robbery.

o

Manslaughter.

o

Criminally negligent homicide.

o

Continuous sexual abuse of a young child or children.

o

Behavior punishable as a felony that involves selling, giving, or delivering to another person, or possessing, using, or being under the influence of marijuana, a controlled substance, a dangerous drug, or alcohol; or committing a serious act or offense while under the influence of alcohol.

24

Expulsion •

Engaging in retaliation against a school employee or volunteer combined with one of the above-listed mandatory expulsion offenses.

Under Age Ten

When a student under the age of ten engages in behavior that is expellable behavior, the student will not be expelled, but will be placed in a DAEP. A student under age six will not be placed in a DAEP unless the student commits a federal firearm offense.

Process

If a student is believed to have committed an expellable offense, campus behavior coordinator or other appropriate administrator shall schedule a hearing within a reasonable time. The student’s parent will be invited in writing to attend the hearing. Until a hearing can be held, the campus behavior coordinator or other administrator may place the student in:

Hearing



Another appropriate classroom.



In-school suspension.



Out-of-school suspension.



DAEP.

A student facing expulsion will be given a hearing with appropriate due process. The student is entitled to: 1.

Representation by the student’s parent or another adult who can provide guidance to the student and who is not an employee of the district,

2.

An opportunity to testify and to present evidence and witnesses in the student’s defense,

3.

An opportunity to question the witnesses or

After providing notice to the student and parent of the hearing, the district may hold the hearing regardless of whether the student or the student’s parent attends. The board of trustees delegates to the superintendent or his designee authority to conduct hearings and expel students. Board Review of Expulsion

After the due process hearing, the expelled student may request that the board review the expulsion decisions. The student or parent must submit a written request to the superintendent within seven days after receipt of the written decision. The superintendent must provide the student or parent written notice of the date, time, and place of the meeting at which the board will review the decision. The board will review the record of the expulsion hearing in a closed meeting unless the parent requests in writing that the matter be held in an open meeting. The board may also hear a statement from the student or parent and from the board’s designee. The board will hear statements made by the parties at the review and will base its decision on evidence reflected in the record and any statements made by the parties at the review. The board will make and communicate its decision orally at the conclusion of the presentation. Consequences shall not be deferred pending the outcome of the hearing.

25

Expulsion Expulsion Order

Before ordering the expulsion, the board or campus behavior coordinator shall take into consideration: 1.

Self-defense (see glossary),

2.

Intent or lack of intent at the time the student engaged in the conduct,

3.

The student’s disciplinary history, or

4.

A disability that substantially impairs the student’s capacity to appreciate the wrongfulness of the student’s conduct.

If a student is expelled, the board or its designee shall deliver to the student and the student’s parent a copy of the order expelling the student. Not later than the second business day after the hearing, the Board or its designee shall deliver to the juvenile court a copy of the expulsion order and the information required by Section 52.04 of the Family Code. If the length of the expulsion is inconsistent with the guidelines included in the Student Code of Conduct, the expulsion order shall give notice of the inconsistency. Length of Expulsion

The length of an expulsion shall be correlated to the seriousness of the offense, the student’s age and grade level, the frequency of misbehavior, the student’s attitude, and statutory requirements. The duration of a student’s expulsion will be determined on a case-by-case basis. The maximum period of expulsion is one calendar year except as provided below. An expulsion may not exceed one year unless, after review, the district determines that: 1.

The student is a threat to the safety of other students or to district employees, or

2.

Extended expulsion is in the best interest of the student.

State and federal law require a student to be expelled from the regular classroom for a period of at least one calendar year for bringing a firearm, as defined by federal law, to school. However, the superintendent or other appropriate administrator may modify the length of the expulsion on a case-by-case basis. Students who commit offenses that require expulsion at the end of one school year may be expelled into the next school year to complete the term of expulsion. Withdrawal During Process

When a student has violated the district’s Code in a way that requires or permits expulsion from the district and the student withdraws from the district before the expulsion hearing takes place, the district may conduct the hearing after sending written notice to the parent and student. If the student then reenrolls in the district during the same or subsequent school year, the district may enforce the expulsion order at that time, less any expulsion period that has been served by the student during enrollment in another district. If the campus behavior coordinator or the board fails to issue an expulsion order after the student withdraws, the next district in which the student enrolls may complete the proceedings.

Additional Misconduct

If during the expulsion, the student engages in additional conduct for which placement in a DAEP or expulsion is required or permitted, additional proceedings may be conducted, and the campus behavior coordinator or the board may issue an additional disciplinary order as a result of those proceedings.

26

Expulsion Restrictions during Expulsion

Expelled students are prohibited from being on school grounds or attending schoolsponsored or school-related activities during the period of expulsion. No district academic credit shall be earned for work missed during the period of expulsion unless the student is enrolled in a district-approved program.

Newly Enrolled Students

The district shall continue the expulsion of any newly enrolled student expelled from another district or an open-enrollment charter school until the period of the expulsion is completed. If a student expelled in another state enrolls in the district, the district may continue the expulsion under the terms of the expulsion order, may place the student in a DAEP for the period specified in the order, or may allow the student to attend regular classes if: 1.

The out-of-state district provides the district with a copy of the expulsion order, and

2.

The offense resulting in the expulsion is also an expellable offense in the district in which the student is enrolling.

If a student is expelled by a district in another state for a period that exceeds one year and the district continues the expulsion or places the student in a DAEP, the district shall reduce the period of the expulsion or DAEP placement so that the entire period does not exceed one year, unless after a review it is determined that: 1.

The student is a threat to the safety of other students or district employees, or

2.

Extended placement is in the best interest of the student.

Emergency Expulsion Procedures

When an emergency expulsion is necessary to protect persons or property from imminent harm, the student will be given verbal notice of the reason for the action. Within ten days after the date of the emergency expulsion, the student shall be given appropriate due process required for a student facing expulsion.

DAEP Placement of Expelled Students

The district may provide educational services to any expelled student in a DAEP; however, educational services in the DAEP must be provided if the student is less than ten years of age.

27

Glossary The glossary provides legal definitions and locally established definitions and is intended to assist in understanding terms related to the Student Code of Conduct. Abuse is improper or excessive use. Aggravated robbery is defined in part by Texas Penal Code 29.03(a) when a person commits robbery and 1.

Causes serious bodily injury to another;

2.

Uses or exhibits a deadly weapon; or

3.

Causes bodily injury to another person or threatens or places another person in fear of imminent bodily injury or death, if the other person is: a.

65 years of age or older; or

b.

A disabled person.

Armor-piercing ammunition is defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 as handgun ammunition used in pistols and revolvers and designed primarily for the purpose of penetrating metal or body armor. Arson is defined in part by Texas Penal Code 28.02 as: 1.

A crime that involves starting a fire or causing an explosion with intent to destroy or damage: 1.

Any vegetation, fence, or structure on open-space land; or

2.

Any building, habitation, or vehicle: 1) Knowing that it is within the limits of an incorporated city or town; 2) Knowing that it is insured against damage or destruction; 3) Knowing that it is subject to a mortgage or other security interest; 4) Knowing that it is located on property belonging to another; 5) Knowing that it has located within it property belonging to another; or 6) When the person starting the fire is reckless about whether the burning or explosion will endanger the life of some individual or the safety of the property of another.

2.

A crime that involves recklessly starting a fire or causing an explosion or attempting while manufacturing or attempting to manufacture a controlled substance and the fire or explosion damages any building habitation, or vehicle; or

3.

A crime that involves intentionally starting a fire or causing an explosion and in so doing: a.

Recklessly damages or destroys a building belonging to another, or

b.

Recklessly causes another person to suffer bodily injury or death.

Assault is defined in part by Texas Penal Code 22.01(a)(1) as intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly causing bodily injury to another. Breach of Computer Security includes knowingly accessing a computer, computer network, or computer system without the effective consent of the owner as defined in Texas Penal Code 33.02, if the conduct involves accessing a computer, computer network, or computer system owned by or operated on behalf of a school district; and the student knowingly alters, damages, or deletes school district property or information; or commits a breach of any other computer, computer network, or computer system.

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Glossary Bullying is defined in Section 37.0832 of the Education Code as a single significant act or a pattern of acts by one or more students directed at another student that exploits and imbalance of power and involves engaging in written or verbal expression, expression through electronic means, or physical conduct that: 1.

Has the effect or will have the effect of physically harming a student, damaging a student’s property, or placing a student in reasonable fear of harm to the student’s person or of damage to the student’s property;

2.

Is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive enough that the action or threat creates an intimidating, threatening, or abusive educational environment for a student.;

3.

Materially and substantially disrupts the educational process or the orderly operation of a classroom or school; or

4.

Infringes on the rights of the victim at school.

Bullying includes cyberbullying. (See below) This state law on bullying prevention applies to: 1.

Bullying that occurs on or is delivered to school property or to the site of a school-sponsored or school-related activity on or off school property;

2.

Bullying that occurs on a publicly or privately owned school bus or vehicle being used for transportation of students to or from school or a school-sponsored or school-related activity; and

3.

Cyberbullying that occurs off school property or outside of a school-sponsored or schoolrelated activity if the cyberbullying interferes with a student’s educational opportunities or substantially disrupts the orderly operation of a classroom, school, or school-sponsored or school-related activity.

Chemical dispensing device is defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 as a device designed, made, or adapted for the purpose of dispensing a substance capable of causing an adverse psychological or physiological effect on a human being. A small chemical dispenser sold commercially for personal protection is not in this category. Club is defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 as an instrument specially designed, made, or adapted for the purpose of inflicting serious bodily injury or death. A blackjack, nightstick, mace, and tomahawk are in the same category. Criminal street gang is three or more persons having a common identifying sign or symbol or an identifiable leadership who continuously or regularly associate in the commission of criminal activities. Cyberbullying is defined by Section 37.8032 of the Education Code as bullying that is done through the use of any electronic communication device, including through the use of a cellular or other type of telephone, a computer, a camera, electronic mail, instant messaging, text messaging, a social media application, an Internet website, or any other Internet-based communication tool. Dating violence occurs when a person in a current or past dating relationship uses physical, sexual, verbal, or emotional abuse to harm, threaten, intimidate, or control another person in the relationship. Dating violence also occurs when a person commits these acts against a person in a marriage or dating relationship with the individual who is or was once in a marriage or dating relationship with the person committing the offense, as defined by Section 71.0021 of the Family Code. Deadly conduct occurs when a person recklessly engages in conduct that places another in imminent danger of serious bodily injury, such as knowingly discharging a firearm in the direction of an individual, habitation, building, or vehicle. Deferred adjudication is an alternative to seeking a conviction in court that may be offered to a juvenile for delinquent conduct or conduct indicating a need for supervision. Deferred prosecution may be offered to a juvenile as an alternative to seeking a conviction in court for delinquent conduct or conduct indicating a need for supervision.

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Glossary Delinquent conduct is conduct that violates either state or federal law and is punishable by imprisonment or confinement in jail. It includes conduct that violates certain juvenile court orders, including probation orders, but does not include violations of traffic laws. Discretionary means that something is left to or regulated by a local decision maker. E-cigarette means an electronic cigarette or any other device that simulates smoking by using a mechanical heating element, battery, or electronic circuit to deliver nicotine or other substances to the individual inhaling from the device. The term includes any device that is manufactured, distributed, or sold as an e-cigarette, e-cigar, or e-pipe or under another product name of description and a component part, or accessory for the device, regardless of whether the component, part, or accessory is sold separately from the device. Explosive weapon is defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 as any explosive or incendiary bomb, grenade, rocket, or mine and its delivery mechanism that is designed, made, or adapted for the purpose of inflicting serious bodily injury, death, or substantial property damage, or for the principal purpose of causing such a loud report as to cause undue public alarm or terror. False Alarm or Report occurs when a person knowingly initiates, communicates, or circulates a report of a present, past, or future bombing, fire, offense, or other emergency that he or she knows is false or baseless and that would ordinarily: 1.

Cause action by an official or volunteer agency organized to deal with emergencies;

2.

Place a person in fear of imminent serious bodily injury; or

3.

Prevent or interrupt the occupation of a building, room, or place of assembly.

Firearm is defined by federal law (18U.S.C. &921 (a) as: 1.

Any weapon (including a starter gun) that will, is designed to, or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive.

2.

The frame or receiver of any such weapon.

3.

Any firearm muffler or firearm or

4.

Any destructive device, such as any explosive, incendiary or poison gas bomb, or grenade. Such term does not include an antique firearm.

Firearm silencer is defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 as any device designed, made, or adapted to muffle the report of a firearm. Graffiti are markings with aerosol paint or an indelible pen or marker on tangible property without the effective consent of the owner. The markings may include inscriptions, slogans, drawings, or paintings. Handgun is defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 as any firearm that is designed, made, or adapted to be fired with one hand. Harassment is: 1.

Conduct that meets the definition established in district policies DIA(LOCAL) and FFH(LOCAL); or

2.

Conduct that threatens to cause harm or bodily injury to another student, is sexually intimidating, causes physical damage to the property of another student, subjects another student to physical confinement or restraint, or maliciously and substantially harms another student’s physical or emotional health or safety, as defined in Section 37.001 (b)(2) of the Education Code.

Hazing is defined by Section 37.151 of Education Code as an intentional, knowing, or reckless act, on or off campus, by one person alone or acting with others, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, initiation into, affiliation with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in an organization.

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Glossary Hit list is defined in Section 37.001 (b)(3) of the Education Code as a list of people targeted to be harmed, using a firearm, a knife, or any other object to be used with intent to cause bodily harm. Improvised explosive device is defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 as a completed and operational bomb designed to cause serious bodily injury, death, or substantial property damage that is fabricated in an improvised manner using nonmilitary components. Indecent exposure is defined by Texas Penal Code 21.08 as an offense that occurs when a person exposes his or her anus or any part of his or her genitals with intent to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person, and is reckless about whether another is present who will be offended or alarmed by the act. Intimate visual material is defined by Texas Civil Practices and Remedies Code 98B.001 and Texas Penal Code 21.16 as visual material that depicts a person with the person’s intimate parts exposed or engaged in sexual conduct. “Visual material” means any film, photograph, video tape, negative, or slide of any photographic reproduction or any other physical medium that allows an image to be displayed on a computer or other video screen and any image transmitted to a computer or other video screen. Location-restricted knife is defined by the Texas Penal Code 46.01 as a knife with a blade over five and one-half inches. Knuckles as defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 are is any instrument consisting of finger rings or guards made of a hard substance and designed or adapted for inflicting serious bodily injury or death by striking a person with a fist enclosed in the knuckles. Look-alike weapon means an item that resembles a weapon but is not intended to be used to cause serious bodily injury. Machine gun as defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 is any firearm that is capable of shooting more than two shots automatically, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger. Mandatory means that something is obligatory or required because of an authority. Paraphernalia are devices that can be used for inhaling, ingesting, injecting, or otherwise introducing a controlled substance into a human body. Possession means to have an item on one’s person or in one’s personal property, including but not limited to clothing, purse, or backpack; a private vehicle used for transportation to or from school or school-related activities, including but not limited to an automobile, truck, motorcycle, or bicycle; telecommunications or electronic devices; or any school property used by the student, including but not limited to a locker or desk. Prohibited weapon under Texas Penal Code 46.05 (a) means: 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

The following items unless registered with the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives or otherwise not subject to that registration requirement or unless the item is classified as a curio or relic by the U.S. Department of justice: a. An explosive weapon; b. A machine gun. c. A short-barrel firearm; Knuckles; Armor-piercing ammunition; A chemical dispensing device A zip gun A tire deflation device; An improvised explosive device; or A firearm silencer, unless classified as a curio or relic by the U.S. Department of Justice or the actor otherwise possesses, manufactures, transports, repairs, or sells the firearm silencer in compliance with federal law.

Public Lewdness is defined by Texas Penal Code 21.07 as an offense that occurs when a person knowingly engages in an act of sexual intercourse, deviate sexual intercourse, or sexual contact in a public

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Glossary place or, if not in a public place, is reckless about whether another is present who will be offended or alarmed by the act. Public school fraternity, sorority, secret society, or gang means an organization composed wholly or in part of students that seeks to perpetuate itself by taking additional members from the students enrolled in school based on a decision of its membership rather than on the free choice of a qualified student. Educational organizations listed in Section 37.121(d) of the Education Code are excepted from this definition. Reasonable belief is a determination made by the superintendent or designee using all available information, including the information furnished under Article 15.27 of the Code of Criminal Procedure. Self-defense is the use of force against another to the degree a person reasonably believes the force is immediately necessary to protect himself or herself. Serious misbehavior means: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Deliberate violent behavior that poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others; Extortion, meaning the gaining of money or other property by force or threat; Conduct that constitutes coercion, as defined by Section 1.07, Texas Penal Code; or Conduct that constitutes the offense of: a. Public lewdness under Section 21.07, Texas Penal Code; b. Indecent exposure under Section 21.08, Texas Penal Code; c. Criminal mischief under Section 28.03, Texas Penal Code; d. Personal hazing under Section 37.152, Education Code; or e. Harassment under Section 42.07(a)(1), Texas Penal Code, of a student or district employee.

Serious or persistent misbehavior includes but is not limited to: •

Behavior that is grounds for permissible expulsion or mandatory DAEP placement.



Behavior identified by the district as grounds for discretionary DAEP placement.



Actions or demonstrations that substantially disrupt or materially interfere with school activities.



Refusal to attempt or complete school work as assigned.



Insubordination.



Profanity, vulgar language, or obscene gestures.



Leaving school grounds without permission.



Falsification of records, passes, or other school-related documents.



Refusal to accept discipline assigned by the teacher or principal.

Short-barrel firearm is defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 as a rifle with a barrel length of less than 16 inches or a shotgun with a barrel length of less than 18 inches, or any weapon made from a rifle or shotgun that, as altered, has an overall length of less than 26 inches. Terroristic threat is defined by Texas Penal Code 22.07 as a threat of violence to any person or property with intent to: 1.

Cause a reaction of any type by an official or volunteer agency organized to deal with emergencies;

2.

Place any person in fear of imminent serious bodily injury;

3.

Prevent or interrupt the occupation or use of a building; room, place of assembly, or place to which the public has access; place of employment or occupation; aircraft, automobile, or other form of conveyance; or other public place;

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Glossary 4.

Cause impairment or interruption of public communications, public transportation, public water, gas, or power supply or other public service;

5.

Place the public or a substantial group of the public in fear of serious bodily injury; or

6.

Influence the conduct or activities of a branch or agency of the federal government, the state, or a political subdivision of the state (including the district).

Tire deflation device is defined in part by Section 46.01 of the Texas Penal Code as a device, including a caltrop or spike strip, that, when driven over, impedes or stops the movement of a wheeled vehicle by puncturing one or more of the vehicle’s tires. Title 5 felonies are those listed in Title 5 of the Texas Penal Code that typically involve injury to a person and may include: •

Murder, manslaughter, or homicide under Sections 19.02,-.05, Texas Penal Code;



Kidnapping under Section 20.03, Texas Penal Code;



Trafficking of persons under Section 20A.02, Texas Penal Code;



Smuggling or continuous smuggling of persons under Sections 20.05-.06, Texas Penal Code;



Assault under Section 22.01, Texas Penal Code;



Aggravated assault under Section 22.02, Texas Penal Code;



Sexual assault under Section 22.011, Texas Penal Code;



Aggravated sexual assault under Section 22.021, Texas Penal Code;



Unlawful restraint under Section 20.2, Texas Penal Code;



Continuous sexual abuse of a young child or children under Section 21.02, Texas Penal Code;



Bestiality under Section 21.09, Texas Penal Code;



Improper relationship between educator and student under Section 21.12, Texas Penal Code;



Voyeurism under Section 21.17, Texas Penal Code;



Indecency with a child under Section 21.11, Texas Penal Code;



Invasive video recording under Section 21.15, Texas Penal Code;



Disclosure or promotion of intimate visual material under Section 21.16, Texas Penal Code;



Sexual coercion under Section 21.18, Texas Penal Code;



Injury to a child, an elderly person, or a disabled person of any age under Section 22.04, Texas Penal Code;



Abandoning or endangering a child under Section 22.041, Texas Penal Code;



Deadly conduct under Section 22.05, Texas Penal Code;

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Glossary •

Terroristic threat under Section 22.07, Texas Penal Code;



Aiding a person to commit suicide under Section 22.08, Texas Penal Code; and



Tampering with a consumer product under Section 22.09, Texas Penal Code.

[See FOC(EXHIBIT)] Under the influence means lacking the normal use of mental or physical faculties. Impairment of a person’s physical or mental faculties may be evidenced by a pattern of abnormal or erratic behavior or the presence of physical symptoms of drug or alcohol use or by admission. A student “under the influence” need not be legally intoxicated to trigger disciplinary action. Use means voluntarily introducing into one’s body, by any means, a prohibited substance. Zip gun is defined by Texas Penal Code 46.01 as a device or combination of devices, not originally a firearm, but adapted to expel a projectile through a smooth-bore or rifled-bore barrel by using the energy generated by an explosion or burning substance.

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2017-2018 TISD Student Handbook and Student Code of Conduct Acknowledgment Dear Student and Parent: As required by state law, the District has officially adopted the Student Handbook and the Student Code of Conduct in order to promote a safe and orderly learning environment for every student. These handbooks are available on the TISD website at http://www.txkisd.net/ . We urge you to read these publications thoroughly and to discuss them among your family. If you have any questions about the behaviors and consequences, we encourage you to ask for an explanation from the student’s teacher or campus administrator. If you are unable to read these handbooks on our website and need a printed copy, please contact your student’s school office. You will be contacted when the printed handbook is ready to be picked up by a parent or guardian at the student’s school. The student and parent should each sign this page in the space provided below, and then return the page to the student’s school. Paul Norton, Superintendent Texarkana Independent School District

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We acknowledge that we have received information on how to access or how to obtain a copy of the TISD Student Handbook and Student Code of Conduct for the 2017-2018 school year. We understand that students will be held accountable for their behavior and will be subject to the disciplinary consequences outlined in these publications.

Date:

________________________________________________________

Print name of student: ________________________________________________________ Signature of student:

________________________________________________________

Print name of parent:

________________________________________________________

Signature of parent:

________________________________________________________

School:

________________________________________________________

Grade level:

________________________________________________________

Please sign this page and return it to the student’s school.