Student Housing Market Study - UCSC Media Files - University of

Student Housing Market Study - UCSC Media Files - University of

S T U D E N T H O U S I N G M A R K E T S T U DY R E P O R T P R E PA R E D F O R UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ J U LY 2 0 1 4 FINAL REPORT ...

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S T U D E N T H O U S I N G M A R K E T S T U DY R E P O R T P R E PA R E D F O R

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ J U LY 2 0 1 4

FINAL REPORT

INSPIRE. EMPOWER. ADVANCE.

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PREFACE

PREFACE In March 2014, Brailsford & Dunlavey (“B&D”) was engaged by the University of California Santa Cruz (“UC Santa Cruz” or “University”) to conduct a student housing market study. Located in Santa Cruz, CA, the 2,030 acre campus has an enrollment of 17,200 students among its ten colleges. In the past decade, the campus has seen considerable growth that has put pressure on its existing student housing stock and the larger Santa Cruz community. With the ability to provide housing accommodations to over 50% of its population, the University relies on the Santa Cruz housing market to meet the remaining housing needs of its enrollment. Unfortunately, the local Santa Cruz market is very expensive due to a limited supply of affordable housing and lack of developable land. Students are not exempt from the difficulties found in the local housing market. Recognizing the practical limitations of developable land and campus priorities, the University is looking for creative ways to address this problem in order to meet the needs of the student population.

OBJECTIVES This housing market analysis prescribes a prudent market-responsive set of recommendations for the University to follow to address the needs and desires of its undergraduate and graduate students. To complete this study, the Project Team was tasked specifically with the following: 

Quantify demand for differing types of on-campus bed spaces for students with families, graduate students, and upper division undergraduates;



Evaluate the financial feasibility of delivering housing inventory to meet demand and recommend an ideal unit mix that can be delivered to best address market sector demand;



Recommend a strategic delivery program that delivers the ideal unit mix to meet program needs while addressing financial feasibility constraints, costs of housing programs vs. room and board rates, including debt service constraints for the campus; and



Develop a set of data points that will help inform the discussions and planning specific to the City of Santa Cruz.

METHODOLOGIES To accomplish this, B&D’s approach involved both qualitative and quantitative research that included input from campus stakeholders, undergraduate, and graduate students. B&D’s work effort commenced with meetings with key UC Santa Cruz administrators to understand the drivers and vision associated with on-campus housing at the University. Based on feedback from the University, B&D examined UC Santa

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

Cruz’s existing conditions with respect to the current student housing portfolio, student demographic composition, student enrollment trends, and real estate market conditions, and used these analyses to conduct a detailed market analysis. The results of the analysis are instrumental in framing issues that would affect demand for housing relative to key market characteristics. The methodologies employed in this study included the following:



A review of relevant documentation including the UCSC Third Week Enrollment Reports, the Colleges, Housing and Educational Services (“CHES”) residential portfolio, occupancy trends, and other pertinent information.



An existing conditions review was undertaken to understand the nature of the existing CHES student and employee residential real estate portfolio with regards to the quantity and type of units, location, occupancy rates, and resident demographics.



A housing market supply analysis was completed to assess local market conditions within the City of Santa Cruz with respect to price, location, and facility conditions;



Focus groups and stakeholder interviews were conducted with undergraduate and graduate students, to gain qualitative information regarding campus dynamics and existing housing issues and preferences for future housing;



A demographic analysis was completed to understand the makeup of UC Santa Cruz students, to identify demographic trends;



An on-line survey was distributed to all students, to understand their current housing situation, to gauge interest in additional university-sponsored housing, to test potential unit preferences and amenities, and to ultimately inform the demand model; and



A housing demand model was developed to project demand for additional undergraduate and graduate student housing based on key market data.



A financial analysis was completed to determine the order of magnitude capital costs of new housing and feasibility of the new housing to meet the unmet demand.

The findings contained in this report represent the professional opinions of the Project Team personnel, based upon assumptions and conditions detailed in the report.

The Project Team has conducted

research using both primary and secondary information sources that are deemed to be reliable, but whose accuracy cannot be guaranteed. The market data presented in this report is accurate as of July

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2014. However, if there are fluctuations in local, national and global economic conditions, the demand projections may vary. Far from being purely an academic or analytical exercise, this report is structured and developed within a framework emphasizing pragmatism and ease of implementation, and the Project Team’s intent is for this document to serve as an integral tool in guiding the institution’s implementation of a plan to address student and employee housing.

Brailsford & Dunlavey would like to give special thanks to the following individuals for their guidance during the development of this report.



Steve Houser, Director, Capital Planning and Employee Housing, CHES



Dean Fitch, Senior Planner, Physical Planning & Construction



Chris Karzag, Principal Budget Analyst, Business & Financial Analysis, CHES



Jim Grove, Principal Analyst, CHES



Anna Sher, Assistant Director for Assessment, Institutional Research, Assessment & Policy Studies

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTIONS 1.

Executive Summary

2.

Strategic Asset Value Analysis

3.

Student Housing Assessment A. Student Demographic Analysis B. On-Campus Existing Conditions C. Off-Campus Rental Market

4.

Demand Analysis A. Concept Options

5.

Financial Analysis

APPENDIX A.

Focus Group Report

B.

Housing Market Data

C.

Survey Data / Comments 1. Student Survey Data 2. Survey Comments

D.

Financial Models

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In March 2014, University of California Santa Cruz (“UC Santa Cruz” or “The University”) engaged Brailsford & Dunlavey (“B&D” or “the Project Team”) to conduct a Student Housing Market Study to identify latent demand for housing and to determine if the current product mix meets the needs of the Santa Cruz undergraduate and graduate students. As a part of this process, the Project Team conducted a visioning session with campus administrators, toured the existing student housing stock, conducted focus groups with students, examined campus demographic trends, studied the Santa Cruz real estate market, and developed a quantitative on-line survey to test housing needs and preferences. The information gathered as part of the analysis was synthesized and used to inform the demand model and to qualitatively understand housing preferences for the UC Santa Cruz student, faculty, and staff communities. B&D researched several market factors, the results of which were instrumental in framing issues that affect demand for graduate student and employee housing. The following is a summary of these findings.

HOUSI NG ASSESSMENT SUMM ARY OF FINDI NGS STRATEGIC ASSET VALUE ANLYSIS (VISIONING) B&D met with a variety of campus leaders to discuss the role that housing plays in the lives of UC Santa Cruz students. The conversations helped the Project Team understand the stakeholders’ impression of oncampus housing, the Santa Cruz real estate market, and what the University would like to see in terms of new student housing. The Project Team assembled the outcomes of the visioning session into a Strategic Asset Value story comprised of four parts: the quantity and location of housing, the target market and unit types, the financial accessibility, and underwriting criteria and institutional will. Key findings include: Quantity and Location of Housing / Target Market 

First-year and lower division housing should be centered on the existing college system. Location of housing for upper division and graduate students is not as important.



Providing housing for the student population must be in line with the Long Range Development Plan (“LRDP”) to accommodate enrollment growth.



Housing for first-year and lower division students is currently sufficient to accommodate the educational and student life outcomes of the residential colleges. However, opportunities exist to de-densify current residence halls to allow for greater community spaces within the buildings.



The University should create housing specifically suited to upper division students with appropriate residential life programs that provide greater privacy and independence.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

Financial Accessibility / Underwriting Criteria 

UC Santa Cruz housing rates should be consistent with the off-campus market while recognizing a premium for on-campus convenience.



The default assumption is utilization of revenue bonds supported by the net operating income of the housing system; however, public private partnerships should continue to be investigated and evaluated for benefits in rental rates and debt capacity.

STUDENT HOUISNG MARKET & DEMAND ANALYSIS DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS UC Santa Cruz has experienced significant growth in undergraduate and graduate enrollment. Since 2004, fall quarter undergraduate enrollment has increased 15% to 15,695 students and graduate enrollment has increased 12% to 1,508. The classes that have seen the greatest enrollment growth are juniors at 11% and seniors at 41%. The growth in upper division students indicates a significant transfer population and an increasing number of fifth-year seniors.

Undergraduate Graduate Total

2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 % Change 13,669 13,600 13,941 14,381 15,125 15,259 15,668 15,945 15,978 15,695 15% 1,344 1,401 1,419 1,439 1,488 1,504 1,507 1,501 1,426 1,508 12% 15,013 15,001 15,360 15,820 16,613 16,763 17,175 17,446 17,404 17,203 15%

FIGURE 1.1: UC SANTA CRUZ ENROLLMENT, 2004-2013 (ALL FIGURES REPRESENT 3RD WEEK FALL QUARTER ESTIMATES).

EXISTING CONDITIONS UCSC currently offers a mix of residence halls and apartments in 17 on-campus residential communities. Totaling nearly two million gross square feet of residential space, the facilities have a design capacity of 6,715 beds and a functional capacity of 8,396 beds due to the tripling of double occupancy units and the conversion of common space to residential space. The University currently provides on-campus housing for approximately 46% of its students. Approximately 61% of the units are in a traditional residence hall configuration targeted towards first and second year students and 39% are apartments intended for upper division students. Academic year rental rates range between $10,550 and $11,183. Since 2007, occupancy rates have averaged 113% of design capacity.

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

OFF-CAMPUS MARKET ANALYSIS Nearly all students who rent in the off-campus market live within the City of Santa Cruz. Focus group conversations reveal that students prefer to live within close proximity to public transportation that has convenient access to campus. Many described the market as highly competitive due to a limited supply of affordable and well maintained housing. The competitive nature of the market has led to high housing prices and an environment where the landlord maintains leverage in all aspects of the leasing process. The Project Team’s research found that the average monthly rental rates for multifamily properties in the market area range from $1,179 for a studio to $2,933 per month for a three-bedroom unit with an overall average of $1,792 per month. On a per student basis, the average rental rate is $1,235 per month. Average rental rates for single family homes range between $2,423 for a two-bedroom to $4,506 for a five-bedroom house with an overall average of $3,083 per month. On a per student basis, the average rental rate for a single family home is $1,019 per month. However, many students opt to share a bedroom to further reduce their monthly housing costs. The student survey analysis revealed that students pay on average $711 per month in rent exclusive of utilities, considerably less than the average rates found in the market analysis. The discrepancy between the market rates and the actual self-reported rates is a result of many students sharing a bedroom or sharing the rent with more students than the unit is designed for to reduce the overall cost. When compared to the average rental rates for apartment style units on campus, these self-reported rates are between 44% and 26% less than on=campus rates for a single and double occupancy units respectively. DEMAND ANALYSIS Utilizing data from the student housing assessment, B&D projects a net new demand of 1,585 beds of student housing. Targeted towards upper division students, the housing should not be affiliated with any college. In addition, analysis reveals that there is demand for 203 units of student family housing. Figures 1.2 and 1.3 illustrate the demand for housing based on fall 2013 enrollment figures. CURRENT RESIDENTS 3,461 1,999 1,390 906 77 7,833

MAX POTENTIAL DEMAND 3,485 2,113 1,823 1,089 102 8,612

Housing Design Capacity1

6,583

6,583

6,583

Delta

(1,250)

(2,029)

(1,585)

CLASS Freshmen Sophmores Juniors Seniors Graduates Total

OCCUPANCY COVERAGE RATIO 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.5

TOTAL DEMAND 3,485 2,113 1,665 837 68 8,168

Note: The 6,583 figure is the permanately adjusted design capacity. The figure does not include FSH or any guest housing units.

FIGURE 1.2: STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND.

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CURRENT RESIDENTS 100 80 180

MAX POTENTIAL DEMAND 90 179 269

Family Housing Units

196

196

196

Delta

16

(73)

(7)

COHORT Families No Children Families With Children Total

OCCUPANCY COVERAGE RATIO 1.20 1.40

TOTAL DEMAND (Units) 75 128 203

FIGURE 1.3: FAMILY HOUSING DEMAND.

Given the demand for additional student housing and very low vacancy rates within the market, any substantial increase in student enrollment could result in increased market rents and/or increased difficulty securing a unit within reasonable distance to campus.

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT OPTIONS Based on the demand findings, the Project Team recommends a multi-phased approach to develop additional on-campus housing. Phase IA & IB – Phase one consists of the development of approximately 800 beds of apartment style housing in two consecutive phases on the West Campus. Targeted towards upper division students, the project should feature a mix of studios, one-, two-, and four-bedroom apartments in both single and double occupancy configurations. Assuming a fall 2017 delivery, Phase IA would consist of 400 beds with a projected project cost of $79 million at $198,000 per bed. An additional 400 beds would be delivered in Phase IB in 2019 with a total project cost of $84 million at $210,000 per bed. Phase 2 – Slated for a fall 2021 delivery, Phase II features 700 beds of apartment style housing on the West Campus. Similar to Phase IA and IB, the project will include a mix of studio, two-, and four-bedroom units. Total project cost is estimated at $176 million at $251,000 per bed. Family Housing – Given the demand for student family housing, the University has a variety of options to replace the existing family housing. The project team recommends a 200 unit project that offers a mix of one-, two-, and four-bedroom units. With a fall 2017 delivery, the project is estimated to cost $61 million at $305,000 per unit. A 200-unit project assumes that there will be a mix of married students with no children and families. Should the University wish to limit the project to families only, the option exists to develop a 100 to 150 unit project. Given the complexity of the development sites, local market construction costs, and rental income limitations, these projects will need the support of the housing system to cover debt service and operating expenses.

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STRATEGIC ASSET VALUE ANALYSIS

STRATEGIC ASSET VALUE ANALYSIS OBJECTIVES Nationwide, colleges and universities recognize the important role that student housing plays in meeting institutional goals and enhancing campus life. On many campuses, student housing and related facilities are used as strategic assets. In order to help achieve enrollment goals and address other priorities related to student recruitment and retention, the university can use housing facilities to develop a comprehensive campus community that raises and maintains student satisfaction. B&D acknowledges the administration’s objective to enrich residential facilities that will serve as strategic assets and enhance enrollment management goals by improving recruitment, retention, and satisfaction among students. Although many factors impact the University’s ability to meet institutional goals, the following report provides evidence that carefully planned housing and other “quality of life” facilities are important components of the overall strategy. As a result, B&D identified UC Santa Cruz’s strategic goals with the Master Plan Working Group and reviewed the University’s and Residential Life’s unique missions, and the existing housing capacity to contribute to the realization of these objectives.

METHODOLOGY B&D uses a “Destination Value” approach to facility development to respond to the constant challenge of assuring that campus life improvements respond to the University’s strategic objectives.

More

specifically, B&D proceeded with the understanding that: “All of the project objectives must be expressed in specific terms that demonstrate their relevance to furthering the school’s mission, reinforcing campus values, responding to institutional commitments and responsibilities, and improving the school’s competitive position in the market.” B&D’s approach required a working relationship with the University and UC Santa Cruz administrators to develop a detailed understanding of the institution’s mission, relevant stakeholders, customer groups, and strategic project objectives which best serve that mission.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

SUMM ARY OF FINDINGS B&D assembled the outcomes of the strategic asset value into the SAV story comprised of four parts: the quantity and location of housing, the target market and unit types / programmatic priorities, the financial accessibility and quality reconciliation, and the level of service / underwriting criteria and institutional will. QUANTITY AND LOCATION OF HOUSING



The college system remains the core component of the UC Santa Cruz residential experience which is a critical aspect of the first-year undergraduate experience. First-year and lower division housing should be centered on the existing colleges. Location of housing for upper division and graduate students is not as important.



Providing housing for the student population must be in line with the Long Range Development Plan (“LRDP”) to accommodate enrollment growth.

T AR G E T M AR K E T A N D U N I T T Y P E S / P R O G R A M M AT I C P R I O R I T I E S



Existing first-year and lower division student housing around the colleges is nearly sufficient to accommodate the educational and student life outcomes of the communities. De-densifying the residence halls would allow for greater community spaces within the buildings.



The University does not accommodate upper division apartment housing to the desired extent. UC Santa Cruz should develop housing specifically suited to juniors and seniors with appropriate residential life programs for those class levels.

Greater privacy and responsibility would be

additional selling points for the project. FINANCIAL ACCESSIBILITY & QUALITY RECONCILIATION



University housing should provide housing rates comparable to the off-campus market but in line with premiums for on-campus convenience.

Due to high construction costs in the market and

site conditions on campus, type V construction is anticipated and acceptable. LEVEL OF SERVICE / UNDERWRITING CRITERIA & INSTITUTIONAL WILL



The default assumption is utilization of revenue bonds supported by the net operating income of the housing system; however, public private partnerships should continue to be investigated and evaluated for benefits in rental rates and debt capacity.

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STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS Brailsford & Dunlavey conducted a detailed market and demand analysis that examined characteristics of UC Santa Cruz’s existing student housing supply, enrollment trends, the local housing market, and student housing preferences. The results of the analysis are instrumental in framing issues that would affect demand for additional housing. The analyses included a review of the following market factors: 

Student Enrollment Trends



UCSC Existing Student Housing Supply



Santa Cruz Housing Market Supply



User Preferences and Demand Drivers

To evaluate these market factors and determine latent demand for student housing, the Project Team employed the following exercises. 

Stakeholder interviews with UCSC administrators were conducted to gain an understanding of their vision for student housing and the residential life experience;



Student focus groups were conducted to gain a qualitative understanding of current student housing satisfaction and needs, as well as to learn about preferences for future housing;



A demographic analysis of the UCSC student population was conducted to identify enrollment trends that may impact demand for housing;



A supply analysis was undertaken to understand the nature of the existing on-campus student housing portfolio with regards to the quantity, type of units, location, occupancy rates, and costs;



A housing market supply analysis was completed to assess local market conditions within the City of Santa Cruz with respect to price, location, and future development; and



An on-line survey was sent to all students to quantitatively assess their housing satisfaction, current living situation, and to test potential unit preferences and amenities, and to ultimately inform the demand model.

The key findings from the analyses form the basis for the following student housing assessment.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET STUDY

DEMOGR APHIC AN ALYSIS B&D assessed the UCSC student demographics and enrollment trends to define the likely target market for additional employee housing. The Project Team used the results of this analysis, along with an understanding of off-campus market dynamics, to develop demand projections for new housing. Using 3rd Week Fall Quarter data provided by UC Santa Cruz, B&D was able to analyze the following key demographic characteristics. 

Total Enrollment



Enrollment by Class Level



Enrollment by Gender



Enrollment by Origin

TOTAL ENROLLMENT

Since 2004, fall enrollment estimates at UCSC have grown 15% in undergraduate and 12% in graduate students. This is comparable to the rest of the University of California system, where undergraduate enrollment grew by 14% and graduate enrollment grew by 11%, respectively. As of fall 2013, total enrollment was made up of 15,695 undergraduate and 1,508 graduate students for a total of 17,203 students. Enrollment figures represent a composition of 91% undergraduate and 9% graduate students.

FIGURE 3.1 : ENROLLMENT GROWTH, 2004-2013 (ALL FIGURES REPRESENT 3RD WEEK FALL QUARTER ESTIMATES).

ENROLLMENT BY CLASS LEVEL

Fall 2013 enrollment data by class status revealed a growing representation of upper division students. The composition of the fall 2013 population was made up of 23% freshmen, 21% sophomores, 25% juniors, and 29% seniors, respectively. Over the period of 2004-2013, enrollment by class grew 3% for

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freshmen, 7% for sophomores, 11% for juniors, and 41% for seniors, respectively. Growth among the upperclassman classifications is in part due to the growth of the transfer population. Class

Freshmen Sophomore Junior Senior Visitor Total

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

% Change (2004-2013)

2013

3,747 3,352 3,760 4,200 4,506 3,715 3,662 4,035 4,238 3,857 3,040 3,007 2,782 2,985 3,259 3,491 2,921 2,795 3,165 3,251 3,593 3,658 3,668 3,472 3,696 3,983 4,638 4,072 3,920 3,986 3,267 3,571 3,731 3,724 3,664 4,068 4,445 5,036 4,654 4,597 1 4 7 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 13,669 13,600 13,941 14,381 15,125 15,259 15,668 15,945 15,978 15,695

3% 7% 11% 41% 15%

FIGURE 3.2: ENROLLMENT BY CLASS LEVEL

TRANSFER STUDENT ENROLLMENT GROWTH

Two subsections of the UCSC enrollment population with strong growth have been the transfer and first generation populations. Enrollment by transfer students for the fall 2012 quarter was 1,217 students, a 38% increase from fall 2005. Correspondingly, transfer applications rose 58% during the 2005-2012 period with admission rates ranging from 15% to 17%. First generation students have grown at a rate of 29% during the 2008-2013 period. These two groups are important to note as they are more likely to require supportive services such as housing.

FIGURE 3.3 : TRANSFER ENROLLMENT

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET STUDY

ENROLLMENT BY GENDER

Enrollment by gender was examined for the campus and found to be slightly in favor of females, who comprise 53% of all students enrolled. This is a trend that is typical of college campuses across the country, as women are typically in the majority. However, the enrollment gap among genders has closed during the period of fall 2003 to fall 2012, as the male population has increased by 4% while the female population has decreased by 3%. This is important to note as female students are more likely to live on campus than males.

FIGURE 3.4 : UNDERGRADUATE GENDER COMPOSITION FIGURE 3.5 : GRADUATE GENDER COMPOSITION

ENROLLMENT BY ORIGIN

Approximately 94% of students that enrolled at UCSC in fall 2013 were from California. Of those that enrolled from California, the majority were from the San Francisco Bay (27%) and Los Angeles (29%) areas. Recent enrollment trends have shown strong growth from out-of-state and international students, while the traditional San Francisco/Santa Clara/Monterey Bay areas have declined by 5%. All Students Monterey Bay - Santa Clara Valley San Francisco Bay Area Northern California East Central California Los Angeles South Coast San Diego - Desert Other California Out-of-State International Total

2005 698 1217 111 426 984 297 115 14 3,862

2006 661 1378 102 452 1067 355 148 13 4,176

2007 707 1369 95 552 1245 375 122 124 16 4,605

2008 741 1,439 82 522 1,369 474 115 18 4,760

FIGURE 3.6 : ENROLLMENT BY ORIGIN

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2009 702 1,156 75 475 1,109 391 88 8 4,004

2010 772 1,276 85 564 1,281 443 47 15 4,483

2011 801 1,245 84 611 1,450 523 63 10 4,787

2012 854 1,302 82 694 1,466 536 86 21 5,041

2013 666 1,151 56 553 1,228 408 140 104 4,306

% Change -5% -5% -50% 30% 25% 37% 22% 643% 31%

STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

ON-C AMPUS STUDENT HOUSI NG SUPPLY UCSC currently has 1.9 million gross square feet of residential space in 17 1 housing locations to accommodate 8,055 undergraduate and graduate students. The built capacity of these facilities was originally 6,715 students, however through a series of modifications, its temporary adjusted capacity is now 8,396 students. The facilities benchmark capacity has the capability to house 8,416 students. The increase in capacity is a result of tripling of students in rooms that were designed for two students and the conversion of lounge spaces to residential spaces. Of the housing facilities available to students, 61% of its beds are in traditional residence halls and 39% are located in apartment type units 2. College Facility

Buildings

Built

GSF

Built Capacity

Benchmark Capacity

Cowell College Stevenson College Crown College Merrill college

10 11 10 5

1966 1966 1967 1968

147,870 141,561 90,245 85,295

612 435 606 685

825 644 874 742

Crown/Merrill Apartments 2 Porter College Kresge College Oakes College College Eight College Nine College Ten

8 11 12 10 8 3

1986 2004 1973 1976 1989 2002 2002

102,862 278,132 61,924 132,823 144,852 190,449 103,334

707 329 549 598 681 407

816 352 709 801 876 557

College Nine/Ten Apartments 3

-

2000

90,874

-

-

Transfer Community1 The Village Redwood Village

1 19 5

1971 1979 1988

31,995 35,700

408 153 112

473 153 146

University Town Center 4 Graduate Student Housing Camper Park Family Student Housing

5 4 42 41

1986 1984 1971

26,725 765 186,156

112 80 42 199

128 82 42 196

6,715

8,416

205 1

GSF is ncluded in Porter

2

Capacities are part of Crown College and Merrill College

3

Capacities are part of College Nine and College Ten

4

GSF not avilable

1,851,562

FIGURE 3.7 : EXISITING CONDITIONS

1 2

Crown/Merrill apartments and College Nine/Ten Apartments are considered part of their colleges Not including guest housing, the UCDC program, and family student housing

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET STUDY

LOCATION OF HOUSING

The existing housing is distributed throughout the University with a strong presence in the core and peripheries of campus. The on-campus residence halls were constructed between 1966 and 2002. Given the average age of 34 years, many of the halls are outdated and in need of renovation. The newest residential facilities, College Nine and College Ten, are a mix of traditional and apartment units on the northern edge of campus.

FIGURE 3.8 : LOCATION OF STUDENT HOUSING

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STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

ENROLLMENT BY RESIDENCE

Currently, there are 7,758 3 total students living in University supported housing. Housing by enrollment classification is led by freshmen at 44%, followed by sophomores at 26%, juniors at 18%, seniors at 12%, and graduate students at 1%. Those facilities that housed the greatest number of students were Stevenson College (621), Cowell College (581), Crown College (556), College Ten (548), and College Nine (523). Housing Facility Cowell College Cowell Apartments Stevenson College Crown College Merrill College Crown/Merrill Apartments Porter College Porter Apartments Kresge College Oakes College Oakes Apartments College Eight College Eight Apartments College Nine College Ten College Nine/Ten Apartments Transfer Community The Village Redwood Grove University Town Center Graduate Student Housing UCDC Program Occupancy by Classification

FR

SO

JR

SR

GRAD

Total

60% 10% 56% 61% 70% 6% 69% 5% 85% 87% 17% 75% 15% 59% 58% 2% 0% 0% 9% 4% 1% 0% 44%

29% 49% 34% 21% 22% 45% 17% 35% 10% 6% 52% 21% 50% 22% 30% 16% 0% 7% 33% 26% 0% 0% 26%

6% 30% 5% 11% 3% 27% 7% 19% 2% 3% 20% 3% 21% 11% 9% 41% 96% 34% 28% 45% 1% 5% 18%

6% 11% 5% 7% 4% 22% 7% 41% 3% 5% 11% 2% 14% 8% 3% 41% 4% 59% 29% 26% 3% 95% 12%

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 95% 0% 1%

581 219 621 556 488 468 508 228 293 305 360 480 296 523 548 332 435 153 141 121 80 22 7,758

Note: As of 7/14/14, da ta not a va i l a bl e for Ca mper Pa rk a nd Fa mi l y Student Hous i ng. Stevens on a nd Kres gee i nfi l l were under renova ti on duri ng th 2013-2014 a ca demi c yea r. FIGURE 3.9 : HOUSING BY CLASSIFICATION

3

Does not include Camper Park and Family Student Housing for the purpose of enrollment by residence

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET STUDY

HOUSING RATES

The average housing rate paid by undergraduate and graduate students is approximately $1,209/month; however, this may vary depending on the unity type and occupancy. Students living in residence halls paid between $959/month to $1,514/month. Students living in apartments paid between $1,011/month to $1,591/month, which included the Village, Graduate Housing, Family Student Housing, and the University Town Center. Over the past ten years, campus room and board rates have increased by an average of 3.98%, with the most significant increases coming in 2008-2009 (7%) and 2009-2010 (6.5%).

FIGURE 3.10: HOUSING RATES

OCCUPANCY RATES

Housing capacity at UCSC has continued to grow to accommodate growing demand for housing on campus. To accommodate this demand, the University has temporarily adjusted its capacity through the conversion of lounges into triples or quads, doubles into small triples, and singles into small doubles. Since 2007, the Temporary Adjusted Capacity (TAC) has grown by an average of 213 beds per year to house students at levels above the built capacity. In 2013, residential halls supported students at 116% of the built capacity and apartment facilities housed students at 123% of the built capacity. Figure 3.11 compares the occupancy levels of residents at the built capacity and TAC levels.

FIGURE 3.11 : OCCUPANCY LEVELS

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STUDENT VIEWS ON ON-CAMPUS HOUSING

During the Project Team’s focus group sessions, the overarching theme became students’ dissatisfaction with the prices they were being charged for on-campus housing. Part of their dissatisfaction is a result of a perceived lack of value for the housing and dining provided to them. Graduate students said they were especially burdened by housing rates and deserved special consideration due to their lack of financial support. Other focus group conversations centered on the size of units being too small due to their conversion to triple occupancy units. Student participants also described the facilities as outdated and in need of repair. As a result, many participants felt that resources should be used toward the current, rather than new, supply of housing. Focus group participants from family student housing described the facilities as outdated and in disrepair. However, given the proximity of the facilities to campus, their affordability, and the amenities available to support their families, they were the preferred choice over the off-campus market. Other factors of importance were children’s safety, greater parking, and separation from the student population. For the full Focus Group report, see Exhibit A. SURVEY FINDINGS

To better understand how well the supply of housing met students’ needs, participants were asked to select which years they have lived on campus and which years they would live on -campus. Respondents indicated that as they matriculated through UCSC, a higher percentage would live on campus as compared to the years they actually lived in University housing. This unmet demand suggests that UCSC housing is an attractive option to students.

FIGURE 3.12 : PREFERENCE FOR UNIVERSITY HOUSING

Further analysis revealed that students living on campus showed a level of satisfaction almost equal to that of students living off campus. Those students living in University housing (82%) responded with “very

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satisfied” or “satisfied” with their living situation, as compared to 88% of students living in the off-campus market. This indicates that the existing on-campus housing is capable of satisfying the needs of students as well as the housing that is offered in the off-campus market.

FIGURE 3.13 : SATISFACTION BY LOCATION

Survey respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction with a variety of on-campus housing features. Analysis of survey results reinforced the focus group findings. Only 28% of students were “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with the housing rates on -campus, as compared to 63% of students living in the off-campus market. Similarly, only 38% of on-campus students were satisfied with their dining rate, as compared to 80% of off-campus students. These results suggest that students are moving into nonUniversity housing as they matriculate due to more favorable rates, rather than the physical features of the facilities.

FIGURE 3.14 : SATISFACTION BY FEATURE

Survey respondents were then asked about the importance of various factors as the University considers improvements to on-campus housing. Survey data showed a consistent theme of the importance of housing and dining affordability. Approximately 98% of survey respondents indicated that affordability was

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either “very important” or “important” to future housing improvements, while 89% indicated the importance of dining programs. The need for greater facility modernization was supported by 85% of students that pointed to its importance toward future improvements. Housing Considerations Keep housing costs affordable

98%

Improve existing residential dining programs

89%

Provide modern and attractive living environments to students

85%

Help retain students at UCSC

79%

Create more academically-focused residential communities

73%

Make UCSC more attractive to prospective students

71%

Increase the student residential population on campus

48%

FIGURE 3.15 : IMPORTANCE OF FACTORS AS UCSC CONSIDERS ON-CAMPUS HOUSING IMPROVEMENTS

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OFF-C AMPUS SUPPLY MARKET AREA DEFINITION

Based on the geographic isolation of the UCSC campus, the off-campus housing options are mainly limited to the city of Santa Cruz. To better understand this market, sample properties chosen for this analysis were located within a seven mile radius of the UCSC campus. The market area for this analysis was created based on feedback from focus groups and survey results that revealed an average commute time of 23-minutes. The majority of multi-family housing properties available were made up of studio, one, two-, and three-bedroom unit types. Single-family housing properties found in the local market were comprised of two-, three-, four-, and five-bedroom homes.

FIGURE 3.16: LOCATION OF SURVEYED PROPERTIES

LOCAL AREA MARKET TRENDS

Demand for housing in the city of Santa Cruz is very high, demonstrated by the city’s low vacancy rate of 2.7% 4. Since 1990, the housing stock of Santa Cruz has grown by just over 4,000 units, an increase of less than 1% per year. During that period, the composition of the housing stock has consistently been two-thirds single-family properties and one-third multi-family properties. Potential alleviation of this demand will be supplied through the construction of 35 single-family and 657 multi-family properties based on data from the Santa Cruz planning department. These potential new units will create a 0.2% 4

Based on properties that were for-sale or for rent

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increase in Santa Cruz’s single-family inventory and an 8.8% increase in its multi-family inventory. Currently, over 56% of the city’s housing units are renter occupied.

FIGURE 3.17: HOUSING COMPOSITION

The city’s 2007-2014 Housing Element cites the diminishment of vacant land as a major inhibitor to future growth of the housing market. The Plan also indicates that industrial areas are not plausible sites for future housing due to the need to preserve land uses which create jobs and provide a tax base to support city services. R E N T AL R AT E A N A L Y S I S

To understand the local market, B&D surveyed 20 apartment complexes. The average rental rates (not including utilities) for an entire studio, one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartment unit in Santa Cruz and Capitola were $1,179, $1,597, $2,030, and $2,933, respectively. Based on feedback from focus groups, students indicated that they split the cost of housing to lessen their financial burden. The average rental rates per person for a private single bedroom and shared room can be significantly less. However, these configurations may not always be allowed by the unit’s property owner.

FIGURE 3.18: APARTMENT RATES

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET STUDY

Given the predominance of single-family properties within Santa Cruz’s housing inventory and their popularity among students, 24 single-family homes were also surveyed. The average rental rates for two-, three-, four-, and five-bedroom houses were $2,423, $2,998, $3,317, and $4,507, respectively. When each room within these houses is occupied, the rates for a private room were $1,212, $999, $829, and $901, respectively. Sharing a room in a single-family home provided the lowest rent levels of all options, but again these configurations may not always be allowed by the unit’s property owner.

FIGURE 3.19: SINGLE FAMILY HOME RATES

To better understand how competitive UCSC’s rental rates were with the off-campus market, a comparison was made among apartments at UCSC and off-campus apartments. The rental rate comparison measured the difference between units with single and double occupancy rates. The UCSC rates are based on room rates only with any meal plan costs removed from the price of rent. In addition, a self-reported monthly utility rate was added to the price of housing for off-campus properties. Overall, the average rental rates for UCSC single occupancy apartments were 2% higher than the offcampus market (including utilities). The largest variance among the two markets was the three-bedroom option off campus, with University housing being 18% more expensive.

Off-Campus UCSC Rates Variance

Efficiency 1-Bedroom $1,251 $1,659 $1,285 $1,285 3% -29%

2-Bedroom 3-Bedroom $1,087 $1,050 $1,285 $1,285 15% 18%

FIGURE 3.20: COMPARISON OF RATES – SINGLE OCCUPANCY

Overall, the average rental rates for UCSC double occupancy apartments were 58% higher than the offcampus market (including utilities). The largest variance among the two markets was the three-bedroom option off campus, which saw University housing 84% higher.

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Efficiency 1-Bedroom Off-Campus UCSC Rates Variance

$626 $966 54%

2-Bedroom 3-Bedroom

$830 $966 16%

$525 $966 84%

$543 $966 78%

FIGURE 3.21: COMPARISON OF RATES – DOUBLE OCCUPANCY

AM E N I T Y A N A L Y S I S

B&D analyzed the most common amenities offered by each of the properties included in the off-campus market analysis. Twenty-three (23) different amenities were researched for their availability among the apartment units surveyed. Research of apartment complexes showed that the market is student friendly in terms of the amenities that students typically demand such as various kitchen amenities, on-site laundry, and parking. A comparison of off-campus properties revealed that apartments typically include trash and water costs in their rent, while the cost of electricity was most commonly passed along to the student. Amenities Type UNIT AMENITIES

Amenities

Apartments

Cable/Internet Ready

100%

Refrigerator

100%

Stove

95%

Patio/Balcony

70%

Microwave

60%

Walk-in Closet

40%

In-Unit Laundry

25%

Furnished

15%

A/C BUILDING AMENITIES

5%

On-Site Laundry

80%

Extra Storage

45%

Pool

40%

Gym

35%

Club House

25%

FIGURE 3.22: AMENITIES ANALYSIS

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L E AS E T E R M S A N D F E E S

The rental market surrounding the University typically asks for a one-year lease for both single family homes and apartment complexes. Those with shorter leases typically ask for a higher monthly rate. When asked about the allowance of a co-signor, 70% of apartment complexes indicated that they would allow one, lessening the barrier to market entry. The average security deposit that was required of students renting an apartment unit was $1,189. These findings were consistent with focus groups’ feedback in which participants stated that they typically sign a one-year lease and were required to pay a deposit of one to two months’ rent. Approximately 51% of off-campus survey respondents reported having a 12-month lease and paying an average security deposit of $663 which is nearly the average reported monthly rent. The lower selfreported security deposit may be a result of students sharing a room to reduce their financial burdens as indicated in focus group sessions.

FIGURE 3.23: LENGTH OF CURRENT LEASE FIGURE 3.24: PERSONAL SHARE OF THE SECURITY DEPOSIT

S T U D E N T V I E W S O N O F F - C AM P U S H O U S I N G

During focus groups, participants described the off-campus market as highly competitive due to a small supply of affordable and well-maintained housing. Students explained that high demand for housing forced many to agree to unfavorable terms due to the one-sided nature of the market in favor of property owners. Added difficulties of living in the off-campus market were the unreliability of public transportation and the contentious relationship that existed between students and non-student families.

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Based on survey results, student participants considering living off campus found cost effectiveness (72%) to be the biggest reason for moving. This sentiment matches focus group findings that indicated a need for less expensive housing and dining options. Reasons

Percent

More cost effective

72%

Fewer rules and regulations

35%

More privacy

34%

More living space

31%

No meal plan requirement

31%

Access to my own kitchen

31%

FIGURE 3.25: REASONS FOR MOVING OFF- CAMPUS (PERCENT OF “VERY IMPORTANT” OR “IMPORTANT”)

Those students living in the off-campus market reported paying an average of $699 for rent only. Approximately 50% of these respondents indicated that they shared a bedroom with at least one other person, which is consistent with focus group feedback. In addition to rent, students reported paying an average of $72 per month in utilities.

FIGURE 3.26: PERSONAL SHARE OF MONTHLY RENT/HOUSING COSTS EXCLUDING UTILITIES

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STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND ANALYSIS

STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND ANALYSIS UCSC is exploring the development of additional student housing on its campus. To project demand, B&D reviewed existing demographic and housing information specific to UCSC. This information included detailed demographic characteristics of the student population, occupancy data, enrollment trends, and off-campus market data. Based on this data, B&D developed a target market consisting of students who would likely be interested in living on campus.

T AR G E T M AR K E T

To project realistic demand for the housing project under consideration, B&D developed specific target markets consisting of survey respondents who would likely be interested in living in student housing at UCSC. However, only certain demographic groups were included in the target markets for the demand based program (“DBP”). Students must meet all of the criteria in order to be included in one of the target markets defined below. 

Enrolled full-time,



Live on campus, or



Renting in the off-campus market, and



Paying more than $600/month in rent

All other students who did not meet the criteria above were excluded from the demand analysis. A capture rate is determined from these filtered target markets, which then determines the raw housing demand. UNIT TYPE PREFERENCES

By utilizing unit type preferences demonstrated in the electronic survey, B&D’s student housing demand model projected demand onto UCSC’s fall 2013 total student enrollment. Survey respondents were provided with a narrative description of anticipated augmentations to UCSC’s student housing, sample floor plans for a range of potential unit types, and estimated rental rates for each unit type. Following their review of the narrative, proposed floor plans, and rental rates, respondents were asked to indicate which unit type and occupancy option they would have selected to live in, had it been available at the

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beginning of the upcoming academic year (Fall ’13). The specific unit types and prposed rental rates are shown below.

Unit A: Traditional $5,440 - $6,610 / Year (Double)

Unit B: One-Bedroom Semi-Suite $8,000 - $8,200 / Year (Single Occupancy) $7,200 - $7,400 / Year (Double Occupancy) $6,200 - $6,400 / Year (Triple Occupancy)

Unit C: Two-Bedroom Semi-Suite $7,800 - $8,000 / Year (Single Occupancy) $6,400 - $6,600 / Year (Double Occupancy) $5,800 - $6,000 / Year (Triple Occupancy)

Unit D: Full-Suite $9,600 - $9,800 / Year (Single Occupancy) $7,000 - $7,200 / Year (Double Occupancy)

Unit E: Studio Apartment $12,800 - $13,000 / Year

Unit F: 1BR Apartment $15,600 - $15,800 / Year (Single) $11,200 - $11,400 / Year (Double)

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Unit G: 2BR Apartment $13,000 - $13,200 / Year (Single) $10,000 - $10,200 / Year (Double)

Unit H: 4BR Apartment $9,600 - $9,800 / Year (Single)

SINGLE STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND

The following represents demand that would likely be exhibited by students within the defined target market. Occupancy coverage ratios were applied to account for market forces that may impact the raw demand figure. Ratios between 1.0 and 1.5 were used to account for student sensitivity to price and competition in the private rental market. Factoring an occupancy coverage ratio and existing housing supply, the analysis demonstrates demand for 1,585 net new beds. Figure 4.2 illustrates the distribution of demand by housing type. CURRENT RESIDENTS 3,461 1,999 1,390 906 77 7,833

MAX POTENTIAL DEMAND 3,485 2,113 1,823 1,089 102 8,612

Housing Design Capacity1

6,583

6,583

6,583

Delta

(1,250)

(2,029)

(1,585)

CLASS Freshmen Sophmores Juniors Seniors Graduates Total

OCCUPANCY COVERAGE RATIO 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.5

TOTAL DEMAND 3,485 2,113 1,665 837 68 8,168

Note: The 6,583 figure is the permanately adjusted design capacity. The figure does not include FSH or any guest housing units. FIGURE 4.1: STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND

HOUSING TYPE Residence Halls Apartments Total

STUDENT DEMAND 4,823 3,345 8,168

EXISTING SUPPLY 3904 2,679 6,583

VARIANCE (919) (666) (1,585)

FIGURE 4.2: STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND BY HOUSING TYPE

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S T U D E N T F AM I L Y H O U S I N G D E M A N D

The following represents demand for student family housing. Occupancy coverage ratios between 1.2 and 1.4 were applied to account for student sensitivity to price and competition in the private rental market.

Factoring an occupancy coverage ratio, the analysis demonstrates demand for 203 units.

Analysis by user type reveals that there are 128 units of demand for families with chidren and 75 units for couples with no children. Factoring the existing supply of family housing, there is a new demand of seven units. Figure 4.4 illustrates the ideal distribution of demand for new on-campus family housing by unit size. CURRENT RESIDENTS 100 80 180

MAX POTENTIAL DEMAND 90 179 269

Family Housing Units

196

196

196

Delta

16

(73)

(7)

COHORT Families No Children Families With Children Total

OCCUPANCY COVERAGE RATIO 1.20 1.40

TOTAL DEMAND (Units) 75 128 203

FIGURE 4.3: TOTAL FAMILY HOUSING DEMAND

UNIT TYPE

COHORT

1BR 56 39 95

Families No Children Families With Children Total

2BR 19 79 98

4BR 0 10 10

TOTAL UNITS 75 128 203

FIGURE 4.4: TOTAL FAMILY HOUSING DEMAND BY UNIT TYPE

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT OPTIONS

Based on the demand findings, the Project Team recommends a multi-phased approach to develop additional on-campus housing. Phase IA & IB – Phase one consists of the development of approximately 800 beds of apartment style housing in two consecutive phases on the West Campus. Targeted towards upper division students, the project should feature a mix of studios, one-, two-, and four-bedroom apartments in both single and double occupancy configurations. Family Housing – Given the demand for student family housing, the University has a variety of options to replace the existing family housing. The project team recommends a 200 unit project that offers a mix of one-, two-, and four-bedroom units. A 200-unit project assumes that there will be a mix of married

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students with no children and families. Should the University wish to limit the project to families only, the option exists to develop a 100 to 150 unit project. Phase 2 – Slated for a Fall 2021 delivery, Phase II features 700 beds of apartment style housing on the West Campus. Similar to Phase IA and IB, the project will include a mix of studio, two-, and four-bedroom units. Project

Project Type

Beds / Units

Gross Square Feet

Opening

Phase 1A

Apartments

400

160,000

Fall 2017

Phase 1B

Apartments

400

160,000

Fall 2019

Family Housing

Apartments

200

125,000

Fall 2017

Phase 2

Apartments

700

250,000

Fall 2021

1,700

695,000

Total FIGURE 4.5: PROPOSED PROJECT CONCEPTS

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FINANCIAL ANALYSIS

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS To understand the financial implications of developing new student housing, Brailsford & Dunlavey (“B&D”) created a financial model to test different scenarios with respect to project costs based on the results of the market study and current economic conditions. Several factors may impact the actual performance of the project; therefore the model was developed to test multiple scenarios and includes several sensitivity analyses to test the project concepts under a variety of market conditions and development options.

OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY B&D assessed the financial feasibility of four scenarios to construct new on-campus student housing at UC Santa Cruz. The model is based on the demand parameters outlined in B&D’s Demand Analysis and the operating budget for CHES on UC Santa Cruz’s campus for academic year 2013-2014. Likely project capital costs for new construction were derived though Conversations with CHES and B&D’s experience with comparable projects. Revenue projects were measured by projecting revenues based on current housing rates The financial analysis includes a thirty-year pro forma showing all revenues, expenses, net operating income, debt service payments, reserves, and cash flow. The model assumed the University would pursue development and operations of the new facility. All variables were integrated to ensure that any change in assumptions would automatically modify corresponding components of the model to maintain consistency. A full copy of the detailed financial models can be found in Exhibit D of this report.

PROJECT OVERVIEW The demand analysis identified a maximum potential demand for 1,585 net new on-campus beds. B&D has developed a multi-phase program to meet this demand and replace the existing family housing. In total, the multi-phase development program will add up to 1,700 new beds and 695,000 gross square feet of space to the existing residential portfolio Figure 5.1 summarizes the four development projects.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

Project

Project Type

Beds / Units

Gross Square Feet

Opening

Phase 1A

Apartments

400

160,000

Fall 2017

Phase 1B

Apartments

400

160,000

Fall 2019

Family Housing

Apartments

200

125,000

Fall 2017

Phase 2

Apartments

700

250,000

Fall 2021

1,700

695,000

Total FIGURE 5.1: PROJECT OVERVIEW

PROJECT ECONOMICS PRELIMINARY PROJECT PROGRAMS The purpose of the preliminary programs are to illustrate its impact on capital costs and housing rates. However, as UCSC moves forward, a detailed project program and site analysis for each project should be conducted to identify the potential of the project sites. Figure 5.2 is a summary of each scenarios development program. Project

Project Type

Phase 1A Phase 1B Family Housing Phase 2 Total

Apartments Apartments Apartments Apartments

Unit Mix Beds / Studio 1BR (S) 1BR (D) 2BR (S) 2BR(D) 4BR (S) Units 48 0 20 60 72 200 400 48 0 20 60 72 200 400 0 60 0 126 0 14 200 72 0 28 80 320 200 700 168 60 68 326 464 614 1,700

GSF 160,000 160,000 125,000 250,000 695,000

GSF / BED 400 400 625 357

FIGURE 5.2: HOUSING PROGRAMS

PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT BUDGET AND DEBT SERVICE The project costs for each phase were based on conversations with UCSC administrators and B&D experience with similar projects. A construction cost of $350 per square foot and 3.5% construction inflation were used for this analysis. Soft costs (not including financing costs) of 30% of hard costs were assumed for development. Hard costs were assumed to include an enclosed building, excavation and site preparation, site utilities and infrastructure, landscaping, and parking spaces. Soft costs were assumed to include A/E fees, testing / survey fees, project contingencies, construction management fees, project management fees, and fixtures, furniture and equipment (FF&E). The debt service assumptions for this model were: tax-

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exempt bonds, 6.0% fixed interest rate, and a 30-year term (straight-line amortization). Figure 5.3 outlines the preliminary development budget and annual debt service for each of the proposed projects. Phase IA 2017 400 160,000

Phase IB 2019 400 160,000

Family Housing 2017 200 125,000

Phase 2 2021 700 160,000

Hard Costs Soft Costs Total Project Costs

$60,000,000 $19,000,000 $79,000,000

$64,000,000 $20,000,000 $84,000,000

$47,000,000 $14,000,000 $61,000,000

$137,000,000 $39,000,000 $176,000,000

Annual Debt Service

$5,700,000

$6,100,000

$6,900,000

$12,800,000

Project Costs / SF Project Costs / Bed

$494 $198,000

$525 $210,000

$488 $305,000

$1,100 $251,000

Project Delivery Beds / Units GSF

FIGURE 5.3: HOUSING DEVELOPMENT BUDGETS AND ANNUAL DEBT SERVICE

OPERATING PARADIGM The model assumes that the total operating expenses are consistent with the current operating cost per bed for CHES. REVENUE ASSUMPTIONS Revenues for housing were derived primarily from room rentals. Rental rates used for this analysis are outlined below for the newly-constructed housing. All unit and occupancy types were assumed to offer an academic year lease and summer leases were not included in the rental revenue assumption. Rental rates reflected in the financial model are per academic year per person and include basic utilities, highspeed Internet access, and a fully furnished unit. Figure 5.4 illustrates the total annual rental income assuming 97% occupancy. Project Delivery Studio 1BR (Single) 1BR (Double) 2BR (Single) 2BR (Double) 4BR (Single) Total Annual Rental Income

Phase IA 2017 Beds Annual Rent 48 $13,050 20 $12,600 60 $14,400 72 $13,050 200 $13,950 $5,307,840

Phase IB 2019 Beds Annual Rent 48 $13,050 20 $12,600 60 $14,400 72 $13,050 200 $13,950 $5,970,598

Family Housing 2017 Beds Annual Rent 60 $14,850 126 14

$16,200

$13,950 $3,033,675

Phase 2 2021 Beds Annual Rent 72 $13,050 28 $12,600 80 $14,400 320 $13,050 200 $13,950 $11,105,714

Notes 1. Revenues are shown at first year of operation 2. Assumes 4% annual rent escalation 3. Assumes 3% vacancy FIGURE 5.4: HOUSING RATE ASSUMPTIONS

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A

Exhibit

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EXHIBIT A: FOCUS GROUP ANALYSIS

FOCUS GROUP ANALYSIS OBJECTIVES The purpose of our focus groups and intercept interviews was to engage a variety of individuals in dynamic conversation about on-campus residential facilities at the University of California, Santa Cruz (“the University;” “UCSC”). B&D focused on understanding ways that residential spaces can be repurposed, renovated, or expanded to meet current residents’ preferences, as well as assess the potential for a future student housing facility at UCSC. The focus groups are intended to yield qualitative data for the researchers, identifying sensitivities and previously unconsidered issues, as well as discover students’ preferences in new student housing.

METHODOLOGY With the assistance of University Housing staff, B&D held focus groups to obtain a diverse mix of feedback from a wide range of UCSC students, faculty, and staff. Approximately 64 individuals participated in seven separate focus groups on March 11th and 13th, 2014, along with several intercept interviews in and around the UCSC campus. A moderator from Brailsford & Dunlavey led each of the focus group sessions and guided the conversation to address housing and campus life issues. The moderator presented a series of open-ended questions and permitted individuals to discuss tangential issues and engage in dynamic dialogue. While the moderator was predisposed to obtaining answers to the questions asked, he or she also paid close attention to participant-generated issues raised during the discussion.

SUMM ARY OF FINDINGS STUDENT PARTICIPANTS

Why did you choose to attend UCSC? ♦

Students’ decision to attend UCSC was due in large part to the beauty of the campus’ natural surroundings.



Participants stated that the University’s structure of multiple colleges enticed them to come live with people of similar interests.

JULY 2014

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ

STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS



Others mentioned that the value of a “University of California” education was a large factor in choosing UCSC over other universities.



Additional reasons given for choosing UCSC were: o

Availability of desired major,

o

The student body’s awareness of current events and important issues,

o

UCSC was far enough away from home, but not too far,

o

Proximity of good school districts for students with children,

o

The availability of apartment style housing, and

o

Inclusion of financial aid or funding in their acceptance package.

What is your overall perception of the campus culture at UCSC? ♦

The most common response from students was that the University lacked an overall sense of unity. This response was in part due to the system of colleges at the University insolating students from one another.



Students indicated a sense of open-mindedness and acceptance across campus as a positive aspect of the campus’ culture.



Participants cited the loss of lounge spaces in residential halls as contributing to student isolation by inhibiting their ability to congregate.



The lack of a central area on campus was seen as detrimental to fostering greater campus cohesion.



Students repeatedly cited that the quality of academics at UCSC was stronger than its reputation. As well, many felt that their peers created an atmosphere of academic collaboration over competition.

What is your overall perception of the housing facilities on the UCSC campus?

2



The consensus among students was that campus housing was too expensive and that they were not receiving enough value for what they were paying. Many upper-division students indicated they wanted to move back to University housing, but couldn’t afford it.



Participants indicated that the size of their units was too small. Many cited the conversion of double rooms into triples as the largest cause of this problem.



The issue of Internet availability came up as a recurring problem. Many claimed that students had started buying their own routers to ensure reliable Internet service.



A majority of students described housing as being very convenient to their academic and campus pursuits. This was identified as the biggest reason students wanted to come back to University housing.

BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT A: FOCUS GROUP ANALYSIS



Participants listed many areas of their housing facilities that were outdated or falling apart. Many expressed a need for the University to consider renovating its current facilities before building anything new.



Another issue expressed by traditional students and those in student family housing was the ability for noise to travel across their housing facilities.



Participants expressed that problems can occur when older transfer students are placed in the same housing facilities as freshmen, as is the case at Porter College.



Students continually cited a general lack of social space due to the loss of lounges. As well, they felt there wasn’t enough space dedicated to study areas.



Other impressions of housing given by participants were: o

Housing was very secure,

o

The roommate selection process needs improvement,

o

Residential programs do well at creating social opportunities for students, and

o

There are problems maintaining privacy.



Students in family housing felt that while the housing facilities were outdated, its proximity to campus, affordability, and amenities for their children made it a preferred choice.



Other impressions from students in family housing were: o

The design of the facility needs to better incorporate the safety of children,

o

Parking for residents and visitors is difficult, and

o

Separation from the undergraduate population is very important.

What are you preferences for future housing? What aspects would you like to see incorporated? 

The most cited preference for future housing among participants was greater affordability among all housing options. Many students expressed that they would consider coming back to University housing if they could afford it.



The second most desired feature in new housing facilities was greater space. This was primarily a result of students’ frustration with double rooms being converted into triples.



A common preference mentioned as part of any future housing was the ability to opt out of meal plans. It was highly desired that communal kitchens take their place.



Students commonly referenced the need for a more extended and reliable transportation service on- and off-campus.



Participants expressed a need for a stronger and more consistent Wi-Fi service throughout the residential facilities.

JULY 2014

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ

STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS



Another potential improvement mentioned for future housing was greater lighting across campus as students walk home at night.



Greater availability of housing during winter and spring break periods was listed as a feature to help accommodate students that can’t go home over break.



In response to the loss of lounge space, participants would like to see more social spaces incorporated into future housing. Participants felt that noise issues would decrease if students weren’t forced to congregate in the halls.



Other preferences for future housing were: o

Greater efforts by staff to quickly resolve maintenance issues,

o

Greater cell phone service, and

o

Better wayfinding.



Overall, participants currently living in student family housing saw affordability as the most important issue when considering new housing. Many felt a simple design was sufficient if it would keep prices down.



Other preferences for future student family housing included: o

Single story units to ensure child safety,

o

Sound and weather insulation,

o

Additional storage for families,

o

Updated lighting and fixtures, and

o

A community garden with an area for composting.

What is your overall perception of the off-campus market?

4



The off-campus market in Santa Cruz was described as highly competitive due to a small supply of affordable and well maintained housing. As a result, students indicated that local landlords took advantage of the situation with numerous restrictions, difficult applications, and long leases.



Participants described the market as being very expensive. In order to find a reasonable housing rate, students were forced to split the cost of housing with a large number of other tenants.



The housing stock was characterized by students as being old and in disrepair. As well, they found that it was difficult to get their landlords to service their maintenance requests.



An added difficulty placed on students in the off-campus market was the unreliability of public transportation.

BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT A: FOCUS GROUP ANALYSIS



There exists a contentious relationship between students and the families that live among them. Students explained that they’ve received numerous complaints regarding excess noise.



Of the students that said they would live off-campus next year, they gave the following reasons: o

They were not guaranteed on-campus housing,

o

The price of housing in the off-campus market is more affordable,

o

The ability to opt out of the University meal plan was preferable, and

o

The sense of independence from living off-campus.

JULY 2014

5

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B

Exhibit

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ GENERAL INFORMATION - MULTIFAMILY

Apartments

No.

Apartment Complex

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA

Address

Miles from Campus

Lease Term

Year Built

# of Units

Allow Co-Signer

Occupancy Rate

1

Cypress Point

101 Felix Street

1.8

7-12 mo.

1975

240

Yes

97%

2

1010 Pacific Apartments

1010 Pacific Avenue

2.1

6-12 mo.

2004

113

Yes

100% 100%

3

Oceanview Apartments

222 Columbia Street

2.4

Flex

1969

104

Yes

4

Pacific Shores Apartments

1240 Shaffer Road

2

8-12 mo.

2003

206

Yes

99%

5

Chestnut Street

143 Chestnut Street

1.9

12-13 mo.

2002

96

Yes

100%

6

Westmont Place Townhomes

801 Nobel Drive

0.3

12 mo.

1998

54

Yes

100%

7

Landing at Capitola

3045 Capitola Road

4.9

3-15 mo.

1973

50

Yes

100%

8

Highland Street

217 Highland Ave. #3

1.2

12 mo.

1973

3

No

100%

9

Chestnut Street

318 Chestnut #2

1.8

Mo.- Mo.

1988

6

Yes

100%

2

12 mo.

-

6

No

100%

10 Center Street

220 Center Street #2

11 Second Street Commons

108 Second Street

2.7

12 mo.

2008

44

Yes

100%

12 Pacific Avenue

2030 N. Pacific Ave. #332

1.7

12 mo.

2008

70

No

100%

13 Maple Street

502 Maple Street, Apt #1

1.9

Flex

1971

16

Yes

-

14 Berry Steet

320 Berry Street #B

2.7

12 mo.

1972

-

Yes

100%

15 Hidden Creek Apartments

200 Button Street

2.6

Flex

1972

146

Yes

100%

16 St. George Residences

833 Front Street

2.0

6 mo.

1993

125

Yes

100% 100%

17 Swan Lake Gardens

755 14th Avenue

4.8

6-12mo.

1973

79

Yes

18 Breakwater Apartments

1630 Merril Street

5.1

8-12mo.

1972

100

No

98%

19 Branciforte Commons

632 Water Street

2.2

12 mo.

2005

50

No

100%

20 Plum Street Garden Apartments

501 Plum Steet

7.0

6 mo.

-

51

No

100%

2.7

Varies

1987

82

70%

99.7%

Average

Averages

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ GENERAL INFORMATION - SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

Single Family Homes

No.

Name

Address

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA

Zip Code

Miles from Campus

Lease Term

Year Built

1

Poplar

316 Poplar Ave

95062

2.9

12 mo

1977

2

Third

1009 3rd St

95060

2.5

12 mo

1979

3

Button

624 Button St

95060

3

12 mo

1946

4

Woodrow

315 Woodrow Ave

95060

2.2

12 mo

NK

5

Cayuga

230 Cayuga St

95062

3.2

-

1927

6

Esperanza

1762 Esperanza Ct

95062

4.1

6 mo

1987

7

Pasatiempo

58 Pasatiempo Dr

95060

4.3

12 mo

1976

8

Fifth

390 5th Ave.

95062

3.7

12 mo

2010

9

Morrissey

1114 Morrissey Blvd.

95065

3.9

12 mo

1973

10 Grandview

222 Grandview St

95060

1.6

12 mo

2005

11 Grandview

93 Grandview St

95060

1.7

12 mo

1980

12 Carmel

620 Carmel St

95062

3.9

12 mo

1976

13 Clinton

106 Clinton St

95062

3.5

12 mo

1998

14 Hagemann

101 Hagemann Ave

95062

3.3

12 mo

1930

15 Fourth

113 4th Ave

95062

3.5

NK

1926

16 Beachview

233 Beachview Ave

95060

1.5

Mo. - Mo.

1976

17 Alamo

333 Alamo Ave

95060

1.2

12 mo

1966

18 Alta Loma

480 Alta Loma Lane

95062

3.6

10 mo

1976

19 Mason

115 Mason St

95060

1.4

12 mo

1905

20 Alta Vista

410 Alta Vista Dr

95060

0.7

12 mo

1976

21 Walnut

905 Walnut Ave

95060

1.2

-

1953

22 Monterey

302 Monterey St

95060

2.2

School Year

1986

23 Storey

121 Storey St

95060

1.5

12 mo

1937

24 Franklin

119 Franklin St

95060

2.3

12 mo

2001

2.6

1 Year

1968

Average

Total Average

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ RENTAL RATES STUDIOS

Apartments

No.

Off Campus Housing Options

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA Rent Per Unit

Rent Private Room

Rent Shared Room

Unit Size (SF)

Rent/SF

1

Cypress Point

$1,579

$1,579

$789.50

440

$3.59

2

1010 Pacific Apartments

$1,499

$1,499

$749.50

385

$3.89

3

Oceanview Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

4

Pacific Shores Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

5

Chestnut Street

-

-

-

-

-

6

Westmont Place Townhomes

-

-

-

-

-

7

Landing at Capitola

-

-

-

-

-

8

Highland Street

-

-

-

-

-

9

Chestnut Street

-

-

-

-

-

10 Center Street

$1,095

$1,095

$548

450

$2.43

11 Second Street Commons

$1,000

$1,000

$500

310

$3.23

12 Pacific Avenue

-

-

-

-

-

13 Maple Street

-

-

-

-

-

14 Berry Steet

-

-

-

-

-

15 Hidden Creek Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

$925

$925

$463

232

$3.99 -

16 St. George Residences 17 Swan Lake Gardens

-

-

-

-

18 Breakwater Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

19 Branciforte Commons

$1,000

$1,000

$500

315

$3.17

20 Plum Street Garden Apartments

$1,158

$1,158

$579

376

$3.08

Subtotal Average

$1,179

$1,179

$590

358

$3.34

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ RENTAL RATES ONE-BEDROOM UNITS

Apartments

No.

Off Campus Housing Options

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA Rent Per Unit

Rent Private Room

Rent Shared Room

Unit Size (SF)

Rent/SF

1

Cypress Point

$1,779

$1,779

$890

625

$2.85

2

1010 Pacific Apartments

$1,650

$1,650

$825

705

$2.34

3

Oceanview Apartments

$1,974

$1,974

$987

740

$2.67

4

Pacific Shores Apartments

$2,007

$2,007

$1,003

804

$2.50

5

Chestnut Street

$2,000

$2,000

$1,000

650

$3.08

6

Westmont Place Townhomes

-

-

-

-

-

7

Landing at Capitola

-

-

-

-

-

8

Highland Street

-

-

-

-

-

9

Chestnut Street

$1,175

$1,175

$588

650

$1.81

10 Center Street

-

-

-

-

-

11 Second Street Commons

-

-

-

-

-

12 Pacific Avenue

-

-

-

-

-

$1,350

$1,350

$675

-

-

13 Maple Street 14 Berry Steet

-

-

-

-

-

$1,350

$1,350

$675

488

$2.77

-

-

-

-

-

17 Swan Lake Gardens

$1,595

$1,595

$798

600

$2.66

18 Breakwater Apartments

$1,613

$1,613

$806

624

$2.58

19 Branciforte Commons

$1,200

$1,200

$600

486

$2.47

20 Plum Street Garden Apartments

$1,358

$1,358

$679

610

$2.23

Subtotal Average

$1,587

$1,587

$794

635

$2.54

15 Hidden Creek Apartments 16 St. George Residences

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ RENTAL RATES TWO-BEDROOM UNITS

Apartments

No.

Off Campus Housing Options

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA Rent Per Unit

Rent Private Room

Rent Shared Room

Unit Size (SF)

Rent/SF

1

Cypress Point

$2,199

$1,100

$550

771

$2.85

2

1010 Pacific Apartments

$2,344

$1,172

$586

940

$2.49

3

Oceanview Apartments

$2,489

$1,245

$622

917

$2.72

4

Pacific Shores Apartments

$2,522

$1,261

$630

1026

$2.46

5

Chestnut Street

$2,500

$1,250

$625

990

$2.53

6

Westmont Place Townhomes

$2,421

$1,211

$605

910

$2.66

7

Landing at Capitola

$2,007

$1,004

$502

960

$2.09

8

Highland Street

$1,650

$825

$413

950

$1.74

9

Chestnut Street

-

-

-

-

-

10 Center Street

-

-

-

-

-

11 Second Street Commons

-

-

-

-

-

12 Pacific Avenue

-

-

-

-

-

13 Maple Street

-

-

-

-

-

14 Berry Steet

$1,500

$750

$375

800

$1.88

15 Hidden Creek Apartments

$1,800

$900

$450

686

$2.62

-

-

-

-

-

17 Swan Lake Gardens

$1,950

$975

$488

750

$2.60

18 Breakwater Apartments

$1,953

$977

$488

892

$2.19

19 Branciforte Commons

$1,625

$813

$406

536

$3.03

20 Plum Street Garden Apartments

$1,458

$729

$364

800

$1.82

Subtotal Average

$2,030

$1,015

$507

852

$2.41

16 St. George Residences

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ RENTAL RATES TWO-BEDROOM UNITS

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA

Type: Single Family / Segmented Homes

Single Family Homes

No.

Name

Rent Per Unit

Rent Private Room

Rent Shared Room

Unit Size (SF)

Rent/SF -

1

Poplar

-

-

-

-

2

Third

-

-

-

-

3

Button

$2,700

$1,350

$675

854

$3.16

4

Woodrow

$2,200

$1,100

$550

1,100

$2.00

5

Cayuga

$2,490

$1,245

$623

1,006

$2.48

6

Esperanza

$2,300

$1,150

$575

1,580

7

Pasatiempo

-

-

-

-

-

8

Fifth

-

-

-

-

-

9

Morrissey

-

-

$1.46

-

-

10 Grandview

$2,500

$1,250

$625

1,100

-

$2.27

-

11 Grandview

$2,350

$1,175

$588

924

$2.54

12 Carmel

-

-

-

-

-

13 Clinton

-

-

-

-

-

14 Hagemann

-

-

-

-

-

15 Fourth

-

-

-

-

-

16 Beachview

-

-

-

-

-

17 Alamo

-

-

-

-

-

18 Alta Loma

-

-

-

-

-

19 Mason

-

-

-

-

-

20 Alta Vista

-

-

-

-

-

21 Walnut

-

-

-

-

-

22 Monterey

-

-

-

-

-

23 Storey

-

-

-

-

-

24 Franklin

-

-

-

-

-

$2,423

$1,212

$606

1094

$2.32

Average Totals

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ RENTAL RATES THREE-BEDROOM UNITS No.

Apartments

1

Off Campus Housing Options Cypress Point

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA Rent Per Unit

Rent Private Room

Rent Shared Room

Unit Size (SF)

Rent/SF

-

-

-

-

-

2

1010 Pacific Apartments

$3,290

$1,097

$548

1106

$2.97

3

Oceanview Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

4

Pacific Shores Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

5

Chestnut Street

-

-

-

-

-

6

Westmont Place Townhomes

-

-

-

-

-

7

Landing at Capitola

-

-

-

-

-

8

Highland Street

-

-

-

-

-

9

Chestnut Street

-

-

-

-

-

10 Center Street

-

-

-

-

-

11 Second Street Commons

-

-

-

-

-

$3,250

$1,083

$542

1500

$2.17

13 Maple Street

-

-

-

-

-

14 Berry Steet

-

-

-

-

-

15 Hidden Creek Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

16 St. George Residences

-

-

-

-

-

12 Pacific Avenue

17 Swan Lake Gardens

-

-

-

-

-

$2,258

$753

$376

955

$2.36

19 Branciforte Commons

-

-

-

-

-

20 Plum Street Garden Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

$2,933

$978

$489

1187

$2.50

18 Breakwater Apartments

Subtotal Average

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ RENTAL RATES THREE-BEDROOM UNITS

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA

Type: Single Family / Segmented Homes

Single Family Homes

No.

Rent Per Unit

Rent Private Room

Rent Shared Room

Unit Size (SF)

Rent/SF

1

Poplar

Name

$2,950

$983

$492

1,626

$1.81

2

Third

$3,000

$1,000

$500

1,672

$1.79

3

Button

-

-

-

-

-

4

Woodrow

-

-

-

-

-

5

Cayuga

-

-

-

-

-

6

Esperanza

-

-

-

-

-

7

Pasatiempo

$3,300

$1,100

$550

1,848

$1.79

8

Fifth

$3,500

$1,167

$583

1,252

$2.80

9

Morrissey

-

-

-

-

-

10 Grandview

-

-

-

-

-

11 Grandview

-

-

-

-

-

$3,200

$1,067

$533

1,508

$2.12

12 Carmel 13 Clinton

-

-

-

-

-

14 Hagemann

$2,500

$833

$417

988

$2.53

15 Fourth

$2,400

$800

$400

1,192

$2.01

-

-

-

-

-

17 Alamo

$3,000

$1,000

$500

1,206

$2.49

18 Alta Loma

$2,400

$800

$400

1,250

$1.92

-

-

-

-

-

$2,950

$983

$492

1,700

$1.74

-

-

-

-

-

$4,275

$1,425

$713

2,200

$1.94

23 Storey

-

-

-

-

-

24 Franklin

$2,500

$833

$417

1,150

$2.17

$2,998

$999

$500

1466

$2.09

16 Beachview

19 Mason 20 Alta Vista 21 Walnut 22 Monterey

Average Totals

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ RENTAL RATES FOUR-BEDROOM UNITS

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA

Type: Single Family / Segmented Homes

Single Family Homes

No.

Name

Rent Per Unit

Rent Private Room

Rent Shared Room

Unit Size (SF)

Rent/SF

1

Poplar

-

-

-

-

-

2

Third

-

-

-

-

-

3

Button

-

-

-

-

-

4

Woodrow

-

-

-

-

-

5

Cayuga

-

-

-

-

-

6

Esperanza

-

-

-

-

-

7

Pasatiempo

-

-

-

-

-

8

Fifth

-

-

-

-

9

Morrissey

$738

$369

$2,950

$1,268

$2.33

10 Grandview

-

-

-

-

-

11 Grandview

-

-

-

-

-

12 Carmel

-

-

-

-

-

13 Clinton

-

-

-

-

-

14 Hagemann

-

-

-

-

-

15 Fourth

-

-

-

-

$1,000

$500

16 Beachview

$4,000

$1,506

$2.66

17 Alamo

-

-

-

-

18 Alta Loma

-

-

-

-

-

19 Mason

-

-

-

-

-

20 Alta Vista

-

-

-

-

-

21 Walnut

$750

$375

22 Monterey

-

-

-

-

-

23 Storey

-

-

-

-

-

24 Franklin

-

-

-

-

-

$3,317

$829

$415

1554

$2.19

Total Average

$3,000

$1,889

-

$1.59

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ RENTAL RATES FIVE-BEDROOM UNITS

Single Family Homes

No.

Name

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA

Rent Per Unit

Rent Private Room

Rent Shared Room

Unit Size (SF)

Rent/SF

1

Poplar

-

-

-

-

-

2

Third

-

-

-

-

-

3

Button

-

-

-

-

-

4

Woodrow

-

-

-

-

-

5

Cayuga

-

-

-

-

-

6

Esperanza

-

-

-

-

-

7

Pasatiempo

-

-

-

-

-

8

Fifth

-

-

-

-

-

9

Morrissey

-

-

-

-

-

10 Grandview

-

-

-

-

-

11 Grandview

-

-

-

-

-

12 Carmel

-

-

-

-

-

13 Clinton

$4,495

$899

$450

2,259

$1.99

14 Hagemann

-

-

-

-

-

15 Fourth

-

-

-

-

-

16 Beachview

-

-

-

-

-

17 Alamo

-

-

-

-

-

18 Alta Loma

-

-

-

-

-

$5,000

$1,000

$500

1,644

$3.04

20 Alta Vista

-

-

-

-

-

21 Walnut

-

-

-

-

-

22 Monterey

-

-

-

-

-

23 Storey

$4,025

$805

$402.50

1,675

$2.40

24 Franklin

-

-

-

-

-

$4,507

$901

$451

1859

$2.48

19 Mason

Total Average

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ MULTIFAMILY UTILITIES

Apartments

No.

Off Campus Housing Options

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA

Trash

Water

Sewer

Electricity

Gas

1

Cypress Point

-

-

-

-

-

2

1010 Pacific Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

3

Oceanview Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

4

Pacific Shores Apartments

-

-

-

-

x

5

Chestnut Street

-

-

-

-

-

6

Westmont Place Townhomes

-

-

-

-

-

7

Landing at Capitola

-

-

-

-

-

8

Highland Street

x

x

x

-

-

9

Chestnut Street

x

x

-

-

-

10 Center Street

x

x

-

x

x

11 Second Street Commons

x

x

x

-

-

12 Pacific Avenue

x

-

x

-

-

13 Maple Street

x

x

-

-

-

14 Berry Steet

x

x

-

-

-

15 Hidden Creek Apartments

x

x

x

-

-

16 St. George Residences

x

x

x

x

x

17 Swan Lake Gardens

x

x

x

-

x

18 Breakwater Apartments

-

-

-

-

-

19 Branciforte Commons

x

x

-

-

-

20 Plum Street Garden Apartments

x

x

x

-

x

60%

55%

35%

10%

25%

Total Average

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ MULTIFAMILY FEES

Apartments

No.

Off Campus Housing Options

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA Application Fee

Require Rent Insurance

Pet Deposit

Pet Rent

Security Deposit

1

Cypress Point

$40

Yes

$400

$25

$900

2

1010 Pacific Apartments

$35

Yes

$1,200

$25

$1,200

3

Oceanview Apartments

$39

Yes

$500

$25

$500

4

Pacific Shores Apartments

$33

Yes

$750

$25

$800

5

Chestnut Street

$38

Yes

$625

$50

$650

6

Westmont Place Townhomes

-

No

$500

-

$750

7

Landing at Capitola

$40

Yes

$400

$25

$900

8

Highland Street

$25

-

-

-

$2,400

9

Chestnut Street

$20

No

$400

-

$1,000

10 Center Street

$30

No

-

-

$1,000

11 Second Street Commons

$20

No

-

-

$1,000

12 Pacific Avenue

$25

No

$500

-

$3,250

13 Maple Street

-

No

-

-

$1,350

14 Berry Steet

$20

No

-

-

$1,600

15 Hidden Creek Apartments

$38

No

-

-

$1,575

16 St. George Residences

$25

No

-

-

$925

17 Swan Lake Gardens

$33

18 Breakwater Apartments

$39

19 Branciforte Commons

$25

20 Plum Street Garden Apartments

$25 $31

47%

Average Totals

Yes

$700

-

$950

$500

$30

$950

No

-

-

$1,275

Yes

$200

-

$800

$556

$29

$1,189

Yes

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ MULTIFAMILY BUILDING AMENITIES

Apartments

No.

Off Campus Housing Options

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA

On-Site Laundry

Gym

Extra Storage

Pool

Assigned Parking

Covered Parking

Club House

Business Center

Total

1

Cypress Point

x

x

-

x

x

x

x

-

6

2

1010 Pacific Apartments

x

x

-

-

x

x

-

-

4

3

Oceanview Apartments

x

-

x

x

-

x

-

-

4

4

Pacific Shores Apartments

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

8

5

Chestnut Street

x

-

-

-

-

x

-

-

2

6

Westmont Place Townhomes

x

-

-

x

-

x

-

-

3 3

7

Landing at Capitola

x

-

-

-

x

x

-

-

8

Highland Street

x

-

x

-

x

-

-

-

3

9

Chestnut Street

-

-

-

-

x

-

-

-

1

10 Center Street

x

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

11 Second Street Commons

x

-

x

-

x

x

-

-

4

12 Pacific Avenue

x

x

x

x

x

x

-

-

6

13 Maple Street

-

-

-

-

x

-

-

-

1

14 Berry Steet

-

-

-

-

x

-

-

-

1

15 Hidden Creek Apartments

-

-

x

x

x

-

-

-

3

16 St. George Residences

x

x

-

-

-

x

-

x

4

17 Swan Lake Gardens

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

-

18 Breakwater Apartments

x

x

x

x

x

-

-

-

7

19 Branciforte Commons

x

-

x

-

x

x

x

-

5

20 Plum Street Garden Apartments

x

-

-

-

x

-

x

-

3

80%

35%

45%

40%

75%

60%

25%

10%

4

Total Average

5

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ MULTIFAMILY UNIT AMENITIES

Apartments

No.

Off Campus Housing Options

EXHIBIT B HOUSING MARKET DATA

A/C

Cable Ready

In-Unit Laundry

Furnished

Refrigerator

Microwave

Stove

Dishwasher

Walk-in Closet

Balcony/Pati o

Total

1

Cypress Point

-

x

-

x

x

x

x

x

-

x

7

2

1010 Pacific Apartments

-

x

x

-

x

x

x

x

x

x

8

3

Oceanview Apartments

-

x

-

-

x

x

x

x

-

x

6

4

Pacific Shores Apartments

-

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

9

5

Chestnut Street

-

x

-

-

x

-

x

x

-

x

5

6

Westmont Place Townhomes

-

x

x

-

x

x

-

x

-

x

6 6

7

Landing at Capitola

-

x

-

-

x

x

x

x

-

x

8

Highland Street

-

x

-

-

x

-

x

-

x

-

4

9

Chestnut Street

-

x

-

-

x

-

x

-

-

-

3

10 Center Street

-

x

-

-

x

-

x

-

x

-

4

11 Second Street Commons

x

x

-

-

x

x

x

-

-

x

6

12 Pacific Avenue

-

x

x

-

x

x

x

-

x

x

7

13 Maple Street

-

x

-

-

x

-

x

-

-

-

3

14 Berry Steet

-

x

-

-

x

-

x

x

-

-

4

15 Hidden Creek Apartments

-

x

x

-

x

x

x

x

x

x

8

16 St. George Residences

-

x

-

x

x

x

x

-

-

-

5

17 Swan Lake Gardens

-

x

-

-

x

-

x

x

x

x

6

18 Breakwater Apartments

-

x

-

-

x

-

x

x

-

x

5

19 Branciforte Commons

-

x

-

-

x

x

x

-

x

x

6

20 Plum Street Garden Apartments

-

x

-

-

x

x

x

-

-

x

5

5%

100%

25%

15%

100%

60%

95%

55%

40%

70%

6

Total Average Many of the studios have mini-fridges, space is a premium

C1

Exhibit Student Survey Data

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University of California Santa Cruz Spring 2014 Housing Master Plan Description: Date Created: 4/7/2014 1:30:39 PM Date Range: 4/14/2014 12:00:00 AM - 5/20/2014 11:59:00 PM Total Respondents: 4693 Q1. What is your current status at UCSC? Count

Percent

2769

89.84%

Undergraduate student

313

10.16%

Graduate/professional student

0

0.00%

Faculty

0

0.00%

Staff

3082

Respondents

Q58. Do you currently live in UCSC housing? Count

Percent

2015

66.24%

Yes

1027

33.76%

No

3042

Respondents

Q59. If currently living on campus in UCSC student housing, in what location do you reside? Count

Percent

203

10.51%

155

8.03%

225

11.65%

Crown College

158

8.18%

Merrill College

271

14.03%

Porter College

95

4.92%

Kresge College

133

6.89%

Oakes College

208

10.77%

College Eight

146

7.56%

College Nine

143

7.41%

College Ten

30

1.55%

The Village

40

2.07%

Redwood Grove Apartments

29

1.50%

Graduate Student Housing

68

3.52%

Family Student Housing

11

0.57%

Camper Park

16

0.83%

University Town Center

1931

Cowell College Stevenson College

Respondents

Q60. How important was the availability of on-campus housing in your decision to attend UCSC? Count

Percent

1230

42.59%

Very important

998

34.56%

Important

498

17.24%

Unimportant

162

5.61%

2888

Respondents

Very unimportant

Q61. Which years have you lived on campus in UCSC's student housing? SELECT ALL THAT APPLY, INCLUDING PARTIAL YEARS Count

Respondent %

Response %

316

10.93%

6.96%

2223

76.92%

48.99%

Frosh year

1075

37.20%

23.69%

Sophomore year

616

21.31%

13.57%

Junior year

223

7.72%

4.91%

Senior year (including fifth year and beyond)

85

2.94%

1.87%

Graduate/professional year(s)

2890

Respondents

4538

Responses

None

Q62. If on campus housing was available to you throughout your time as a student, which year(s) would you choose to live on campus? SELECT ALL THAT APPLY, INCLUDING PARTIAL YEARS. Count

Respondent %

Response %

238

8.27%

3.46%

2214

76.93%

32.19%

Frosh year

1829

63.55%

26.60%

Sophomore year

1268

44.06%

18.44%

Junior year

959

33.32%

13.95%

Senior year (including fifth year and beyond)

369

12.82%

5.37%

2878

Respondents

6877

Responses

Q63. How satisfied are you with your current residence? Count

Percent

762

26.35%

Very satisfied

1667

57.64%

Satisfied

372

12.86%

Unsatisfied

91

3.15%

2892

Very unsatisfied

Respondents

Q64. How satisfied are you with the physical condition of your current residence? Count

Percent

694

24.06%

Very satisfied

1627

56.41%

Satisfied

452

15.67%

Unsatisfied

111

3.85%

2884

Very unsatisfied

Respondents

Q65. How satisfied are you with the size of your current residence? Count

Percent

861

29.85%

Very satisfied

1345

46.64%

Satisfied

511

17.72%

Unsatisfied

167

5.79%

2884

Respondents

Very unsatisfied

None

Graduate/professional year(s)

Q66. How satisfied are you with the amenities and services offered at your current residence? Count

Percent

567

19.72%

Very satisfied

1680

58.43%

Satisfied

517

17.98%

Unsatisfied

111

3.86%

2875

Very unsatisfied

Respondents

Q67. How satisfied are you with the dining rate you are paying for your current residence? Count

Percent

283

10.07%

Very satisfied

1158

41.20%

Satisfied

944

33.58%

Unsatisfied

426

15.15%

Very unsatisfied

2811

Respondents

Q68. How satisfied are you with the housing rate you are paying for your current residence? Count

Percent

274

9.52%

875

30.39%

Satisfied

1145

39.77%

Unsatisfied

585

20.32%

Very unsatisfied

2879

Very satisfied

Respondents

Q69. How convenient to your academic interests (e.g., classes, library, labs) do you consider your current living situation? Count

Percent

924

32.08%

Very convenient

1370

47.57%

Convenient

458

15.90%

Inconvenient

128

4.44%

2880

Very inconvenient

Respondents

Q70. How convenient to your non-academic, on-campus interests (job, recreation, activities, etc.) do you consider your current living situation? Count

Percent

570

19.83%

Very convenient

1505

52.35%

Convenient

630

21.91%

Inconvenient

170

5.91%

2875

Respondents

Very inconvenient

Q71. What were the FIVE MOST important factors in your decision on where to live this year? SELECT UP TO FIVE RESPONSES Count

Respondent %

Response %

1704

59.46%

12.59%

857

29.90%

6.33%

1427

49.79%

10.54%

493

17.20%

3.64%

Proximity to other students

549

19.16%

4.06%

Proximity to, or availability of, convenient parking or public transportation

373

13.01%

2.76%

Proximity to my work

184

6.42%

1.36%

Proximity to shopping, entertainment, or restaurants

773

26.97%

5.71%

Availability of high-speed Internet

325

11.34%

2.40%

Reliability of maintenance and custodial services

257

8.97%

1.90%

Flexible lease/rental terms

137

4.78%

1.01%

Availability of a good building manager or landlord

486

16.96%

3.59%

Less restrictive rules and supervision

416

14.52%

3.07%

Ability to stay during breaks

673

23.48%

4.97%

Availability of a quiet place to study

671

23.41%

4.96%

Access to UCSC resources (computer labs, student services, administrative offices, etc.)

256

8.93%

1.89%

Opportunity to be involved in UCSC residential communities (living/learning programs, theme communities, etc.)

449

15.67%

3.32%

Safety and security features

700

24.42%

5.17%

Availability of a private (single) bedroom

351

12.25%

2.59%

Availability of a private bathroom

380

13.26%

2.81%

Availability of additional living space outside my bedroom but within my unit

961

33.53%

7.10%

Availability of a kitchen

463

16.15%

3.42%

Availability of convenient laundry facilities

648

22.61%

4.79%

Access to campus dining

2866 13533

Respondents Responses

Total cost of rent and utilities Ability to choose my own roommate(s) Proximity to classes

Q72. What were the FIVE LEAST important factors in your decision on where to live this year? SELECT UP TO FIVE RESPONSES Count

Respondent %

Response %

228

8.17%

1.79%

Total cost of rent and utilities

408

14.62%

3.21%

Ability to choose my own roommate(s)

321

11.51%

2.52%

Proximity to classes

778

27.89%

6.12%

Proximity to other students

545

19.53%

4.29%

Proximity to, or availability of, convenient parking or public transportation

677

24.27%

5.32%

Proximity to my work

1159

41.54%

9.11%

Proximity to shopping, entertainment, or restaurants

287

10.29%

2.26%

Availability of high-speed Internet

482

17.28%

3.79%

Reliability of maintenance and custodial services

619

22.19%

4.87%

Flexible lease/rental terms

577

20.68%

4.54%

Availability of a good building manager or landlord

684

24.52%

5.38%

Less restrictive rules and supervision

974

34.91%

7.66%

Ability to stay during breaks

303

10.86%

2.38%

Availability of a quiet place to study

457

16.38%

3.59%

Access to UCSC resources (computer labs, student services, administrative offices, etc.)

907

32.51%

7.13%

Opportunity to be involved in UCSC residential communities (living/learning programs, theme communities, etc.)

317

11.36%

2.49%

Safety and security features

650

23.30%

5.11%

Availability of a private (single) bedroom

584

20.93%

4.59%

Availability of a private bathroom

316

11.33%

2.49%

Availability of additional living space outside my bedroom but within my unit

291

10.43%

2.29%

Availability of a kitchen

191

6.85%

1.50%

Availability of convenient laundry facilities

961

34.44%

7.56%

Access to campus dining

2790 12716

Respondents Responses

Q73. Who made the decision regarding where you lived this year? Count

Percent

1706

59.20%

53

1.84%

905

31.40%

139

4.82%

My spouse/partner and I jointly

79

2.74%

Other (please specify)

2882

Respondents

I did solely My parent(s)/guardian(s) solely My parent(s)/guardian(s) and I jointly

Q74. Where do you plan to live next year while attending UCSC? Count

Percent

1209

41.86%

On campus

1135

39.30%

Off campus

19

0.66%

University Town Center

159

5.51%

Undecided on where to live

366

12.67%

2888

Not applicable; I will not be attending UCSC next year.

Respondents

Q75. If you're considering living in campus housing next year, what location would you prefer to live in? Count

Percent

91

7.56%

146

12.14%

Stevenson College

152

12.64%

Crown College

82

6.82%

Merrill College

46

3.82%

Porter College

88

7.32%

Kresge College

78

6.48%

Oakes College

114

9.48%

College Eight

115

9.56%

College Nine

102

8.48%

College Ten

52

4.32%

The Village

59

4.90%

Redwood Grove Apartments

8

0.67%

Graduate Student Housing

41

3.41%

Family Student Housing

11

0.91%

Camper Park

18

1.50%

University Town Center

1203

Respondents

Cowell College

Q76. If considering living OFF CAMPUS next year, why would you prefer to do so? SELECT UP TO FIVE RESPONSES Count

Respondent %

Response %

266

11.76%

2.88%

I may not be attending UCSC next year

58

2.56%

0.63%

I am ineligible to live in UCSC's student housing

179

7.91%

1.94%

UCSC was unable to provide housing for me on campus

329

14.54%

3.57%

To live in a quieter environment

78

3.45%

0.85%

To satisfy my parent's/family's wishes

800

35.37%

8.67%

Fewer rules and regulations

271

11.98%

2.94%

More convenient location

254

11.23%

2.75%

More convenient parking or public transportation

1638

72.41%

17.76%

249

11.01%

2.70%

My preferred on-campus living accommodation may not be available

173

7.65%

1.88%

Better Internet access

383

16.93%

4.15%

Better living unit amenities

35

1.55%

0.38%

Better security/safety

456

20.16%

4.94%

Ability to live with or near friends

144

6.37%

1.56%

Ability to live with or near family or partner

760

33.60%

8.24%

More privacy

707

31.26%

7.66%

More living space

711

31.43%

7.71%

No meal plan requirement

708

31.30%

7.67%

Access to my own kitchen

153

6.76%

1.66%

More convenient laundry facilities

185

8.18%

2.01%

Better physical condition of the building

28

1.24%

0.30%

Better building management and staffing

32

1.41%

0.35%

Better maintenance and housekeeping services

8

0.35%

0.09%

Better accessibility for persons with disabilities

126

5.57%

1.37%

To live away from other students

372

16.45%

4.03%

To have a pet

122

5.39%

1.32%

Other (please specify)

2262

Respondents

9225

Responses

More cost effective

Q77. Please rate how important each of the following factors should be to UCSC as it considers improvements to on-campus housing: SELECT ONE RESPONSE FOR EACH FACTOR - Provide modern and attractive living environments to students Count

Percent

1027

36.85%

Very important

1356

48.65%

Important

314

11.27%

Unimportant

90

3.23%

2787

Respondents

Very unimportant

Q78. Please rate how important each of the following factors should be to UCSC as it considers improvements to on-campus housing: SELECT ONE RESPONSE FOR EACH FACTOR - Create more academically-focused residential communities Count

Percent

762

27.51%

Very important

1269

45.81%

Important

632

22.82%

Unimportant

107

3.86%

2770

Very unimportant

Respondents

Q79. Please rate how important each of the following factors should be to UCSC as it considers improvements to on-campus housing: SELECT ONE RESPONSE FOR EACH FACTOR - Make UCSC more attractive to prospective students Count

Percent

749

27.24%

Very important

1210

44.00%

Important

615

22.36%

Unimportant

176

6.40%

2750

Very unimportant

Respondents

Q80. Please rate how important each of the following factors should be to UCSC as it considers improvements to on-campus housing: SELECT ONE RESPONSE FOR EACH FACTOR - Help retain students at UCSC Count

Percent

904

32.85%

Very important

1269

46.11%

Important

478

17.37%

Unimportant

101

3.67%

2752

Very unimportant

Respondents

Q81. Please rate how important each of the following factors should be to UCSC as it considers improvements to on-campus housing: SELECT ONE RESPONSE FOR EACH FACTOR - Increase the student residential population on campus Count

Percent

413

15.03%

Very important

900

32.75%

Important

1102

40.10%

Unimportant

333

12.12%

Very unimportant

2748

Respondents

Q82. Please rate how important each of the following factors should be to UCSC as it considers improvements to on-campus housing: SELECT ONE RESPONSE FOR EACH FACTOR - Keep housing costs affordable Count

Percent

2511

90.75%

214

7.73%

Important

26

0.94%

Unimportant

16

0.58%

Very unimportant

2767

Respondents

Very important

Q83. Please rate how important each of the following factors should be to UCSC as it considers improvements to on-campus housing: SELECT ONE RESPONSE FOR EACH FACTOR - Improve existing residential dining programs Count

Percent

1521

55.19%

Very important

921

33.42%

Important

266

9.65%

Unimportant

48

1.74%

Very unimportant

2756

Respondents

Q84. Once enrolled for the first time at UCSC, how easy was it for you to find a place to live on or near campus? Count

Percent

294

31.85%

Very easy

353

38.24%

Easy

192

20.80%

Difficult

84

9.10%

923

Very difficult

Respondents

Q85. With whom do you currently live? Count

Percent

67

7.25%

512

55.41%

68

7.36%

114

12.34%

32

3.46%

112

12.12%

19

2.06%

924

I live alone With other UCSC roommate(s) With other non-UCSC roommate(s) With both UCSC and non-UCSC roommate(s) With my parent(s) or other relative(s) With my spouse/partner and/or children Other (please specify)

Respondents

Q86. Do you currently rent or own? Count

Percent

875

95.21%

Rent

29

3.16%

Own

15

1.63%

Other (please specify)

919

Respondents

Q87. What type of unit do you line in off campus? Count

Percent

335

36.45%

Apartment/condo

392

42.66%

Single family home

91

9.90%

Townhouse

62

6.75%

Duplex/Tri-plex/Four-plex

39

4.24%

Other (please specify)

919

Respondents

Q88. How many bedrooms are in your current housing unit? Count

Percent

151

16.45%

1 bedroom

270

29.41%

2 bedrooms

246

26.80%

3 bedrooms

112

12.20%

4 bedrooms

139

15.14%

5 or more bedrooms

918

Respondents

Q89. Do you share a bedroom? Count

Percent

465

50.43%

No

403

43.71%

Yes, with one other person

54

5.86%

922

Yes, with two or more other people

Respondents

Q90. What is your personal share of monthly rent/housing costs excluding utilities? Count

Percent

37

4.24%

90

10.32%

$400 - $499

137

15.71%

$500 - $599

208

23.85%

$600 - $699

194

22.25%

$700 - $799

104

11.93%

$800 - $899

31

3.56%

$900 - $999

23

2.64%

$1,000 or more

11

1.26%

$1,100 $1,199

7

0.80%

$1,200 $1,299

2

0.23%

$1,300 $1,399

5

0.57%

$1,400 $1,499

12

1.38%

$1,500 or more

6

0.69%

I don't know

5

0.57%

I don't pay rent

872

Respondents

Less than $400

Q91. In addition to your rent, for which of the following utilities do you currently pay? SELECT ALL THAT APPLY Count

Respondent %

Response %

87

9.99%

2.52%

Not applicable; I do not pay for any utilities

254

29.16%

7.36%

Cable/satellite television

439

50.40%

12.72%

Heat

732

84.04%

21.21%

Internet

720

82.66%

20.86%

Electric

502

57.63%

14.55%

Water

262

30.08%

7.59%

Sewer

109

12.51%

3.16%

Telephone

346

39.72%

10.03%

871 3451

Trash

Respondents Responses

Q92. How much is your individual monthly cost for all the utilities selected in the previous question? Count

Percent

48

6.15%

245

31.37%

$25 - $49

338

43.28%

$50 - $99

88

11.27%

$100 - $149

24

3.07%

$150 - $199

23

2.94%

$200 or more

15

1.92%

Don't know

781

Less than $25

Respondents

Q93. How long is your current lease? Count

Percent

76

8.78%

Not applicable; I have no lease

27

3.12%

More than 12 months

442

51.04%

12 months

119

13.74%

Academic year (approximately 9 months)

5

0.58%

177

20.44%

20

2.31%

866

Respondents

Academic term (e.g., semester) Monthly Other (please specify)

Q94. What was your personal share of the security deposit required for your current lease? Count

Percent

60

6.94%

No deposit required

10

1.16%

Less than $100

25

2.89%

$100 - $199

39

4.51%

$200 - $299

35

4.05%

$300 - $399

59

6.82%

$400 - $499

85

9.83%

$500 - $599

94

10.87%

$600 - $699

100

11.56%

$700 - $799

71

8.21%

$800 - $899

35

4.05%

$900 - $999

200

23.12%

52

6.01%

865

$1,000 or more Don't know

Respondents

Q95. What is your primary mode of transportation between UCSC and your primary residence during the school year? Count

Percent

201

23.21%

57

6.58%

Carpool (with at least one other person)

5

0.58%

UCSC Vanpool

445

51.39%

Public transportation/bus

110

12.70%

Bicycle

9

1.04%

Motorcycle

36

4.16%

Walk

3

0.35%

Other

866

Car, drive alone

Respondents

Q96. What is your typical one-way time in minutes from your residence to UCSC? Count

Percent

38

4.40%

252

29.17%

5 - 15 minutes

252

29.17%

16 - 25 minutes

185

21.41%

26 - 35 minutes

67

7.75%

36 - 45 minutes

27

3.13%

46 - 55 minutes

18

2.08%

56 minutes - 1 hour 5 minutes

3

0.35%

1 hour 6 minutes - 1 hour 15 minutes

10

1.16%

1 hour 16 minutes - 1 hour 30 minutes

12

1.39%

1 hour 31 minutes or more

864

Respondents

Less than 5 minutes

Q97. If all of the unit types described above were available on UCSC's campus at the rents outlined above, what would have been your living preference for this academic year (2013-2014)? Count

Percent

350

12.88%

164

6.03%

Unit B Single occupancy (private) bedroom in a one-bedroom semisuite for approximately $889 - $911/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

54

1.99%

Unit B: Double occupancy (shared) bedroom in a one-bedroom semisuite for approximately $800 - $822/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

57

2.10%

Unit B: Triple occupancy (shared) bedroom in a one-bedroom semisuite for approximately $689 - $711/month/person

139

5.11%

Unit C: Single occupancy (private) bedroom in a two-bedroom semisuite for approximately $867 - $889/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

115

4.23%

Unit C: Double occupancy (shared) bedroom in a two-bedroom semisuite for approximately$711 - $733/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

116

4.27%

Unit C: Triple occupancy (shared) bedroom in a two-bedroom semisuite for approximately $644 - $667/month/person

37

1.36%

Unit D: Single occupancy (private) bedroom in full suite bedroom for approximately $1,067 - $1,089/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

84

3.09%

Unit D: Double occupancy (shared) bedroom in a full suite bedroom for approximately $778 - $800/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

86

3.16%

Unit E: Single occupancy (private) bedroom in a studio apartment for $1,422 $1,444/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

43

1.58%

Unit F: Single occupancy (private) bedroom in a one-bedroom for approximately $1,733 - $1,756 /month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

31

1.14%

Unit F: Double occupancy (shared) bedroom in a one-bedroom for approximately $1,244 - $1,267/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

57

2.10%

Unit G: Single occupancy (private) bedroom in a two-bedroom apartment for approximately $1,444 - $1,467/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

84

3.09%

Unit G: Double occupancy (shared) bedroom in a two-bedroom apartment for approximately $1,111 - $1,133/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

303

11.15%

Unit H: Single occupancy (private) bedroom in a four-bedroom apartment for approximately $1,067 - $1,089/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

758

27.89%

I would prefer to live off campus

240

8.83%

2718

Respondents

Unit A: Double occupancy (shared) in a traditional bedroom for approximately $604-$623/month/person (CLICK HERE FOR IMAGE)

I would prefer to live in housing currently available on campus

Q98. If you prefer to live in housing currently available on campus, which residence hall would you prefer? Count

Percent

18

7.56%

Cowell College

15

6.30%

Stevenson College

33

13.87%

Crown College

14

5.88%

Merrill College

13

5.46%

Porter College

13

5.46%

Kresge College

13

5.46%

Oakes College

17

7.14%

College Eight

19

7.98%

College Nine

17

7.14%

College Ten

6

2.52%

The Village

12

5.04%

Redwood Grove Apartments

0

0.00%

Graduate Student Housing

33

13.87%

13

5.46%

Camper Park

2

0.84%

University Town Center

238

Family Student Housing

Respondents

Q99. How many occupants would you prefer within your bedroom? Count

Percent

1428

52.12%

Single occupancy

777

28.36%

Double occupancy

220

8.03%

315

11.50%

2740

Triple occupancy I don't have a preference

Respondents

Q100. What is your class standing? Count

Percent

738

26.88%

First year

627

22.83%

Second year

578

21.05%

Third year

460

16.75%

Fourth year

71

2.59%

Fifth year and beyond

260

9.47%

Graduate/Professional

12

0.44%

Other (please specify)

2746

Respondents

Q101. What is your current enrollment status? Count

Percent

2642

96.74%

Full time

89

3.26%

Part time

2731

Respondents

Q102. What is your age? Count

Percent

5

0.18%

1601

58.49%

18 - 20

804

29.38%

21 - 24

206

7.53%

25 - 30

121

4.42%

31 or over

2737

17 or under

Respondents

Q103. What is your gender? Count

Percent

882

32.34%

Male

1749

64.14%

Female

28

1.03%

Other

68

2.49%

Prefer not to answer

2727

Respondents

Q104. What is your race/ethnic background? Count

Percent

9

0.33%

Nonresident alien

628

23.16%

Hispanic or Latino

45

1.66%

1028

37.91%

11

0.41%

534

19.69%

25

0.92%

299

11.03%

32

1.18%

Race/ethnicity unknown

101

3.72%

Other (please specify)

2712

African American or Black White American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander Two or more races

Respondents

Q105. What is your current residency status? Count

Percent

2604

95.11%

84

3.07%

Out of state (U.S. citizen or permanent resident outside of California)

50

1.83%

International student

2738

In state (California permanent resident)

Respondents

Q106. Please let us know if you have any other comments regarding UCSC's Housing program: Count

Percent

926

100.00%

926

Respondents

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C2

Exhibit

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EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

SURVEY COMMENTS STUDENT COMMENTS – ON-CAMPUS

1.

55 meal plan for students in an apartment being mandatory is greedy and should not be mandatory, it was a waste of money this year for me due to dining preference, my own cooking ability, and food allergies. If I had the ability to get out of paying for a 55 meal plan this year, I would have.

2.

A better protocol and process to follow for future students that happen to get bed bugs during the year, please. Maybe a step by step guide.

3.

A dining hall plan is WAY too expensive for the quality of food that is offered. The rooms are a good size for the doubles and singles. Rent is way too expensive though. You can rent a single room for less than $800 per month off campus. Between my roommate and I combined we spend more than 4 times that amount for our double.

4.

A lesser meal plan than 55 should be offered

5.

A lot of the bathroom facilities are sub par. Plastic shower curtains are not exactly state of the art or very private; doors like the ones to the restrooms should be installed in the showers. Also, small chairs to set your stuff down would be nice instead of putting shower items on the floor.

6.

A lot of the deciding factor in housing is based on price, rather than needs. For example, the current triples are often too small, especially for students who need quiet and personal space, but doubles or triples as they are are affordable.

7.

A meal plan should be optional for students living in the residence halls, specially for non-freshman students.

8.

Affordable housing would make everything easier and retain students at UCSC

9.

All of the housing options shown in the previous question were amazing. having room floor plans such as those would be great and a large improvement to what we have now.

10.

All options are fairly nice but are obscenely expensive compared with (frankly much nicer) off campus options.

11.

All the new housing plans were way too expensive

12.

Allow me to have my own contract with Comcast. UCSC's Comcast service is atrocious, the UCSC modem's are sub-par, and the policy is invasive. I want good internet and UCSC will not allow me to have it.

13.

Amazing expeience!

14.

Apartments are cool. I don't think they need much else but I do believe that it is about that time to get new vacuums. The vacuums we have shoot crumbs back at me feet.

15.

Apartments need more bonding programs. The CRE @ 9/10 takes his job to seriously. Create a trail from the Community at 9/10 to that conveniently leads down to the forest trail that is a nice short-cut to Jack Baskin School of Engineering.

16.

Apts, at least the older ones, should be updated in every way possible.

17.

As a second year, I chose to continue living in Stevenson, but was bummed by the fact I had no access to a kitchen within my community. House 7 is the only place with a kitchen, which non house 7 residents are not permitted to use. I would like to request the addition of kitchen use in 1-2 more Stevenson houses for the use of trained students, whose work leads them to work late and early - thus missing many dining hall open hours. The mandatory 5 or 7 day meal plan is inconvenient for me as a second year spending time at work and the marine lab off campus and I would further propose

jULY 2014

1

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

the option of students living within the kitchen house communities to have the option of signing up for a 55 meal plan - just as the apartment communities have the option. I recognize that the university wants to provide for the freshmen, as they are virgins to Santa Cruz and university life, but for the upperclassmen, choosing to live in the dorms for the convenience of classes and university services - more flexible meal plan options and kitchen assess would be very welcomed, and strongly influences where I wish to live next year. I may choose to live off campus for the mere fact that I need access to a kitchen and cannot afford to live in the apartments. Long story short, I'd like to be able to reside in the dorms, but with a kitchen and the option of a smaller meal plan. 18.

As long as it is cheaper to leave in essentially equivalent housing off campus students will. The housing program either needs to be improved to the point where it is better than off campus accommodations or UCSC needs to find a way to make it cheaper. This is especially true given how insanely expensive rent is in Santa Cruz. The rates are comperable to San Francisco. That should provide some context for how extremely expensive campus housing is.

19.

Better access to healthier foods. Healthy Mondays are a good start, but are currently being used to bring cost down, not present people with healthier options.

20.

Better dinning hall food. lower costs. Room with private bathroom.

21.

Better janitors!

22.

Bigger singles!

23.

Bring back apartment with 4 singles option to College Eight. And make more apartments have singles.

24.

Bring back paper towels in the dorms, or install hand dryers.

25.

Bring back the 75-Day meal plan!

26.

Bring back the 75-meal plan!

27.

Cheaper is always better.

28.

Close proximity of the dining hall loading station is quite annoying. Very loud, noisy. Sometimes hard to sleep at night. Also, some students on my floor do not know how to: flush a toilet, keep the toilet clean, take a shit and have it land IN the toilet, not shit in the shower. Do we have grade schoolers at UC Santa Cruz?

29.

College Eight housing is super nice. Friend at Merrill says Merrill apartments need to be updated badly.

30.

Construction has been extremely inconvenient and disrupting of sleep and disrupting studying

31.

Construction is inconsiderate to students. Even though we were told it would not interfere with us and would be done by the time we moved in, the construction is loud and restricts access to our homes. We live here and this is supposed to be a comfortable place for us to think of as home, but it's really not. The CSOs do not help keep people safe at all, and focus on writing people up for insignificant things (ie. noise after quiet hours-or even before quiet hours- when everyone in the hall is awake and ok with the noise level). I think it is hypocritical to enforce a noise level so militantly when we are woken up by construction earlier than 8am sometimes. I think that, especially if noise is such an issue, UCSC should offer a lounge open 24 hours all week for people to go and freely talk (or "make noise") for every residential community. I also strongly feel that there should be a music room open all week at least until quiet hours begin for musicians and music students to use. It is truly unfair that we cannot play/practice music in our dorms/homes, and the practice rooms restrict amplification and/or close too early. Aside from the proximity to beautiful hiking trails and the UCSC natural reserves, I did not feel at home or have an enjoyable experience in campus housing (Merrill dorms) this year.

32.

Cost is really the only factor I really care about. Yes i would love a single but for the price I would most likely go for a triple.

2

BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

33.

Costs way to much for a building that is already paid off. And if it isn't payed off yet then where is my money going?

34.

Cowell is in need of having the dorms remodeled.

35.

Cowell/Stevenson dorms need to be renewed.

36.

Crown College is extremely run down and in need of work. The bathrooms are immensely worse than the dorms.

37.

Crown College really needs to have their dormitories renovated.

38.

Crown Housing is the completely terrible. I pay the same amount of money as 9/10 and Stevenson/Cowell students but I get the smallest room, illegally cramped with 3 people and there stuff. Either Crown needs to only offer doubles or cheaper small triples or they need to break down walls between two rooms to create more living space. The current living condition in Crown is like living in a jail cell. There is no room, leg space, or even netting to ensure we don't fall out of the window. Overall, I am very disappointed in my living condition and I hope Crown is bulldozed and renovated VERY soon. The apartments are okay, but they need more room living space as well. Plus, the current housing program makes it insanely difficult for one to live in another college. I believe we should get the choice to change our living space every year. Coming to UCSC, I almost wanted to drop after seeing my room. This living condition needs to be fixed as soon as possible for the future of Crown. It's already bad enough that we don't have a two bus stops and that we live on top of a hill. One could at least hope for a castle on a hill, but that is exactly the opposite of what we are provided. It's disgusting that the school even expects so many students to be cramped up into these small triples.

39.

crown overall needs to be updated! I feel we get the short end of the stick as crown is one of the older colleges and im all for keeping the historic features of crown preserved but the rooms are smaller then all other colleges. we end up paying the same but we are less comfortable in our environment. our rooms are small and we pay the same and that drives me up the wall. why pay more money for something we know others are getting more for it. The facilities need to be updated. i get that we are a smaller college but we have 2 bathrooms per floor while others have 16 bathrooms per floor we have two showers per floor. there is hardly any privacy. We need a remodel.

40.

CSOs are assholes and the smoking ban killed the porter quad

41.

Current housing is very expensive.

42.

Currently my dorm housing is very stuffy and cramped. Better window ventilation would be appreciated.

43.

deadlines for housing should be extended.

44.

Definately need new meal plans. The curret system is a waste of money.

45.

Dining hall food all tastes rubbery or old or stale or tasteless. It's not worth the $. Kresge Apts have stuff breaking down constantly. But I'd never live in a regular room because I want a kitchen. And a bathroom. Proposed options are all too much $ or no kitchen. Kresge style 5 person apt is fine. Also why do you require meal plans? We're adults, if we don't want to spend thousands each year for bad food let us not do it. Seems to me you guys are afraid no one will buy meal plans if they don't have to bc everyone knows food isn't worth it

46.

Dinning Program should be remolded. Having a smaller meal plan than the 5 day meal plan should be available for people living in the dorms.

47.

Do not be like the mess that is the UTC. Poor internet service, adequate TV services, several problems with leaks and small rooms

48.

Do not build in upper campus. There is enough housing on campus.

49.

DO NOT EXPAND INTO UPPER CAMPUS. BUILD UP AND NOT OUT. Upper Campus is what attracts students to UCSC. Do not build new housing in the forests. PLEASE

jULY 2014

3

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

50.

Don't force meal plans.

51.

don't force people to get a meal plan if they don't want it. Give them that option of not having a meal plan.

52.

Don't make expensive options that are ridiculous and unnecessary on UCSC's campus. Having studio apartments seems too expensive and takes up a lot of space. Suites are useless, because the main attraction of having more space in the living area is to have a kitchen as well which makes life 10000 times better. Don't make huge residences that cram tons of students into a tiny space. It is inappropriate to have apartments with 8 - 10 people in them. Just make sure there is reasonable housing that is a viable option for everyone!!

53.

Don't raise rent.

54.

Doubles should not be triples

55.

Drop the prices. We're paying through the fucking nose.

56.

During the summer of 2014, I helped turn what were already triple-occupancy rooms, and some double-occupancy rooms, into quadruples. This is an egregious transgression against the students. Not only is it unsafe, but it is unethical to try and pass off a space meant for two individuals as a four-person space.

57.

Expense is the most important factor

58.

expensive and maintenance doesn't always replenish supplies, clean well, etc.

59.

Expensive as hell

60.

Family Student Housing facilities and technology is incredibly antiquated and not at all conducive to the academicmindedness of the grad students that stay there. Please, please replace the internet technology with something even a bit more up to state of the art, current standards. At times, FSH actually feels like one has traveled back into the past, what with the state of the apartments and the technological amenities.

61.

Family Student housing has enabled my family to live on campus in an environment large enough to comfortably live in. The rent has raised and yet the amenities and condition has stayed the same so the reason for the increases seem to not match the work being done. Also, the front office staff is not very friendly and do not go over and beyond to make sure the residents' needs are satisfied.

62.

Family Student Housing is too expensive and is extremely stressful to find ways to pay for so much in summer

63.

Family student housing needs to be remolded my apartment is full of mold and they clean it but it just comes back. These apartments are really old compared to others on campus and i pay just as much if not more than for rent.

64.

Family student housing needs to be updated with cost efficient windows and doors, fixtures, lighting, etc. The cost needs to be lower because single parent families can barely survive, More families and less single people. Too many people get special treatment with parking, etc. Seems like the military are running this place!

65.

Family student housing needs two major upgrades to be perfect: 1) better landscaping or fewer gardening restrictions. A little would go a long way. Currently we have dirt yards and the planting regulations are too restrictive, so there is no incentive to plant ourselves 2) the buildings are falling apart, but our rent is raised every year. This doesn't seem fair when upgrades are happening all over campus, and FSH is like the grad student ghetto. A third problem is housing for single parents. If we could have units of varying sizes and varying rates that would be very helpful. I would love a smaller cheaper apartment, but only if I could live in FSH.

66.

Family Student Housing severely needs to be updated first before creating new housing. That way it would mean less cost and more availability in housing since most families take on roommates that are ucsc students and the rent is generally cheaper.

4

BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

67.

Faster internet. I don't like having 100+ mbps in computer labs and libraries yet a measly 9 mbps in the dorm.

68.

fix the dryers please!! none of them work!

69.

For C9/10 apartments: -There are electrical outlets no farther than 3 inches from the kitchen sink. That is a very poor design. Why? In the words of OPERs, "water+electricity=ZAP!" - I work in San Francisco and go three days a week. I have to park in Remote Lot (because too expensive for the C permits) and I have to walk over a mile to my car in East Remote or to North Remote! Can you also imagine how annoying it is to get groceries? Then, when I come back to drop things off, people are occupying the 10 minute spots for the entire weekend or for longer than 10 minutes. This makes it hard to park other places because I don't want to get a ticket! So i lug my groceries from East/North remote... sweating hardcore by the time i make it back!

70.

For facilities that have a kitchen, let it be used by the residents!!!!!!

71.

FSH needs energy efficient upgrades for the heater and water systems, structural upgrades. Old windows and not good isolation does not represent the environmental friendliness of the university.

72.

Fuck being required to buy a meal plan. Thanks. Expensive low quality food. Also apartments are super expensive.

73.

Gender neutral housing should be truly gender neutral, not limited to people who are trans*. I and multiple other people I know have been denied our ideal living arrangement because we are cisgender and wished to live with cisgender people of the opposite gender, which discriminated against us based on our gender identification. The people I live with matter far more to me than the configuration of rooms and beds.

74.

Get a better housing coordinator

75.

Good housing, but too expensive and we should not have to pay for a 55 day meal plan. Not all of us want it. Plus, everything on campus is over-priced

76.

Great housing program. Made me who i am.

77.

GSH is too expensive compared to similar off campus arrangements

78.

have more activities on campus

79.

Have the RA's be less rude to students. They're our age but they act so superior. It's kinda like the Stanford Prison Experiment and they're the guards. (not emily though, she's very considerate)

80.

Hire RAs that actually care enough to enforce the rules everyone agrees to.

81.

Honestly, I am not happy with the current state of the Merrill College dorms. It think it is unfair to charge full price to live in a building that has been under construction all year. When I applied for housing last year, I was not granted a CrownMerrill Apartment, which was my first choice, so I settled for a dorm because we were told all construction being done on the dorms would be completed during the summer and the only construction being done at Merrill during the school year would be for the new college offices and a restaurant. If I would have known that the dorms were going to be under construction all year, I would have tried to get a dorm at another college. I wish the administration would have been more realistic about the state of the dorms and shut them for the entire year in order to renovate them more efficiently.

82.

Housing and dining are far too expensive. I have honestly considered dropping out of this school just to save the outrageous amounts of money spent on sub-par (dirty, old, dark, broken) housing and unappetizing food.

83.

Housing and dining rates are WAY too much.

84.

Housing availability is really important, and because housing in Santa Cruz is so expensive it is important to take into consideration the need for affordable housing. Living on campus has its perks and drawbacks in terms of cost and proximity to certain locations, so transportation should be taken into consideration as well. I also think it is important to be

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transparent about where these new potential living spaces will be provided. Will old structures be taken down and new ones rebuilt in its place? Or is the University looking to tear down more trees and make space for new dorms? I urge the University to look at all options before they tear down parts of campus, the natural beauty of Santa Cruz makes it unique, and it seems rather ridiculous for a University that is committed to making environmentally conscious decisions to want to tear down the trees and alter the natural beauty of the area. 85.

Housing is beyond expensive. It is also unfair to force students to have a meal plan, especially when they live in an apartment with a kitchen.

86.

Housing is far too expensive as it is now to be cost-effective. Rates ought to go down, not up, or else it will become costprohibitive (it really already is cost-prohibitive for those without grant/scholarship financial aid).

87.

Housing is ridiculously expensive here at UCSC. Paying almost 1,500 a month to live in a single room in Porter apartments is just too much! When the university builds more housing, please build housing that is actually affordable for students. Thanks!

88.

Housing is terrible, some are very mean and uncooperative, to the point of being rude, I will never live in the college again. The rooms are terrible, roommate selection sucks. The dining halls are overly expensive for what little they have.

89.

Housing is too expensive

90.

Housing is very expensive and competitive

91.

Housing is way to costly here. For the same price I can get a single apartment elsewhere. I came thinking that commuting would be too difficult now after one year I realize that it isn't. I am going to look into other options because of cost and will no doubt go to a 55 day plan because the food is constantly undercooked, overcooked, flavorless, and just plain awful. If it was a restaurant I would never return and send my food back at least once a week. I do not feel that I get a good deal on housing at all. We have the most expensive housing in the UC system for subpar at best standards. The crazy cost for housing makes me wonder sometimes if I should have gone to school elsewhere. I could get way more for the exact same amount somewhere else. On a side note everyone I talk to that lives off campus loves not being on campus anymore. That speaks volumes to the rules, standards, and overall experience. Their voices and opinions really influenced and make me consider other options next year.

92.

Housing like the images shown should be for continuing students only. First years should still have to stay in the residence halls like now and not in apartments and such.

93.

Housing on this campus is never reliable. It's sad that you can never transfer to a different college to live in. Yes, you can if you would like to live in the dorms. However, if you want to live in an apartment with friends from a different college, that most likely won't happen. So, my friend living in Oakes was never able to switch to College Eight housing unless she wanted to live in the dorms. Also, the cost of living on campus is outrageous. If you compare on campus prices with off campus, there is a huge difference in price. So, after 2 years of being screwed over by housing, I will live off campus for my final year.

94.

Housing on this campus is way to expensive and then the fact we have to pay for laundry when we already pay expensive tuition. And the meal plan here are ridiculous for the type if food we are served

95.

Housing opportunities are great, but there are some complications with college affiliation and prices are a little steep.

96.

Housing prices in Merrill A in the triple occupancy rooms need to be reassessed based on size. There are way to many people in the smaller sized rooms who pay the exact same amount as three placed in a much larger size room that can

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comfortably fit three people. This is a huge issue and I have already begun the process to dispute this and bring some justice to those that are crammed in extremely small triples and paying unfair amounts. 97.

Housing program is really inconvenient. It does not try to fulfill the accommodations of its students.

98.

Housing rates have gone up, as well as dining rates, that tends to drive students into looking for lower-rate offers offcampus. If the UCSC wants to achieve less students leaving to live off-campus, then the UCSC needs to accommodate the rates so that students don't have to worry about their tuition and schooling, rather than their housing and dining rates.

99.

Housing today is out of the question. It is ridiculous the amount of money Oakes students are being charged to live in a college that lacks constant care from maintenance. Instead of replacing couches (in apartments where rats have left feces on the furniture) Oakes maintenance does nothing, not even reupholster. The bathrooms in the Oakes Dorms desperately need to be re-tilled, and the paint is in desperate need of updating. I wish the University would stop putting the East side of campus on their radar and instead focused on Oakes; a college who is completely neglected and ignores the complaints of its residents. Update our lounges. Give us better studying areas. Repaint our hideous yellow/brown/white color scheme into something modern. Stop ignoring Oakes students and update our college.

100.

How to maintain a better environment with residents and being more respectful to other people's spaces.

101.

I absolutely must get accepted into housing for fall quarter, (at Stevenson dorms preferably!), and was already turned down by 9/10. I have a big fear of not being able to live on campus because I do not know where else I would reside!

102.

I am excited to move into the Stevenson apartments in my junior year(I am a freshman now) as I was hoping to move into the apartments this year but the availability of the apartments did not allow me to do that. The faculty at the housing office have been wonderful in their kindness and assistance!

103.

I am extremely dissatisfied with UCSC's dining plans. I am currently on a 7-day meal plan and I've actually found that some days that there is hardly anything, beyond cereal, to eat given my dietary restrictions. I wish that I could use my meal plan at the various campus cafe's, etc. as at times they are the closest option between classes and also would offer a second option in case a college's dining hall has not much for me to eat.

104.

I am glad our school is building more dorms/apartments.

105.

I am in a triple in Stevenson and it is quite cramped. The lounge is nice but it would be better to have a more central area for students to gather, and a kitchen in every Stevenson House to promote community and creativity, and to allow students to save money on the meal plan. Also, the doors in the residence hall are automatic shutting doors, which takes away from the community atmosphere and leaves a very insular, slightly unfriendly/unwelcoming environment. Also, very little light comes into my room on the the first floor, and I often am unable to get up in time for class because of the lack of natural light infiltrating the building in the morning hours.

106.

I am living in FSH for last two years. I dont like my apartment but they did not show it to me earlier. Also my neighbor complains of children noise from my apartment. But, FSH will not let me change it :(

107.

I believe it is seriously inhumane to house students in a building that is under construction, due to frequent deafening noise, frightening lack of security, and the severe inconveniences of living in a building that is only half finished. The experience is nothing short of nightmarish.

108.

I believe that authorities are too strict and there should be more places that are open 24 hours for students to study.

109.

I believe that building more housing would affect UCSC because it would tear down more of the forest and the experience students get from the forest.

110.

I believe that there should be more units to live in for on campus apartments (specifically College Ten).

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111.

I believe the on campus housing is way over-priced and I wished that it was in better condition for the amount that I am spending.

112.

I can save $1,000 a month by living off campus (a double in a dorm with a 7 day meal plan vs. double in a condo), therefore the new housing plans need to compete with that.

113.

I currently live in a small triple that is way over priced for the tiny space that it offers. We've had to place repeated fixits due to old furniture that is worn down and old. I could put up with these living situations if I wasn't paying over $2,000 a quarter. The pricing is just plain outrageous.

114.

I currently live in Family Student Housing and am curious why there hasn't been any major renovation in this area since the housing was established in the 70s. I often commute past the reconstruction of the housing by Porter/Kresge and feel that the FSH community has been denied similar attention for many years. The lack of renovation has been brought up by FSH residents for years but has never been adequately addressed. We feel forgotten, undervalued, and under served. When will UCSC help us?

115.

I did this to get a prize and you're not collecting contact information -_- . Here is my email [email protected]

116.

I do not support the addition of more residential colleges as planned in the Long Range Development Program. If any improvements are implemented, they should be made through renovations of existing colleges. The existing student body is impacting the local environment enough as it is.

117.

I do NOT think that the university is lacking sufficient housing for current and prospective students.

118.

I do think that it is great and offers a lot considering the price. However, that price is not affordable to all. I believe that the school should provide safe, clean, AND affordable housing for EVERY UC Santa Cruz student. No matter what their socioeconomic background is. I know way too many people who are forced to live off-campus because on-campus is too expensive.

119.

I don't know how important having the kitchens and bathrooms in each room are. The idea of the bathrooms connecting a couple rooms is neat and could allow for more privacy but it think most people would be fine with just a kitchen to each hall, possibly with lockers students could keep their cooking supplies in.

120.

I dont think a new housing unit is necessary. Make dinnjng hall food taste better and the rates for dinning less and students wouldnt be opposed to wanting to live on campus. Also, maybe installing a one unit bathroom at the end of each hall could be a start to making students feel more comfortable with their restroom situation, because the option to not have to always share a restroom is available.

121.

I feel like rooms should be a little bigger and not tightly compacted with the big dresser closets in the way of out light switch.

122.

I feel that I do not get enough for what I pay for. I live in a triple and I pay around 13000 a year for a room the size of my bedroom back home. I know that space is limited and American standards are extremely big compared to international school that offer the same size room but fit more people. I think having a comfortable place to live is more important. I leave my current college, Oakes College, and go to either College 8 or Stevenson College to study and/or eat. I do so because it's impossible to study in the dorms provided spaces, the lounge is always full of people playing around ( which is not a problem but sometimes I need to study and I don't have time to go to a study area across campus. Also there are no study areas provided in Oakes college, to my knowledge. The meal plan alright but I would like to have the option for the dining halls to be open until midnight everyday or like some other other colleges open almost 24hours. I always feel

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myself comparing UCSC to other colleges because the other colleges seem to have more for their students and not just housing wise. 123.

I feel that Stevenson needs more themes and programs that revolve around diversity and inclusion because there isn't much and it would benefit and help many students feel welcomed in the Stevenson area.

124.

I feel welcomed by the housing community to stay on-campus rather than move away to make room for other students. This feels really good to me as a student that's entering his final year.

125.

I got lucky with a normal sized triple, but I wish I had more space to do stuff and have more storage. It would also be nice to not have to share a bathroom with the whole floor. I understand that it is tough to make drastic changes to residence halls, but some things should definitely be different for students in the future.

126.

I hate everyone I live with. I made a mistake living at College Nine and on-campus housing.

127.

I hate how slow and unreliable the internet tends to be. Also Oakes can would benefit from some remodeling. Finally the Oakes Cafe needs to get a new menu or change their current one.

128.

I have been a UCSC Camper Park resident for the past three years, and am currently an RA there. Ever since discovering its existence, I have been enamored with the Camper Park. Living at Camper Park has truly been one of the best and most enriching experiences I have had at UCSC, and in life. The community of intelligent, creative and environmentallyconscious residents attracted to the vibrantly-painted trailers and beautiful environment surrounding them has been a family and an invaluable academic resource to me. I believe this unique living environment to be crucial to UC Santa Cruz and a jewel to both the UC system and the city of Santa Cruz. I urge the university to continue to support its existence and well-being far into the future.

129.

I have been living on campus for 4+ years. I used to live in graduate student housing. Since I got married, I moved to family student housing. I love on-campus housing. I hope the University can do something to reduce the rental. Please don't raise it. The graduate student housing cost 899 USD per month when I moved it, while almost 1000 USD when I moved out. It seems the university will raise it further. Please, please don't do that, for the sake of poor student. Thank you so much if you can make the on-campus housing more affordable.

130.

I have had great experiences with on campus housing, the triple was a little tight, but it was doable. The suite is everything i wanted and more. Love it.

131.

I highly dislike living on campus, but that is my personal opinion.

132.

I just feel like living on campus is very very expensive, what one student can pay in a double or even a triple room can afford a single room at an off campus unit. I feel like the cost of living on campus causes a lot of stress to its students and there are just way to many rules and policies some in which are not even taken care of by NAs and CAs, In this case i would do a lot better living off campus.

133.

I just have one question: Is this campus interconnected?

134.

I know this is not something that can be strictly enforced, but bathroom cleanliness is so important. The bathroom gets shared by so many people and those people's habits are all different, which can lead to extremely disgusting and potentially hazardous situations. Since I won't be living on campus anymore, it would be great for future or continuing students to have more options in regards to shared spaces, i.e. bathrooms. I would have chosen and perhaps paid a little more to have a (more) private bathroom because I'm a really clean person and others are not necessarily the same. I felt so disgusted this year having to share a bathroom with like 40 people, it was so horrendous. Students should have the

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option to have less communal spaces, especially if the surveys given before moving in the dorms are supposed to gauge peoples' personal habits and match them up with compatible roommates, and consequently, hallmates. 135.

I like FSH mostly because of it's convenient location, affordability, and safety compared to options off campus. The only complaint I have is the thin walls because I have a baby and we hear everything. My suggestion is that it would be awesome if we had a cafe right here in the housing area, I would definitely eat there often. Otherwise we love it here so much and are thankful to be here!

136.

I like it

137.

I live in a small triple and its too small. I wanted a single but i have no money. The meal plan is too expensive for how much most of the students complain about the food.

138.

I live in an apartment in Kresge. Since I live in an apartment, clearly I have to pay more for housing than I would've if I lived in a dorm. I have access to a kitchen so I don't need to go to Porter or to other dining halls on weekends (Porter dining hall is closed on weekends) for food. It is however, inconvenient that I have to buy a meal plan I don't plan on using. I think dining plan should be made optional for people living in apartments, or maybe made compulsory only for freshmen.

139.

I live in Family Student Housing with my spouse, our baby and my parent. While I am satisfied with the sq. footage of the house, I am not satisfied with the condition of the house (all houses are over 40 years old) which includes improper ventilation in the restroom causing mold. I am also highly unsatisfied with the cost of rent, we are barely making it. I would also like to be able to sublet the house during summer (which used to be an option but starting this year, it is no longer accepted) because of the high cost and no available work in Santa Cruz.

140.

I live in Merrill and it was very disappointing! I live in a small triple thats the same size as some peoples doubles and I'm paying for a large triple (which is still an outrages price considering there are 3 people each paying that same price). There was construction going on the entire year which we were told would be finished by the time we moved in. It was a disturbance as well as an inconvenience and just plain ugly. We have to use our IDs as keys instead of actual keys which I did not like at all. The showers are not efficiently built. At the beginning of the quarter some people didn't even have bathroom doors! We are constantly having to compromise and it was absolutely not worth the amount that we were paying. I refuse to live in a place like this again.

141.

I LOVE Cowell College!!!! MoHouse forevaaaa <3

142.

I love living on campus because it is very convenient and is helpful because I don't have a car. I like living on campus because it is easy to get to class and go to the libraries, especially when I need to stay in the library till late at night and can just walk or bus back to my on campus apartment. Having a single provides me with privacy and it is very helpful for me in my studies. However, the cost of having a single on campus is currently ridiculously high, and cost is the most important factor for my housing status during the school year. I speak for myself and many other students on campus for lowered housing rates. I am currently looking for off campus housing for next year because the cost of living on campus next year is just too high and unaffordable.

143.

I love my 1st year here so far and am excited for next year!

144.

I love my single room # 308 at Turner Hall on Cowell College Grounds. Tabby is the best RA ever!!!

145.

I love this campus, but the prices are insane. I understand we're paying for location & amenities as well, but my apartment was literally falling apart and moldy, and I don't think that's fair given that I paid close to 16 grand on housing alone this

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year. I think if the university doesn't want to spend the money fixing places like Oakes apartments, they should at least lower the rent. 146.

I only want housing that's cheap, will provide convenience and be attractive, if possible.

147.

I prefer apartments because we get the option of a 55 day meal plan instead of having to go to the DH 5 to 7 days a week. If you want to know what would make apartments more attractive, add large white boards. It would attract new students because they will think it is cool, and for current students we would have an extra resource for studying in our own home instead of having to reserve a room at the library (which is difficult during finals week)

148.

i really appreciate you guys having a place for students and their families but I would like for the place to in better shape

149.

I really enjoyed most of my year in the dorms. I was lucky to get one of the bigger doubles living with one of my friends. It would have been nice to get a bathroom. The only problem I had was the the food was satisfying and I found that I did not want to eat there. I would just suggest improving the dinning food.

150.

I really hope that the outlines for the apartments and suites are not really something that the university is considering. It seems like a waste of money and resources.

151.

I really hope you guys utilize these. I liked the look of them and they seemed very affordable, especially compared to what I'm paying now.

152.

I really like the new housing ideas. They seem very convenient and very comfortable. I would LOVE to live in these apartments in the next year or two.

153.

I really need a single, it is very important to me and the space for the Fall is extremely tight and not really accessible to my needs.

154.

I really wish there was access to a kitchen in the dorms

155.

I recall that Merrill's construction was supposed to be finished before this school year started. So much for that.

156.

I still feel that the price of housing is still too much, which is why many choose to go off campus.

157.

I think freshman year at the very least should be required to live in a dorm setting with at least one other roommate just to experience living in the same room with someone else. I think it helps people to learn to manage space and create ground rules between another person to at least live in a reasonably comfortable way.

158.

I think if the university is considering expanding it is very important to increase the amount of housing available on campus

159.

I think it is a good idea to provide more options to the UCSC students, i would have definitely picked to lived in the suite that was shown the blue prints. i might even attract more students.

160.

I think more apartments would be a plus for all of the campus. As I live in Crown, I believe renovations would be nice, but I still enjoy the aesthetic of Crown housing.

161.

I think practicality is way more important than aesthetics, but this is not really the case with the newer dorms like Merrill.

162.

I think that a meal plan should not be mandatory for students living in any ucsc apartment. FSH is the best and should be advertised more, if I had known about it last year my partner and I would have moved in sooner.

163.

I think that housing needs to be reconsidered. Building new building like the rooms proposed in this survey was beyond ridiculous. Also, I am at a loss with actually providing quantitative feedback instead of just choosing a bubble. I cannot afford to live on campus because it is really expensive even for the community of Santa Cruz.

164.

I think that the apartments on campus are really great, they're just too expensive on top of all the other cost we have as students.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

165.

I think that the fact that many lounges around campus were/are being converted into dorms makes living spaces more secluded and takes away from that feeling of community that one would feel other wise. Being from College Ten I have already seen lounges that were used in previous years be converted into rooms to accommodate for 2-3 individuals while taking away a space that would benefit many students to have.

166.

I think that there is an uneven distribution of housing resources. Students from Oakes are not able to enjoy a beautiful infrastructure like Merill, or Cowell. Our buildings are old and the study spaces are too small, and the furniture is super old. We deserve better infrastructures and study spaces to improve our academic performance

167.

I think that there should be some sort of program where students who are in long term committed relationships have the option for affordable housing on campus together, such as a studio where they have a kitchen/ bathroom etc. The main reason I am moving off campus is to be able to live with my boyfriend, and also that housing is very expensive here.

168.

I think the Janitors do a fantastic job! However, people don't clean up after themselves in the bathrooms. Which is a really big problem.

169.

I think the locations need bus stops everywhere. Every college but merrill has two bus stops one for arriving one, for leaving, give us a bus stop please! The rooms in Merrill dorms are horrible, why pay so much when you fit three people into one single sized space and make them pay a ridiculous amount for them.

170.

I think there should be an option of having no meal plan for apartments because it would allow us to save, and there is access to a kitchen. Also, housing rates in general should be much cheaper especially if the school wants more of the students to remain on the campus.

171.

I think there should be availability of apartments that have co-ed rooms. Not available to frosh, but available to upperclassmen. Some people don't live as well with one gender as they do with another. It could be request only.

172.

I think there should be female only and male only bathrooms.

173.

I think they should make repairs on current housing not make them look different. There are several problems within our apartment that we haven't had fixed.

174.

I think ucsc could improve family student housing by upgrading the buildings on par with the housing the single unmarried students have. I think there is a big gap in how fsh is maintained in comparison with the other residence halls.

175.

I think you guys should check buildings more often for repairs, and such, many of the lights in certain buildings in Oakes, such as Casa Huerta, have lights which are non-functional.

176.

I very much like the state of housing. I have lived on campus for all four of my years here, three years in the Merrill dorms (before the renovation, and I still thought it was a great housing experience then) and this year in the Merrill Apartments, which I also find to be a great housing experience. I do not think Suites should be available to freshmen whatsoever. The experience of living on a hall is critical. I am an RA, and I have seen the power of this simple thing in action. I have also visited UCSD and seen the isolation and lack of personal growth which I attribute in large part to Suite-based freshmen housing. People hate triples, even if the triple is nice and large. The problem is people. 4 times out of 5, the occupants of the triple hate each other and hate their room in a big tangle of hatred which began with hating each other. I'd advise making lots of nice doubles that cost more (so you can recoup your money better) instead of fewer triples that pack in more people. It's the psychology of the thing. No matter how nice you make the triple, the resident will probably hate it for reasons other than the room itself.

177.

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EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

178.

I WANT TO LIVE IN THE STEVENSON APARTMENTS BUT IT'S SO DIFFICULT. SORRY, BUT THE SYSTEM ISN'T WORKING.

179.

I was appalled by the living conditions in Merrill and how the students there were being treated there. To a point where students quit the University because they could not continue living in Merrill due to construction and disrespect from certain "Fix It" members. Investigation at Merrill is crucial.

180.

I wish access to parking space and downtown would be easier, so students' time is used more efficiently, and not wasted on transporting that could be made more efficient or fast.

181.

I wish I could live in the apartment with out having to pay for the 55 meal plan. I live here for the purpose of preparing my own food to meet my dietary needs, therefore I am paying for a meal plan i do not need.

182.

I wish I had access to the Porter Dorm Kitchen. A freshmen in our building is allowed to use it to make cookies but no one else is. I'm sick of dinning hall food I would like to use it.

183.

I wish someone told me how loud Porter is, it's nice but not for someone who just wants to study. Also, I really wish the no smoking rule was enforced better. So many people smoke in the parking lot at Porter and I smell it from my room. It's disgusting.

184.

I wish that there would be one floor were the bathrooms are gender separate in the dorms because I do not like the gender neutral bathroom situation.

185.

I wish the beds in graduate student housing were full instead of twin. We are all adults living here, and other universities furnish graduate student housing with full beds.

186.

I wish the housing advisor would not squeeze three students in a room meant for two people. It was very crowded to clean and just stay in the room. I had to mostly spend time outside my dorm because it was too small and not enough space for studying.

187.

I wish we had more say in how housing/roommate/RA problems were handled. I feel like my RA and my CRE did not adequately handle or resolve any problems some of the people in my building, including myself, encountered.

188.

I would attempt to get te cheapest housing off campus possible even if this means picking an option not ideal for me.

189.

I would have chosen the housing type C, but A was my first choice due to the price, which is about the average when living off-campus. The meal plan should either be reduced OR there should be an increase in either dining options (like different variety of stations, food made to order, etc) or more healthier and delicious food.

190.

I would like for UCSC to have more colorful rooms with more options and technology.

191.

I would like housing on campus to be more affordable and have more privacy

192.

I would like less mold, better food quality, and cheaper housing.

193.

I would like to get updates on the new on campus housing

194.

I would like to make a suggestion. Perhaps instead of making more buildings for housing. Maybe remodeling the older buildings to have such rooms would be good for publicity for older buildings.

195.

I would like to see improvements on the cleanliness of the bathrooms and have better screens!

196.

I would love to have no meal plan and still live on campus

197.

I would prefer a double but can only afford a triple. The meal plan rates are exorbitant, especially for the 7 day meal plan holders because of the lack of hours certain dining halls are open/weekend dining hall closures.

198.

I would really like the prices to go down on housing.

199.

I'd imagine the University could offer lower rates than what surrounding private property owners can.

jULY 2014

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

200.

I'm moving off campus because it's $1000 cheaper per month. On-campus housing should be affordable; students are paying exorbitant amounts for housing that is unsatisfactory or sub-par at best. Please fix the housing we currently have on campus before expanding into Upper Campus. Please make the rent affordable for students. I know many students who would love to live on campus, but it's not a financial possibility for them. The housing market in Santa Cruz is very competitive, and instead of profiting off the students who pay an increasingly rising tuition to go here, UCSC Housing should provide affordable living spaces. Next year, I'll be able to stay in my residence over breaks without worrying about the power being shut off, or maintenance entering anytime from 9AM - 5PM, like this past spring break. I'm also looking forward to not living in a room where the windows rattle every time a bus passes, like the room I currently occupy.

201.

I'm seriously reconsidering living on campus due to the behavior of my CRE at Cowell. My building just went through a horrendous experience with her regarding our lounge.

202.

I'm sure the university will build new housing on campus as they want to increase the number of students attending the school, but I think you could do some renovations to your current housing first. I'm not sure about other colleges, but Oakes desperately needs some new furniture: foam comes out of the holes in our couches, our curtains are stained, and last year I got bed bugs while living in the dorms. Make sure what you already have is working before adding more, please.

203.

I'm very upset about not being able to live in an apartment with 4 singles next year. That's where I lived this year and it worked perfectly and it's not fair that we got that taken away from us.

204.

ID card key in Stevenson cowell

205.

If that unit b setup is available for this upcoming year, I'd definitely take it.

206.

if the rent for a two bedroom is around $1,300 per person for a month, and it is expected at least two adults stay in the apartment, the rent is far too high. if i read this incorrectly, then it should be better clarified.

207.

If there were some way to lower the cost of living on campus, it would be a great help financially, but it is obvious we're paying for convenience and living on campus is very convenient!

208.

If two family members want to share a room they should not be allowed a third roommate. This causes a lot of problems when one roommate is excluded.

209.

If you are going to tear down FSH to make room for the proposed housing listed in this survey, and not offer the same affordable housing to families then that's a bad idea. I know that the affordable FSH plans are a godsend for many of us here.

210.

If you are trying to come up with a new suites for people to live in, the prices are way too high for anyone and that is what made me not even pick any of them, even if they were hypothetical.

211.

If you decide to build new housing, please don't take away the camper park. It is essential to the university in remembering where the university started and holds a lot of the values we started out with. Thank you =]

212.

If you make this happen, I will stay on-campus for my remaining years here at UCSC.

213.

im an RA, so i don't get to choose too much!

214.

improve dining

215.

Improve dining hall food; have my residential activities; lower tuition (housing on-campus is expensive);

216.

Improve dining hall meals.

217.

Improve soundproofing and showers! The tiny shower heads make it hard to get clean quickly when it only washed off 4 square inches at a time!

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BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

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EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

218.

Improvement on washers and dryers is a MUST

219.

In Graduate Student Housing. When moving in, I was not satisfied with the state of the apartment. The place was not very clean upon moving in; please make sure that in the future that the place is thoroughly cleaned between tenants.

220.

Incredibly expensive and small. No kitchen available at Porter, but CA's have access to it, that's fair.

221.

ineternet speed/stability always most important.

222.

Internet in residence halls is bad. Some triples in college 10 res halls (like mine) are too small and should be either doubles or cheaper triples. Roommate selection is not so good

223.

It is far too expensive. I have a triple in Kresge and pay nearly 3,000$ a quarter. With a double in an off campus apartment I will be paying less than half this. I was not able to afford anything but the 55 day meal plan and have been seriously dis-satisfied with it. I have little money to afford food outside of the meals I receive at the dining halls and most days have one meal total. It is unhealthy, and with the money I spent on this meal plan I could have been eating much healthier, and three times a day. The current housing program is extremely hard on poor students who rely on their financial aid to live. These students are forced to live unhealthily, while seriously over paying for the housing provided. Maybe this is fine for students who have funds, and they may even over look the ridiculously expensive housing for the convenience of living on campus, but some can not afford such a luxury. Fairly priced housing should be offered to students on financial aid, at the least. I could spend half as much living off campus, and would have better accommodations, and a healthy diet.I would not choose to live on campus again, nor would I recommend it to entering students.

224.

It is MUCH too expensive! These options shown are less expensive than current housing, which is encouraging but they are still way more than students pay off campus. Also it would be wonderful for every residential dorm building to have a communal kitchen.

225.

It is too expensive and a meal plan should not be required if living in the apartments.

226.

It is too expensive and we do not get much out of the rooms. They are small and so closed off.

227.

It is too expensive to live on campus because if you are a minority is hard to pay for housing.

228.

It NEEDS to be more affordable

229.

It seems ridiculous for UCSC to be considering creating more housing units when they cannot maintain the current ones they have, and the student body is already too high for the campus. The beauty of the natural facets to the campus is more important.

230.

It should not be so difficult to get apartments.

231.

It was great living in Cowell. The proximity to OPERS and the athletic fields was excellent. However, the noise and cramped space of dorms contributed to me moving off of campus.

232.

It works well

233.

It would be great if each residence hall had a microwave available in a common room. also the showers only have a curtain separating them from the rest of the shared bathroom. I feel very uncomfortable because I feel like people can just walk in on me or peek. could the showers have a locking stall door like the toilets?

234.

It would be great if students living in apartments do not have to get a meal plan. I think it should be optional. Please do something about the poor cell phone reception and the noisy stairs

235.

It would be nice if it were easier to get in for priority housing.

jULY 2014

15

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

236.

It would be very beneficial if the dorm residents had access to the kitchen. Although we are required to get a 5-day or 7day meal plan, we are only allowed to use the kitchen under a CAs supervision. I live in the Porter A Building (Transfer Dorm). The majority of us are 20-25 and have had lots kitchen experience and do not supervised. Please open kitchen access. And install windows in the bathroom or ventilation. People take steamy showers and defecate quite frequently and this smells just linger and there is no way to avoid it. Thank you.

237.

It would make it better to not have construction during the school year.

238.

It'd be nice if housing were available to non-affiliates of a certain college, or at least make the process of applying for housing at another college. easier for non-affiliates because we were assigned affiliation to a college we did not want.

239.

It's alright. I just want to live off campus now.

240.

It's disappointing that my floor in Angela Davis college 10 had to sacrifice it's lounge to accompany more students. That would have been a nice study space.

241.

It's inconvenient to live on campus because if you don't have a car you are dependent on the bus system. When the bus system is not functional for whatever reason students without cars are basically trapped on campus, unless they have friends willing to drive them to where they need to go (very unlikely when everyone is busy). Second, for the price that is being payed $1,019 per month in my case, it doesn't seem quite worth it. No adequate heating, extremely loud (with busses passing through frequently and loud obnoxious undergrads) frequent bug infestation, and slow response from the maintenance team. For the inconvenience I have experienced the grad housing price should at least be lowered to 700 a month.

242.

It's ridiculously expensive.

243.

It's so costly to live on-campus, in addition to tuition and meal plans it's intimidating and hard to manage month-to-month. Once renovations are done with the apartments, it would be nice to see prices return to normal, perhaps? I have a smalltriple room and it is FAR TOO SMALL FOR THREE PEOPLE. For the cost, this is not an acceptable living space.

244.

It's too expensive and crowded.

245.

It's too expensive. I'm paying way too much for way too little. Unpleasant showers. Mediocre food choices etc..

246.

It's worked for me. The meal plans seem a little expensive and it would be nice if people in apartments didn't HAVE to have one but whatever.

247.

its too expensive :(

248.

Jacob Youssefzadeh 1339548

249.

Just think Kresge needs remodling. Or just think that maybe it should have priority over the newer apartments. Kresge's pretty old.

250.

KEEP EVERYTHING CLEAN AND MAINTAINED IF YOU ARE GOING TO CHARGE US A LOT!!!

251.

Keep the cost low!

252.

Keep the housing modern, or update it to what is shown in the examples, but keep the prices low, or "affordable."

253.

let people of different genders live together. get with the times

254.

Living in a triple frankly isn't that bad, however, I learned that my triple used to be a double, which I think makes a lot more sense given the small amount of space to be living in with two other humans. I wish this were the size for a double.

255.

Living in the dorms is ridiculously over-priced, and rooms are too small and cramped. We are living like prisoners in these small spaces. Dining halls do not accomodate all students.

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BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

256.

Living on-campus is very convenient, but lower costs would make it even more satisfying for those who are concerned about money.

257.

LOWER COST OF HOUSING AND DINING!

258.

Lower costs and actually promote study halls that are quiet.

259.

Lower dining costs/offer other options

260.

Lower prices would significantly help students be successful.

261.

Lower prices. Bring back the 75 meal plan.

262.

Lower the price. Dorm kitchens are nice. Meal plans should be optional/at least make the 55 day an option (instead of just the 5 or 7 day) to people living in the dorms.

263.

Maintaining the health and beauty of the redwood forests on upper campus should be the number one priority as opposed to expansion for housing. I came here for the natural setting, and accept the living conditions as par for the course of living in on-campus residences. The forest is the most outstanding attraction.

264.

maintenance should also be done on the weekends in the residence halls.

265.

MAKE AFFORDABLE FOR GRADUATE TAs. The standard is to pay 30% of income on rent. 30% of $1750 would be a little over $500, especially if you are sharing a space on campus. Asking over $1000/month is unacceptable, and creates a cycle of poverty.

266.

Make apartment living cheaper, please.

267.

Make housing more affordable!

268.

Make it affordable and different style.

269.

Make it cheaper. Also give option to people living on campus in apartments to not have a meal plan.

270.

Make kitchens more available, and other meal plan options

271.

Make more housing around campus!!!!!!

272.

Make singles more affordable so students have the accesibility to have a quiet place to work and sleep.

273.

make things cheaper if possible

274.

Make triple rooms bigger they are way too small to accommodate 3 people, or at least make all triple have 2 REAL closets and not wardrobes

275.

Making it cheaper would be nice. Especially the apartments.

276.

Many of the appliances need to be replaced.

277.

Maybe clean only every other day, so someone can come on the weekend, because the bathrooms get terrible in that time. It would not only better for the cleaning staff, because they won't have to clean the disaster created over the weekend, but also better for the environment because cleaning everyday is a waste of supplies and water.

278.

Meal plan: It would be nice if there was a way to convert meal plans into grocery money instead. The quality of the food provided by the dining halls seems to dip as each quarter nears its end. Often there is little I can eat as a result I go once or twice a day even though I have a 7-day plan. It also occasionally makes me sick. I would prefer to buy my own groceries. I can feed myself better and for less than what the dining halls have to offer. I understand why meal plans are required for on campus housing. I would suggest the possibility of a grocery money plan as an alternative to dinning hall meal plans. To prevent people from starving maybe have either an on campus grocery store(unrealistic) or do a weekly small direct deposit to the students account. Some of the housing units desperately need to have air conditioning. My apartment at oakes was nearly unlivable during spring quarter. On the bright side at least the heater there was not next to

jULY 2014

17

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

my bedroom. If you are building new housing please for the love of all that is holy don't put noisy climate control equipment next to somewhere that someone is going to be trying to sleep. Someone was clearly not thinking in that respect when they designed the redwood grove apartments. 279.

Meal plans should be optional for everyone.

280.

measuring rooms to accurately charge residents should be very important. as an RA, i think it is very unfair that some of my residents are paying as much as the person next to them when clearly their room is significantly smaller. DINING HALLS NEED TO HAVE FOOD VARIETY!!! and if possible, can the food actually have some taste to it.

281.

Merrill Apartment location is inconvenient although there is nothing you can do about that. Dining halls have usually been sub-par, or at least not worth the money you spend for it. Housing is much more expensive on campus.

282.

Merrill B dorm is too small

283.

Merrill needs major social improvements

284.

More accessible housing office

285.

More communication between FSH mgmt and residents re: things like internet e.g. device limit on modem).

286.

More housing options on campus should not be required to have a meal plan, especially apartments that have a full kitchen.

287.

More kitchen availability would be preferred.

288.

More living options for second year apartments would be nice, and it would be great if it was more affordable.

289.

More single rooms, roommates are the reason I am sick of living here. I wouldn't care if it was more expensive, for god's sake offer more singles. I think the graduation rate might even go up.

290.

More single rooms.

291.

My apartment in kresge was falling apart. We had to put in multiple fix-it's throughout the year. The lights flicker, respond slowly, and sometimes never turn on. The internet sucked. The washing machines in the laundry room made my clothes smell weird, and the dryer wouldn't completely dry my clothes sometimes. AND THERE IS A HORRIBLE MOLD PROBLEM. This was not worth the money that is charged to live here.

292.

My CA told us we had no access to the kitchen, which needs to be changed. She said she would have to supervise and she has no time for that. As a 24 year old, almost 25 year old woman, being supervised is laughable. Not only am I several years older than my CA, I can cook better than 99% of the people who cook at the dining hall (which if you knew me, you would be horrified because all I usually cook is top ramen). I can't tell you how important it is to be able to often cook for myself or others, for possible holidays (not widely celebrated) or even for comfort. Also, the dining hall situation is a disaster. Students hired there for work-study are the ones concocting these "meals" in which are inedible. Mac n cheese all of a sudden has papaya in it? Meat-less mondays? One student "cook" told me I should appreciate his originality in concocting some type of "california pasta" that had 6+ ingredients in it, none of which should ever be on the same plate with pasta. Why don't they just take whats left over from the trash and throw it in a dish, because it would look and taste the same. Please know that my scrutiny comes from not cruelty but absolute frustration. Coming back from an exam, work or both at the end of the day to find out you have 10 minutes to eat because porter dining closes at 7, and all you want to do is eat something WARM or even REMOTELY WARM, or just bite into a nice cheese burger, but you cant because, 1. the food is NEVER warm, it is ALWAYS room temp, which is most nauseated out of all of it. and 2. EVERYTHING is GONE, and they kick you out and even shut off the ice cream machine at 6:30 so you can't even have a simple ice cream cone, or 3. BECAUSE THERES NO MEAT CAUSE ITS MONDAY. how awful. I wish I had done more research about

18

BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

these living conditons in terms of food, because this is an important, crucial part of mental and physical survival, one in which all of my fellow peers and I have struggled with this past year. No one except 2-3+ years of cooking/culinary arts should be allowed to touch the food, and the availablity of a kitchin and later dining availability needs to be addressed. If this all was to be guaranteed to me, I would love to live at porter another year. Overall my stress was increased due to the nightmare of the dining halls, and I really have become resentful towards how much I am paying for this stuff. Never again. 293.

My first year wasn't a great one. I had many bad experiences in my building that made me want to leave this school and return home. No one around campus could help me and just left me to deal with the problems I went through which I found the be very saddening and so did my parents. Although this has happened to me I have had to deal with it in order to maintain my grades and standing here at ucsc . I wish things would have been different

294.

My housing decision and preferences are entirely dictated by cost. Note: not cost effectiveness as in yeah this housing may be worth the money but i just don'tI have that money (don't want to take out loans for this). I'm sure this applied to most students as well.

295.

My RA made my first year at UCSC amazing!!

296.

My roommate bullied me, moved my stuff, and constantly tormented me until I stopped staying there completely. I reached out to my RA's but despite having a roommate mediation he did not do anything to help and the situation has gone unchanged.

297.

need more housing space

298.

Need more kitchen availability.

299.

need to have bunk beds in small doubles, otherwise it's really too small

300.

need to update oakes and make it cheaper. livnig on campus is too expensive for the quality of living we are given

301.

Needs more musical facilities. Why is it so incredibly difficult to get access to drum kits around here? Seriously. Not all of us are solo acoustic guitar crooners, and not all of us have friends with drum kits. I was lucky enough to have the latter, but seriously. We need more drum around here.

302.

Needs to be more affordable.

303.

Nice blueprints

304.

NO MORE ANTS PLEASE! :(

305.

Nothing needs to be renovated. Everything is beautiful and awesome as it is.

306.

Oakes housing is great!

307.

Of the options offered, none are ideal. The ideal for me as a graduate student would be to have a single occupancy studio apartment with a kitchenette.

308.

Off campus housing is sti cheaper

309.

Older residential houses need to be upgraded, and be reduced of their current prices

310.

On campus housing pricing is not attractive, off campus housing is more desirable and has a lower cost

311.

On-campus apartment rooms are tiny. For instance, my chair for my desk is right against my bed. If I back up my chair even slightly, it will hit the bed. I have to turn the chair to even get in/out of my desk. Ridiculous. If a single room needs to be this small, the beds should be lofted to give more space to move around the room.

312.

On-campus housing costs too much

jULY 2014

19

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

313.

One of the biggest CONS about the UC's is the small dorm situations, especially putting three people in a double etc. A suite bathroom at SDSU is the same size as my triple. Make UCSC attractive for prospective and current students with better dorms!

314.

Our community at the UCSC Camper park has felt extremely violated by the programs Manager, Katherine due to many unexpected disturbances to our individual homes at late hours and on weekends. Her unprofessional behavior is greatly concerning and we are working on furthering our action to deal with this sitution.

315.

Our room this year in the Crown College dorms was well below standards: a converted small-double room made to fit three people. Conditions were prison-like for sure. Enjoyed this year without a doubt, but I am certainly upset that we had to pay the same in these tiny, ancient Crown Dorms as those in the souped up College 9 or 10 rooms, which could have easily fit ours inside twice. Prices should be adjusted per college based on condition of living space, because there is very little equality regarding this between colleges.

316.

Overall I have been very satisfied with my housing. Some updates/improvements are needed to some of the older buildings (such as Stevenson), but overall everything has been very nice.

317.

Overall, I have been satisfied with the effort that UCSC has provided to its students. However, I believe that the stevenson apartmenta were fine just the way they were. I would have liked to live there this year (my senior year), but the construction disallowed that from happening. I am excited to see how the apartments turn out once they are finished.

318.

Overall, very good

319.

People in doubles should never have bigger rooms than people in triples, that's ridiculous.

320.

people keep stealing the toilet paper........................................

321.

Pets really need to be allowed.

322.

Please consider greater investment in soundproofing multi-occupant apartments.

323.

Please consider prices we pay on campus versus comparable housing off campus. I pay for a 7 day meal plan and double at a rate of $1671 monthly for food services closing at 8 and shorter times on weekends, a bathroom shared with 30 other people on my floor, having to share a laundry machine between 2 floors (since the third is an all girls floor), having to use my own devices to have reliable internet service in my room, and not allowed to alter so much as the height of my bed (I'm not living here for 3 quarters having to jump onto my bed like a child) when I can pay a monthly $600-$1000 rent in a house of 5-8 people with a kitchen, 2 bathrooms, laundry machines, and freedom to do more with my living space.

324.

Please do not build our housing/dorms as if you were building a prison. Windows, at Merrill, do not slide all the way. (First floors). Safety reasons? Yeah right.

325.

Please do not demolish our beautiful campus to create more housing. As it is, it is very difficult to obtain one's desired classes because our bloated school population. We need lower acceptance rates in order to be considered a more impressive university. Please put funds towards improving our existing facilities.

326.

Please don't develop upper campus

327.

Please don't expand into the forest, the natural environment was my main reason for choosing UCSC.

328.

Please don't make us pay for a super expensive meal plan that I rarely if ever use.

329.

Please don't tear down Family Student Housing to build these things in the name of greed. :/

330.

Please equip freshman dorms with a nice study/socializing place and enough bathrooms. Sharing a bathroom with +50 students on one floor is just horrible.

331.

20

Please fix the crown apartments!

BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

332.

Please have custodians to clean the communal bathrooms on the weekend!

333.

Please improve the dinning services.

334.

Please improve the maintenance of housing structures and equipment.

335.

Please keep it affordable

336.

Please lower the cost of all housing, it is ridiculously high for no apparent reason!

337.

Please lower the rate of dorm and apartment living. At the very least, please don't force students living in apartments to buy a meal plan.

338.

Please make bigger triples!

339.

Please make housing cheaper! Glad to take this questionnaire!

340.

Please make housing cheaper. It's too expensive and it keeps going up. If you want to make new places for people to live on campus, do it on places where there has already been construction done and don't expand to the forest!

341.

Please make housing more affordable to students! And please do not turn a double room into a triple, students need the spaces! We need affordable and livable housing.

342.

Please make it more affordable.

343.

Please make meal plans optional for all students. I am a vegan and also prefer to eat healthy, and I am wasting so much money this year paying for food I cannot eat. I'm living in an on campus apartment next year and am going to try to petition to be allowed to not purchase a meal plan. I don't see the point in forcing people to get a meal plan if they have a kitchen. The university needs to be more sensitive to those with alternative diets, but all they care about is getting more money out of every individual. There should also be communal kitchens available to those in the dorms. I know that there are kitchens in Porter, but they are always locked. My entire desk is cooking supplies, and it would be nice to actually use it for homework and do my cooking elsewhere.

344.

Please make meal plans optional for students in apartments. The fact that we have to pay for a meal plan is making me and my friends seriously consider moving off-campus. The cost is ridiculous and given that we have a full kitchen I see no reason (other than profit) for the university to force us to pay for a meal plan.

345.

Please make meal plans optional.

346.

please make more apartment housing available at college eight. I love this college the only downside is the limited apartment housing available to students.

347.

Please make more apartments available at Crown/Merrill.

348.

Please make sure rooms are clean before new students move in, especially in the middle of the school year.

349.

please make the housing rate affordable. the housing rate right now is too high, and it's going up in the next year, which is not acceptable!

350.

Please make water accessible in the residence halls. Our water fountain at Leo in Crown has a lot of minerals/chemicals in the water and I cannot drink it because I am allergic to some metal in the water. I am very dehydrated constantly here. I put in fix-its but its still the same.

351.

Please refurnish Oakes. The furniture is often unsanitary and physically unappealing and uncomfortable.

352.

Please send reminder emails to Study Abroad students. It's hard to keep track of due dates when you're out of the country and very busy.

353.

Please try to make housing on campus more affordable.

354.

Please update the online pictures because they can be very misleading. Especially at Merrill.

jULY 2014

21

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

355.

Please, reduce the cost of living on campus a lot more affordable.

356.

Prices are so high! could be lowered by a bit (single)

357.

Prices for menu items in facilities like Banana Joe's rose rather high this year, making the current "Meal" in the 55 Meal Plan inefficient for purchasing more than a single burger (no side or drink), and has resulted in trying to compensate by using more than one meal per visit (even if unneeded). Meals go faster at the beginning of the quarter, but are more useful in the middle-end of the quarter during midterms and finals since they mean one does not need to leave campus or cook their own food and use time better spent studying. Please consider reducing prices again.

358.

Pricing has been too high lately.

359.

Pricing SUCKS

360.

Priority system is disadvantaging to many students, causing them to flee and live off campus

361.

Provide affordable rent is the most important thing

362.

Provide high speed internet at the university town center.

363.

Put designated smoking areas around the school, removing ashtrays solves nothing and just adds to litter.

364.

Put something where Tacos Morenos was.

365.

Rather than building a new residential community, I think the UC should rebuild Kresge college (which is falling apart) and a more space effective way that would be safer, healthier, and more economic for students residing there. Kresge could be built as higher story building a and also have some traditional dorms and would thus be able to house more people.

366.

Really expensive and the buildings need to be redone.

367.

Renovate Oakes Apartments please!

368.

RENOVATE OAKES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

369.

Renovation to crown college is a must. The ceilings of some rooms are cracking due to movement on the upper floor which can be a safety hazard in the near future. Also crown dorms are much smaller than say college 9/10 dorms which is unfair since the price for rent is the same.

370.

Rent is too high, especially for students who have to pay for both tuition and housing with no financial aid.

371.

Rent is too high. The university is draining students' pockets.

372.

rent should be in line with what graduate students make as a TA. For example, if I make $1900/month, rent should be no more than 50% of my take-home: $950/month. Or if Rent is $1500 my take-home should be $3000. Otherwise I cannot afford to be a graduate student.

373.

Restrooms need cleaning everyday. They're disgusting.

374.

Roommate surveys need to be matched up more accurately.

375.

Rooms are stupid expensive for the living space provided

376.

Rooms are too confined and living spaces are too cramped for what we're paying. Please offer upgraded living spaces for the current price or decrease the price for current on-campus housing.

377.

Rude and incompetent housing staff, poor physical condition of the building, and CAs that do not do their jobs. The noise level was always high and it affected by sleep pattern. On top of that, ridiculously expensive. I would rather commute an hour every day than pay this much money to live in such a place.

378.

seriously fuck the village. that place is a joke. There is some really shitty stuff going on there. It is a complete rip off. Also the staff down there does not give a fuck about you. seriously bulldoze that whole place.

379.

22

Single Apartment/Studio with Kitchen & Bathroom for one person

BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

380.

Singles in a dorm is way to expensive especialy for merrill B dorm. Constuction was disruptive and was not worth/ given, my money.

381.

Some apartments in Oakes have damaged furniture, such as sofa's with holes in them I think it it unfair that we all pay the same for apartments yet some colleges like Oakes have damaged furniture or poor functioning facilities. Specifically in my apartment we are lacking a dustpan when one was provided last year when I lived in the apartments.

382.

Some housing building is a lot older than other housing building and it doesn't seem fair for those living in older buildings to be paying the same amount as those living in newer buildings.

383.

Some of the rooms could definitely be larger.

384.

some of those rooms looked awesome, BUT THEY ARE COMPLETELY OVER PRICED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Students in on campus apartments should not have to get meal plans...

385.

Stevenson dorms are DISGUSTING and need remodeling!

386.

Stevenson needs to be updated. I walk up to College Nine and Ten and I see beautiful couches with wide screen TVs and then I come back to my house and we barely get 10 channels on the tiny box screen TVs. The furniture is in terrible condition and extremely dirty too. For the amount we pay to come here, its not fair that all the money seems to going to the more recent and newer colleges.

387.

stevenson residence halls are super old and are falling apart. There were termites, ants, and ladybugs in my room through out the course of the year. If you aren't going to renovate them, at least put a considerable amount of effort fixing them for next year. I have tape on all my windows because the windows are too small for the space provided. I lived in the Porter transfer building last year and it was much cleaner and nicer. I chose Stevenson for the location because it is near OPERS and I love the convenience.

388.

Stevenson students should have priority over Cowell students for Stevenson apartments.

389.

Stop raising Camper Park rent!

390.

Sucks you can't make them young'uns turn down their awful music and guitar in middle of the day.

391.

The ability to change our roommates should not be complicated and there should be an available kitchen for everyone and not just the RA because some people would prefer to make their own meals sometimes or would rather not spend a lot of money on dining hall food.

392.

The ability to receive housing, even if it isn't the ideal living situation, is the greatest feature here. The requirement for a meal plan is outrageous. I waste so much money per quarter on a 5 day meal plan that i don't even use. Make the students buy a slug club card or drop the requirements to allow all housing situations to have a minimum of a 55day meal plan if desired.

393.

The amount Cowell college resudents pay for dorm housing is ridiculously expensive.

394.

The amount of policing of loud noise on this campus is absolutely awful. It would be nice if there was a harsher policy on noise at all hours. There is no reason whatsoever to not wear headphones. Not everyone wakes up at 8am or goes to sleep at 2am.

395.

The apartments in Cowell have a nice setup. The other colleges, including Oakes needs to be remodeled badly.

396.

The apartments shouldn't be closed during the school year.

397.

The assistance for students pursuing off-campus housing is very helpful and increasing its services offered would help many students.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

398.

The bathrooms are horrific. I also feel like the triples in cowell are incredibly crowded. Doubles should definitely be more of an available option to EVERYone.

399.

The bathrooms get dirty and the showers need to have better water pressure. The food in the dining halls is bad

400.

The best change to the housing program would be adding reliable and high-speed wifi in all housing buildings.

401.

The buildings are comfortable but I think the housing department could do a better job of placing students together who are like minded.

402.

The CA's in the Porter B building do an awful job. It is unfair that they are paid so much for doing so little. They are abusive toward residents, unavailable when needed, and subjective in their enforcement of housing rules. I suggest that the screening process for these people be heavily improved.

403.

The camper park is a beautiful part of UCSC. Management needs to be improved. The system as it stands is inherently flawed and many things should be fixed (janitorial services provided, community cleaning standards, more regular inspections that are less intrusive, better seller-buyer contract facilitated through university?? The system as it is is corrupt. This year I was forced to pay for many problems that the university deemed were passable last year, yet the conditions have not changed at all. ), but it is a vital part of UCSC community. Please do all that is possible to keep a beautiful, special tradition alive.

404.

The construction during the school year is horrible.

405.

The cost is what most student's look at followed by location

406.

The cost should be a bit lower despite all the accomodations.

407.

The cost to live on campus is increasing as the years are passing by which is making it non-affordable for several people along with the dining services not being that great anymore. The food contains a lo of oil/greasy. Too many sweets are put out and the salad bars can be a lot better.

408.

The crammed spaces shared by most incoming students is rather discomforting for not only those living in limited quarters, but those who have a reasonable living situation like myself in a double. It causes crowded bathrooms and a strain on the internet network which causes everyone's standard of living to decrease. Having lived in a triple last year and currently residing in a double this year, the quality increase is noticeable. A short list would be more privacy, lower bedroom temperature relating to the number of occupants as well as the position of the beds closer to the ceiling where the temperature is drastically higher, lower ventilation, lack of appropriate space to feel comfortable doing homework or tasks within your own room. That being said, a double is what it seems these buildings were built for and the recent surge of admits has made living on campus undesirable in terms of comfort and rising price.

409.

The current amount me and my housemates pay for this ugly looking apt in the college9/10 apts is outrageous. The buildings look nothing less than an ugly zinc'd-walled and concrete prison, why does the toilet room not have proper ventilation? or even better a window! Buildings 1&2&3 are awkwardly positioned to maximize no student-bonding or community because of their separations, also building 1 is extremely far away from the laundry room, relative to the other 2 buildings. The ILC, however, was a job well done, their buildings are positioned like a "semi-circle" that allows a better student community and easy access to laundry room and lounge room for all residents. Finally, there should be workstudy options for students to work by cleaning the outside of the apts area, our stairs are so dirty, dusty, leaves everywhere and even what seems to be a fresh vomit stain on the steps that has remained there for many weeks.

410.

The difference in single and triple room prices (for the stevenson appartments) is huge and is a big damper on room coordination

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INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

411.

The dining hall sucks

412.

The dining halls have gotten terrible. Often the food tastes horrible. I recently contracted food poisoning from a dining hall. Also why are all the resident halls the same price when some of them have much larger rooms than others?

413.

The dining halls should supply more cruelty free (i.e. vegan) foods and be more consistent with their labeling of them.

414.

the dinning halls are terrible quality. The food is terrible for your health. Even the salad bars are terrible, the salad is frequently not fresh or washed. There are not very many healthy good food options. we pay way too much for the food we get. The meal plan also should not be required.

415.

The dorms/housing buildings need to be renovated because we are not getting the condition we are paying for. There needs to be up to date appliances and toilet paper and trash bags should come along with the on campus apartments.

416.

The facilities are old, worn down, and not worth the rent. Honestly, if there were cheaper places off campus, I would take them in a heartbeat. The worst housing and most expensive I have ever had. Also, the staff is overbearing and makes one not feel welcome in the community. Pets should also be allowed on campus.

417.

The housing and dining programs are very overpriced and somewhat unsatisfactory. I would like to see either lower prices for the very cramped living spaces provided, or larger living spaces to match the high prices. Also, the meal plan options are extremely limited. It would definitely be more affordable and attractive to live on campus if the meal plans had more options and weren't compulsory for students living on campus, Maybe even customizable meal plans would help. The 7day, 5-day, and 55-meal plans do not fit all needs.

418.

The housing cost is ridiculous for the amount space an individual who is sharing rooms gets.

419.

The housing cost is too high and honestly I believe the university set the price solely to profit from it. Sharing a room with two other people is supposed to reduce the housing cost per person. But no, a university gain $4122 from a single room and $8334 from a full small triple.

420.

The housing in Cowell is fucking terrible but it is convenient and has a nice view and attracts wonderful students. Three people DO NOT work in a small triple. Almost all the triples in my building are now doubles. Also the bathrooms and lounge are gross and overcrowded.

421.

The housing is more expensive than it's worth

422.

The housing is very expensive, and I really wish that I was given more knowledge on where I would be living before I had to make a final decision. I think that Porter college is both a great and beautiful place to live, but, I feel my experience here would have been much better if I could have been around students with majors similar to mine.

423.

The housing options are varied but I would prefer if there were cheaper options as well as I am an out-of-state student and already have to pay extra for school.

424.

The housing program is very expensive, including the dining hall. We shouldn't have to pay so much. I am a low income students and cannot afford to pay all of the tuition and housing fees. I have to take out so much in loans to help pay off, i'm gonna be in so much debt after school.

425.

The housing rate is a little bit higher. (e.g. Graduate student housing rate now is >$1000 per month.)

426.

The housing situation at Family Student Housing is good for students with children. One observation is that students living here that do not have families are likely to rent out spare bedrooms to undergrads who would otherwise not qualify to live at family student housing. On the other hand, for students with children, it is hard to rent out a spare bedroom. Meanwhile, students with children are the ones with higher living expenses and are more at risk for dropping out. In this way, whether or not it is intentional, the current system seems to favor students without children at Family Student Housing. Another

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

issue is that residents who do not have children sometimes complain or seem to get upset by children playing outdoors. These residents should not be protected by the FSH staff, instead they should be asked to consider moving to another residence. FSH staff should screen potential residents to insure that they are okay with children playing outside. 427.

The internet at Family student housing needs to be better. There have been times it is so slow it impairs my school studies.

428.

The internet is hardly "high-speed" and is worse than it has been in previous years. I am also incredibly disappointed with the removal of paper towels from residential halls. It is nonsense to take paper towels away and then neglect providing any other means of drying hands. I am extremely disappointed that living features are being reduced and yet housings costs are increasing next year. It is in unfathomable that a school which thrives on offering alternatives does not maintain consistency among the different departments. I propose that if the school wishes to go waste free certain amenities must still be offered. As such instead of removing paper towels from residence halls and ignoring the needs of residents, the UCSC Housing program should pay for some alternative such as air dryers.

429.

the internet needs to get better! please, wer seriously paying so much money and working so hard to succeed at the university its really frustrating when it becomes a struggle to complete the online hw that the university is telling me to do because of poor internet access.

430.

The limited amount of rooms in Stevenson apartments is very inconvenient and has made housing plans for myself and friends very difficult.

431.

The main reason why students do not want to live on campus is because you require a meal plan. If a meal plan was not required then more people would be inclined to live on campus because it is more convenient.

432.

The Merrill Dorms were terrible. As a first year student my experience was very tainted. The amount of construction and commotion all year was unacceptable. Merrill was the last place I wanted to be for this exact reason. The amount of money I pay to live in those dorms is not equivalent to the amount of problems and inconveniences there have been this year. UNACCEPTABLE.

433.

the most important is the roommate selection which is not very good in the way its is done now I know so many people who have trouble with their roommates.

434.

The number of people who can access restrooms at Porter dorm buildings is extremely uncomfortable. The doors should be locked to only those who live on the floor, so that there may be fewer issues and a higher level of respect for a common space.

435.

The only problem with your housing plan is that they aren't cost effective. The housing prices are going up significantly in A short amount of time and thats not okay. Thats going to cause a lot of students an inconvenience.

436.

The phone reception in the college 10 apartments, especially for Verizon, is very poor.

437.

The plumbing is not all that great and the water pressure in the showers is terrible.

438.

The preponderant issues are as follows: Outsized security at College 9 & 10 compared to other colleges. Folks are tired of being harassed by CSO's for simply choosing to live at the flagship college. Also the emphasis on triples instead of doubles unduly affects the hygiene of bathroom facilities. Worse is the conversion of floor lounges into bedrooms which DRAMATICALLY escalates the latent noise levels. People hang out and study in the halls since there is no available place on our floor after the lounge conversion. The consequent noise is the principle reason my friends and I are moving out next year. It's hard to describe how loud it is at all hours.

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EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

439.

The price for laundry is outrages. To start, it costs $1.75 just to wash and dry one load. That is too expensive by itself. When you add the amount of times you have to wash and/or dry each load because the machines DO NOT WORK the price is outrageous. I have had the laundry machines literally take money off my card and not do anything. The oncampus housing is already expensive, making many worry about affording it. The additonal cost of laundry is outrageous.

440.

The prices need to stop going up. Do fundraisers outside of campus to raise money for the students. Maybe bring up sports, make nicer apparel, do SOMETHING to let the world know we exist.

441.

The primary reason I would choose to live off campus is finances.

442.

The proximity to classes and the library/other resources make it very convenient to live on campus, in addition to less responsibility (ie. grocery shopping or maintenance is not necessary if I live on campus).

443.

The RA program needs to be greatly improved. I am currently living on campus this year and I feel that my RAs are not performing their duties, I also do not feel comfortable going to them with my issues because of their dismissive behavior in the past. A huge part of the living environment is not only the structure but the behavior of those around you and in my case the RAs have done nothing to ensure that I feel safe.

444.

The rent is too expensive for the living quarters that are offered.

445.

the rooms are toooooooo small. Dont try to put three people in a room that was meant for only two. It doesnt work.

446.

The school should offer a cheaper alternative to the 55 meal plan for those who live in the on-campus apartments.

447.

The set up of the apartments could be better/not so many triples!

448.

the shower room too small. Single room too small, single room should have their own toilet. Students should be able to stay on campus during winter break

449.

The Stevenson houses need to be remodelled. The floors creak excruiciatingly loud and the lounges are, to be quite honest, pathetic --especially house 6's. The floors and walls are just too thin. Every time someone walks in the house, everyone is woken up to the sound of creaking floorboards.

450.

The tuition for out of state students is extremely high, I almost didn't want to come to UICSC because of it.

451.

The UCSC Camper Park has been an absolute pleasure to reside in. It is the perfect environment from which to enjoy this beautiful campus. Please continue to keep it a part of the UCSC experience!

452.

The UCSC trailer park housing option has been a phenomenal experience in terms of on-campus living. In terms of adding additional housing options to campus - WE DO NOT NEED TO EXPAND CAMPUS!! Our campus is already impacted and housing is simply outrageously unaffordable to anybody trying to pay their own way through college (such as myself). The notion of clearing natural reserve/wild parts of campus to make MORE established on-campus housing is quite honestly REVOLTING.

453.

The UCSC Trailer Park is a gem among on campus housing. I have grown more in this community than any other living space prior to this year. The University should recognize the creative power and potential for the trailer park.

454.

The walls are too thin

455.

The walls need to be thicker. Noise travels too much. Better and more storage space. More academic themes, residential themes in general. More places to study (in each residential building). Recreational rooms in each building.

456.

The water fountains in my building are so yucky! Please fix them so that they don't taste like metal

457.

The way you determine housing is ridiculous. When I applied to the school I did not know that the college I associated with would pretty much determine where I live. Just because I associate with crown does not mean I want to live there. It would be nice if this was made more clear rather than talk about the college values and moral stance. I can always

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

partake in those events the once or twice they happen a quarter I want. I do not want to go from science hill to crown everyday. End rant. 458.

The windows in the Crown dorms need screens just live many other buildings here have. The way things are now, birds and insects (specifically bees, wasps, and mosquitoes) can fly in if the windows are open to allow ventilation in the room, and that is honestly a health hazard.

459.

There are bug issues in the dorm. The dorm rooms can get really hot and there's no way to get the room cool down

460.

There are flies in the College 10 Angela Davis bathrooms.

461.

There isn't enough noise regulation in the dorms, making it very difficult to study and/or sleep (and I live on the so-called 'quiet floor'). It would be very helpful if you're going to put rooms directly across from bathrooms if the doors were quieter, but it would be better if this just didn't happen at all. Apparently bathrooms are gathering places for late night conversations...loud conversations. Also, the food in the dining halls is in serious need of variation. Also, healthier options that don't come in the form of a salad bar would be great. Late night is particularly bad. There are nights where I'm not done with homework or study groups before eight o'clock and therefore only get to eat late night for dinner and it's always deep fried and/or covered in sauce or gravy. Just because people are eating at a time that you consider late, does not mean that they are high. You should also do a better job of enforcing the smoking ban, for both cigarettes and marijuana. There are constantly people smoking, not only outside, but in their rooms. This is just ridiculous, and really hard to live with when you're highly allergic to both.

462.

There needs to be a better sense of community within the campus.

463.

There needs to be more information about different colleges at UCSC for incoming freshmen. I do not feel like I'm in the right environment more my interests

464.

There should be a correction period for priority housing applications! I work closely with Res Life and a large amount of people made the same small mistake on their application(Applying for different communities by accident. I.e. A group of students affiliated with sister colleges, applying to be in the same apartment but not realizing they need to apply as a group for strictly one community). I think it's reasonable to allow them to fix this mistake.

465.

There should be a website for housing reviews. It would really help in making housing decisions.

466.

There should be more doubles in the residence halls and they should be cheaper

467.

There should be one dorm building and one apartment building in each college that has no college affiliation, but only seniority affiliation. This would create diversity and a better community where people from other colleges each other know and meet new people, not only from their respective college.

468.

These costs are just too damn high

469.

They should be more a fordable. Also if you are going to charge everyone the same amount for and apartment that its supposedly the same size as the rest you should really make sure they are all the same size. cause you charge the same price to student with smaller apartments which is unfair.

470.

Thicker or more insulated walls would be appreciated in their moments.

471.

This campus has pathetic family student housing. it's a disaster. The entire purpose of family student housing is to have an affordable and supportive environment for single parents in school or married parents who are both in school. The only reason we are still here is because all of our money is wrapped up in this junky unit so we can't gather 1st, last, and security deposite plus the 2 months rent it would take to get out of here. Coming from a college town that appreciates it's student families I can say with certainty that this campus has no regard for families and it makes me sad. You can't even

28

BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

stop a huge illegal event from taking place directly behind family housing and the preschool which puts our children in danger. campus should be ashamed of itself. 472.

This university has been longstanding as an extremely kind, and vanguard experience, however the administration's plans to expand have destroyed student sentiment & respect among all other campuses. I am currently a residential assistant and have been extremely disappointed with the housing offered at UCSC. As a Porter affiliate, and current Cowell RA, there are quite a few renovations that need to happen on our campus before we decide to expand our campus. The Cowell Dorms, Kresge Aptmts, College 8 dorms, and especially Merrill Aptmts need to be up kept or completely destroyed. They are simply disgusting. Aside from their architectural ingenuity, it is heart wrenching to show these places of residence to prospective students. My university has not given me a single reason to suggest that prospects to live on campus. People are beginning to laugh at us because of YOU. If you wish otherwise, and our school to maintain some form of integrity, start with renovations of our current dorms instead of the already endangered California redwoods. After all, isn't that supposed to be some sort of selling point to our university? -Christopher K Rad

473.

Those housing options looked so good!

474.

Three students in a double-sized room is too many. I don't think one of three roommates should have to receive less space, i.e. wardrobe instead of closet.

475.

To make housing/meal cost affordable. Not all students have the same privileges as other students.

476.

Too expensive especially ij my situation

477.

TOO EXPENSIVE! It's upsetting that we pay so much, and still have to pay for for washing and drying our clothes. It's frustrating that people say they understand how expensive it is, but they don't. We are poor college students, we are struggling and it's not entirely impossible to work and be in school, but you expect us to do well, you should consider how difficult it is for most to do well while worrying about paying for school.

478.

Too expensive!!!

479.

Too expensive.

480.

Too expensive. Need to go off campus because of costs!!

481.

Too freakin small

482.

TOO FUCKING EXPENSIVE.

483.

Too much weed, too little action.

484.

Try to cut the cost of rents to be more competitive with off-campus housing options

485.

U really hope the cost of the housing next year can be brought down to more reasonable prices. So many of my friends I know who wish to stay on campus but can't afford it are seeking off campus housing and sacrificing transportation cost and convenience.

486.

UCSC doesn't need more/fancier housing. Continue to maintain what there is. Hold the line at the current population and be a shining symbol of the wisdom of limiting growth and maintaining quality of life. The Santa Cruz area has exceeded its carrying capacity. Desalination is insanity. Don't mess with the beautiful communities of Family Student Housing and the Trailer Park. Realize that they are incredibly important in terms of being exactly the sorts of things that lend to UCSC being a desirable academic destination for many. Don't turn us into another giant edifice with misconceived pretentions to being glamorous.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

487.

UCSC has the 14th highest residential housing cost in the nation (public + private colleges) according to CNBC. Lower. Housing. Costs. Expensive on-campus housing pushes students into dangerous neighborhoods in Santa Cruz. Should anything happen to them, the blood is on your hands.

488.

UCSC is a growing school! In people and prestige, both need to be accounted for in improving on campus Housing and food. It is really important to keep the nature-loving, natural feel of the campus though. Here are some things! -Keep up the organic and other healthy food -Increase Dining hall operation times if possible -More student input about food (more suggestion boxes and such) -Re-establish what the CSO's are supposed to do. Keep the peace, keep people safe, not cut down on petty stuff like "noise". It feels like harassment Another thing about Stevenson dorms. I think the smaller houses form much better communities, so I wouldn't want them demolished and rebuilt. But the bathrooms definitely need a huge improvement. And the lounge amenities too.

489.

UCSC residence halls are often unclean and not affordable for many, should be improved to look more attractive to prospective students (particularly Stevenson College)

490.

UCSC should take out the meal plan requirement. They over charge students.

491.

ugh

492.

Upon seeing some of the options some looked really nice. The price and rent that is being asked for them seems a bit ridiculous especially as many students do not actually have a job. Providing an affordable living situation would be ideal to reduce strain on ones financial status and less stress with in families who struggle to make some of these payments.

493.

Upper classmen (jr & sr +)should be able to choose to accept or decline meal plan if living in the dorms. they should be able to get a 55 day meal plan or similar. It is absolutely absurd that after 1-2 years of living on campus and understand the meal options on campus that we are required to get a 5 day or 7 day meal plan in the dorms.

494.

Very rude housing coordinators for Redwood Grove. They were not able to help me with my housing situation even though I went to them almost everyday for a month, and they were very rude about it. They also stated different information to different students about housing availability and did not allow gender-neutral living even though on the housing website gender-neutral is allowed.

495.

Way too expensive for a tiny triple room.

496.

Way too expensive! And a kitchen in the residential buildings

497.

WAY TOO EXPENSIVE. I LIVE IN A TINY TRIPLE IN STEVENSON THAT HAS LESS THAN A FEW STEPS OF MOVING SPACE AND IM PAYING ALMOST 3000 A QUARTER FOR THIS? THATS ABOUT 9 GRAND FOR A ROOM NO BIGGER THAN 200 SQ FT. ALSO, DINING PLAN IS ABOUT 13 DOLLARS PER MEAL. FOR DINING HALL FOOD. SERIOUSLY?

498.

We might need more than one toilet per room

499.

What I have felt most uncomfortable having a UCSC housing contract is that your stuck to a 10-12 month contract. As an independent student over 25 years old and paying an out of state tuition it has been very hard for me to pay the housing. Is too expensive, at some point I wanted to get away from my contract because I am stretching every penny I have, but I couldn't get away from it. I THINK THAT IS BETTER IF CONTRACTS ARE PER QUARTER. This gives you the possibility of finding someplace else if at some point you're financially tight. Also it gives you the possibility TO CHANGE ROOMMATES EVERY QUARTER IF YOU DON'T LIKE THEM.

500.

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When I say I live at College Nine, I specifically mean the International Living Center.

BRAILSFORD & DUNLAVEY

INSPIRE. EMPOW ER. ADVANCE.

EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

501.

When I was a freshman, i had a meal plan and never went to the dining hall. However, was still forced to have a meal plan because i was living in the dorms. There should be a system which allows a few students to be able to make having a meal plan optional, even if where they live requires them to have one. Making it a requirement is like forcefully charging them for something they don't need, or want.

502.

Whenever I do housing, I try to do the lowest cost of housing, meaning that if I have to do a triple housing to have it really cheap then I would pick that as my option, I want to live in an apartment that doesn't cost too much.

503.

where is my prize it won't let me get a prize guys seriously where is my prize

504.

Who will clean the bathroom and sink? I would prefer that staff was able to clean the bathroom, this would provide jobs

505.

Why don't these options exist now….so cool!

506.

Why is everything so expensive? Honestly, what are we actually paying for? Rooming? Understandable, sure, but it's still so expensive..Food at the dining hall? Not..quite what I would pay for the whole year, now, honestly.. I am not trying to be a whiny little college student, but there could be different ways of constructing how much money it is to cost to be here in UCSC (or just college in general). We don't have money from our pockets or parents, that's why we had to get grants/financial aid..yet, we STILL have to take out loans, which we would have to pay in the end, when we have no job, and are forced into debt already because of the way the schooling system is in the U.S. It's sad, that's what this is.

507.

Why is rent so much cheaper in these hypothetical situations?

508.

Why only available to freshmen should be open to everyone!

509.

Why so expensive?

510.

wifi should be available in every living area. i have had to use ethernet the past two years and this is unacceptable. A college campus should have wifi throughout.

511.

With a student budget, is really hard to make ends meet. In order to attract the best student prospects, UCSC should focus on making housing affordable. Compared with other universities, student housing prices in SC are ridiculously high. You cannot charge market prices, you are leaving out poor talented people.

512.

Would love to see more support for FSH, I've seen a huge lack of community involvement, I can see it being connected to not a lot of events getting funded and the high cost of living. Housing for families should be more affordable, or model after section 8 housing as I've heard originally it was. Also the locks on the doors are a hazard, not sure who decided on them when building these homes. Also the implementation of say a resource center or larger community room would be great. Currently only one room is available to hold events(way too small) and then another holds a small computer lab and living room type place. Having space to fit the needs of families would be helpful.

513.

Wouldn't mind cheaper on-campus housing.

514.

You guys should listen to the residents here at UCSC, threats should be taken seriously whether or not they come from another parent. Also read the roommate requirements because it seems that you just place people with whom ever regardless as to what they put down on their application.

515.

You need to be more accommodating to LGBTQIA needs—I wasn't able to live with people who identify as a gender identity I find myself more comfortable with and my comfort and housing situation on campus has suffered due to that.

516.

You need to renovate the Crown buildings. They have squeaky floors and smelly bathrooms

517.

You should do some remodeling in the interior of the Kresge apartments (like with an AC, better showers etc)

518.

Your housing program is virtually robbery.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA S ANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS

S T U D E N T C O M M E N T S – O F F - C AM P U S

1.

I was offered an apartment on campus but I was going to be living with four males. When I told the housing coordinator that I was not comfortable living with only males, he told me that as a transfer student that was all he could offer me. I did not feel like the coordinator was willing to work with me as far as housing accommodations went. If I was able to choose at least who I wanted to live with I would have choose to live on campus.

2.

I would love to live on campus as a graduate student. However, the current situation does not allow pets so this makes it impossible for me. The proposed prices are outlandish. Why would I pay $1700 /mo/person for a 2 bedroom apartment when I am currently pay $1600/month for a 2 bedroom town house split between 2 people that allows pets and provides a lot more freedom? You have to make it attractive for graduate students to live on campus (for their pets and families), otherwise no one will utilize the services.

3.

My husband and I would love to live on campus, but we have our own furnishings and a pet that we are not willing to give up. Housing for more mature students would be appreciated.

4.

the housing it totally unaffordable. if you want to attract graduate students make it possible to live here.

5.

$1700 for a tiny single bedroom apartment is insane.

6.

A program should be implemented to have students who are leaving santa cruz communicate with students who want to move off campus. In addition resources should be given to show students approximately how much they will pay when they live off campus, provide surveys to show students the change in cost, lifestyle and necessities provided for off campus living.

7.

Absolutely none of those housing options would be affordable for graduate students or students with families, especially given the low pay rate for TAs. Just about everything off-campus is a better deal, including both single- and doubleoccupancy. Given the need for space on campus, you should just make the higher-density units and have them be as cheap as possible.

8.

AFFORDABILITY!!!!!! And less restrictions for those that can possibly attend some sort of training or courses--so that the monitoring and patrolling of CRE's or other personnel is lessened. Also, access to a kitchen with open access and less restriction would have made the dorm experience tolerable as a transfer student.

9.

All of the units illustrated are great, but not at that price. I would rather live off campus with several roommates and have to commute than pay those suggested rents.

10. All the choices are outrageously expensive for graduate students. 11. Allow individuals to have someone room with them (such as their husband or partner) even if they do not go to UCSC, but if they work in the area to be able to afford the on campus 1 bedroom apartments. 12. As a 1 year graduate student (Teaching Credential Program), it did not make sense for my family to move on campus for only a year. Had I had the option of staying longer I would have considered using on-campus housing. 13. As a graduate student, I'm too old to share a room with someone else, yet on a TA salary I cannot realistically afford any of the single-bedroom options listed earlier on this survey. Because of this, I must live off-campus. No matter how convenient the location may be on campus, the price of the single bedroom options that also involve having a kitchen (also a necessity for graduate/older/more mature students) nearly automatically precludes me. 14. As an adult I would never live on campus and share a room.

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EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

15. As of now, the rent is far too high for me to live on campus. Unless the rent for a single bedroom within any kind of oncampus living situation was between $650-$750 per month including utilities, I wouldn't be able to afford to live on campus. 16. As someone who lived in the apartments that are currently at UCSC, I am extremely confused as to why we have to purchase Flexis despite the fact that we have kitchens available. At the end of the year we are able to apply for a refund, but it seems like an added hassle that could be avoided if we weren't charged in the first place. Flexis are quite easy to purchase throughout the year and I think that because this service is already in place we should be able to choose to opt out of being charged in the first place. 17. Availability of kitchens would help keep students on campus. If they can pay the same amount of rent off-campus and have access to a kitchen and other amenities they will not choose to live on-campus. 18. Based on friends living in family student housing first year of grad school: Unavailability of convenient late night transportation to/from town, poor cell phone network coverage (verizon, anywhere near family student housing), termites in buildings. 19. Born/raised in area so had housing before attending UCSC. Also transfer student. 20. BULLSHIT 21. Bye. 22. Campus housing is not affordable. This is the main reason I, and my friends, have chosen to live off campus. 23. Campus housing isn't affordable for me, though as a graduate student I would probably rather live off-campus (in the community) anyhow. I would much rather see any funds for improvements to graduate housing go toward providing more affordable childcare for students with children, and living wages for TAs. 24. Change the price of dinning ball. That's what is killing the prices 25. Cheapen it so that its affordable! 26. Cheaper rooms, required provided kitchens, optional meal plans. 27. Cost! Cost! Cost! 28. Crown is fucking disgusting. 29. Crown student housing needs serious remodeling. It is unfair that college 9 and 10 have buildings with card swipes and elevators and Crown housing has old and deteriorating bathrooms and carpets. Students who pick to be in academically focused housing are punished by living and studying there. I am a crown affiliate and this is why I have chosen to live off campus. 30. Current prices are too high. 31. Do not expand the campus, there is enough students here at UC Santa Cruz. It is not for the benefit of the students that you are trying to expand, but for the financial benefits of the shareholders. I will never support UCSC expansion. Build another Campus in a new location & Stop building into the forest! 32. Do not expand UCSC housing. 33. Do not put three people in a room that is meant for one person! 34. Don't cut down the upper campus forest to build more shoddy university housing. 35. Don't make students subsidize a subpar dining hall environment. 36. During the summer prior to my first year as a transfer student I drove to the campus and meet with Joe DePage regarding a room. I explained to him that I needed a quit room not next to loud doors, or lots of foot traffic. In edition to my ADHD I

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had to split up my sleep due to work(35 hours a week in Fremont). Also, at the time, I was a full time math major. He said he would take care of it and did assign me a room on the fifth floor (quite wing). The people around me were wonderfully respectful and pretty quite. However my room was right next to the south stairwell door. An extremely well used stairwell. With a door that was required to be shut and it was... often. Between the extremely loud frequencies of the stairwell foot traffic and the door constantly opening and closing, I rarely slept. It was such a weird thing for Joe to do. It's like he gave me exactly the opposite of what I requested, almost. I was going to stay on campus again this year. The DRC contacted Joe and he assigned me a room. When I went to look at it I saw that it was directly across from the bathroom and next to some huge smoke stack type thing that the current resident admitted made a lot of noise. I really don't get that guy. I have always been respectful to him. I don't think that the housing program truly understands how much they effect our academic success. This needs to improve. That is after all why we stay on campus. 37. Expensive, but moving off campus is too, unfortunately Financial Aid still drops when you move off campus. 38. Expensive, food sucks. Porter is best. 39. Finding pet friendly accommodations was a huge factor in my housing search. 40. First year in the dorms was great! But after that it is much more appealing to me to live off campus where I can feel part of the city of Santa Cruz and UCSC. Due to the layout of campus and the town it can feel disconnected and isolated living just up on the campus hill. 41. First, I think on campus housing options (at least for Grad Students) are too expensive (U$1000 for a room in a 4bed apartment is way higher than the city average. Second, rules for Family Student Housing are a bit restrictive. I can't apply because I'm not married yet, but wait till Fall to apply would mean having to find a place to live before I get the answer, which makes this option not viable. 42. For me, the issue of the cost of on-campus housing and the fact that meal plans are forced onto students that stops me from living on campus. Otherwise, I would love the convenience of living on campus. 43. For the 55 day meal plan, we can use the meals at on campus establishments which is great. But the meal is only worth $8 when if you break it down mathematically, we pay more than $8 for each meal. 44. For what the students are getting for the on-campus amenities, UCSC housing is WAY too expensive. The housing fees as well as the meal plan fees are all too expensive and not affordable to everyone, which forces people to live off campus. This results in less monetary income for UCSC as well as an increase in off-campus housing, which makes the Santa Cruz residents hate us as students because we increase the rent prices throughout the entire town. 45. From personal experience, I would rather have a cheaper rent by putting more people in a room as well as having a kitchen, bathroom. All the rooms look great, I would definitely make there be a more obvious payment decrease the more people you add in the room, as shown above I noticed differences of less than $100 for adding another person, having a 3 person room instead of a 1 person should be a huge price difference (to help out those in the 3 person room). 46. Generally speaking on campus housing is much less popular than off campus housing to students who are looking for (even remotely) economical options. There should be an option to opt out of paying a dining fee, granted the student has immediate access to a kitchen. 47. Getting on-campus housing as a second year student is an absurdly stressful process in terms of being housed with friends, getting the desired housing option, etc. This process needs to be easier and housing needs to be cheaper in order for more students to see the benefit in staying on campus.

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EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

48. Give me back my $1000 for the housing cancellation fees that I was charged after cancelling my housing contract because you could not give me the housing I requested. 49. Graduate Student Housing is not affordable for Graduate Students at UCSC. We only make around 17,000 Dollars a year. The University is attempting to charge us 12,000 dollars in yearly rent for a room in a shared suite. This is way above the market rate in Santa Cruz. 50. Graduate student housing is outrageously expensive -- far above market rates in Santa Cruz and completely inaccessible for those of us trying to live on a TA/GSR salary. 51. Graduate students need less expensive housing options!! The Santa Cruz rental / campus racket/market does not work on what we're paid. I'm likely to leave my program because despite tuition remission, TAships and other support, the cost of living in Santa Cruz is unsustainable. We need a 30% raise or subsidized housing!! Please help!! 52. Greek housing on campus 53. Having more on-campus apartments that isn't more than $1000/person available for students would be nice. 54. Honestly not cost efficient. 55. Housing aimed at graduate students is way, way, too expensive when compared with off-campus housing. This is the primary reason why I don't live on campus. 56. Housing for spouses is very hard to come by, and non-existent if a pet is present. We would love to live on campus, but are unable to due to a small indoor cat. If an affordable option was available on campus that would be great. Over all rent for our 1 bedroom apartment consumes just as much as tuition. The lack of affordable housing is a bit of a struggle for self-supporting students. 57. Housing is too expensive and I didn't want to be on the meal plan anymore. It adds to the cost and we have no access to kitchens in the dorms in Cowell. 58. Housing is too expensive. Student debt is trauma in the making. Can't afford any of this on TA salary. Please change this! 59. Housing is too expensive. Financial aid does not help much. 60. Housing neeeeeds to be cheaper. This campus is beautiful but there is no excuse we have to be ranked the 7th most expensive campus in California. 61. Housing off or on campus in the santa cruz area is outrageously expensive, the main concern with ucsc's housing program should be to provide students with affordable housing. 62. Housing on campus is too expensive and I would like to graduate with the least amount of debt. 63. Housing options seem so expensive. What perks account for such inflated prices? 64. Housing should be separated from meal plans 65. I can't afford the meal plan and housing. 66. I can't even consider living on campus because of the cost. The only affordable option is Family Student Housing. 67. I could not live on campus strictly due to housing cost. I moved here with my fiance, and we share a 2 bedroom apartment for 1400 a month that is 1.5 miles away from campus on the east side. If you want housing to be utilized on campus, make it more private, and more affordable. Also, the dinning hall schedules need to change. If I lived on campus I would be really upset that I couldn't eat when I wanted to because the dinning halls were closed (closed too early at night, and too late in the morning for a responsible student). 68. I decided to live off campus for 3 reasons: 1. The family student house is too old and ugly. New buildings would be the solution; 2. The units are small. The new buildings should have more space and two bathrooms; 3. The campus is

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beautiful, but the area around the family student housing is old and ugly. The solution is a totally new and beautiful area, including the new units. 69. I did not get my first preference in room size during Freshman year. 70. I do not like that the meal plan is required for students who have access to a kitchen. It is greedy of the university to make a student pay for bad food when they can make their own using less money. 71. I do not want more housing because it will crowd the campus and town too much and destroy the forest and drain water resources even more, I am completely against a new desalination plant, it is not good for the environment. 72. I don't understand why people who live in the on-campus apartments are REQUIRED to have a meal plan. That's just unnecessary spending for an already expensive housing. Since they already have access to a kitchen, there's absolutely no reason for them to be forced to have a meal plan. If they want one or not should be up to them. For example, I love cooking, and if I lived in the on-campus apartments, I would be cooking everyday; no need for a meal for me. It would definitely help me save a lot of money too by not having a meal plan. 73. I have a cat and a partner. These factors and the price are my main reasons for never having explored the option of campus housing. 74. I have a child; on-campus dormitory housing is not appropriate for me. 75. I have a family of 4 with pets and feel like your 2 bedroom apartment is outrageously expensive. As a graduate student with a family we would need a place that would be reasonable space for our kids, which it looks like it would be but allowing pets, at least in some of the units would allow families to be on campus. These units are more expensive then our current mortgage on a 3 bedroom house. As a graduate student, you are looking for the safest, least expensive options and add in having a family where obviously at least one of the parents is a student, that can be very expensive. 76. I have a gluten free vegan, so living on campus sucks because the dining halls don't have great options catered to my needs. That was my original primary reason for moving off campus. 77. I have had a lot of help with housing and I highly respect the crown/Merrill residential staff. They have been very helpful. 78. I have never had the experience of living through campus housing - whether it be on campus or off campus, so my responses may be a bit one-sided. I do, however, thoroughly living off campus in the apartment that I currently live. 79. I have never lived on campus because I am from Santa Cruz, and my current living situation is atypical, so my opinions on this survey are, unfortunately, irrelevant. 80. I hope my responses are helpful, but please note that I'm an older grad student and enjoy being part of the larger Santa Cruz community (my age). Also, I have a dog (though did not during my first years of grad school). 81. I hope this helps! 82. I like the idea of getting student input. 83. I like the ideas of the potential rooms you have for UCSC. But it is realistically too expensive for students. Even if there is financial aid, I personally feel like there are more students that must take loans than grants. And usually people live with friends and their financial situations always don't match so I don't think it is fair to make the pricing like that based on how many people want to live at the same location because not event receives the same finances. 84. I lived in kresge last year and from what I've heard from students from other colleges, kresge is the best format. Living with other people, having a kitchen option, and also privacy.

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EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

85. I lived in the dorms when I was 18 and attended another college. It was a great experience but I never want to do it again. I'm also older and have been living with housemates on my own for almost 10 years. I have a cat and a lot of furniture. My life does not fit into campus housing. 86. I lived in the ILC my 2nd year, I am currently studying abroad, and I plan to live in the ILC next year. I think if it were not for those factors I would have been much more likely to move off campus. 87. I lived in the Porter Apartments last quarter and was very distracted and interrupted by the construction going on in Kresge J/K. Living in my apartment during the day was loud and difficult to do my homework. One day an alarm went off for the entire day and I had to call the construction company to come out and turn it off. The continuous construction going on is disruptive to the people who currently live there and a waste of students money. I have lived on campus for four years and never once have I lived on campus where there was no construction going on. 88. I lived in the Porter transfer community and had insomnia as a result of the constant activity. Near the end of my stay it was very difficult to stay focused on school. It was overall a good learning experience but I would never repeat dorm life. 89. I never had problems with finding housing, but the housing at UCSC was VERY limited. I lived in Kresge and those buildings make no sense architecturally. I understand it is because of Kresge's history, but renovations are very necessary. Typically, I've seen housing on campus is very expensive, and the only benefit is proximity to classes. Although, because of parking, that sometimes isn't even true. 90. I participate in many off-campus activities and the on-campus housing and parking situation (parking especially) is too much of a pain for me to ever consider living on-campus. The price of housing and parking is also exorbitant. 91. I probably would have lived in on campus housing all four years but when I was an incoming Porter sophomore all the members of my housing group were arbitrarily given late signup times while upperclassmen affiliated with other colleges filled up the Porter Apartments. When we went to the housing office to discuss the issue further we were treated with complete disrespect and decided to not pursue on campus housing further. I have since lived off campus, and I felt alienated from my college community and devalued by Porter College because of it. To be perfectly honest, it is something that occasionally still actively bothers me almost two years later. 92. I stayed in the porter transfer community two years ago. It was waaaaaay to noisy and had cigarette smoke wafting through the window all day and night. Those negatives easily outweigh the positives for me and I don't think I would want to stay in a dorm again. 93. I think making parking more accessible is a big thing. I would have stayed on campus longer than my freshman year due to convenience if I had been allowed to park my car somewhere as a Sophomore. That was one of the biggest reasons I decided to move off campus at that time. Also allowing pets on campus is a big thing. A lot of students, myself included, do not have an anxiety problem per-se but they do like to have animals around as stress relief. I moved off campus and adopted 2 cats for the reasoning that they were a comforting family away from my family at home, a resource not available to me on campus. 94. I think some of the housing prices are very unrealistic. If the university could find a way to provide housing prices in line with those available in the city of santa cruz i believe far more students would live on campus due to the commute required to get up the hill. I do not understand why it is so costly to live on campus, paying 800 dollars a month PLUS a required meal plan just to live in a single dorm room is ridiculoso!!!!!!!!!!! 95. I think that UCSC's housing program is really expensive and I do not think that housing should be as priced as high as it is.

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96. I think the living accommodations are fairly priced. The meal plan was the primary reason I preferred to live off campus. 97. I understand the importance of creating good on-campus housing but the prices are pretty ridiculous for the conditions given. Tuition already costs more than enough, add housing and I could barely afford to go to school here. 98. I wanted an apartment last year. I didn't get it 99. I was disappointing that the family housing has only 2 bedrooms. THis would only really work if you had one child. Does not help students with more than one child which is a typical family structure. There should be some housing for this. 100. I was very unsatisfied with on campus housing, and I don't know anyone who was satisfied. WAY too expensive for what was included, and the meal plan was money down the drain. My monthly groceries cost less than a quarter of the meal plan cost/mo. Moving off campus was the best decision I ever made. 101. I would be more interested in living on campus, if there was no required meal plan to purchase. 102. I would choose to live on campus if there were co-ops or housing that had less strict rules, possibly pets, and was more affordable. Kitchens also are nice to have. I think people choose to live off campus because of independence, if the rules and housing were adjusted then it would give the necessary aspects of adulthood that college students seek. 103. I would consider it if it were afordable but it is much more expensive than what you can get off campus. 104. I would consider on-campus housing more if there was some way program to lower housing costs through working for the campus or something similar. 105. I would have like to have lived on campus since it would have been more convenient but the prices are far too expensive and financial aid does not provide enough money to cover those expenses. I found it cheaper to live off of campus but it was very difficult to find a place within my price range and to even be considered since the market is saturated with so many students. I looked at at least 50+ places over a 3-4 month period. Living on campus would've taken away the stress and headache of finding a place. Since I am 35 I would not feel comfortable sharing a space with people far younger than me. If there was a one bedroom apartment or studio with a kitchen, bedroom, bath, etc that was within a great price range I definitely would have considered staying on campus. 106. I would have stayed on-campus all four years if the housing would have been more affordable. 107. I would just like to say that I am very displeased with on-campus housing. My friends and I were denied on-campus housing as sophomores and once again as juniors because of 'senior status' and college affiliation. All we wanted was to live in an apartment-like complex somewhere on-campus but the university failed to provide us with that. Instead they offered us the freshman dorms once again. 108. i would live here if you allowed dogs on campus. 109. I would love to have had the option to live in family housing, but the pricing there was simply not affordable for a student that has a child to care for, even with a husband who is working full time. I would've had to have been working as well in order to make ends meet if I had chosen to live on campus with family housing. Working was simply out of the question for me as the graduate program I was attending was extremely demanding. 110. I would prefer to live on campus but it's just too expensive. There's just no way to justify paying more and not being able to have basic stuff - like a kitchen or a bathroom that's not shared with more than 3-4 people. Of the prospective units shown to me, only the last few would be preferable, mostly because the others don't even have a kitchen. 111. I would strongly encourage the designers of this survey to change "Nonresidential alien" to "Undocumented student/individual" or something to that effect.

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EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

112. I would vehemently oppose any additional housing built on campus that involves demolishing alternative student housing options (the UCSC trailer park) or is not carbon neutral in comparison to the existing ecosystem. 113. I'd love to live on campus but I can't afford it and I have a cat. 114. I'd love to live on campus, but the rents charged are just not competitive with those available in the off-campus housing market. 115. I'll move back onto campus once you get all the people to be quiet by 8:30pm every night (you have control over that sort of thing if you don't have to reside into a packed dorm building). I get the same thing as your "unit G" and save almost $500 each month for living 10 minutes away. 116. I'm married 117. If housing was significantly cheaper I would definitely consider living on campus. 118. If it was cheaper, I know I would more willing live on campus. My allowance from my dad is around $200/ month and with a job that makes about $500/month, I can only afford a place that is at max $700/month including utilities and food. And keeping up with school and the stress of tuition and housing really isn't conducive to a good environment for me to learn effectively. 119. If on-campus housing fills up, the students who are left on the waitlist should be notified immediately, not whenever you feel like sending out the email. Those of us who are not from here rely on having solid housing until we've learned the area, waiting until almost mid-August does not give enough time to properly find a good enough substitute. Maybe undergrads can get away with it, but for grad students who have to be on campus by the second week of September more heads-up is needed. 120. if there was more parking available for students living on campus close by to their apartments that would be helpful. That way people are able to go grocery shopping for themselves without making it an all day excursion 121. If this is about building new residene halls, please consinder this, I had a funnel attached to the ceiling to catch a leak for 3 months in the dorms. The only reason I never sued is I'm not a dick. If this is about renovating or rebuilding existing residence halls then please go ahead. if this has anything to do with the LRDP please take that money and shove it up your ass. 122. If you want a kitchen (which I don't know how people live without one), then housing is not cheaper on campus than it is off campus. And off campus means easier access to groceries, beach, downtown without a car (I only have a bike). So on campus was never an option for me. 123. Is the University planning on building new housing or remodeling what already exists? The student body and general SC community should know about this planning process as there is very little to no reasonable space to build upon without creating great environmental consequences. I understand our school must grow as more and more students join the "slug life", I love this university and deeply appreciate my experiences here. However I firmly believe that we should not build on upper campus for multiple reasons that I will not lay out here, because you're probably not taking me seriously as a student; we just come and go from the campus. Thank you for creating this survey, please make the planning process TRANSPARENT. 124. It all comes down to cost. UCSC Housing is astronomically more expensive than off campus. 125. It doesn't make sense to live on campus with the ridiculous prices. I can pay around $500 less a month for a single and have access to my own kitchen, bathroom, and house. 126. It is expensive to live in a non-dorm-like unit on campus.

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127. it is great 128. It is impossible to live in Santa Cruz on the Teaching Assistant salary I make. I have to work a 2nd job and take out student loans. My place is the most affordable place I could find, and it's around $1000 a month plus utilities. TAs need to get a raise or be offered affordable, non-invasive living situations on campus. For what campus offers, it is way cheaper and more pleasant to take my chances with a landlord off campus. There is no way I could afford living on campus on my TA salary. I make about $17K a year. 129. It is totally inappropriate to offer campus housing to graduate students for which rent is higher than their monthly income. unbelievable. 130. It is unappealing to live on campus because I live about minutes away in a single bedroom apartment with a living room, kitchen, my own porch, and close to downtown and it's significantly less than something of this size would be on campus. I barely make it by as is but it is so worth it. 131. It is way too expensive to live on campus. When i look back at the costs to what i now pay off campus, i am amazed that i was able to pay it off. The food also provided on campus is not satisfying. I also do not like the fact that RA's are always involved with our personal affairs. I want to be able to do what I want in my room since I am the one paying and sleeping in there. I do not believe that someone should have the right to tell me what to do in there since they are not the ones paying for it. 132. It just costs too much for the little service it offers. 133. It should be affordable for all students. 134. It would be great if there were university subsidized apartment housing (one-two bedrooms, single room occupancy) for reentry students. The cost of housing in this area is horrendous, and has caused me to incur the vast majority of my student loan debt. SF State has some great off, but near, campus housing options for students. 135. It would be very convenient that Financial Aid would covert housing expenses, or at least a percentage of it. 136. It's expensive as all hell. 137. It's far too expensive. And the requirement to purchase a meal plan while living in an on campus apartment seems unnecessary. For dorms I can understand since there's no kitchen and there's a liability issue there. With an on campus apartment, theres a kitchen. I cooked for myself everyday and ended up with a lot of leftover meals at the end of each quarter and they'd just go to waste, a very very expensive waste. 138. it's far too expensive. There should be scholarships offered to impoverished people of color 139. It's gonna suck next year, pleace out bitches! 140. It's rediculous to require a meal plan. Kids should learn to cook for themselves or atleast have the option to. I live off campus because on campus is too expensive. 141. It's significantly cheaper to rent a single occupancy room off campus and be closer to stores and recreation. Bus service to campus on nights and weekends is also far less frequent than desired. It makes more sense to live off campus and not be limited by transportation. 142. It's so expensive. About 1k+ a month when people can be leaving off campus for half of the price. 143. It's very expensive to live on campus..... 144. It's way too expensive for the quality of life and the size of the rooms. You shouldn't be required to eat the dining hall food, which is of terribly low quality. Also, the architects made porter feel like a prison. 145. It's way too expensive for what you get and you are forced to get a meal plan which is awful.

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EXHIBIT C2: SURVEY COMMENTS

146. It's way too expensive to live on-campus 147. It's way too expensive! Because of that, rent off campus is also inflated! 148. It's way too expensive. I pay half what I did living in on campus apartments as I do living in an off campus apartment. The campus housing system is supposed to provide cheaper housing, it fails to do this. Also meal plans should be optional across the board. Many students in the apartments resort to wasting their 55 meal plans and waste thousands of dollars. 149. Joe DuPage is terrible. Replace him 150. Just focus on more cost effective housing and making sure the dining hall is always fully stocked with food. 151. Just make them more affordable. Definitely more comfortable for the students. More spacious. There shouldn't be 3 students in what use to be a room for 2. That's just not right. 152. keep the camper park. That is where I would prefer to live. 153. KEEP THE TRAILER PARK!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 154. Lacking campus community. Too expensive. Meal plan is a rip off (55 day costs more than purchasing 55 individual meals) 155. Less expensive housing and fewer regulations would make it much more appealing 156. Lived in grad housing my first year, but it became too expensive and I wanted to live with friends/my boyfriend. Now I have a dog too. 157. Living on campus is too expensive. I get more privacy and freedom off campus, even though I have to live in a smaller place. 158. Living on campus my first year as a graduate student was a terrible experience. I lived in graduate student housing. The units were filthy upon arriving, poorly maintained, and worst of all TOO EXPENSIVE. I was renting one room in a 4bedroom apartment for $900 at the time (2009-2010). When I moved out I was able to find a one bedroom apartment close to downtown for the same price. It is my perception as well as that of others that UCSC is exploiting students, particularly international students that cannot find alternative housing, for additional revenue. Furthermore, the staff at student housing has always been unpleasant, stubborn, and not understanding: at one point, one employee suggested I borrow money when I could not pay my exorbitant rent, rather than grant me an extension. Shame on you people. 159. Lower costs would make on-campus much more attractive to a lot of people. A lot of people that live off-campus care more about cost than being close to campus 160. Make housing cheaper and more like offf campus housing with the convenience of being on-campus. 161. Make it cheaper. Maybe then I would consider living there. Just a suggestion. 162. Make it more affordable and earth-friendly. DO NOT build more housing or anything else that requires fossil fuels. 163. Make it more affordable for students 164. Make sure the building design is correct for Santa Cruz's wet climate! 165. Many irrelevant questions for off campus dwellers. 166. Maybe if the rent for each housing option were more reasonable, more students would prefer to live on-campus. 167. Meal plans so expensive. My RA freshmen year was so terrible 168. more affordable housing wether it is on campus or OFF CAMPUS but close to campus 169. more clarity for the students who receive financial aid -- I wanted to live on-campus when I first transferred but could not because financial aid and housing could not tell me whether my financial aid could cover the costs. 170. More housing means more cars on campus.

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171. Most people don't want to live on campus. Living off campus and out in the surrounding community in a real house with other people is a great learning experience and teaches students a lot of life lessons. It is important in becoming an adult. Living on campus stunts this growth and should not be supported by the university. If you want to help UC students you should instead spend this money on making it easier and more affordable to live off of campus. 172. My answers (and preference to live off campus) was not because the on campus living is bad. It is almost solely just because I like a bigger house in a neighborhood instead of on campus living and rules. The on campus housing program is great! 173. My first year I lived in an eight person apartment in Kresge, and it was the best living situation I could have asked for. I love the layout of Kresge, it is very community building and friendly. I loved it. 174. My main concern is the price 175. My main motivation to move off was cost. All the new on-campus housing options presented in this survey, and those currently available, were extremely expensive compared to living off campus in a nicer facility. 176. My number one turn-away from campus housing: You must have a meal plan. Why can't we have access to kitchens instead? 177. My sister went to SFSU, and lived in their on campus apartment style housing. Was two double occupancy rooms, with a little living room and kitchen between the two rooms. Also, right next to each room was 1 bathroom so 1 bathroom was shared by only 2 people, not 4 like in your diagrams. I thought it was and looked nice and felt big enough. Their rent, including a meal plan, was around 1200 dollars a month. What seems crazy is how much more they were offering, and at a cheaper price than these new housing options UCSC is thinking about, especially because it was in San Francisco. My advice would to be have a lower price for your housing, lowering your price would increase demand for your housing, meaning more people would choose to live there instead of cheaper options off campus. 178. My spouse has mental disabilities which prevent her from living in shared housing, and is not a student at UCSC, but rather at Cabrillo. I understand that FSH is a viable option for us to live together on campus, but the rate is simply too high given our current situation. I wish there was a cheaper alternative where we could live together on campus with only two residents in a one bedroom apartment that was cheaper than FSH. 179. My UCSC housing experience was totally positive! I moved off-campus after three years, to (1) live closer to the ocean; (2) experience living in the town; (3) reduce the costs a bit. I have seen a number of other university housing facilities in other schools in California and elsewhere, and UCSC housing facilities are definitely amongst the very best. 180. None of these options are grad-appropriate, and are all severely overpriced. 181. Non-resident/Alien is not a race or ethnic background…that was offensive and I would suggest taking that option off. 182. On campus housing is too expensive. 183. On campus studio housing, with a full kitchen + very quiet noises from nearby renters would be perfect. 184. On-campus housing is very convenient (except if you don't have a car to get places since the METRO system is often inadequate) but expensive, there should be a way to balance out convenience and its expense. 185. One of the main things I hated were how invasive the CSOs were. I was written up twice for no reason my sophomore year. 186. Perhaps consider building housing where the current trailer park is located. It would be a better use of space as it is already used for housing and can be built upwards. Sorry to the trailer park residents. 187. Please cut top admin salaries and provide decent housing at realistic rates, or increase graduate salaries.

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188. Please do not tear down any forest are surrounding UCSC in order to pursue housing plans. This would make me very disappointed in UCSC, unwilling to make donations as an Alumni, and in my opinion would reflect poorly upon UCSC's mission to be "eco-friendly". 189. Please don't build up into upper campus. I feel as though the current housing on campus is sufficient. 190. Please don't expand housing/colleges (ie College 11) into uppercampus if that is what this survey is for. I don't think that it is necessary and could be environmentally detrimental and detrimental to students....there are so many lack of funds going to education (TA, professors, etc.) as is... 191. Please Include your consideration for access to housing for AB540 students that cannot afford to live on campus because of lack of financial aid. 192. Please keep in mind that for some students housing is extremely hard to pay for. 193. Please let me wins prize. I've been doing surveys since my freeman year and no prize yet 194. Please lower these costs, I'd like to not have to sell my soul for a place to stay on campus 195. Please make org. and co-op housing 196. Please please PLEASE don't expand into Upper Campus! How about into lower campus (near the Village) instead? 197. Prices are far too high. As a graduate student, my take home pay is about $1600/month, so I cannot afford to pay the $1100+ for a shared apartment on-campus. UCSC should build much more housing and also find a way to charge less for it -- at our salaries, we shouldn't be asked to pay more than $600-700/month for housing. 198. Prices are ridiculous for students who cant pay for it even with financial aid. Had I lived on campus, my academic standing would have probably been in the 3.8 range. I spend too much time driving here than I should. I would never be able to afford housing here. Ever. Its cheap to drive but sometimes I question if it's worth all I am going through. I just hope that someday it becomes cheap so all freshman could live on campus their first year. Anyways, that is just me 199. providing more various housing styles to let students choose 200. RA's are too anal about alcohol and weed, I was never written up, and I do believe that big and loud dorm parties need to be shut down. However I saw way too much harassment of people just trying to have a good time. Isn't it better than adventurous college students drink casually on campus(safely) rather than have to venture to houses they don't know? 201. Rates are unreasonably high. 202. Rates should be lower 203. Rent is incredibly expensive in Santa Cruz. We need AFFORDABLE graduate student on-campus housing or off-campus housing subsidies. 204. Requiring a meal plan when you like in an apartment or unit with a kitchen is ridiculous. It costs a fortune and there is no point if I can prepare my own meals. Have the OPTION to have one sounds more reasonable.... Close parking (not remote) also needs to be increased.... LOVE the idea of studios ON CAMPUS. If you would of have those sooner, I would have lived on campus all my years here. 205. Rooms should be bigger, especially triples in dorms. 206. [email protected] 207. Seriously ya'll for what you pay and for what you get... I swear im $30K in the hole and that's mainly for housing, both on and off campus, and so there's that. 208. Should allow pets 209. Should be more affordable for AB540 Students.

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210. So expensive ): 211. So expensive. I moved off campus and I am barely affording rent for a single. 212. Some people are complete assholes and make noise complaints for little to no reason. The CSO's who respond to these complaints act more like police officers who are out to arrest some one. This creates a stressful environment where punishment seems too severe and too common. Also, they need to learn how to spell. 213. Some RA's are power hungry and take advantage of said power 214. Sorry, to be blunt. But these housing options fucking suck. Most of my cohort is in their late 20s and early 30s with partners, many cannot afford to live in Santa Cruz; it seems a bit ridiculously to be asking us to be sharing bedrooms. We're not children. Furthermore, if I had known about the lack of housing options at UCSC, and the low quality of those available I seriously would've reconsidered my enrollment. I moved here from New York, and I pay basically the same amount in rent and utilities as I did to live one subway stop from Manhattan. It is ludicrous that Santa Cruz rents are as expensive as New York, but then the market price, lack up supply, high demand, is not in the university's fault; however, it is even more absurd that the salaries for TAs are so low and that the university still cannot provide adequate housing for grad students at a reasonable price. They hardly better than slum lords. 215. Stop cramming kids into smaller rooms. 216. Studio and one-bedroom apartments can and should be made available for less than the prices quoted here. The university should consider purchasing units in town if possible. Rents cited here are higher than they need to be. There must be a way for the university to help foster affordable housing that also includes independent living, as opposed to having roommates or living in an en suite setting. 217. Survey questions/answers did not fit well with my situation—living off-campus with spouse and children. 218. Thank you for seeking help in improvements for the future! 219. The apartments on campus are actually very appealing housing options, but the requirement of a meal plan is stupid. If you have access to a kitchen, it shouldn't be necessary. 220. The big aspect is just price. 221. The biggest drawback, other than price which is worth it for the convenience, is that pets are not allowed. Pets are necessary for many students; for example, students with depression for whom a pet is often very helpful. 222. The Camper Park is a fantastic, safe, creative space that students are lucky to have as an option. The only thing is the increased rent....if anything, rent should be diminishing. Students worked together to create such a space decades ago. To this day, there is a community of people who feel connected through that space. I've met UCSC alumns who lived in the park, and it is always a pleasure. Students have maintained the trailers over the years- paying for new tires and other features. So, why raise the rent? Housing is great in Stevenson for Freshman. It allows for a great social environment. People I know in Stevenson are friends beyond college. The new porter dorms don't allow for that. The rooms are too isolated. 223. The campus is very convenient to greater Santa Cruz, and the public transportation uphill is extensive. As a result, I think that campus dormitories compete on a more or less equal footing with off-campus apartments. 224. The common wisdom among graduate students is that on-campus housing is very expensive for the size of the rooms, the speed of the internet, the mold in the units, and the distance to reasonably-priced, reliably available (even during breaks!) food. Only the clueless live on campus.

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225. The cost of housing is ridiculously expensive at UCSC. It is one of the most expensive housing programs of all universities in the U.S. Given that on-campus housing is mandated for year 1, all efforts should be made to reduce this cost. The cost of housing should not rival the cost of classes. 226. The cost of living and not having a kitchen to cook my own meals deterred me from choosing to live on campus. 227. The cost of the dining plan is what makes living on campus so expensive, if there was any way to reduce this cost students would be more likely to live on campus 228. The cost of UCSC student housing is not competitive with the off campus housing rental market. It is cheaper to live off campus 229. The cost to live on campus at UCSC is absurd given the quality of the accommodations (which feel institutional and not very comfortable). The only people I know who live on campus do so because they value the convenience and their financial aid will cover most if not all of it. 230. The cost to me is the most important aspect: Whether ore not it is affordable 231. The cost was the biggest deterrent for me, but I really love the social aspect of on campus housing. Living so close to students and friends make it really convenient and easy to socialize outside of my usual group of friends. 232. The current graduate housing option is insufficient: the apartments are run-down and too expensive. The housing possibilities listed in this survey are also quite expensive: it is impossible to afford rent of, for example, $1,700 per month for a one-bedroom studio with the salary of a grad student TA. I support student housing that is much more affordable. The rent market in Santa Cruz, as we know, is high; however, the costs of living on campus are much higher than what is available in town, off-campus. 233. The housing is really unequal. I lived in an Oakes apt my freshman year in a single but I paid the same amount as someone from cowell who has way better facilities. It seems like before you add even more housing, try making the current housing livable 234. The housing options are all too expensive for me to live on campus. The rooms are to small and overpriced for a grad student budget. My location within walking distance of downtown and the beach is equivalently priced as some of the campus rooms. I would have no motivation to pay the same/more for being in a less wonderful location. 235. The housing program sucks in general, and it is ridiculous to expect such high rates for such shitty tiny rooms. 236. The issue is not solely how many people crammed into one room but also the size and availability of common space. Space is both a matter of how many people are in a room as it is the amount and availability of common space. My frosh dorms at C10 did not have very much shared spaces and they were all fairly small. 237. The largest obstacles to living on campus for me are: Private accommodations, price, parking options, and regulations involving pets and/or visitors. 238. The main deterrent for a prospective graduate student in deciding between UCSC and another graduate program would be cost of living expenses directly related to housing costs. Accommodations off campus are ideal (private room, shared bathroom, with laundry and kitchen access), however it takes much invested effort to find affordable accommodations ($800/month rent or less). I think incoming prospective students struggle with finding housing more than anyone, and successful housing experiences are (in part) key to your initial success in acclimating to graduate school. Incoming prospective students are not as well-integrated into the community with available affordable housing. As a result, I think UCSC would recruit more incoming prospective graduate students if the University guaranteed affordable housing on

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campus for the first year of graduate school, until these students are able to find affordable off-campus housing more efficiently. 239. The main factor for me and many other students is cost. Although there is more financial aid when living on campus, sometimes it is not comparable to living off campus. There should also be a living arrangement option of living with a partner/spouse. 240. The main issue I decided to live off campus was because there were too many rules enforced. The CSO's on campus did not provide a safe environment and knocked on my door in the middle of the night when we were not doing anything wrong. I appreciate that there are improvements being made to UCSC's Housing Program, but I would never live on campus because of the strict rules. 241. The main reason I live off campus (and many of my friends) is the substantial difference in price. 242. The new designs for housing would be a great idea at least for the apartments. 243. The only problem that ucsc housing should focus is the cost. 244. The options provided are unreasonably expensive for the living situations described. The benefit of on-campus housing, besides living closer to the university, should be to allow students to find reasonably priced housing in one of the most expensive areas of the country. 245. The plans you offered towards the end were ridiculously expensive. The campus should subsidize the rents to provide especially grad students- more reasonable housing opportunities. 246. The prices to live on campus are just not competitive, especially on a graduate student salary. 247. The pricing of student housing is ridiculous. I don't understand how the school can justify charging the prices they do when students can find off campus housing for much, much less. My share of the rent and utilities off campus still costs less than it would if I were to live in a triple occupancy room on campus. And then you require a meal plan on top of that? Which is another few thousand? I would never live on campus because of the pricing. 248. The programs are good for freshman, but the cost is too expensive, especially for people like myself who are paying for college on their own. Also, having so few options with a kitchen is regrettable. I love to cook and groceries are the more economical choice and they give a much needed freedom for us older students. 249. The proposed housing options are either just as expensive, and in some cases, more expensive than off-campus housing. On a public university, subsidized by by taxes, housing should be less expensive than its for-profit competitors in the private sector. As a grad student making a little over $17,000 a year (before taxes), how can I honestly afford housing ranging for $900-$1,200 a month? It is absurd to charge similar prices as the slum lords of Santa Cruz. 250. The proposed units looked nice, but were out of my price range. I'm a teaching assistant, and would not be able to afford rent + meal plan or rent for the optional meal plan housing. 251. The reason I live off campus right now was because there was no available housing on campus for me and my 3 other friends. 252. The rule of not having dogs on campus is ridiculous. 253. The thing that's different about off campus and on campus housing is if you split up the room with more people, the rent is stationary and split evenly or decided upon by the residents. On campus if there's another person in the room the school's making more money and the students living together aren't benefiting significantly from their space sharing. Also the fact that you have to pay more for a room with a kitchen because you can opt out of a meal option is not right, it's like an eating healthy or culturally tax. Sure it cost more to build a kitchen, but why does each student year after year have to pay

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for that cost when it is basically initially paid off with the first students. All students regardless of their room type should have access to a kitchen, think about the detrimental effects of a student who is more often than not a young adult, not having the option to cook for themselves, leaving college and never learning that life skill, that's when unhealthy eating habits are born as people go for the cheap and quick meals. P.s. In porter's building A, the kitchen that is off limits to residents has carpet on the floor. Might want to fix that or else who knows what will grow. 254. The website is EXTREMELY unhelpful. I spent two hours on the website trying to find typical apartment layouts for ANY college, and ended up with one barely useful pdf from Kresge (it didn't have any apartment layouts other than "typical flats" when I was looking for J/K apartment layouts). If you want more people to live on campus, I would make useful information more readily available. Secondly, please make it more clear when the housing accommodations will be established. NO WHERE on any website of UCSC does it say when housing is assigned to continuing students and this is very frustrating. 255. There are only 2 options of the units available that are within the affordable range for my salary as a PhD student and for the same price I can get much more space and amenities in off campus housing. Please reconsider the housing plans. 256. There is a wide variety of housing in different locations (around campus) which is appealing 257. There needs to be maintenance on the steps at stevenson dorms 258. There needs to be some allowance for pets (dogs) for graduate student or family housing. We would have gladly lived on campus if we could live there as a family and my dog is part of our family. 259. There should be an option for apartment living to not have to purchase a meal plan 260. these are all far too expensive. do you realize what graduate students are being paid, here? this is pathetic and distressing that you would even consider pricing the only dignified options for housing situations that give privacy to adult students above the wage of the student workers at the university. shame on you, ucsc. 261. These housing options are completely unaffordable. This is insulting. UCSC does not pay graduate students enough to even live on campus. Grad students need to be paid a living wage and need access to affordable housing so that we can do our jobs. Otherwise we will lose students. 262. This survey was designed terribly, and does not take into account the differing needs of graduate students compared with undergraduate students. I am DISMAYED to learn of the pricing on these new options. The 2-bedroom shared apartment-which is the only realistic option for a single graduate student should have a separate kitchen and living room, not combined, like a real apartment--IS NOT AFFORDABLE ON A TA SALARY. This needs to be taken into consideration. Please see the comparable housing options available at UC Irvine, which are much more attractive and start at $710/month, rather than $1100+: http://housing.uci.edu/rates/Rates.html. I am EXTREMELY DISAPPOINTED in these options, none of which are graduate appropriate, and I hope housing plans to reconsider, and consult with living arrangements and prices on other UC campuses. I don't want to hear about the debt capacity; the Arboretum is in the red every year, yet we allow its existence to continue--similarly, we should subsidize the housing of our graduate students, our front-line educators. Shame on you UCSC, once again. 263. Though I would have loved to live on campus, the high cost of rent, utilities, and additional fees, make it impossible for myself, my partner and our child to live on campus. 264. UCSC campus housing is expensive as is. Money would be better spent improving existing housing conditions to make them more affordable or at least more livable to the extent to justify the high price required to live on campus. New housing would increase the maintenance costs and result in an increase in either tuition, housing costs, or both, a

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situation that would likely reduce the appeal of more students which would be detrimental to the apparent goal of increasing the student body. 265. UCSC can't possibly compete with the prices of off campus housing. You may be able to offer nicer accommodations, but student's aren't so interested in niceness. If you can offer a single room with a shared bathroom, no meal plan, etc for $500, you may see more interest. But my current off-campus situation is equivalent to what you want more than $1000 for. There's no way you could convince me to me. 266. UCSC housing is extremely expensive. I am financially unable to pay the top shelf fees. When rent comes down I'll consider it. 267. UCSC is already a very beautiful campus. I don't think that the aesthetics of the campus/housing are and issue! 268. UCSC needs to either stop over-selling R permits or create more parking spaces. The parking permits are already ridiculously overpriced and it's absolutely absurd how full all the lots get. This is probably the only major issue I had with the campus throughout my entire undergrad years. a.

UCSC should also offer more sustainable living arrangements

269. UCSC should have off-campus student housing. A designated area for students to all live in the same vicinity. Apartments, condos, and/or houses. 270. UCSC should NOT build new housing on campus. Destroying more of our campus will ruin the environment, as well as UCSC's reputation for sustainability. If there is a greater need for more on-campus housing, the university ought to retrofit current housing. That is, UCSC should build up, not out. This will reduce the need for small-triples (which are a terrible housing option, as well as a fire hazard) and maintain our beautiful campus. 271. UCSC should not delve further into upper campus in order to construct more housing. An increased inflow of students into UCSC is not sustainable and decreases the quality of the education offered. If you expand the housing program you will destroy more of both UCSC's natural and learning environments. By not accepting an increasing number of students each year and keeping the acceptance rate constant, demand for UCSC will grow as will its prestige. This will lead to a better learning environment overall as the quality of student will improve. If you must, raise the acceptance rate in five to ten years once UCSC has become significantly more selective; the more selective the school, the more people want to attend. Then you will be able to boast a more selective acceptance rate while also accepting more students. You must also make student housing more affordable. Living off campus I am paying one-third of what I paid last year exclusively for housing and am receiving much more for it. 272. UCSC should offer housing subsidies for single parents. I have a teenage ward, and could not afford family student housing with my grad stipend alone 273. Unreasonably high cost, and shitty dining hall food. Living on campus is torture for those reasons 274. We need Greek Housing!! A lot of students have greek rows, and chapter houses, and UCSC doesn't seem to show any support to their Greek lettered student orgs. Its a shame. 275. We shouldn't be required to have a meal plan if living on campus. 276. When graduate student TAs make $1700/month, none of these options are feasible. On campus housing is insultingly expensive and unrealistic for graduate students. Please recommend that UCSC offer affordable housing for its students and workers. 277. When I lived on Campus, the CSO's were very militant and aggressive. They clearly prioritized being petty watchdogs over actually trying to assure the safety of the students. Second year myself and my housemates experienced actions like

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the surveillance of our apartment by CSO's on a regular basis when they had no evidence of any violations, and the unlawful search of our apartment by the UCPD and a CSO with a personal ego-driven grudge against one of my housemates. They jointly interrogated him after he had already been traumatized by several recent events, until he had a full panic attack. It was this nerve-wracking and continual surveillance and terrorism alone that led me to move off campus, and that precipitated a mental breakdown in my former housemate. 278. When will they be completed if completed 279. While I would prefer a single bedroom in a four bedroom apartment, I could not afford to pay even close to $1000 a month. For that reason I will almost ALWAYS choose to live off campus. However, I think eliminating required meal plans for students living in units with kitchens is a great idea. 280. While on campus housing is insanely convenient, having CSO/RA baby sitters is annoying. Also the on campus rent is obscenely expensive. Also the crown living conditions really suck. Mold everywhere. 281. Wifi has always been hit or miss in housing. Wish it would be faster (eg, able to accommodate all the students trying to access it). 282. With the options presented in an earlier question and I was a freshmen or sophomore, I would choose a suite or a 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom apartment. 283. Would have preferred to live on campus as both our kids attend the child center. We didn't apply as we have two cats. Would have paid additional deposit had it been an option. 284. Would love updated family housing. 285. You did not accommodate me my first year with residency preferences, and finding housing on campus last year that was not a dorm was impossible. Something needs to change. You need more apartments or something because I wanted to live on campus, but was not going to live in the dorms again. 286. You guys need to pressure the city to make student housing sections in the city to make housing more available to us. Additionally cramming more freshmen into triples and quads is not a solution. a.

You need more housing. Don't cram people into those tiny ass rooms. It is not enjoyable for anyone.

287. You really need to offer cheaper housing, I am most likely not coming here next year for that exact reason. 288. You should not force on campus residents to purchase a meal plan. Forcing students (primarily those with perfectly good kitchens) to purchase on campus meals inflates rent costs, and decreases quality of life (mass produced food is generally not that great). 289. You should not require people to answer questions on unsecured pages. Developing upper campus for housing is a TERRIBLE IDEA. 290. Your apartment rent prices are too high for the area. Comparable cheaper units can be found off-campus, nearer to downtown. 291. Your housing prices are greatly inflated per person. You can find much more cost effective living in town, and you don't have to share a bedroom. 292. Your housing program is unrealisticallly expensive

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D1

Exhibit Phase IA Financial Model

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING PROGRAM - PHASE IA

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Residential Space Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Units

Subtotal - Residential Space

48 0 10 30 18 50 156

Community / Support Space 6.00 Community Spaces (7% of Residential Space ) 7.00 Support Spaces (2% of Residential Space ) Subtotal - Community / Support Space Other Space 8.00 Non-assignable Spaces (Efficiency Factor of 70% ) Subtotal - Other Space

Development Metrics Total Residential Space Total Community / Support Space Total NASF NASF / Bed

Residents / Unit NASF / Unit 1 375 1 500 2 555 2 600 4 650 4 990

Total NASF 18,000 0 5,550 18,000 11,700 49,500 102,750

Total Beds

48 0 20 60 72 200 400

Total NASF 7,193 2,055 9,248 Total Non-ASF 47,999 47,999

Program SF 102,750 9,248 111,998 280

Program % 64% 6% 70%

Total Other Space Total GSF GSF / Bed

47,999 159,996 400

30% 100%

Total Revenue Generating SF Total Non-Revenue Generating SF Total GSF

23,550 136,446 159,996

15% 85% 100%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING DEVELOPMENT BUDGET - PHASE IA

1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03

Building Summary Total Bed Count Gross Square Footage Construction Duration (months)

2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07

Hard Costs Enclosed Building Costs Site Costs Utilities Costs Infrastructure costs Landscaping Costs Construction Contingency Parking Costs

2.08 Inflation Allowance

400 159,996 18

$350 Per Sq. Ft.

0 $3,000 3.5% 2.0

No. of Spaces Per Space Rate Yrs. To MidPt.

Subtotal: Hard Costs 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07

Soft Costs Architectural and Engineering Fees Additonal A&E Services Miscellaneous Fees Furniture Fixtures, and Equipment (FF&E) FF&E Tax Project Contingency Development Manager Fee

$55,998,750 Included Above Included Above Included Above Included Above Included Above $0 $3,988,511 $59,987,261

8.5% of Hard Costs 7.0% of A&E Budget $3,500 0.0% 15.0% 0.0%

Per Bed % of FF&E of the above of the above

$5,098,917 $356,924 $1,500,000 $1,400,000 $0 $10,251,465 $0

Subtotal: Soft Costs

$18,607,307

Subtotal: Hard and Soft Costs

$78,594,568

Total Project Cost

$78,594,568

Development Metrics Project Cost Percentages Hard Costs Soft Costs Cost Per Bed Hard Cost Per Bed Soft Cost Per Bed Cost Per Square Foot Hard Cost Per Square Foot Soft Cost Per Square Foot

100.0% 76.3% 23.7% $196,486 $149,968 $46,518 $491 $375 $116

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING OPERATING REVENUE ASSUMPTIONS - PHASE IA

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Rental Revenue at 100% Occupancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Total Beds

48 0 20 60 72 200

Subtotal - Rental Revenue

7.00 8.00 9.00 10.00 11.00 12.00

Rental Revenue at 3% Vacancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Rent Per Academic Year $13,050 $14,850 $12,600 $14,400 $13,050 $13,950

400 Total Beds

1 0 1 2 2 6

Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense

12

Total Rental Revenue (less 5% vacancy expe

56

Other Revenue 11.00 Summer Conference Revenue 12.00 Other (Damanges, application, cancelation, laundry, etc.) Total Other Revenue Revenue Escalation Assumption Occupancy Assumption

Rent Per Quarter $4,350 $4,950 $4,200 $4,800 $4,350 $4,650

Total $626,400 $0 $252,000 $864,000 $939,600 $2,790,000 $5,472,000

Rent Per Rent Per Quarter Academic Year $4,350 $13,050 $4,950 $14,850 $4,200 $12,600 $4,800 $14,400 $4,350 $13,050 $4,650 $13,950

Total $18,792 $0 $7,560 $25,920 $28,188 $83,700 $164,160

$47,391

$94,783

$5,307,840

1.00%

Total $200,000 $53,078 $253,078

4.0% 97.0%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING OPERATING EXPENSE ASSUMPTIONS - PHASE IA

Building Summary

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00

Operating Expenses Admin & Clerical (Personnel) Housekeeping Communications Repair & Maintenance Utilities Miscellaneous Student Programming Community Safety General Expenses Total Operating Expenses - PHASE IA

Non-operating Expenses 10.00 Replacement Reserves Total Non-operating Expenses Operating Expense Escalation Assumption

Sq. Ft. 159,996

Bed 400

Total

$1.05 $1.57 $0.87 $1.56 $1.52 $0.05 $0.78 $0.43 $5.72

$418 $629 $348 $624 $607 $21 $310 $170 $2,288

$167,200 $251,600 $139,200 $249,600 $242,800 $8,400 $124,000 $68,000 $915,200

$13.54

$5,415

$2,166,000

$13.24

$5,294

$2,117,600

$13.24

$5,294

$2,117,600

3.0%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING DEBT ASSUMPTIONS - PHASE IA

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Debt Assumptions Current Year Year of Opening Amount Financed Interest Rate Debt Term Annual Debt Service Term

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Year 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046

2014 2017 $78,594,568 6.0% 30 $5,709,810 Beg. Balance $78,594,568 $77,600,432 $76,546,648 $75,429,637 $74,245,606 $72,990,532 $71,660,154 $70,249,954 $68,755,141 $67,170,640 $65,491,068 $63,710,723 $61,823,556 $59,823,160 $57,702,740 $55,455,094 $53,072,590 $50,547,136 $47,870,154 $45,032,554 $42,024,697 $38,836,369 $35,456,742 $31,874,336 $28,076,987 $24,051,796 $19,785,094 $15,262,390 $10,468,323 $5,386,613

Interest $4,715,674 $4,656,026 $4,592,799 $4,525,778 $4,454,736 $4,379,432 $4,299,609 $4,214,997 $4,125,308 $4,030,238 $3,929,464 $3,822,643 $3,709,413 $3,589,390 $3,462,164 $3,327,306 $3,184,355 $3,032,828 $2,872,209 $2,701,953 $2,521,482 $2,330,182 $2,127,404 $1,912,460 $1,684,619 $1,443,108 $1,187,106 $915,743 $628,099 $323,197

Principle $994,136 $1,053,784 $1,117,011 $1,184,032 $1,255,073 $1,330,378 $1,410,201 $1,494,813 $1,584,501 $1,679,571 $1,780,346 $1,887,166 $2,000,396 $2,120,420 $2,247,645 $2,382,504 $2,525,454 $2,676,982 $2,837,601 $3,007,857 $3,188,328 $3,379,628 $3,582,405 $3,797,350 $4,025,191 $4,266,702 $4,522,704 $4,794,066 $5,081,710 $5,386,613

Payment $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810 $5,709,810

End. Balance $77,600,432 $76,546,648 $75,429,637 $74,245,606 $72,990,532 $71,660,154 $70,249,954 $68,755,141 $67,170,640 $65,491,068 $63,710,723 $61,823,556 $59,823,160 $57,702,740 $55,455,094 $53,072,590 $50,547,136 $47,870,154 $45,032,554 $42,024,697 $38,836,369 $35,456,742 $31,874,336 $28,076,987 $24,051,796 $19,785,094 $15,262,390 $10,468,323 $5,386,613 $0

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ OPERATING PRO FORMA - PHASE IA Operating Pro Forma Operating Revenue Rental Revenue Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single) Subtotal - Rental Revenue

2017

1

2018

2

2019

3

2020

4

2021

5

2022

6

2023

7

2024

8

2025

9

2026

10

$651,456 $0 $262,080 $898,560 $977,184 $2,901,600 $5,690,880

$677,514 $0 $272,563 $934,502 $1,016,271 $3,017,664 $5,918,515

$704,615 $0 $283,466 $971,882 $1,056,922 $3,138,371 $6,155,256

$732,799 $0 $294,804 $1,010,758 $1,099,199 $3,263,905 $6,401,466

$762,111 $0 $306,597 $1,051,188 $1,143,167 $3,394,462 $6,657,525

$792,596 $0 $318,860 $1,093,236 $1,188,894 $3,530,240 $6,923,826

$824,300 $0 $331,615 $1,136,965 $1,236,449 $3,671,450 $7,200,779

$857,272 $0 $344,879 $1,182,444 $1,285,907 $3,818,308 $7,488,810

$891,563 $0 $358,675 $1,229,741 $1,337,344 $3,971,040 $7,788,362

$927,225 $0 $373,022 $1,278,931 $1,390,838 $4,129,882 $8,099,897

$19,544 $0 $7,862 $26,957 $29,316 $87,048 $170,726

$20,325 $0 $8,177 $28,035 $30,488 $90,530 $177,555

$21,138 $0 $8,504 $29,156 $31,708 $94,151 $184,658

$21,984 $0 $8,844 $30,323 $32,976 $97,917 $192,044

$22,863 $0 $9,198 $31,536 $34,295 $101,834 $199,726

$23,778 $0 $9,566 $32,797 $35,667 $105,907 $207,715

$24,729 $0 $9,948 $34,109 $37,093 $110,143 $216,023

$25,718 $0 $10,346 $35,473 $38,577 $114,549 $224,664

$26,747 $0 $10,760 $36,892 $40,120 $119,131 $233,651

$27,817 $0 $11,191 $38,368 $41,725 $123,896 $242,997

$5,520,154 $263,202 $5,783,355

$5,740,960 $273,730 $6,014,689

$5,970,598 $284,679 $6,255,277

$6,209,422 $296,066 $6,505,488

$6,457,799 $307,909 $6,765,708

$6,716,111 $320,225 $7,036,336

$6,984,755 $333,034 $7,317,789

$7,264,146 $346,355 $7,610,501

$7,554,711 $360,209 $7,914,921

$7,856,900 $374,618 $8,231,518

$172,216 $259,148 $143,376 $257,088 $250,084 $8,652 $127,720 $70,040 $942,656 $2,230,980

$177,382 $266,922 $147,677 $264,801 $257,587 $8,912 $131,552 $72,141 $970,936 $2,297,909

$182,704 $274,930 $152,108 $272,745 $265,314 $9,179 $135,498 $74,305 $1,000,064 $2,366,847

$188,185 $283,178 $156,671 $280,927 $273,274 $9,454 $139,563 $76,535 $1,030,066 $2,437,852

$193,831 $291,673 $161,371 $289,355 $281,472 $9,738 $143,750 $78,831 $1,060,968 $2,510,988

$199,646 $300,424 $166,212 $298,035 $289,916 $10,030 $148,062 $81,196 $1,092,797 $2,586,317

$205,635 $309,436 $171,198 $306,977 $298,613 $10,331 $152,504 $83,631 $1,125,581 $2,663,907

$211,804 $318,719 $176,334 $316,186 $307,572 $10,641 $157,079 $86,140 $1,159,348 $2,743,824

$218,158 $328,281 $181,624 $325,671 $316,799 $10,960 $161,792 $88,725 $1,194,128 $2,826,139

$224,703 $338,129 $187,073 $335,442 $326,303 $11,289 $166,646 $91,386 $1,229,952 $2,910,923

Net Operating Income

$3,552,375

$3,716,780

$3,888,430

$4,067,636

$4,254,720

$4,450,019

$4,653,882

$4,866,677

$5,088,782

$5,320,595

Debt Service Debt Coverage Ratio

$5,709,810 0.62

$5,709,810 0.65

$5,709,810 0.68

$5,709,810 0.71

$5,709,810 0.75

$5,709,810 0.78

$5,709,810 0.82

$5,709,810 0.85

$5,709,810 0.89

$5,709,810 0.93

Non-Operating Expense Replacement Reserves Property Tax (3.267% of value) Total Non-Operating Expense

$2,181,128 $0 $2,181,128

$2,246,562 $0 $2,246,562

$2,313,959 $0 $2,313,959

$2,383,377 $0 $2,383,377

$2,454,879 $0 $2,454,879

$2,528,525 $0 $2,528,525

$2,604,381 $0 $2,604,381

$2,682,512 $0 $2,682,512

$2,762,988 $0 $2,762,988

$2,845,877 $0 $2,845,877

Net Cash Flow Cumulative Net Cash Flow

($4,338,563) ($8,771,054)

($4,239,592) ($13,010,646)

($4,135,338) ($17,145,984)

($4,025,551) ($21,171,535)

($3,909,969) ($25,081,504)

($3,788,316) ($28,869,820)

($3,660,308) ($32,530,129)

($3,525,645) ($36,055,774)

($3,384,015) ($39,439,789)

($3,235,092) ($42,674,882)

Rental Vacancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Four-Bedroom (Single) Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense) Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense) Total Rental Revenue Total Other Revenue Total Revenue Operating Expense Admin & Clerical (Personnel) Housekeeping Communications Repair & Maintenance Utilities Miscellaneous Student Programming Community Safety General Expenses Total Operating Expenses - PHASE IA

D2

Exhibit Phase IIA Financial Model

This Page Left Intentionally Blank

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING PROGRAM - PHASE IB

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Residential Space Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single) Subtotal - Residential Space

Units

48 0 10 30 18 50 156

Community / Support Space 6.00 Community Spaces (7% of Residential Space ) 7.00 Support Spaces (2% of Residential Space ) Subtotal - Community / Support Space Other Space 8.00 Non-assignable Spaces (Efficiency Factor of 70% )

Residents / Unit NASF / Unit 1 375 1 500 2 555 2 600 4 650 4 990

Total NASF 18,000 0 5,550 18,000 11,700 49,500 102,750

Total Beds

48 0 20 60 72 200 400

Total NASF 7,193 2,055 9,248 Total Non-ASF 47,999

Subtotal - Other Space

47,999

Development Metrics Total Residential Space Total Community / Support Space Total NASF NASF / Bed

Program SF 102,750 9,248 111,998 280

Program % 64% 6% 70%

Total Other Space Total GSF GSF / Bed

47,999 159,996 400

30% 100%

Total Revenue Generating SF Total Non-Revenue Generating SF Total GSF

23,550 136,446 159,996

15% 85% 100%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING DEVELOPMENT BUDGET - PHASE IB

1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03

Building Summary Total Bed Count Gross Square Footage Construction Duration (months)

2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07

Hard Costs Enclosed Building Costs Site Costs Utilities Costs Infrastructure costs Landscaping Costs Construction Contingency Parking Costs

2.08 Inflation Allowance

400 159,996 18

$350 Per Sq. Ft.

0 $3,000 3.5% 4.0

No. of Spaces Per Space Rate Yrs. To MidPt.

Subtotal: Hard Costs 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07

Soft Costs Architectural and Engineering Fees Additonal A&E Services Miscellaneous Fees Furniture Fixtures, and Equipment (FF&E) FF&E Tax Project Contingency Development Manager Fee

$55,998,750 Included Above Included Above Included Above Included Above Included Above $0 $8,261,104 $64,259,854

8.5% of Hard Costs 7.0% of A&E Budget $3,500 0.0% 15.0% 0.0%

Per Bed % of FF&E of the above of the above

$5,462,088 $382,346 $1,500,000 $1,400,000 $0 $10,950,643 $0

Subtotal: Soft Costs

$19,695,077

Subtotal: Hard and Soft Costs

$83,954,930

Total Project Cost

$83,954,930

Development Metrics Project Cost Percentages Hard Costs Soft Costs Cost Per Bed Hard Cost Per Bed Soft Cost Per Bed Cost Per Square Foot Hard Cost Per Square Foot Soft Cost Per Square Foot

100.0% 76.5% 23.5% $209,887 $160,650 $49,238 $525 $402 $123

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING OPERATING REVENUE ASSUMPTIONS - PHASE IB

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Rental Revenue at 100% Occupancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Total Beds

48 0 20 60 72 200

Subtotal - Rental Revenue

7.00 8.00 9.00 10.00 11.00 12.00

Rental Revenue at 3% Vacancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Rent Per Academic Year $13,050 $14,850 $12,600 $14,400 $13,050 $13,950

400 Total Beds

1 0 1 2 2 6

Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense)

12

Total Rental Revenue (less 5% vacancy expen

56

Other Revenue 11.00 Summer Conference Revenue 12.00 Other (Damanges, application, cancelation, laundry, etc.) Total Other Revenue Revenue Escalation Assumption Occupancy Assumption

Rent Per Quarter $4,350 $4,950 $4,200 $4,800 $4,350 $4,650

Total $626,400 $0 $252,000 $864,000 $939,600 $2,790,000 $5,472,000

Rent Per Rent Per Quarter Academic Year $4,350 $13,050 $4,950 $14,850 $4,200 $12,600 $4,800 $14,400 $4,350 $13,050 $4,650 $13,950

Total $18,792 $0 $7,560 $25,920 $28,188 $83,700 $164,160

$47,391

$94,783

$5,307,840

1.00%

Total $200,000 $53,078 $253,078

4.0% 97.0%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING OPERATING EXPENSE ASSUMPTIONS - PHASE IB

Building Summary

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00

Operating Expenses Admin & Clerical (Personnel) Housekeeping Communications Repair & Maintenance Utilities Miscellaneous Student Programming Community Safety General Expenses Total Operating Expenses

Non-operating Expenses 10.00 Replacement Reserves Total Non-operating Expenses Operating Expense Escalation Assumption

Sq. Ft. 159,996

Bed 400

Total

$1.05 $1.57 $0.87 $1.56 $1.52 $0.05 $0.78 $0.43 $5.72

$418 $629 $348 $624 $607 $21 $310 $170 $2,288

$167,200 $251,600 $139,200 $249,600 $242,800 $8,400 $124,000 $68,000 $915,200

$13.54

$5,415

$2,166,000

$13.24

$5,294

$2,117,600

$13.24

$5,294

$2,117,600

3.0%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING DEBT ASSUMPTIONS - PHASE IB

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Debt Assumptions Current Year Year of Opening Amount Financed Interest Rate Debt Term Annual Debt Service Term

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Year 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046 2047 2048

2014 2019 $83,954,930 6.0% 30 $6,099,234 Beg. Balance $83,954,930 $82,892,992 $81,767,337 $80,574,143 $79,309,357 $77,968,684 $76,547,571 $75,041,191 $73,444,428 $71,751,860 $69,957,737 $68,055,967 $66,040,091 $63,903,262 $61,638,223 $59,237,282 $56,692,285 $53,994,588 $51,135,029 $48,103,896 $44,890,895 $41,485,115 $37,874,987 $34,048,252 $29,991,913 $25,692,194 $21,134,491 $16,303,326 $11,182,291 $5,753,995

Interest $5,037,296 $4,973,580 $4,906,040 $4,834,449 $4,758,561 $4,678,121 $4,592,854 $4,502,471 $4,406,666 $4,305,112 $4,197,464 $4,083,358 $3,962,405 $3,834,196 $3,698,293 $3,554,237 $3,401,537 $3,239,675 $3,068,102 $2,886,234 $2,693,454 $2,489,107 $2,272,499 $2,042,895 $1,799,515 $1,541,532 $1,268,069 $978,200 $670,937 $345,240

Principle $1,061,938 $1,125,655 $1,193,194 $1,264,786 $1,340,673 $1,421,113 $1,506,380 $1,596,763 $1,692,569 $1,794,123 $1,901,770 $2,015,876 $2,136,829 $2,265,039 $2,400,941 $2,544,997 $2,697,697 $2,859,559 $3,031,133 $3,213,001 $3,405,781 $3,610,127 $3,826,735 $4,056,339 $4,299,720 $4,557,703 $4,831,165 $5,121,035 $5,428,297 $5,753,995

Payment $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234 $6,099,234

End. Balance $82,892,992 $81,767,337 $80,574,143 $79,309,357 $77,968,684 $76,547,571 $75,041,191 $73,444,428 $71,751,860 $69,957,737 $68,055,967 $66,040,091 $63,903,262 $61,638,223 $59,237,282 $56,692,285 $53,994,588 $51,135,029 $48,103,896 $44,890,895 $41,485,115 $37,874,987 $34,048,252 $29,991,913 $25,692,194 $21,134,491 $16,303,326 $11,182,291 $5,753,995 $0

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ OPERATING PRO FORMA - PHASE IB Operating Pro Forma Operating Revenue Rental Revenue Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single) Subtotal - Rental Revenue

2019

3

2020

4

2021

5

2022

6

2023

7

2024

8

2025

9

2026

10

2027

11

2028

12

$704,615 $0 $283,466 $971,882 $1,056,922 $3,138,371 $6,155,256

$732,799 $0 $294,804 $1,010,758 $1,099,199 $3,263,905 $6,401,466

$762,111 $0 $306,597 $1,051,188 $1,143,167 $3,394,462 $6,657,525

$792,596 $0 $318,860 $1,093,236 $1,188,894 $3,530,240 $6,923,826

$824,300 $0 $331,615 $1,136,965 $1,236,449 $3,671,450 $7,200,779

$857,272 $0 $344,879 $1,182,444 $1,285,907 $3,818,308 $7,488,810

$891,563 $0 $358,675 $1,229,741 $1,337,344 $3,971,040 $7,788,362

$927,225 $0 $373,022 $1,278,931 $1,390,838 $4,129,882 $8,099,897

$964,314 $0 $387,942 $1,330,088 $1,446,471 $4,295,077 $8,423,893

$1,002,887 $0 $403,460 $1,383,292 $1,504,330 $4,466,880 $8,760,848

$21,138 $0 $8,504 $29,156 $31,708 $94,151 $184,658

$21,984 $0 $8,844 $30,323 $32,976 $97,917 $192,044

$22,863 $0 $9,198 $31,536 $34,295 $101,834 $199,726

$23,778 $0 $9,566 $32,797 $35,667 $105,907 $207,715

$24,729 $0 $9,948 $34,109 $37,093 $110,143 $216,023

$25,718 $0 $10,346 $35,473 $38,577 $114,549 $224,664

$26,747 $0 $10,760 $36,892 $40,120 $119,131 $233,651

$27,817 $0 $11,191 $38,368 $41,725 $123,896 $242,997

$28,929 $0 $11,638 $39,903 $43,394 $128,852 $252,717

$30,087 $0 $12,104 $41,499 $45,130 $134,006 $262,825

$5,970,598 $284,679 $6,255,277

$6,209,422 $296,066 $6,505,488

$6,457,799 $307,909 $6,765,708

$6,716,111 $320,225 $7,036,336

$6,984,755 $333,034 $7,317,789

$7,264,146 $346,355 $7,610,501

$7,554,711 $360,209 $7,914,921

$7,856,900 $374,618 $8,231,518

$8,171,176 $389,603 $8,560,778

$8,498,023 $405,187 $8,903,210

$182,704 $274,930 $152,108 $272,745 $265,314 $9,179 $135,498 $74,305 $1,000,064 $2,366,847

$188,185 $283,178 $156,671 $280,927 $273,274 $9,454 $139,563 $76,535 $1,030,066 $2,437,852

$193,831 $291,673 $161,371 $289,355 $281,472 $9,738 $143,750 $78,831 $1,060,968 $2,510,988

$199,646 $300,424 $166,212 $298,035 $289,916 $10,030 $148,062 $81,196 $1,092,797 $2,586,317

$205,635 $309,436 $171,198 $306,977 $298,613 $10,331 $152,504 $83,631 $1,125,581 $2,663,907

$211,804 $318,719 $176,334 $316,186 $307,572 $10,641 $157,079 $86,140 $1,159,348 $2,743,824

$218,158 $328,281 $181,624 $325,671 $316,799 $10,960 $161,792 $88,725 $1,194,128 $2,826,139

$224,703 $338,129 $187,073 $335,442 $326,303 $11,289 $166,646 $91,386 $1,229,952 $2,910,923

$231,444 $348,273 $192,685 $345,505 $336,092 $11,628 $171,645 $94,128 $1,266,851 $2,998,251

$238,387 $358,721 $198,466 $355,870 $346,175 $11,976 $176,794 $96,952 $1,304,856 $3,088,198

Net Operating Income

$3,888,430

$4,067,636

$4,254,720

$4,450,019

$4,653,882

$4,866,677

$5,088,782

$5,320,595

$5,562,528

$5,815,011

Debt Service Debt Coverage Ratio

$6,099,234 0.64

$6,099,234 0.67

$6,099,234 0.70

$6,099,234 0.73

$6,099,234 0.76

$6,099,234 0.80

$6,099,234 0.83

$6,099,234 0.87

$6,099,234 0.91

$6,099,234 0.95

$2,313,959 $0 $2,313,959

$2,383,377 $0 $2,383,377

$2,454,879 $0 $2,454,879

$2,528,525 $0 $2,528,525

$2,604,381 $0 $2,604,381

$2,682,512 $0 $2,682,512

$2,762,988 $0 $2,762,988

$2,845,877 $0 $2,845,877

$2,931,254 $0 $2,931,254

$3,019,191 $0 $3,019,191

($4,524,763) ($18,703,682)

($4,414,976) ($23,118,658)

($4,299,393) ($27,418,051)

($4,177,741) ($31,595,792)

($4,049,733) ($35,645,525)

($3,915,070) ($39,560,595)

($3,773,440) ($43,334,034)

($3,624,517) ($46,958,551)

($3,467,960) ($50,426,511)

($3,303,414) ($53,729,926)

Rental Vacancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Four-Bedroom (Single) Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense) Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense) Total Rental Revenue Total Other Revenue Total Revenue Operating Expense Admin & Clerical (Personnel) Housekeeping Communications Repair & Maintenance Utilities Miscellaneous Student Programming Community Safety General Expenses Total Operating Expenses

Non-Operating Expense Replacement Reserves Property Tax (3.267% of value) Total Non-Operating Expense Net Cash Flow Cumulative Net Cash Flow

D3

Exhibit Family Housing Financial Model

This Page Left Intentionally Blank

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING DEVELOPMENT BUDGET - FAMILY HOUSING

1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03

Building Summary Total Bed Count Gross Square Footage Construction Duration (months)

2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07

Hard Costs Enclosed Building Costs Site Costs Utilities Costs Infrastructure costs Landscaping Costs Construction Contingency Parking Costs

2.08 Inflation Allowance

200 197,099 18

$350 Per Sq. Ft.

0 $3,000 3.5% 2.0

No. of Spaces Per Space Rate Yrs. To MidPt.

Subtotal: Hard Costs 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07

Soft Costs Architectural and Engineering Fees Additonal A&E Services Miscellaneous Fees Furniture Fixtures, and Equipment (FF&E) FF&E Tax Project Contingency Development Manager Fee

$68,984,738 Included Above Included Above Included Above Included Above Included Above $0 $4,913,438 $73,898,175

8.5% of Hard Costs 7.0% of A&E Budget $3,500 0.0% 15.0% 0.0%

Per Bed % of FF&E of the above of the above

$6,281,345 $439,694 $1,500,000 $700,000 $0 $12,422,882 $0

Subtotal: Soft Costs

$21,343,921

Subtotal: Hard and Soft Costs

$95,242,097

Total Project Cost

$95,242,097

Development Metrics Project Cost Percentages Hard Costs Soft Costs Cost Per Bed Hard Cost Per Bed Soft Cost Per Bed Cost Per Square Foot Hard Cost Per Square Foot Soft Cost Per Square Foot

100.0% 77.6% 22.4% $476,210 $369,491 $106,720 $483 $375 $108

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING PROGRAM - FAMILY HOUSING

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Residential Space Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Units

Subtotal - Residential Space

0 60 0 126 0 14 200

Community / Support Space 6.00 Community Spaces (7% of Residential Space ) 7.00 Support Spaces (2% of Residential Space ) Subtotal - Community / Support Space Other Space 8.00 Non-assignable Spaces (Efficiency Factor of 70% ) Subtotal - Other Space

Development Metrics Total Residential Space Total Community / Support Space Total NASF NASF / Bed

Residents / Unit NASF / Unit 1 375 1 500 1 555 1 800 1 650 1 990

Total NASF

0 30,000 0 100,800 0 13,860 144,660

Total Beds

0 60 0 126 0 14 200

Total NASF 10,126 2,893 13,019 Total Non-ASF 39,420 39,420

Program SF 144,660 13,019 157,679 788

Program % 73% 7% 80%

Total Other Space Total GSF GSF / Bed

39,420 197,099 985

20% 100%

Total Revenue Generating SF Total Non-Revenue Generating SF Total GSF

30,000 167,099 197,099

15% 85% 100%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING OPERATING REVENUE ASSUMPTIONS - FAMILY HOUSING

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Rental Revenue at 100% Occupancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Total Beds

0 60 0 126 0 14

Subtotal - Rental Revenue

7.00 8.00 9.00 10.00 11.00 12.00

Rental Revenue at 3% Vacancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Rent Per Academic Year $13,050 $14,850 $12,600 $16,200 $13,050 $13,950

200 Total Beds

0 2 0 4 0 0

Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense)

6

Total Rental Revenue (less 5% vacancy expen

54

Other Revenue 11.00 Summer Conference Revenue 12.00 Other (Damanges, application, cancelation, laundry, etc.) Total Other Revenue Revenue Escalation Assumption Occupancy Assumption

Rent Per Quarter $4,350 $4,950 $4,200 $5,400 $4,350 $4,650

Total

$0 $891,000 $0 $2,041,200 $0 $195,300 $3,127,500

Rent Per Rent Per Quarter Academic Year $4,350 $13,050 $4,950 $14,850 $4,200 $12,600 $5,400 $16,200 $4,350 $13,050 $4,650 $13,950

Total

$0 $26,730 $0 $61,236 $0 $5,859

$93,825 $28,090

$56,179

$3,033,675

1.00%

Total $200,000 $30,337 $230,337

4.0% 97.0%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING OPERATING EXPENSE ASSUMPTIONS - FAMILY HOUSING

Building Summary

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00

Sq. Ft. 197,099

Bed 200

Total

Operating Expenses Admin & Clerical (Personnel) Housekeeping Communications Repair & Maintenance Utilities Miscellaneous Student Programming Community Safety General Expenses

$0.42 $0.64 $0.35 $0.63 $0.62 $0.02 $0.31 $0.17 $2.32

$418 $629 $348 $624 $607 $21 $310 $170 $2,288

$83,600 $125,800 $69,600 $124,800 $121,400 $4,200 $62,000 $34,000 $457,600

Total Operating Expenses

$5.49

$5,415

$1,083,000

$5.37

$5,294

$1,058,800

$5.37

$5,294

$1,058,800

Non-operating Expenses 10.00 Replacement Reserves Total Non-operating Expenses Operating Expense Escalation Assumption

3.0%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING DEBT ASSUMPTIONS - FAMILY HOUSING

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Debt Assumptions Current Year Year of Opening Amount Financed Interest Rate Debt Term Annual Debt Service Term

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Year 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046

2014 2017 $95,242,097 6.0% 30 $6,919,235 Beg. Balance $95,242,097 $94,037,388 $92,760,396 $91,406,786 $89,971,958 $88,451,041 $86,838,869 $85,129,966 $83,318,529 $81,398,407 $79,363,076 $77,205,626 $74,918,729 $72,494,618 $69,925,061 $67,201,330 $64,314,175 $61,253,791 $58,009,783 $54,571,136 $50,926,169 $47,062,505 $42,967,021 $38,625,807 $34,024,121 $29,146,333 $23,975,879 $18,495,197 $12,685,674 $6,527,580

Interest $5,714,526 $5,642,243 $5,565,624 $5,484,407 $5,398,317 $5,307,062 $5,210,332 $5,107,798 $4,999,112 $4,883,904 $4,761,785 $4,632,338 $4,495,124 $4,349,677 $4,195,504 $4,032,080 $3,858,850 $3,675,227 $3,480,587 $3,274,268 $3,055,570 $2,823,750 $2,578,021 $2,317,548 $2,041,447 $1,748,780 $1,438,553 $1,109,712 $761,140 $391,655

Principle $1,204,709 $1,276,991 $1,353,611 $1,434,828 $1,520,917 $1,612,172 $1,708,903 $1,811,437 $1,920,123 $2,035,330 $2,157,450 $2,286,897 $2,424,111 $2,569,558 $2,723,731 $2,887,155 $3,060,384 $3,244,007 $3,438,648 $3,644,966 $3,863,664 $4,095,484 $4,341,213 $4,601,686 $4,877,787 $5,170,455 $5,480,682 $5,809,523 $6,158,094 $6,527,580

Payment $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235 $6,919,235

End. Balance $94,037,388 $92,760,396 $91,406,786 $89,971,958 $88,451,041 $86,838,869 $85,129,966 $83,318,529 $81,398,407 $79,363,076 $77,205,626 $74,918,729 $72,494,618 $69,925,061 $67,201,330 $64,314,175 $61,253,791 $58,009,783 $54,571,136 $50,926,169 $47,062,505 $42,967,021 $38,625,807 $34,024,121 $29,146,333 $23,975,879 $18,495,197 $12,685,674 $6,527,580 $0

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ OPERATING PRO FORMA - FAMILY HOUSING Operating Pro Forma Operating Revenue Rental Revenue Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single) Subtotal - Rental Revenue

2018

2

2019

3

2020

4

2021

5

2022

6

2023

7

2024

8

2025

9

2026

10

2027

11

$0 $963,706 $0 $2,207,762 $0 $211,236 $3,382,704

$0 $1,002,254 $0 $2,296,072 $0 $219,686 $3,518,012

$0 $1,042,344 $0 $2,387,915 $0 $228,473 $3,658,733

$0 $1,084,038 $0 $2,483,432 $0 $237,612 $3,805,082

$0 $1,127,399 $0 $2,582,769 $0 $247,117 $3,957,285

$0 $1,172,495 $0 $2,686,080 $0 $257,001 $4,115,577

$0 $1,219,395 $0 $2,793,523 $0 $267,282 $4,280,200

$0 $1,268,171 $0 $2,905,264 $0 $277,973 $4,451,408

$0 $1,318,898 $0 $3,021,475 $0 $289,092 $4,629,464

$0 $1,371,654 $0 $3,142,334 $0 $300,655 $4,814,643

$0 $28,911 $0 $66,233 $0 $6,337 $101,481

$0 $30,068 $0 $68,882 $0 $6,591 $105,540

$0 $31,270 $0 $71,637 $0 $6,854 $109,762

$0 $32,521 $0 $74,503 $0 $7,128 $114,152

$0 $33,822 $0 $77,483 $0 $7,414 $118,719

$0 $35,175 $0 $80,582 $0 $7,710 $123,467

$0 $36,582 $0 $83,806 $0 $8,018 $128,406

$0 $38,045 $0 $87,158 $0 $8,339 $133,542

$0 $39,567 $0 $90,644 $0 $8,673 $138,884

$0 $41,150 $0 $94,270 $0 $9,020 $144,439

$3,281,223 $249,132 $3,530,355

$3,412,472 $259,098 $3,671,569

$3,548,971 $269,461 $3,818,432

$3,690,929 $280,240 $3,971,169

$3,838,567 $291,449 $4,130,016

$3,992,109 $303,107 $4,295,217

$4,151,794 $315,232 $4,467,025

$4,317,865 $327,841 $4,645,706

$4,490,580 $340,955 $4,831,535

$4,670,203 $354,593 $5,024,796

$88,691 $133,461 $73,839 $132,400 $128,793 $4,456 $65,776 $36,071 $485,468 $1,148,955

$91,352 $137,465 $76,054 $136,372 $132,657 $4,589 $67,749 $37,153 $500,032 $1,183,423

$94,093 $141,589 $78,335 $140,463 $136,637 $4,727 $69,782 $38,267 $515,033 $1,218,926

$96,915 $145,837 $80,685 $144,677 $140,736 $4,869 $71,875 $39,415 $530,484 $1,255,494

$99,823 $150,212 $83,106 $149,018 $144,958 $5,015 $74,031 $40,598 $546,398 $1,293,159

$102,817 $154,718 $85,599 $153,488 $149,307 $5,165 $76,252 $41,816 $562,790 $1,331,953

$105,902 $159,360 $88,167 $158,093 $153,786 $5,320 $78,540 $43,070 $579,674 $1,371,912

$109,079 $164,140 $90,812 $162,836 $158,399 $5,480 $80,896 $44,362 $597,064 $1,413,069

$112,351 $169,065 $93,537 $167,721 $163,151 $5,644 $83,323 $45,693 $614,976 $1,455,461

$115,722 $174,137 $96,343 $172,752 $168,046 $5,814 $85,822 $47,064 $633,425 $1,499,125

Net Operating Income

$2,381,400

$2,488,146

$2,599,506

$2,715,676

$2,836,858

$2,963,263

$3,095,113

$3,232,637

$3,376,073

$3,525,671

Debt Service Debt Coverage Ratio

$6,919,235 0.34

$6,919,235 0.36

$6,919,235 0.38

$6,919,235 0.39

$6,919,235 0.41

$6,919,235 0.43

$6,919,235 0.45

$6,919,235 0.47

$6,919,235 0.49

$6,919,235 0.51

$1,123,281 $0 $1,123,281

$1,156,979 $0 $1,156,979

$1,191,689 $0 $1,191,689

$1,227,439 $0 $1,227,439

$1,264,263 $0 $1,264,263

$1,302,190 $0 $1,302,190

$1,341,256 $0 $1,341,256

$1,381,494 $0 $1,381,494

$1,422,939 $0 $1,422,939

$1,465,627 $0 $1,465,627

($5,661,115) ($17,188,854)

($5,588,068) ($22,776,923)

($5,511,417) ($28,288,340)

($5,430,998) ($33,719,338)

($5,346,640) ($39,065,978)

($5,258,162) ($44,324,140)

($5,165,377) ($49,489,517)

($5,068,091) ($54,557,608)

($4,966,100) ($59,523,709)

($4,859,191) ($64,382,899)

Rental Vacancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Four-Bedroom (Single) Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense) Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense) Total Rental Revenue Total Other Revenue Total Revenue Operating Expense Admin & Clerical (Personnel) Housekeeping Communications Repair & Maintenance Utilities Miscellaneous Student Programming Community Safety General Expenses Total Operating Expenses

Non-Operating Expense Replacement Reserves Property Tax (3.267% of value) Total Non-Operating Expense Net Cash Flow Cumulative Net Cash Flow

D4

Exhibit Phase II Financial Model

This Page Left Intentionally Blank

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING PROGRAM - PHASE IB

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Residential Space Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Units

Subtotal - Residential Space

72 0 14 40 80 50 256

Community / Support Space 6.00 Community Spaces (7% of Residential Space ) 7.00 Support Spaces (2% of Residential Space ) Subtotal - Community / Support Space Other Space 8.00 Non-assignable Spaces (Efficiency Factor of 70% ) Subtotal - Other Space

Development Metrics Total Residential Space Total Community / Support Space Total NASF NASF / Bed

Residents / Unit NASF / Unit 1 375 1 500 2 555 2 600 4 650 4 990

Total NASF 27,000 0 7,770 24,000 52,000 49,500 160,270

Total Beds

72 0 28 80 320 200 700

Total NASF 11,219 3,205 14,424 Total Non-ASF 143,556 143,556

Program SF 160,270 14,424 174,694 250

Program % 50% 5% 55%

Total Other Space Total GSF GSF / Bed

143,556 318,250 455

45% 100%

Total Revenue Generating SF Total Non-Revenue Generating SF Total GSF

34,770 283,480 318,250

11% 89% 100%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING DEVELOPMENT BUDGET - PHASE II

1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03

Building Summary Total Bed Count Gross Square Footage Construction Duration (months)

2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07

Hard Costs Enclosed Building Costs Site Costs Utilities Costs Infrastructure costs Landscaping Costs Construction Contingency Parking Costs

2.08 Inflation Allowance

700 318,250 18

$350 Per Sq. Ft.

0 $3,000 3.5% 6.0

No. of Spaces Per Space Rate Yrs. To MidPt.

Subtotal: Hard Costs 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07

Soft Costs Architectural and Engineering Fees Additonal A&E Services Miscellaneous Fees Furniture Fixtures, and Equipment (FF&E) FF&E Tax Project Contingency Development Manager Fee Subtotal: Soft Costs

$111,387,650 Included Above Included Above Included Above Included Above Included Above $0 $25,536,212 $136,923,862

8.5% of Hard Costs 7.0% of A&E Budget $3,500 0.0% 15.0% 0.0%

Per Bed % of FF&E of the above of the above

$11,638,528 $814,697 $1,500,000 $2,450,000 $0 $22,999,063 $0 $39,402,288

Subtotal: Hard and Soft Costs

$176,326,150

Total Project Cost

$176,326,150

Development Metrics Project Cost Percentages Hard Costs Soft Costs Cost Per Bed Hard Cost Per Bed Soft Cost Per Bed Cost Per Square Foot Hard Cost Per Square Foot Soft Cost Per Square Foot

100.0% 77.7% 22.3% $251,895 $195,606 $56,289 $554 $430 $124

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING OPERATING REVENUE ASSUMPTIONS - PHASE II

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Rental Revenue at 100% Occupancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Total Beds

72 0 28 80 320 200

Subtotal - Rental Revenue

7.00 8.00 9.00 10.00 11.00 12.00

Rental Revenue at 3% Vacancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single)

Rent Per Academic Year $13,050 $14,850 $12,600 $14,400 $13,050 $13,950

700 Total Beds

2 0 1 2 10 6

Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense)

21

Total Rental Revenue (less 5% vacancy expen

79

Other Revenue 11.00 Summer Conference Revenue 12.00 Other (Damanges, application, cancelation, laundry, etc.) Total Other Revenue Revenue Escalation Assumption Occupancy Assumption

Rent Per Quarter $4,350 $4,950 $4,200 $4,800 $4,350 $4,650

Total $939,600 $0 $352,800 $1,152,000 $4,176,000 $2,790,000 $9,410,400

Rent Per Rent Per Quarter Academic Year $4,350 $13,050 $4,950 $14,850 $4,200 $12,600 $4,800 $14,400 $4,350 $13,050 $4,650 $13,950

Total $28,188 $0 $10,584 $34,560 $125,280 $83,700 $282,312

$57,773

$115,545

$9,128,088

1.00%

Total $200,000 $91,281 $291,281

4.0% 97.0%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING OPERATING EXPENSE ASSUMPTIONS - PHASE II

Building Summary

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00

Operating Expenses Admin & Clerical (Personnel) Housekeeping Communications Repair & Maintenance Utilities Miscellaneous Student Programming Community Safety General Expenses Total Operating Expenses

Non-operating Expenses 10.00 Replacement Reserves Total Non-operating Expenses Operating Expense Escalation Assumption

Sq. Ft. 318,250

Bed 700

Total

$0.92 $1.38 $0.77 $1.37 $1.34 $0.05 $0.68 $0.37 $5.03

$418 $629 $348 $624 $607 $21 $310 $170 $2,288

$292,600 $440,300 $243,600 $436,800 $424,900 $14,700 $217,000 $119,000 $1,601,600

$11.91

$5,415

$3,790,500

$11.64

$5,294

$3,705,800

$11.64

$5,294

$3,705,800

3.0%

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ STUDENT HOUSING DEBT ASSUMPTIONS - PHASE II

1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00

Debt Assumptions Current Year Year of Opening Amount Financed Interest Rate Debt Term Annual Debt Service Term

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Year 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046 2047 2048 2049 2050

2014 2021 $176,326,150 6.0% 30 $12,809,903 Beg. Balance $176,326,150 $174,095,817 $171,731,663 $169,225,659 $166,569,296 $163,753,551 $160,768,861 $157,605,090 $154,251,492 $150,696,679 $146,928,577 $142,934,389 $138,700,549 $134,212,679 $129,455,537 $124,412,966 $119,067,842 $113,402,009 $107,396,227 $101,030,097 $94,282,000 $87,129,018 $79,546,856 $71,509,764 $62,990,447 $53,959,971 $44,387,666 $34,241,024 $23,485,582 $12,084,814

Interest $10,579,569 $10,445,749 $10,303,900 $10,153,540 $9,994,158 $9,825,213 $9,646,132 $9,456,305 $9,255,090 $9,041,801 $8,815,715 $8,576,063 $8,322,033 $8,052,761 $7,767,332 $7,464,778 $7,144,070 $6,804,121 $6,443,774 $6,061,806 $5,656,920 $5,227,741 $4,772,811 $4,290,586 $3,779,427 $3,237,598 $2,663,260 $2,054,461 $1,409,135 $725,089

Principle $2,230,334 $2,364,154 $2,506,003 $2,656,363 $2,815,745 $2,984,690 $3,163,771 $3,353,597 $3,554,813 $3,768,102 $3,994,188 $4,233,840 $4,487,870 $4,757,142 $5,042,571 $5,345,125 $5,665,832 $6,005,782 $6,366,129 $6,748,097 $7,152,983 $7,582,162 $8,037,092 $8,519,317 $9,030,476 $9,572,305 $10,146,643 $10,755,441 $11,400,768 $12,084,814

Payment $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903 $12,809,903

End. Balance $174,095,817 $171,731,663 $169,225,659 $166,569,296 $163,753,551 $160,768,861 $157,605,090 $154,251,492 $150,696,679 $146,928,577 $142,934,389 $138,700,549 $134,212,679 $129,455,537 $124,412,966 $119,067,842 $113,402,009 $107,396,227 $101,030,097 $94,282,000 $87,129,018 $79,546,856 $71,509,764 $62,990,447 $53,959,971 $44,387,666 $34,241,024 $23,485,582 $12,084,814 $0

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ OPERATING PRO FORMA - PHASE II Operating Pro Forma Operating Revenue Rental Revenue Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Two-Bedroom (Double) Four-Bedroom (Single) Subtotal - Rental Revenue Rental Vacancy Studio (Single) One-Bedroom (Single) One-Bedroom (Double) Two-Bedroom (Single) Four-Bedroom (Single) Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense) Subtotal - Rental Revenue (Vacancy Expense) Total Rental Revenue Total Other Revenue Total Revenue Operating Expense Admin & Clerical (Personnel) Housekeeping Communications Repair & Maintenance Utilities Miscellaneous Student Programming Community Safety General Expenses Total Operating Expenses Net Operating Income Debt Service Debt Coverage Ratio Non-Operating Expense Replacement Reserves Property Tax (3.267% of value) Total Non-Operating Expense Net Cash Flow Cumulative Net Cash Flow

5 2021

6 2022

7 2023

8 2024

9 2025

10 2026

11 2027

12 2028

13 2029

14 2030

$1,143,167 $0 $429,235 $1,401,584 $5,080,743 $3,394,462 $11,449,190

$1,188,894 $0 $446,405 $1,457,648 $5,283,972 $3,530,240 $11,907,158

$1,236,449 $0 $464,261 $1,515,953 $5,495,331 $3,671,450 $12,383,444

$1,285,907 $0 $482,831 $1,576,592 $5,715,144 $3,818,308 $12,878,782

$1,337,344 $0 $502,144 $1,639,655 $5,943,750 $3,971,040 $13,393,933

$1,390,838 $0 $522,230 $1,705,241 $6,181,500 $4,129,882 $13,929,691

$1,446,471 $0 $543,119 $1,773,451 $6,428,760 $4,295,077 $14,486,878

$1,504,330 $0 $564,844 $1,844,389 $6,685,911 $4,466,880 $15,066,354

$1,564,503 $0 $587,438 $1,918,165 $6,953,347 $4,645,555 $15,669,008

$1,627,083 $0 $610,935 $1,994,891 $7,231,481 $4,831,377 $16,295,768

$34,295 $0 $12,877 $42,048 $152,422 $101,834 $343,476

$35,667 $0 $13,392 $43,729 $158,519 $105,907 $357,215

$37,093 $0 $13,928 $45,479 $164,860 $110,143 $371,503

$38,577 $0 $14,485 $47,298 $171,454 $114,549 $386,363

$40,120 $0 $15,064 $49,190 $178,313 $119,131 $401,818

$41,725 $0 $15,667 $51,157 $185,445 $123,896 $417,891

$43,394 $0 $16,294 $53,204 $192,863 $128,852 $434,606

$45,130 $0 $16,945 $55,332 $200,577 $134,006 $451,991

$46,935 $0 $17,623 $57,545 $208,600 $139,367 $470,070

$48,812 $0 $18,328 $59,847 $216,944 $144,941 $488,873

$11,105,715 $354,388 $11,460,102

$11,549,943 $368,563 $11,918,507

$12,011,941 $383,306 $12,395,247

$12,492,419 $398,638 $12,891,057

$12,992,115 $414,584 $13,406,699

$13,511,800 $431,167 $13,942,967

$14,052,272 $448,414 $14,500,686

$14,614,363 $466,350 $15,080,713

$15,198,938 $485,004 $15,683,942

$15,806,895 $504,404 $16,311,299

$339,204 $510,428 $282,399 $506,371 $492,576 $17,041 $251,562 $137,954 $1,856,693 $4,394,228

$349,380 $525,741 $290,871 $521,562 $507,353 $17,553 $259,109 $142,092 $1,912,394 $4,526,055

$359,861 $541,513 $299,597 $537,209 $522,573 $18,079 $266,883 $146,355 $1,969,766 $4,661,837

$370,657 $557,759 $308,585 $553,325 $538,251 $18,622 $274,889 $150,746 $2,028,859 $4,801,692

$381,777 $574,492 $317,843 $569,925 $554,398 $19,180 $283,136 $155,268 $2,089,725 $4,945,743

$393,230 $591,726 $327,378 $587,023 $571,030 $19,756 $291,630 $159,926 $2,152,416 $5,094,115

$405,027 $609,478 $337,199 $604,633 $588,161 $20,348 $300,379 $164,724 $2,216,989 $5,246,938

$417,178 $627,763 $347,315 $622,772 $605,806 $20,959 $309,390 $169,666 $2,283,499 $5,404,347

$429,693 $646,595 $357,735 $641,456 $623,980 $21,587 $318,672 $174,756 $2,352,004 $5,566,477

$442,584 $665,993 $368,467 $660,699 $642,699 $22,235 $328,232 $179,998 $2,422,564 $5,733,471

$7,065,874

$7,392,451

$7,733,410

$8,089,365

$8,460,956

$8,848,852

$9,253,747

$9,676,366

$10,117,465

$10,577,828

$12,809,903 0.55

$12,809,903 0.58

$12,809,903 0.60

$12,809,903 0.63

$12,809,903 0.66

$12,809,903 0.69

$12,809,903 0.72

$12,809,903 0.76

$12,809,903 0.79

$12,809,903 0.83

$4,296,038 $0 $4,296,038

$4,424,919 $0 $4,424,919

$4,557,667 $0 $4,557,667

$4,694,397 $0 $4,694,397

$4,835,228 $0 $4,835,228

$4,980,285 $0 $4,980,285

$5,129,694 $0 $5,129,694

$5,283,585 $0 $5,283,585

$5,442,092 $0 $5,442,092

$5,605,355 $0 $5,605,355

($10,040,067) ($62,870,116)

($9,842,371) ($72,712,486)

($9,634,160) ($82,346,646)

($8,685,850) ($8,417,121) ($9,414,935) ($9,184,175) ($8,941,336) ($8,134,531) ($7,837,430) ($91,761,580) ($100,945,756) ($109,887,092) ($118,572,942) ($126,990,063) ($135,124,593) ($142,962,023)