Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  Cooperative Agreements to Benefit Homeless Individuals for States  Biannual Progress Report...

459KB Sizes 0 Downloads 4 Views

Recommend Documents

clergy as gatekeepers to mental health and substance abuse services
However, it is important for clergy to be aware of their lim- its and make referrals to trained mental health profession

2017 Generations Conference - Substance Abuse & Mental Health
Steven J. Chen, PhD – Psychologist & Owner, Management Systems .... Camille VanWagoner Hawkins, LCSW – Executive Dir

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Resource Guide - Granite State
At Phoenix House New Hampshire, we understand that substance abuse affects every aspect of a ..... Address: 87 Washingto

Substance Abuse, Mental Health, and Criminal Justice Studies
This is the third time that BJS has contracted with NORC to survey indigent defense systems. Conversion of Criminal Hist

SMI - Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health
SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS (SMI) including SUD: Substance Abuse and ... INPATIENT OR OUTPATIENT TREATMENT: History of a cont

Local Mental Health Authority.xlsx - Division of Substance Abuse and
Mar 7, 2016 - Price. Four Corners Community Behavioral Health. Kara Cunningham ... Cindy Simon, Director of Clinical Ser

Mental Health and Substance Abuse: The Issue at Hand Background
Mental Illness continues to be a matter of concern in the District of Columbia. For example, from 2005-2010, the average

Mental Health Fact Sheet - CSOSA Substance Abuse and Treatment
to Teplin, Abram and McClelland (1996) serious mental disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar .... History of illicit s

FFY 2014-2015 Mental Health and Substance Abuse Block Grant
Jan 1, 2014 - The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority, ... In addition, there are four DMHA-funded speci

BC Mental Health and Substance Use Services fact sheet
Oct 1, 2017 - How we serve individuals, families and communities in BC: We work with regional health authorities, commun

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  Cooperative Agreements to Benefit Homeless Individuals for States  Biannual Progress Report    Government Project Officer: Caroline Fernandez    Reporting Period Dates: October 1, 2015 – March 31, 2016  Grant Number: 1H79TI025345‐01/5H79TI025345‐02 Revised  Grant Year: 2015‐2016  Reporting Period Number: 1    Grantee: State of Nevada – Department of Public and Behavioral Health  4126 Technology Way  2nd Floor  Carson City, NV 89706‐2027    Project Director: Ellen  Richardson‐Adams  Southern Nevada Adult Mental  Health Services  Division of Public and  Behavioral Health  6161 W Charleston Blvd  Las Vegas, NV 89146  Phone: (702) 486‐6239  Fax: (702) 486‐8047  Email: [email protected]   

Program Manager: Michael  McMahon – Clinical Program  Planner II  Statewide Quality Improvement  Team  Division of Public and  Behavioral Health  4126 Technology Way, Suite  201  Carson City, NV 89706  Phone: (775) 687‐7519  Fax: (775) 684‐4211  Email:  [email protected]      Provider Sites:  HELP of Southern Nevada  New Frontier Treatment Center  Kelly Robson – Chief of Social  Lana Henderson‐Robards –  Services  Executive Director  1640 Flamingo Road, #100  1490 Grimes St.  Las Vegas, NV 89119‐5249  Fallon, NV 89406  Phone: (702) 369‐4357, ext. 100  Phone: (775) 423‐1412  Fax: (702) 369‐4089  Fax: (775) 423‐4054  Email: [email protected]   Email: [email protected]      

Evaluator – Al Stein‐Seroussi –  Center Director and Senior  Program Evaluator  Pacific Institute for Research  and Evaluation (P.I.R.E.)  1516 E. Franklin Street  Suite 200  Chapel Hill, NC 27514  Phone: (919) 265‐2616  Fax: (919) 265‐2659  Email: [email protected]  

  Volunteers of America – ReStart  Pat Cashell – Executive Director  335 Record Street, #155  Reno, NV 89512  Phone: (775) 324‐4622, ext. 101  Fax: (775) 324‐0446  Email:  [email protected]‐ncnn.org 

  Clark County Social Service  Michael Pawlak ‐ Director  1600 Pinto Lane   Las Vegas, NV 89106  Phone: (702) 455‐4270  Fax: (702) 455‐5950  Email:   [email protected]   

WestCare  Erin Kinard – Area Director  401 S. Martin Luther King Blvd.  Las Vegas, NV 89106  Phone: (702) 759‐3507  Fax: (702) 307‐0269  Email:  [email protected]    

The Children’s Cabinet    Mike Pomi – Executive Director   1090 South Rock Blvd.  Reno, 89502  Phone: (775) 856‐6200  Fax: (775) 856‐6208  Email:  [email protected]    

          

Washoe County Social Services  Ken Retterath – Division  Director  1001 E. Ninth Street, Building C,  Room 135‐C  Reno, NV 89520  Phone: (775) 328‐2700  Fax: (775) 328‐3648  Email:  [email protected]   

 

2   

Contents  I. 

Organization and Management ............................................................................................................ 1  A.  Workforce ......................................................................................................................................... 1  B.  State Interagency Council ................................................................................................................. 6  C.  Training, TA, and Site Visits ............................................................................................................... 7 

II. 

Project Implementation ...................................................................................................................... 12  A.  Project Workplan ............................................................................................................................ 12  B.  Significant Project Activities ............................................................................................................ 28  C.  Housing Component ....................................................................................................................... 32  D.  Mainstream Benefits ....................................................................................................................... 34  E. 

III.   

Interim Financial Status .................................................................................................................. 36  Attachments .................................................................................................................................... 38 

 

I. Organization and Management  A. Workforce    1. List all State positions supported by grant funds, filled and vacant    Filled Positions  Position Title 

State Agency 

Full name 

Outpatient Administrator/Project  Director 

Nevada Division of  Public and  Behavioral Health  Nevada Division of  Public and  Behavioral Health  Nevada Division of  Public and  Behavioral Health 

Ellen Richardson‐ Adams 

Clinic Program Planner II/Program  Manager  Administrative Services Officer  I/Financial Manager 

Full‐Time  Equivalent  .03 FTE 

Michael J.  McMahon 

.15 FTE 

Christina Hadwick 

.05 FTE 

  Vacancies  There are no current vacancies  2. List all provider positions supported by grant funds, filled and vacant    CABHI‐States Filled Positions  Position Title 

Provider Name 

Residential Program Director 

New Frontier  Treatment Center  Residential Lead Counselor  New Frontier  Treatment Center  Clinical Assistance/Medication  New Frontier  Management  Treatment Center  New Frontier  Data  Collection/HMIS/MyAvatar/Housing  Treatment Center  First  Peer Navigator/Peer Recovery  New Frontier  Specialist  Treatment Center  Administrative Support‐Financial  New Frontier  Treatment Center  Administrative Support‐Janitorial  New Frontier  and Maintenance  Treatment Center 

1   

Full name  Josh Cabral 

Full‐Time  Equivalent  .2 FTE 

Tiana Wilson 

.1774 FTE 

Antoinette St.  Amant  Stacy Wilson 

.2 FTE  .2 FTE 

Isaac Mardis 

.4371 FTE 

Brandi Boothe 

 .05 FTE 

Javier Montez 

 .05 FTE 

  Position Title 

Provider Name 

Full name 

Administrative Support‐Grants  Administration  Administrative Support‐Computer  and Networking  Project Director  Grant Coordinator  Case Manager 

New Frontier  Treatment Center  New Frontier  Treatment Center  ReStart (VOA)  ReStart (VOA)  ReStart (VOA) 

Chris Murphey 

Full‐Time  Equivalent    .05 FTE 

Chris Murphey 

 .05 FTE  .05 FTE  .05 FTE  1.1 FTE 

Peer Navigator/Peer Recovery  Specialist  Drug and Alcohol Counselor  Psychiatrist  Program Manager 

ReStart (VOA) 

Pat Cashell  Julianna Glock   Sheree  Shotts/Jeanine  Fobbs  Shane O’Neal  Lisa Davis  Julia O’Leary  Mindy Torres 

416 contract hours  198 contract hours  .1 FTE 

Oscar Landgrave 

1 FTE 

Stacy Winters 

1 FTE 

Alicia Smith 

1 FTE 

Ambrosia Crump 

1 FTE 

Full‐Time  Equivalent  1 FTE  1 FTE  1 FTE    1 FTE  1 FTE  1 FTE 

Case Manager  Case Manager  Case Manager   Statewide SOAR Coordinator 

ReStart (VOA)  ReStart (VOA)  HELP of Southern  Nevada  HELP of Southern  Nevada  HELP of Southern  Nevada  HELP of Southern  Nevada  Clark County Social  Service 

.5 FTE 

  CABHI‐States Supplemental Filled Positions  Position Title 

Provider Name 

Full name 

Program Director  Program Assistant  Case Manager  Case Manager  Peer Support Specialist  Peer Support Specialist 

WestCare  WestCare  WestCare  WestCare  WestCare  WestCare 

Erin Kinard  Zea Gutierrez  Michael Thwing  Luther Kendrick  LeslieAnn Farrell  Rick Denton 

  CABHI‐States Enhancement Filled Positions  Position Title 

Provider Name 

Full name 

Case Manager  Case Manager 

NFTC  NFTC 

Kathleen Hayhurst  Todd Streck 

   

2   

Full‐Time  Equivalent  0.5 FTE  0.75 FTE 

  CABHI‐States Vacancies  The following vacancies were reported for CABHI‐States.  Position Title 

Provider Name 

Status 

Clinical Director  Therapist  Peer Navigator/Peer Recovery  Specialist 

ReStart (VOA)  ReStart (VOA)  HELP of Southern  Nevada 

Vacant  Vacant  Vacant 

Full‐Time  Equivalent  .158 FTE  .193 FTE  1 FTE 

  CABHI‐States Supplemental Vacancies  The following vacancies were reported for CABHI‐States Supplemental.  Position Title 

Provider Name 

Status 

Registered Nurse  Psychiatrist  Substance Abuse Counselor  Case Manager 

WestCare  WestCare  WestCare  WestCare 

Vacant  Vacant  Vacant  Vacant 

Full‐Time  Equivalent  1 FTE  .4 FTE  .5 FTE  1 FTE 

  CABHI‐States Enhancement Vacancies  The following vacancies were reported for CABHI‐States Enhancement.  Position Title 

Provider Name 

Status 

System of Care Coordinator 

The Children’s  Cabinet  The Children’s  Cabinet  The Children’s  Cabinet  ReStart (VOA)  ReStart (VOA)  HELP of Southern  Nevada   HELP of Southern  Nevada   HELP of Southern  Nevada   Clark County Social  Service 

Vacant 

Full‐Time  Equivalent  1 FTE 

Vacant 

1 FTE 

Vacant 

1 FTE 

Vacant  Vacant  Vacant 

1 FTE  0.9 FTE  1 FTE 

Vacant 

1 FTE 

Vacant 

1 FTE 

Vacant 

1 FTE 

Kids Cottage Case Manager  Kids Cottage Case Manager  Case Manager  Case Manager  Case Manager  Case Manager  Case Manager  Statewide SOAR Specialist   

3   

  3. List staff changes (including contractors/consultants) within the reporting period. Include  personnel hired, promoted, resigned, fired, etc. For each, include name, position, FTE,  date change occurred, type of change.    The following personnel changes were made by ReStart, NFTC and HELP of Southern Nevada.     Current  Previous  Position  FTE  Date of  Type of  Personnel  Personnel  change  Change  None  Mickie Law  Therapist  .193 FTE  3/31/15  Resigned  None  Mickie Law  Clinical Director  .158 FTE  3/31/15  Resigned  Lisa Davis  None  Drug and Alcohol  416  3/31/15  Hired  Counselor  contract  hours  Julia O’Leary  Dr. Nielson  Psychiatrist  198  3/31/15  Dr. Nielson  contract  retired, Julie  hours  was hired as  replacement  None  Jesse Robinson  Peer Navigator/Peer  1 FTE  3/31/15  Resigned  Recovery Specialist  .2 FTE  3/31/15  Kathleen will  Antoinette St.  Kathleen  Clinical  transition to a  Amant  Hayhurst  Assistance/Medication  new position  Management  under the  CABHI  Enhancement  Grant  Isaac Mardis  Todd Streck  Peer Navigator/Peer  .4371 FTE  3/31/15  Todd will  Recovery Specialist  transition to a  new position  under the  CABHI  Enhancement  Grant   Brandi Boothe  Misty Alegre  Administrative Support‐ .05 FTE  3/31/15  Misty  Financial  resigned,  Brandi hired    The following personnel changes were made by WestCare.    Current  Previous  Position  FTE  Date of  Type of  Personnel  Personnel  change  Change  Sabrina Zamora  None  Case Manager  1 FTE  12/31/15  Resigned         

4   

  4. Discuss the impact of personnel changes on project progress. If applicable, include  strategies for minimizing negative impact.    No disruption to client services was experienced with personnel changes at ReStart (VOA), HELP of  Southern Nevada, NFTC, or at WestCare.     5. List changes in addresses/phone numbers/e‐mail addresses of key personnel.    No changes were made in the addresses, phone numbers, or e‐mail addresses of key personnel.     6. Discuss obstacles encountered in filling vacancies (if any); prospects/strategies for filling  vacancies and for minimizing negative program impact.    During this reporting period, there was a considerable delay in obtaining contracts from the State that  impeded hiring for new positions. The State has strict regulatory requirements that must be adhered to  before a contract can be approved and submitted to subrecipients for signature. Due to these processes,  contracts for the CABHI‐States Enhancement grant were not issued to subrecipients during the reporting  period for this report. As a result, HELP of Southern Nevada, ReStart (VOA), NFTC, Clark County Social  Service, Washoe County Social Service and The Children’s Cabinet were not able to hire staff, nor begin  seeing clients. The issue of the State’s contracting process was brought to the attention of the Nevada  Governor’s Interagency Council on Homelessness (ICH) with the recommendation to the Governor that  the State’s contracting process is reviewed to remove barriers from issuing timely contracts.     WestCare has had difficulty finding a psychiatrist as the number in the area is limited. They have also  found that some of the psychiatrists have limits on the number of hours they can work with the license  they hold. WestCare is still working to fill this position.    7. List staff who are hired specifically for their lived experiences of homelessness, substance  abuse, mental illness  and/or co‐occurring mental and substance use disorders and their  overall contribution towards the project (include barriers/challenges that peer‐ mentors/specialist face during the report period and program efforts to address).    Peer Navigators/Support  Organizations  Rick Denton  WestCare  LeslieAnn Farrell  WestCare  Shane O’Neal  ReStart (VOA)  Todd Streck  New Frontier Treatment Center    The Peer Navigators at both ReStart (VOA) and NFTC have been with their programs for a number of  years, having gone through treatment themselves. As noted during previous site visits, they both report  that clients are able to relate to them and they can empathize with the clients while painting a picture of  how recovery works and the benefits they now experience including being stable, healthy, happy, and  connected to the community.   Experience with substance use and mental health clients is in the background of the two personnel that  transferred within WestCare to be part of the Vivo Project, the CABHI‐States Supplemental project in  Nevada. They have been working with individuals experiencing homelessness, substance abuse, mental  5   

  illness and/or co‐occurring mental and substance use disorders in a home‐based setting for the past  year.     All of the Peer Navigators express the importance of their role and how critical it is to the success of  CABHI.     8. Describe significant changes in the staffing structure or organization of the project that  occurred during this reporting period. Include changes in relationships and/or working  arrangements with collaborating agencies. List each change and summarize the  implications of the change.    No significant changes were made in the staffing structure or organization of the project during this  reporting period.    

B. State Interagency Council  The State Interagency Council on Homelessness (ICH) oversees the implementation of the Strategic Plan.  A CABHI Steering Committee was established by the ICH to regularly engage with CABHI subrecipients  through monthly meetings. As the result of the December 2015 face‐to‐face meeting, it was decided  that the subrecipients would conduct quarterly calls with members of the CABHI Steering Committee.  Members of both the ICH and CABHI Steering Committee are listed below. 

  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18 

1. List the members of the ICH (to be completed by CABHI grantees only)    NAME  REPRESENTING  Ellen Richardson‐Adams, Chair  Division of Public & Behavioral Health  Michael Mc Mahon, Co‐Chair  Substance Abuse Prevention & Treatment Agency  Elizabeth (Betsy) Aiello  Division of Health Care Financing & Policy  Steven Fisher  Division of Welfare & Supportive Services  Kevin Quint  Department of Health & Human Services  Vacant  Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation   Carla Jean (CJ) Manthe  Nevada Housing Division  Gilbert (Tony) Ramirez  U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Services  Stephanie Gordon  Individual who has experienced homelessness & recovering  from substance use disorder or co‐occurring disorder  Stephen Shipman  Service Provider (Washoe County Dept of Social Services)  Sr. Pastor John Schmidt  Service Provider(Cornerstone Baptist Church, Elko)  Vacant  Public Housing Authority  Michele Fuller‐Hallauer  State SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access & Recovery (SOAR)  Kelly Robson  Community‐based CABHI grantee  James Dzurenda  Department of Corrections  Kathleen Sandoval  Targeted Populations‐ Children & Youth  Tyrone Thompson  Targeted Populations‐ State Assembly  Wendy Simons  Targeted Populations‐ Veterans’ Affairs          6 

 

  2. List the members of the Steering Committee (to be completed by CABHI grantees only)      MEMBER’S NAME  Affiliation  Stephanie Gordon  Self  Michele Fuller‐Hallauer  Clark County Social Service  Lana Henderson Robards  New Frontier Treatment Center  Erin Kinard  WestCare Nevada  Julianna Mayfield  Volunteers of America – ReStart  Mike McMahon  Division of Public and Behavioral Health  Chris Murphey  New Frontier Treatment Center  Brooke Page  Clark County Social Service  Ellen Richardson‐Adams  Division of Public and Behavioral Health  Kelly Robson  HELP of Southern Nevada    Mindy Torres  HELP of Southern Nevada  Ambrosia Crump  Clark County Social Service    3. List any changes in the Steering Committee within the reporting period, and the impact  of the change on the committee.    The Steering Committee, also referred to as the Nevada Governor’s Interagency Council on  Homelessness (NVICH) CABHI Subcommittee, continued to meet monthly through December 2015  during this reporting period. In December, CABHI‐States and Supplemental subrecipients met with  DPBH, Social Entrepreneurs, Inc. (SEI), and the evaluator to discuss how to reformat the monthly  meetings so that they could serve as a platform for subrecipients to discuss ideas and challenges. It was  agreed that the subrecipients would continue to meet monthly with only the internal team of SEI, DPBH  and the evaluator, and that each quarter, members of the Steering Committee as well as the SAMHSA  Project Officer would be invited to join the public call so that the Steering Committee is aware of project  progress and updates. Subrecipients shared at the December 2015 meeting that they felt unable to have  discussions with the Steering Committee and SAMHSA Project Officer on the phone. By scheduling  quarterly, public meetings, subrecipients will be able to have more open, honest discussions of the  challenges they experience.   

C. Training, TA, and Site Visits  4. Describe staff development for this reporting period (including orientation and  training). Indicate:   Purpose of the training, including target audience   Date(s)/duration of the training   Subject of the training   Number of participants who attended   Who provided the training   Usefulness of the training   Follow‐up plans 

7   

  Purpose/  Target  Audience  SOAR – for  CABHI  personnel 

Date and  Duration  On‐ going/on‐ line  training  

Subject

# of  participants 

Usefulness 

Follow‐Plans

Providers were  Number of  trained on  participants  SOAR so that  enrolled or  they are able  in progress:  to assist clients  4 (ReStart  with applying  VOA)  for SSI/SSDI  5 (HELP of  benefits.  Southern  Nevada)  Technical  1 (NFTC) Assistance  Training for  CSAT Grantee 

Nevada  CABHI  Case managers  Statewide  personnel who  will utilize  SOAR  have been  SOAR with  Coordinator  trained are now  each client to  able to connect  ensure they  their clients  are receiving  with SSI/SSDI  their SSI/SSDI  benefits.  benefits. 

CSAT Grantees 

10/14/15 

CABHI  Personnel 

10/22/16‐ 10/23/16 

Nevada Suicide  Conference 

5 (WestCare) 

Nevada  Coalition for  Suicide  Prevention 

PATH  Grantees 

10/29/15,  12/3/15 

PATH HMIS  Learning  Communities 

1 (NFTC)

SAMHSA

CABHI  Personnel 

11/12/15 

Follow Up 101,  201, 301 

1 (NFTC)

SAMHSA

CABHI  Personnel 

11/12/15 

SOAR Webinar:  Traumatic  Brain Injury  (TBI) 

1 (NFTC)

SOAR Works

8   

Training  Provider 

SAMHSA

CSAT grantees  were provided  an opportunity  to obtain  technical  assistance.  Conference  discussed next  steps in suicide  prevention. 

PATH grantees  participated in  a learning  community  webinar to  share success  and challenges  related to  HMIS.  Personnel  learned best  practices and  strategies for  follow‐up.  This webinar  educated SOAR  practitioners  about the  presence of TBI  among  returning  service  members, as  well as  individuals who  are  experiencing or 

Staff will  utilize skills  obtained  during  webinar.  CABHI  personnel are  better aware  of suicide  prevention  strategies.  Staff will  participate in  learning  community  opportunities  in the future. 

Staff will  implement  skills learned  as a result of  the webinars.  SOAR trained  staff plan to  implement  skills taught  during  webinar with  clients. 

  Purpose/  Target  Audience 

Date and  Duration 

Subject

# of  participants 

Usefulness 

at‐risk of  homelessness.  The webinar  focused on the  challenges  faced by  homeless youth  and the  benefits and  challenges to  collaboration.   Webinar  discussed  promising and  comprehensive  outcomes of  the RAISE Early  Treatment  Program, and  implications for  community  behavioral  health  organizations.  Staff were  trained on new  features in  Clarity. 

CABHI  Personnel 

12/15/15 

Homeless and  Education  System  Collaboration 

1 (NFTC)

National  Center on  Family  Homelessne ss 

CABHI  Personnel 

12/15/15 

Preventing  Disability:  Examining  Outcomes for  New Youth  Psychosis  Treatments 

3 (HELP of  Southern  Nevada) 

National  Council for  Behavioral  Health 

CABHI  Personnel 

12/17/15 

Clarity HMIS  Attendance  Screen/Feature 

1 (NFTC)

Bitfocus

CABHI  Personnel 

12/18/15 

SAIS Data Entry  Training 

1 (NFTC)

Bitfocus

Staff were  trained on how  to enter data  into SAIS. 

HUD funded  providers 

1/6/16

Defining  “Chronically  Homeless”  Final Rule 

3 (NFTC)

HUD

The training  provided a  detailed  overview of  HUD’s new  chronically  homeless  definition, and  how chronically  homeless status  should be  documented. 

9   

Training  Provider 

Follow‐Plans

Agency will  pursue cross  system  collaboration  where  appropriate. 

CABHI  personnel will  continue to  utilize skills  obtained  during  training. 

Staff are now  oriented to  the new  features in  Clarity. No  further follow‐ up plans are in  place.   Staff are now  able to  navigate  through the  SAIS system.  CoC staff will  begin tracking  chronically  homeless  status based  on the new  definition.  

  Purpose/  Target  Audience  CABHI  Personnel 

Date and  Duration 

Subject

# of  participants 

Training  Provider 

Usefulness 

Follow‐Plans

1/14/16 

Person  Centered  Training 

2 (WestCare) 

WestCare

CABHI  personnel will  ensure plans  focus on the  client and  their needs. 

CABHI  Personnel 

1/15/16 

Train the  Trainer 

1 (WestCare) 

WestCare

CABHI  Personnel 

1/25/16‐ 1/29/16 

Veterans  Competency  Training 

5 (WestCare) 

WestCare

SAMHSA  Grantees 

1/26/16‐ 1/28/16 

GPRA Forms  Training 

2 (NFTC)

SAMHSA

CABHI  Personnel 

2/20/16‐ 2/22/16 

Nevada  Department of  Veteran  Services  Training  Workshop 

2 (WestCare) 

Nevada  Department  of Veteran  Services 

CABHI  Personnel 

3/1/16

Community  Re‐Entry for  Justice  Involved  Individuals 

3 (HELP of  Southern  Nevada) 

HUD

CABHI  personnel are  trained to  provide person  centered  planning to  clients.  Providers  trainers with  best practices  and techniques  in training  delivery.  Personnel are  cultural  competent  about veterans  and military  family  members.  The training  demonstrated  how to  complete GPRA  forms.  Training  provided  overview of the  program, and  strategies to  connect  veterans to  services.  The webinar  described  strategies they  utilized to  overcome the  barriers and  challenges  facing  individuals  exiting the  criminal justice  system and  returning to  communities. 

10   

CABHI  personnel will  utilize training  techniques. 

CABHI  personnel will  utilize skills  taught during  training with  their veteran  clients.  CABHI  personnel will  complete  GPRA forms as  trained.  CABHI  personnel will  continue to  utilize skills  obtained  during  training.  CABHI  personnel will  continue to  utilize skills  obtained  during  training. 

  Purpose/  Target  Audience  CABHI  Personnel 

Date and  Duration 

Subject

# of  participants 

Training  Provider 

3/8/16

3 (HELP of  Southern  Nevada) 

Providers’  Clinical  Support  System for  Opioid  Therapies 

CABHI  Personnel 

3/8/16

Addressing the  Peril of Illicit  Drug Use for  Pregnancy:  Medication  Assisted  Treatment &  Integrated  Care  World of  Medicare 

1 (NFTC)

Centers for  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services 

SOAR  Providers,  SOAR  Coordinators,  SOAR Trainers,  SOAR Leaders  and others in  the  community  who provide  services to  immigrants  and non‐ citizens. 

3/10/16 

SOAR Webinar:  Representing  Immigrants  and non‐ Citizens with  Social Security 

3 (HELP of  Southern  Nevada) 

SAMHSA  SOAR TA  Center 

CABHI  Personnel 

3/17/16 

3 (HELP of  Southern  Nevada) 

Centers for  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services 

CABHI  Personnel 

3/21/16 

Better,  Smarter  Healthier;  Initiatives to  Improve Our  Health Care  Delivery  System  State Health  Insurance  Program (SHIP) 

3 (NFTC)

Centers of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services 

   

11   

Usefulness 

Follow‐Plans

The webinar  CABHI  discussed  personnel will  medical  continue to  intervention  utilize skills  obtained  delivered  during  within a  training.  comprehensive  and integrated  set of services.  The online  Staff are  course provided  trained in the  education on  options,  the  eligibility and  fundamentals  enrollment for  of the Medicare  Medicare.  program.  CABHI  The webinar  personnel will  covered key  continue to  areas for  utilize skills  immigrants and  obtained  non‐citizens,  such as,  during  eligibility,  training.  obtaining  documentation,  effects of travel  outside of U.S,  requesting an  interpreter and  other helpful  interviewing  tips and  resources.  The training  CABHI  provided an  personnel will  overview of  continue to  delivery system  utilize skills  reform and  obtained  CMS goals.   during  training.  The training  covered the  purpose of  SHIP. 

Staff are  aware of SHIP  purpose and  services. 

  5. If you received a SAMHSA site visit at any time, please list and provide updates on both  TA Opportunities and Action Items.  A SAMHSA site visit was not conducted during this reporting period.     6. If you received SAMHSA TA at any time, please describe TA and provide updates on  recommendations.  No SAMHSA TA was received during this reporting period.     7. If any training or TA are planned for the next reporting period, describe purpose, topic,  anticipated participants, and providers.    There is a mandatory CABHI –States meeting in Washington D.C. in August 2016. DPBH will be in  attendance, along with the evaluator.     Technical assistance has not been requested for the next reporting period as of April 2016. Additionally,  providers have not identified any trainings in the next reporting period, although they will continue to  attend applicable trainings as they become available.  

II. Project Implementation  A. Project Workplan  1. List and provide status reports of all currently approved project goals and objectives.  If  the grant is significantly behind or falling short in meeting any project goals/objectives,  please explain and provide a plan for resolution /improvement.    Goal 1: Service Capacity ‐ Provide permanent housing, evidence‐based treatment, and critical supportive  services to a growing number of vulnerable people: chronically homeless men, women, and children  who have co‐occurring mental health and substance use disorders.     Status:  Progress has been made in the area of service capacity, and commitment to additional  action has been prioritized:    o Housing for CABHI‐States clients.  During this reporting period, two of the three CABHI‐ States agencies (HELP of Southern Nevada and NFTC) worked collaboratively with the  housing authorities to secure permanent supportive housing vouchers. The third, ReStart,  has a contract with a local jurisdiction for vouchers set‐aside specifically for CABHI clients to  support the permanent housing placements. However, despite these efforts, housing  continues to be a challenge to secure for CABHI clients and agencies have wait lists due to  the lack of housing stock or the strict federal bureaucratic requirements to obtain housing  vouchers. In addition, as the economic recovery takes hold in parts of Nevada, all three  regions report that affordable housing options continue to shrink, with apartment rents  increasing and landlords adding requirements of deposits and background checks. Even with  housing vouchers, this limits the number of options available to house CABHI clients. All of  the grantees report working diligently with landlords in order to establish and maintain  good relationships that can result in housing for their clients.    

12   

 

o

The Nevada Housing Division released their 2015 Annual Housing Survey and found  affordable housing availability to be in a dire predicament:   Average vacancy rates have dropped from 7 percent in 2013 to just 4 percent in  2015.   The gap between Las Vegas (4.3 percent) and Reno (3.5 percent) narrowed in  2015.   Twenty‐nine percent of properties reported that all units were full (0 percent  vacancy rate).   Rents have increased by 11 percent since 2013.   Seventy percent of apartment properties have waiting lists that continue to  grow, with the median waitlist length being 27 households in 2015.   All (100 percent) properties with rental assistance reported having a  waitlist. 1    Lack of affordable rental stock is also a concern in northern Nevada as two companies, Tesla  and Switch, have broken ground on facilities in the region which will result in an infusion of  workers in need of housing. Finally, NFTC is located in the same community as the Fallon  Naval Air Station.     CABHI‐States Supplemental added 50 CABHI clients in southern Nevada. Clark County Social  Services has secured housing resources for the Vivo Project clients. This will ensure those  clients are stably housed.    Leadership across the state, including the ICH, have identified availability of affordable  housing for low‐income individuals and families as a critical issue and are working to  promote policies that incentivize development and set‐asides for low‐income, affordable  housing. A housing summit hosted in northern Nevada is scheduled for April 2016. This  summit, planned by ICH members, is intended to promote development and will alternate  between the north and south every six months.     Enrollment in CABHI‐States. Clients have been identified and enrolled in northern, rural, and  southern Nevada for placement in CABHI‐States.  As of March 31, 2016, 19 clients were  enrolled in Year 3.   The client target was 120.  The decline in new clients was limited due to  best practice program guidelines.   The lack of staff available to handle the case loads of this  high‐need population requiring heavy individualized and intensive attention was one factor.   In addition, the lack of new clients in southern Nevada was due to at least two key factors:   there were staffing restraints as well as lack of flexibility in providing housing due to  geographic program requirements. A final factor in the decline of clients served during this  reporting period was due to the delay in receiving contracts from the State. Because  subrecipients did not have contracts, they were unable to enroll clients into the program.    

                                                                     1

 Nevada Housing Division. Taking Stock 2015: Nevada Housing Division 2015 Annual Affordable Apartment Survey. Accessed  online on April 20, 2016 at http://housing.nv.gov/uploadedFiles/housingnvgov/content/Public/2015TakingStockForum.pdf  

13   

  Table 1 Fiscal Year 2015-2016 Clients Served by Site CABHI-States

   Agency 

ReStart  Help  New Frontier  Statewide 

   No. New  Clients  2015 

  No. New  Clients  2016 

34 49 19 102

   Annual Target 

7 2 10 19

30 70 20 120

No. of  All   2016  2016  6‐Month  6‐Month  Follow Ups  Follow Ups  Completed Per  Completed Per  GPRA Report*  Download*  2  12 1  10 0  10 3  32

* The numbers in these two columns represent (1) the number of six-month follow-ups counted as within the allowed timeframe (FLWP=11) based on the GPRA follow-up report; and (2) the numbers of follow-ups appearing in the 2016 download of clients from the GPRA system. NB: The CDP data has evidently not yet been migrated over, so these numbers are subject to update when that does occur.

The final 2015 client numbers show that the state project met 86% of its new headcount  targets despite limitations of staffing and housing availability.  It appears based on the  2016 year‐to‐date numbers, the statewide program goals for new clients will be met by  two sites, but likely fall short statewide.     With regard to the follow‐up requirements, due to the downtime of the GPRA and CDP  system, follow‐ups could not always be entered into the system in a timely manner.   In  addition, according to the GPRA help desk, apparently not all CDP data has been  migrated back into the GPRA system as of this date.  These issues are in addition to the  fact that this population is difficult to retain and, naturally, to locate if they drop out of  the program.      o

Enrollment in CABHI‐States Supplemental. Clients have been identified and enrolled in  CABHI‐States Supplemental, began in late July 2015. As of March 31, 2016 a total of 34  new clients for Fiscal Year 2016 have been enrolled. Thus the project is on track to meet  its annual goal of 50 clients.    Table 2 Fiscal Year 2016 Clients Served by Site CABHI-States Supplemental

   Agency 

Clark County‐the Vivo  Project 

   No. of New  Clients Served 

   Annual Target 

34

50

 

14   

No. of  6 Month  Follow Ups  Completed 

All   2016  6‐Month  Follow Ups  Completed Per  Download*  2**  5

 

o

The Vivo Project completed two follow‐ups of the six that were due according to the GPRA  on demand report.  However, 5 were actually completed based on the 2016 raw download  file from GPRA.       These numbers are the total number of follow ups completed.  Please note not all clients  would be in the program 6 months and require a follow up at the time the data was  requested, so a rate cannot be calculated from these figures.     Enrollment in CABHI‐States Enhancement.  Clients have not been identified and enrolled in  CABHI‐States Enhancement as contracts were not yet issued to the two providers, Washoe  County Social Service and The Children’s Cabinet as of March 31, 2016. Thus the project is  not on track to meet its annual goal of 100 clients.    Table 3 Fiscal Year 2016 Clients Served by Site CABHI-States Enhancement

   Agency 

   No. of New  Clients Served 

   Annual Target 

No. of  6 Month  Follow Ups  Completed 

All   2016  6‐Month  Follow Ups  Completed Per  Download*  0  0

Washoe County Social  0 80 Services  The Children’s Cabinet  0 20 0  0   o Assisted Outpatient Treatment. DPBH identified existing opportunities to build on in order  to address the “super‐utilizers:” 1) specialized PACT teams, 2) assisted outpatient treatment,  or 3) outpatient civil commitment (court mandated medication), 4) outpatient treatment,  and 5) housing compliance. The state and other community partners are working together  to assess and deliver those services.     o

  o

Housing First. This model of service delivery has been adopted in both northern and  southern Nevada, including the CABHI providers, and is being promoted and adopted as  capacity allows in many counties in rural Nevada.   Development of a Peer Support Network. DPBH is working on several major Peer Support  initiatives, which include:   The Nevada Peer Leadership Advisory Council (NPLAC), consisting of both mental  health and addictions Peers, and family members of Peers, to help provide guidance  and advisory support representation of peers met monthly during the reporting  period. They are currently working to develop draft certification language for Peer  Support Organizations. Once the language has been developed and approved by  NPLAC, NPLAC will have a conversation with the health licensing unit to determine  whether licensure will be administered by the state or an independent entity.   Establishing in Nevada state statutes pertaining to the development of criteria for  licensed Peer Support Recovery Organizations (PSRO) that would ultimately employ  and create workforce opportunities for mental health and addictions peers. The  15 

 

 

o

o

Division of Public and Behavioral Health submitted a Bill Draft (S.B. 489) to the State  Legislator creating PSRO’s. It was signed into law by Governor Brian Sandoval on  June 5, 2015.   Establishing in Nevada state statutes pertaining to the development of a  certification program for individual mental health and substance abuse peers, who  complete the 40‐hour training curriculum and meet other Medicaid requirements.  The training modules have all been completed. S.B. 489, approved in June 2015, will  provide the infrastructure, policy, and procedures needed for certification and  monitoring. The Council has noted that S.B. 489 does not define peer support  services. The Council is working to further define the duties of a peer recovery  support specialist, as well as determine the training and certification requirements.    Working with Medicaid to assure the PSROs, which eventually become licensed and  who employ peers which meet Medicaid criteria, are eligible for reimbursement,  thus increasing workforce opportunities for peers. Nevada Medicaid regulations  allow Peer Support services to be billed to Medicaid.   Developing a website called Nevada Partners for Peers Supports (NPPS) where  important information can go, including but not limited to agendas and minutes of  Peer Leadership Council meetings, bylaws, job descriptions, jobs wanted, and  agency and other peer updates. The project went live in July 2015.      CABHI‐States Supplemental Grant. DBPH was granted the CABHI‐States Supplemental  Application. The Supplemental Application added additional resources through the Vivo  Project. The Vivo Project provides Intensive Case Management (ICM), combining permanent  housing, evidence‐based treatment, and critical supportive services to homeless veterans  with severe mental illness and chronically homeless individuals with co‐occurring mental  health and substance use disorders. The CABHI‐States Supplemental grant is specifically  targeted to expanding the continuum of care, through ICM, targeting veterans and  chronically homeless super‐utilizers of emergency, hospital and law enforcement services.  The target population are 50 (annually) “super‐utilizers” of emergency, hospital and law  enforcement services in Clark County with the goal of helping them achieve stability and  wellness. With funding from the Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Clark County  Social Service (CCSS) contracted with WestCare to implement the Vivo Project in the Clark  County/Las Vegas metropolitan area, identifying consumers who would most benefit from  ICM services. Housing is provided through CCSS’s HUD Housing project. While WestCare is  still working to secure a psychiatrist, their case managers have begun to see CABHI‐ Supplemental clients.      CABHI‐States Enhancement Grant. In April 2015, Nevada applied for a CABHI‐States  Enhancement grant. The funding from the grant will be used to expand and enhance the  scope of the project funded under the CABHI‐States original grant. DPBH received  notification of grant award (NOGA) in September 2015.  

  According to the grant application narrative, the enhancement funds will be used to develop  a system of care (SOC) that addresses the unique needs of homeless individuals. The CABHI  Project Director will manage the System of Care (SOC) in the north and south to create a  statewide approach. The enhancement will:     Increase current CABHI provider capacity through additional case managers,  16   

  

 





Provide additional resources to provide rental deposits; utility deposits; additional  beds targeting youth and young adults who have aged out of the foster system;  and expanded a voucher program.  Expand the resources to provide a higher level of available wrap‐around services  to enhance the project design and results.  Add a Statewide Employment Specialist to provide a resource in the System of  Care (SOC) to better link the homeless population with rehabilitation and  vocational services as well as job services.  Promote working through the emergency room services to provide linkage to  community case managers to minimize the use of the emergency rooms as  primary care, and provide the key linkages to the SOC behavioral and mental  service networks.  Expand the opportunity for services providers to participate in the HMIS and work  towards the integrated system of reporting for those who service Homeless  individuals. 

  As of March 31, 2016, neither of the two new subrecipients (Washoe County Social Service  and The Children’s Cabinet) had received contracts due to the State’s length regulatory  requirements. Because of this, staffing remains vacant and no clients were enrolled into  the program.     o CABHI –States II: On March 15, 2016, DPBH applied for CABHI‐States II. The purpose of the  DPBH CABHI program, in collaboration with the Nevada Interagency Council on  Homelessness, is to provide coordinated, accessible, community‐based, evidence‐ informed, individualized services that are culturally and linguistically sensitive through  community‐based mental health programs, across Nevada. The DPBH is focused on two  main objectives:  (1) enhance and develop the State’s infrastructure to increase its  capacity to provide comprehensive services to chronically homeless individuals with co‐ occurring disorders and ultimately, to reduce and end homelessness in Nevada; (2) to  increase the State’s capacity to provide comprehensive, evidence based treatment and  recovery support services to chronically homeless persons with co‐occurring mental health  and substance use disorders who have attained permanent supportive housing. The  strategy is to work in partnership with homeless‐service providers across the state and the  State’s CoCs to deliver evidence‐based services to chronically homeless persons with co‐ occurring mental health and substance use disorders. The proposed sub‐recipients for  CABHI‐States II will be ReStart (VOA), HELP of Southern Nevada – Shannon West Homeless  Youth Center, Clark County Social Service: SOAR, New Frontier Treatment Center, and The  Children’s Cabinet. The total number of unduplicated clients served in this grant is:  120  per year or 360 unduplicated clients across the 3‐year term of the grant    Goal 2: State Infrastructure ‐ Increase Nevada’s capacity to address homelessness by forming sustained  partnerships across government, community and consumer sectors, including re‐establishing the State  Interagency Council on Homelessness, developing a statewide plan to end homelessness, and partnering  with regional Continua of Care to access and coordinate housing and other critical resources.    Progress has been made on a number of fronts related to state infrastructure.   

17   

  o

o

o

Staffing. Since its establishment in July 2013, DPBH has redirected existing job functions and  hired and/or contracted for a number of staffing positions specifically aimed at  strengthening its ability to address homelessness by forming sustained partnerships across  government, community, and consumer sectors:     The Statewide SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR) Coordinator/Trainer  was hired in January 2015. The SOAR Coordinator has continued to provide a  number of online and in person trainings for CABHI personnel. In the previous  reporting period (August 2015), the SOAR Coordinator worked with SAMHSA and  Policy Research Associates, Inc. to host a statewide SOAR forum. SOAR fundamental  information was provided as well as best practices to highlight strategies that could  strengthen local SOAR programs. More than 60 (68) service providers attended  across the state, marking the first time that case managers across Nevada came  together to discuss the importance of SOAR and to share strategies for  implementing SOAR in their agencies.  Additionally, the SOAR Coordinator hosted  two SOAR Fundamentals training events in northern Nevada on March 9‐10, 2016. A  separate SOAR Fundamental training was provided in southern Nevada on  November 5, 2015. The CABHI‐States Enhancement grant included funding to hire a  Statewide SOAR Specialist. Clark County Social Service has been unable to move  forward with filling the position due to the delay in receiving a contract from the  State, but anticipate being able to hire in the next reporting period.     Governor’s Interagency Council on Homelessness. On November 4, 2013 Nevada Governor  Brian Sandoval signed into effect an Executive Order to reinstate the Nevada State  Interagency Council on Homelessness (NVICH). The Council was appointed and met for the  first time on September 9, 2014. The three Continua of Care (CoCs) in Nevada entered into  an interagency agreement to provide staff support and information to the Council. The  Council meets bi‐monthly and developed a statewide strategic plan to end homelessness.  They established the CABHI subcommittee (also known as the CABHI Steering Committee)  and a Strategic Planning subcommittee was used to develop a statewide strategic plan to  end homelessness. The Strategic Planning subcommittee identified eight strategic issue  areas in the strategic plan, as well as goals to address each area.     Statewide Strategic Plan to End Homelessness. During this reporting period, the Council’s  strategic planning subcommittee completed its implementation plan for the statewide  strategic plan. It was adopted and forwarded to the Governor.  

  The subcommittee identified a number of goals and strategies around eight strategic issue  areas: housing, homelessness prevention and intervention, wraparound services, education  and workforce development, coordination of primary and behavioral health, coordination of  data and resources, policies, and long term planning. The Council adopted the statewide  strategic plan in June of 2015, and workgroups have developed implementation plans for  each of the strategic issue areas. The goals of the plan are as follows:    

Strategic Issue #1  ‐ Housing   Goal 1: Preserve the existing affordable housing stock   Goal 2: Provide the resources necessary to further expand and develop the  inventory by 2020.  18 

 

  













Goal 3: Systemically as a state, identify, standardize, and promote all types  of housing interventions in Nevada for subpopulations by 2017.  Strategic Issue #2 – Homelessness Prevention and Intervention   Goal 1: Expand affordable housing opportunities (including Transitional  Housing (TH)) through improved targeting of current housing programming  that provide rental subsidies as well as an increase in construction of new or  rehabilitated housing in all communities.   Goal 2: Coordinate housing programs and agencies to provide housing  mediation opportunities for individuals and families who are at‐risk of being  evicted.   Goal 3: Rapidly rehouse people who fall out of housing.   Goal 4: Provide cash assistance to individuals and families who are at‐risk of  eviction to cover rent, mortgage, or utility arrears.  Strategic Issue #3 – Wraparound Services   Goal 1: Increase access to all funding (federal, foundations, grants, private)  for which Nevada may be eligible.   Goal 2: Each homeless or at risk of homelessness individual has a person‐ centered care plan, developed through appropriate credentialed personnel,  that meets their medical and social needs.  Strategic Issue #4 – Education and Workforce Development   Goal 1: Expand economic opportunities (through initiatives such as  workforce development, education opportunities, and job skills training) for  those who are at‐risk or are homeless are self‐sufficient through a living  wage.   Goal 2: Increase access to education for people experiencing or most at risk  of homelessness.   Goal 3: Determine eligibility and apply for all mainstream programs and  services to reduce peoples’ financial vulnerability to homelessness.   Goal 4: Improve access to high quality financial information, education, and  counseling.  Strategic Issue #5 – Coordination of Primary and Behavioral Health   Goal 1: Integrate primary and behavioral health care services with homeless  assistance programs and housing to reduce peoples’ vulnerability to and the  impacts of homelessness.   Goal 2: Advance health and housing stability for people experiencing  homelessness who have frequent contact with hospitals and criminal  justice.  Strategic Issue #6 – Coordination of Data and Resources   Goal 1: The system is integrated, streamlined, promotes data sharing and is  captured consistently in HMIS.   Goal 2: Implement centralized/coordinated intake assessment and access  for all housing programs throughout the state for the homeless or those at  risk of homelessness.   Goal 3: Regularly identify options to coordinate resources.  Strategic Issue #7 – Policies 

19   

  



Goal 1: Public and private partnerships who provide services to prevent and  end homelessness will coordinate policy to ensure that barriers are  eliminated and goals of the strategic plan are achieved.   Goal 2: Close the gap in appropriate credentialed health professionals  statewide.   Goal 3: Break the cycle of incarceration that leads to disrupted families,  limited economic prospects and poverty, increased homelessness or at risk  of homelessness, and more criminal activity.  Strategic Issue #8 – Long Term Planning   Goal 1: The strategic plan document is re‐assessed and updated at least  every five years to prevent and end homelessness.   Goal 2: Public outreach and education is conducted to remove the stigma  around homelessness and create awareness. 

  Workgroups were established in July 2015, and have met at least quarterly during this reporting period,  and report back to the ICH at each Council meeting. Each workgroup is charged with implementation of  the goals and action plans assigned to their workgroup. The workgroups include:   

Workgroup:  Coordination of  Primary and  Behavioral Health  and Wraparound  Services

Workgroup: Coordination of Data  and Resources

Workgroup:  Education and  Workforce  Development

ICH

Workgroup:  Housing, and  Homelessness  Prevention and  Intervention

Workgroup: Policies  and Long Term  Planning

    The workgroups have met regularly during the reporting period. The specific dates for each workgroup  meeting are as follows:  Workgroup  Meeting Dates  Workgroup #1: Housing, and Homelessness  December 2, 2015; January 6, 2016; February 3,  Prevention and Intervention  2016, March 2, 2016  Workgroup #2: Education and Workforce  February 28, 2016; March 17, 2016  Development  Workgroup #3: Coordination of Primary and  December 7, 2015; January 11, 2016; February 8,  Behavioral Health, and Wraparound Services  2016; March 14, 2016  20   

  Workgroup  Workgroup #4: Coordination of Data and  Resources  Workgroup #5: Policies and Long Term Planning  

Meeting Dates  December 15, 2015; February 16, 2016; March  15, 2016  December 21, 2015; January 22, 2016; March 18,  2016 

  o

o

Enhanced Homeless Enrollment, Case Management System Capabilities (Clarity). The  statewide HMIS committee for the CoC has continued to work with the vendor, Bitfocus, to  increase functionality of the HMIS system including development of a statewide centralized  intake process. Bitfocus also is under contract to develop a communication platform, known  as an Application Program Interface (API). The API is a published specification outlining the  types of initial data and formats that can be exchanged between systems. In terms of the  API functionality, the vendor has completed Years 1 and 2 of development, and is currently  in Year 3. Bitfocus has already made considerable progress towards implementation of the  API including software and schema development, however, the patch will not be usable  until the end of Year 3 when all of its functionalities are implemented, due to complexities  of the HMIS system.  Additionally, the VI‐SPDAT vulnerability index assessment tool has  been implemented statewide. It is used by all CABHI providers, and data from the VI‐SPDAT  is now entered into the HMIS system.     Creation of the Division of Public and Behavioral Health. On July 1, 2013, the Nevada State  Legislature created a new Division within the Department of Health and Human Services  (DHHS), which combined three state agencies (Public Health, Mental Health and Substance  Abuse Prevention and Treatment) into the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (DPBH).  Current strategic initiatives and priorities have been identified as:  

  





Build Community Capacity. Historically, Nevada has been responsible for providing  public mental health services. DPBH is prioritizing partnering with key stakeholders  across Nevada to provide community‐based, collaborative behavioral health  services. To move this effort forward, the CABHI enhancement grant includes  strategies for DPBH to provide direct oversight of the homeless service providers  and service providers who provide services to chronically homeless veterans,  unaccompanied youth, women with trauma histories and senior citizens. As  oversight of this project, DPBH will sub‐grant to hire a  Behavioral Health Program  Coordinator for northern and southern Nevada to enhance the no wrong door  approach and provide greater linkage with the behavioral and mental health  systems with homeless services to streamline and provide greater, more timely  access to services.  Crisis Prevention including Screening and Early Intervention. DPBH, the Governor’s  Council on Behavioral Health and Wellness and policymakers across the state are  focused on providing an entry point into the system aside from local emergency  rooms, because 90 percent of those needing behavioral health care are not in need  of acute medical care. This includes developing mobile outreach and crisis  intervention teams. The Vivo Project, which is now operational, is targeting  outreach to this population.  Stable Housing. DPBH is working to develop community‐based housing plans and  community‐based housing authorities to assist in the delivery of housing services for  homeless individuals and clients with mental illness. The Policy and Advocacy  21 

 

 

o

workgroup of the ICH is evaluating policy changes and incentives needed to develop  more housing options statewide.    DPBH policies.  DPBH is in the process of revising polices to reflect a person‐ centered approach to the provision of all services to meet the identified bio‐ psychosocial needs of the individuals served. In particular the Division is focused on  strengthening housing options for individuals with mental health, substance abuse,  and co‐occurring disorders.    Access to Medicaid. Policies are in place where upon entry into any DPBH behavioral  health program, all individuals will be screened for Medicaid eligibility and, if eligible,  are immediately assisted with expedited enrollment for Medicaid.  Efforts will continue  in discussion with the Division of Welfare and Supportive Services (DWSS) to establish a  process to expedite the applications for individuals with mental/behavioral health  disorders. The three community service providers for the PATH program are the three  providers for the CABHI‐States Grant Project and all three are Medicaid providers. Many  DPBH providers have received Silver State Health Exchange Certified Application  Counselor (CAC) training to assist individuals in enrolling with third party payers.  Ensuring access to Medicaid is also a strategy in each of the regional strategic plans. In  December, 2014 the Housing and Healthcare (H2) initiative convened a two day summit  to discuss streamlining Medicaid and housing. This Initiative has continued to meet,  most recently on February 26, 2016 to identify benefit eligibility and refinement of the  target population. The technical assistance received through H2 is also being used to  assist with the expansion of the 1915(i) Medicaid waiver in Nevada.  

  The draft budget concept paper details the goal of the expansion of the Medicaid 1915  (i) waiver, which is to support individuals to remain housed in the community as well as  decrease hospitalizations and crisis incidents. In order to do this, Nevada Medicaid will  expand services to a targeted population of homeless individuals with mental illness.  Currently, four services are provided by Nevada Medicaid under 1915(i) authority. They  are: Adult Day Health Care, Home‐Based Habilitation, Rehabilitative Partial  Hospitalization and Rehabilitative Intensive Outpatient Services. The proposal aims to  enhance service options to this targeted population in order to add capacity to the  existing community continuum of care and to provide needed services to stabilize  housing and medical needs, thereby reducing the use of alternate community resources.  The proposal seeks to add the following services under 1915(i) authority either through  the provision of services through individual private providers or as part of a package of  services through a single provider organization:  1. Care Coordinator  2. Housing Navigator  3. Non‐medical transportation  4. Residential Habilitation Services  5. Supportive Living Services.     Those receiving services would benefit by receiving necessary supports and care  coordination in to meet the goals of housing‐related‐ care plan, including locating and  maintaining housing. Participants would also benefit by receiving the necessary  supports to meet health care, socialization and other related needs. As individuals  receive benefits and are able to stabilize medical needs, receive temporary housing and  22   

 

o

become connected with longer‐term housing resources, communities would benefit by  seeing a reduction in the use of acute care hospitals, psychiatric hospitals, jails and  alternate service provider    Medicaid is also being addressed in the goals of the Statewide Strategic Plan to End  Homelessness through the following goals and strategies:  o Goal: Increase access to all funding (federal, foundations, grants, private) for  which Nevada may be eligible.   Strategy 3.1.1  Advocate to Medicaid to expand habilitative services  through 1915(i) funds.   Strategy 3.1.2  Research expanding Targeted Case Management (TCM)  billings to benefit all Medicaid providers.  o Goal: Integrate primary and behavioral health care services with homeless  assistance programs and housing to reduce people’s vulnerability to and the  impacts of homelessness.   5.1.2  Provide services in the homes of people who have experienced  homelessness including using Medicaid‐funded Assertive Community  Treatment Teams for those with behavioral health needs by 2018.   5.1.3  Support and evaluate the effectiveness of a “medical home”  model to provide integrated care for medical and behavioral health, and  to improve health and reduce health care costs in communities with the  largest number of people experiencing homelessness by 2019.   5.1.4  Support medical respite programs in southern and northern  Nevada to allow hospitals to discharge people experiencing  homelessness with complex health needs to medical respite programs  that will help them transition to supportive housing by 2019.   5.1.5   Increase availability of behavioral health services by 15% in  southern, northern, and rural Nevada, including community mental  health centers, to people experiencing or at risk of homelessness.   o Goal: Public and private partnerships who provide services to prevent and end  homelessness will coordinate policy to ensure that barriers are eliminated and  goals of the strategic plan are achieved.   7.1.4  Implement Medicaid program changes by 2018 to improve  behavioral and physical health care delivery in supportive housing.    The NV ICH will continue to track and report on implementation of these strategies.    Development of Medicaid provisions (e.g., Medicaid billable services). Medicaid  provisions are being developed to cover the various services needed for those who  experience chronic homelessness. DPBH will continue to partner with the Division of  Health Care Financing and Policy (DHCFP) in order to ensure all billable services and  opportunities are maximized to include ongoing advocacy for new programs/policies  targeted to ensure services are available to individuals who experience chronic  homelessness.  DHCFP has drafted a budget concept paper to expand the 1915(i)  Medicaid waiver to include habilitative services, and is preparing for its submission to  DHHS in June 2016.      

23   

  o

Assisting substance abuse treatment and homeless providers in becoming Medicaid  providers and developing Medicaid reimbursement mechanisms.  The Substance Abuse  Prevention and Treatment Agency’s (SAPTA) ongoing collaborative efforts in working  with SAPTA providers have resulted in expanded capacity to serve the homeless  population.  DPBH has assisted in the development of a new substance abuse/co‐ occurring disorders provider (Provider Type 17) in partnership with Medicaid or the  Division of Health Care Finance & Policy (DHCFP).  Provider Type 17 is a clinic model that  is available only to SAPTA funded treatment agencies. All potential SAPTA clients are  screened for Medicaid eligibility by treatment program staff. This investment in building  the capacity of substance abuse and mental health providers to bill Medicaid is showing  positive results. Typically, Medicaid reimburses for assessments and outpatient levels of  care. SAPTA can reimburse for services that Medicaid does not typically reimburse. This  affords a greater ability for Medicaid eligible clients to access a wide variety of  treatment and support services.  More providers are billing, and receiving  reimbursement from Nevada Medicaid, as well as from the Managed Care Organizations  (clients in urban counties are covered by the MCOs).      Section 223 of the Protecting Access to Medicare Act (PAMA) of 2014 supports states in  establishing certified community behavioral health clinics (CCBHCs) through the creation  and evaluation of a CCBHC 223 Demonstration Program. The objective of the CCBHC  demonstration is to improve behavioral health outcomes for targeted populations  through innovation and transformation of the way primary and behavioral health care is  delivered. In October 2015, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services  Administration (SAMHSA), in collaboration with CMS, awarded a total of $22.9 million in  planning grants to 24 states to support improvement of behavioral health outcomes  through the integration of primary health care with behavioral health care, and  increased access to high quality, coordinated care for Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries.  Nevada received a CCBHC planning grant in the amount of $933,067 to:     Engage stakeholders and coordinate activities across the health care community  and state agencies to access needs and ensure services are accessible and  available.   Certify CCBHCs based on the requirements established by CMS.   Identify primary care and behavioral health services that will be available.   Implement evidence‐based practices.   Support existing behavioral health and primary care providers to explore their  capabilities to become CCBHCs.   Establish a PPS methodology for payment, including a quality‐based incentive  payment component.   Build the infrastructure for data collection and reporting.    At the end of the planning grant period, Nevada submitted an application and was  selected to participate in the two‐year Demonstration Program.  

o

Engaging and enrolling persons who experience chronic homelessness into Medicaid  and other mainstream benefit programs (e.g., SSI/SSDI, TANF, SNAP, etc.).  As with  chronic homelessness, whenever a client is determined to have needs, the individual is 

 

24   

 

o

referred for targeted case management to assist in linkage to needed benefits and  services. DPBH is also in the process of adding clinical verbiage required for SSI/SSDI  benefits to the standard electronic medical record to document impediments to  employment. With the PATH Grant funds, these three providers aggressively engage in  outreach activities to homeless individuals with mental illness or a co‐occurring mental  illness and substance abuse disorder. Providers have indicated that all CABHI clients are  being enrolled in Medicaid. In addition, the CABHI enhancement grant will add to state  infrastructure by providing an additional SOAR Benefits Specialist (Case Manager II) to  work with referral sources and community partners to identify candidates, Veterans,  and those with mental health disorders through referrals and outreach. In addition,  there would be enhanced ability to track submission rates of the SOAR‐trained service  providers, by agency. This position would carry the following responsibilities: 1) Initiate  paperwork with consumers referred to program by filing initial documentation of  representation with SSA office; 2) Complete interviews with consumers to gather  information to complete SSI/SSDI applications; 3) Gather medical records and other  information to complete SSI/SSDI applications; 4) Accompany consumers to  appointments at the Social Security Administration office; 5) Coordinate visits to medical  doctors, psychiatrics, and other specialist to obtain evidence for case And 6) Assist the  team with administrative tasks as needed.    Streamlining Eligibility processes. Implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)  required each state to develop a single‐streamline application (SSA) for Medicaid  services. The SSA was designed to be an online tool as part of the state or federal based  exchange used to obtain healthcare coverage. In Nevada, the Silver State Health  Insurance Exchange (SSHiX) was tasked with the creation and implementation of the  SSA. Once the SSA was developed and coded into the SSHiX web site, that page became  the only access point to submit an application for healthcare coverage (Medicaid or  Qualified Health Plan).  

  



In the prior reporting period, the State of Nevada Division of Welfare and  Supportive Services (DWSS) reached out to the community‐based providers to  provide instruction on how to use the web site and take in comments to  improve the application process. The effort was well received. A great many of  the community‐based providers participated, and continue to participate, in  these efforts. Additionally, a number of community‐based providers became  Certified Application Counselors (CAC’s) in order to assist people in submitting  applications for healthcare coverage.   Nevada’s Aging and Disability Services Division (ADSD) convened an Advisory  Board to help the State of Nevada develop a three year implementation plan to  expand no wrong door (NWD) philosophy to all populations and all payers. Their  three year strategic plan was adopted in 2015. The goals of the plan are:   Goal #1: Engage and inform consumers, caregivers, and providers in the  NWD system to develop support for the initiative and increase access to  care.   Goal #2: Implement high quality person‐centered counseling across  agencies based on established standards.   Goal #3: Improve access and availability to long term services and  supports.  25 

 

  



Goal #4: Develop an integrated information technology (IT) system to  improve access for consumers and improve efficiencies across programs  and providers.  Goal #5: Establish a governing board to guide, promote, and ensure  success of NWD in Nevada. 

  2. Describe evaluation activities during the reporting period.    The following evaluation activities occurred during this reporting period.        Evaluation  Activities  Date Completed  Review of program documents  October 2014 to present  Training in GPRA, CDP and HMIS/Clarity systems    October 2014 to March 2016  Work with program staff on data systems and access    for the evaluation  October to present   Evaluation plan developed and approved   2/20/15  Monthly statistical reports produced at time of  Monthly reports have been  monthly call.   produced and discussed at each of  the statewide teleconference calls.  6 month summary report     Completion of the report in March  2016. Final version will be provided  in April 2016.  Data administration ‐   Extensive work has been   ‐ Generate reports with demographics and summary  accomplished to work with sites to  of 6 month follow‐up rates, etc.     get data into the system, generate  meaningful results and break down  information by site for the program  managers.  Monthly calls to providers to check in on evaluation  Monthly and continuous  needs, issues   Preparation for annual site visits, interview protocols  Completed. IRB approvals obtained  for stakeholders and clients.    for client focus groups   Annual Site Visits & focus group  The 2016 site visits have been  Interviews  tentatively scheduled for the first  week of June. Focus groups will be  set for August closer to the end of  the fiscal year.   Annual Evaluation Report  Report delivered to the state mid‐ October of 2015, but no numerical  data was available at that time.  This  six month report included final 2015  numbers as well as year to date  2016.      26   

  

Discuss how evaluation findings were used to improve the project. 

The 2015 six month interim evaluation report was completed in April and discussed with the state  project managers.  The report was geared to address the central goals of the project including:  disparity  access, numerical goals, and outcomes as identified and reported through the legacy Government  Performance and Results Act (GPRA) system.  Client outcomes are positive.      In addition, at follow‐up site visits, the evaluation findings were discussed with individual programs.   Other elements discussed focused on ensuring that programs understood when to conduct follow‐up  reports with each client. In addition, clarity about the difference between race and ethnicity, and the  need to collect both race and ethnicity data was discussed.   Discussion of the data was also used to  determine whether adjustments need to be made in the programs as they are currently being  implemented.      One of the findings of the evaluation was that communications across sites would be helpful.  Provider  interviews indicated there was a desire to share and learn from each other in a free and open manner.   Therefore, in December of 2015, the first face‐to‐face statewide meeting was held in Las Vegas which  brought together staff from all sites as well as the state project directors, the evaluator and a data  systems representative. Results of the evaluation report, which had been shared already, were  presented for discussion and action steps going forward.        Problem solving on data issues related to challenges in administering the program and the CDP were a  high priority.  Solutions and alternatives were discussed among participants.  The project managers also  discussed issues regarding outcomes of the program and shared practices found to be successful among  this population.   The meeting was well received and perceived to be very beneficial.  As a result, a  meeting in the spring was also scheduled. This will take place on May 11, 2016.      Discuss any problems encountered in conducting the evaluation, the impact of these problems on  the evaluation and on the overall project, and plans for resolving the problems.  The loss of the GPRA system and its data, as well as the loss of the new CDP system has prevented the  sites from entering data into the system in as timely a manner as needed.  The state proactively  explored and proposed a number of interim solutions that were discussed with the Federal Project  Officer. As a result, subrecipients were asked to provide headcounts of clients and submit data in  December. Additionally, the remains an ongoing discrepancy between what the GPRA platform reports  and the numbers found in a report download. For example, the number of six month follow‐ups  completed per report Statewide for the reporting period was three (3) as listed in the GPRA report. The  data download, however, reported a total of 32 six month follow‐ups.     3. Present evaluation findings to date, including outcomes, process findings, results of  special studies, etc.    The six month report is attached which provides numerical targets for each site and their numbers and  headcount, information on the outcomes and characteristics of the population.  Disparity goals and  comparisons to point in time census figures for the state were also provided. Highlights of the findings  to date include:   The project has positively influenced the state's capacity to address the needs of the homeless  population throughout the state. The ongoing planning efforts have been rigorous and helpful to  27   

 

   

inform and motivate agencies and develop collaborations.   The simple process of receiving this grant, learning about  the federal award process, and having the ability to take  in clients with high need was uniformly noted to be  beneficial and a positive learning experience.    The case managers carry very heavy loads and are not  always able to care for this high need‐population to the  extent they would like.   Staff feel that greater peer‐to‐peer communications  among the sites would be beneficial.   Data collection and entry has been problematic, largely  because the federal reporting system is not functioning.    Obstacles are lack of sufficient funds for housing; lack of  housing options in the rural areas and higher than ideal  caseloads.  Because enrollment has been strong in the  programs, caseloads are over limit and thus outside of  fidelity for Integrated Case Management (ICM).   Additionally, there has been a delay in executing grants  that would build CABHI‐States Enhancement  infrastructure 

    4. If the GPRA intake is below 100 percent or 6‐ month follow‐up is below 80 percent, please  explain the plan for reaching the targets.    Due to the low follow‐up at mid‐year for 2016, at the next  statewide meeting in May 2016, the issue of successful  techniques for improving the follow‐ups will be discussed and  best practices shared among the providers.   Part of the issue  was not being able to locate clients and part was due to not  conducting the follow‐ups within the required time frame as  previously discussed.    Going forward, a possible solution will be closer monthly  monitoring.  Follow‐ups due by client id will be generated,  distributed, and sites will be requested to report on their  numbers at each of the monthly statewide teleconferences.   

B. Significant Project Activities  1. Provide details if there were any adverse events  during the reporting period, such as deaths or  injuries to clients or staff. Discuss any actions  taken following the events to learn from the  experience and prevent future adverse events.    No adverse events were noted during this reporting period.   28   

Feedback from Clients of the Grant for the Benefit of Homeless Individuals Clark County Clients An additional focus group was  conducted for the Clark County  Social Services program operated by  Westcare during this year.  The  group was conducted during the  spring of 2016 to ensure inclusion of  Clark County clients' feedback into  the evaluation report.     The focus group was conducted  with a number of recent  participants in the program. Each  client was extremely satisfied with  the services of the program and  their case workers.  They were  especially appreciative of the  individualized manner their  treatment program was being  handled by their West Care case  workers.  They felt respected and  were particularly happy that their  unique circumstances and needs  were recognized and catered to by a  very attentive and caring staff.     The intake process was perceived as  beyond smooth, actually perfectly  seamless.  The clients recounted of  literally being picked up from their  existing encampment and being  whisked away into a bus and into  their single unit lodging.  The  housing they were provided was  favorably regarded.  Medical needs  were especially important among  this group and those needs were  also carefully attended to.  Strong  and sensible coordination with their  veterans and other health care  benefits and government programs  was likewise lauded as exemplary.  

    2. Discuss problems or barriers encountered during the reporting period (including GPO‐ initiated Corrective Action Plans). Describe the barrier, the impact on the project  implementation, and steps taken or planned to overcome the barrier.    Barrier: Because of the lack of housing stock available in northern, southern, and rural Nevada, as well  as strict requirements to obtain housing vouchers, providers currently have long wait lists and have  difficulty placing clients into permanent housing.     Solution: Providers continue to work with their local Housing Authorities to remove barriers to receiving  housing vouchers. They are also creating relationships with landlords to locate housing for their clients.  They continue to work with the local housing authorities to obtain Section 8 vouchers for their clients.  During this reporting period, vouchers through Nevada Rural Housing Authority were placed on a hold  due to lack of funds, which also occurred during the prior reporting period. Churchill County Social  Services was able to work with NFTC to provide some vouchers for their NFTC CABHI clients. In addition,  they continue to pursue additional funding for housing and advocate for additional housing through the  NV ICH.     A housing summit in northern Nevada is planned for April 2016 to discuss strategies to address the lack  of affordable housing in Nevada.    Barrier: The CABHI‐States grant requires that providers enroll a specific number of clients per each year.  However, the grant does not provide additional funding to support additional case managers to handle  the increased caseload. Because of this, CABHI case managers who had caseloads of 1:30 in Year 1 in  some cases experienced a ratio of 1:60 with the addition of Year 2 clients. If additional case managers  are not hired, caseloads will be 1:90 in Year 3.     Solution: DPBH applied for an expansion grant to address the case manager’s caseloads through hiring  more case managers. DPBH received notification in September that it was awarded funds. In site visits  with CABHI providers in September, they all noted that they had potential candidates for case manager  positions and could hire quickly once the funds are available. This will allow each project to reduce  caseloads and increase the number of home visits conducted with clients. During this reporting period, it  was noted that not all contracts have been executed and subrecipients have been unable to hire  additional case managers. The issue is due to the contracting process which can be arduous, resulting in  long delays. It is anticipated that all contracts will be fully executed by May 2016.     Barrier: During this reporting period, the CABHI‐States Enhancement project experienced a number of  contracting delays due to the State’s regulatory requirements. Even though the State had received its  notice of award in September 2015, some contracts for the CABHI‐States Enhancement subrecipients  had not been executed at the time of this report, which left them unable to fill positions and begin  enrolling clients into the program.    Solution: A report on the status of the CABHI‐States Enhancement contracts will be provided to the  Governor via the ICH. Recommendations for how to streamline the State’s fiscal regulations will also be  provided.   

29   

  3. Discuss any other project activities or events that occurred during the reporting period  that may be important in understanding the progress of the project or the circumstances  under which the project operates.    The loss of the GPRA system and its data, as well as the loss of the new CDP system has prevented the  sites from entering data into the system in as timely a manner as needed.  The state proactively  explored and proposed a number of interim solutions that were discussed with the Federal Project  Officer.     4. Sustainability plans:   Describe efforts to implement the Sustainability Plan and the steps taken  during the award period to ensure continuance of the program after the  award period has ended (e.g. decrease dependence on grant funding by  gradually increasing the availability of other funds over the life of the award).   Components of the sustainability plan have been developed as part of the Statewide Strategic Plan to  End Homelessness. A number of goals have been developed to ensure continuance of the program after  the award period has ended through the development of the following goals and strategies:  o

o

o

Goal: Provide the resources necessary to further expand and develop the inventory by 2020.  o Strategy: Secure affordable permanent housing units statewide as determined by an  annual evaluation to identify ongoing needs.   o Secure permanent supportive housing units based on a Housing First approach,  primarily for chronically homeless, as determined by an annual evaluation to identify  ongoing needs.   Goal: Expand affordable housing opportunities (including transitional housing) through  improved targeting of current housing programming that provides rental subsidies as well as an  increase in construction of new or rehabilitated housing in all communities.  o Strategy: Increase rental housing subsidies to individuals and families experiencing or  most at risk of homelessness by 20 percent in federal, state, local, and private  resources.  o Strategy: Increase the total number of affordable rental homes constructed and  rehabilitated by 10 percent in southern, northern, and rural Nevada.  Goal: Integrate primary and behavioral health care services with homeless assistance programs  and housing to reduce people’s vulnerability to and the impacts of homelessness.  o Strategy: Link housing providers and health and behavioral health care providers to co‐ locate or coordinate health, behavioral health, safety, and wellness services with  housing and create better resources for providers to connect patients to housing  resources by 2018.  o Strategy: Provide services in the homes of people who have experienced homelessness  including using Medicaid‐funded Assertive Community Treatment Teams for those with  behavioral health needs by 2018.  o Strategy: Support and evaluate the effectiveness of a “medical home” model to provide  integrated care for medical and behavioral health, and to improve health and reduce  health care costs in communities with the largest number of people experiencing  homelessness by 2019. 

30   

  o

o

Strategy: Support medical respite programs in southern and northern Nevada to allow  hospitals to discharge people experiencing homelessness with complex health needs to  medical respite programs that will help them transition to supportive housing by 2019.  Strategy: Increase availability of behavioral health services by 15% in southern, northern  and, rural Nevada, including community mental health centers, to people experiencing  or at risk of homelessness. 

In addition, CABHI providers received approval as Provider Type 17 for Medicaid  reimbursement. Special Clinics authorized by the Division of Health Care Financing and Policy  (DHCFP) include Community Health, Family Planning, Federally Qualified Health Centers  (FQHCs), HIV, TB, Methadone, Rural Health (RHC), Special Children's clinics, School Based Health  Centers (SBHC) and Substance Abuse Agency Model (SAAM) clinics. Two of the three CABHI‐ States sites have Provider 17 status. All four CABHI sub grantees are able to bill Medicaid which  creates a funding stream for some of their reimbursable services.   

Include demonstration that any new resources or resources from existing  programs that are included in the funding plan are being allocated specifically  to the GBHI/SSH program. 

The CABHI‐State expansion grant application was awarded in the prior reporting period. The CABHI‐ State expansion grant specifically outlined a strategy to add resources from the Nevada Department of  Employment Training and Rehabilitation (DETR). DETR will provide an Employment Specialist to enhance  state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence‐based supported employment programs  for the population of focus through the funds available for Vocational and Rehabilitation (for Veterans);  registration into JobConnect at one‐stop American Job Centers (AJC); coordination with community  colleges and apprenticeship programs through Jobs for American Graduates (JAG); and be part of the  SOC activities for linkage into the programs. The Nevada JobConnect is a current partner with DPBH to  provide linkage to Veterans programs, access to tax credit programs for Veterans, and to provide all  unemployed individuals with access to job programs, resume’ development and support. This would not  require any additional funding through the CABHI grant. These resources will be used to support the  sustainment of programs.  Additionally, Nevada has applied for CABHI –States II. The purpose of the DPBH CABHI program, in  collaboration with the Nevada Interagency Council on Homelessness, is to provide coordinated,  accessible, community‐based, evidence‐informed, individualized services that are culturally and  linguistically sensitive through community‐based mental health programs, across Nevada. The current  system of coordination for those experiencing homelessness is fragmented and poses significant  coordination and access of care issues that are funding and policy based. The systems that serve  children, youth and families have become increasingly more complicated, growing the need for  coordination, collaboration and case management to reduce duplication of effort, enhance continuity of  care, ensure optimal performance, track outcomes and access across multiple provider systems, and  maximize limited fiscal resources.  The DPBH is focused on two main objectives:  (1) enhance and  develop the State’s infrastructure to increase its capacity to provide comprehensive services to  chronically homeless individuals with co‐occurring disorders and ultimately, to reduce and end  homelessness in Nevada; (2) to increase the State’s capacity to provide comprehensive, evidence based  treatment and recovery support services to chronically homeless persons with co‐occurring mental  31   

  health and substance use disorders who have attained permanent supportive housing. The strategy is to  work in partnership with homeless‐service providers across the state and the State’s CoCs to deliver  evidence‐based services to chronically homeless persons with co‐occurring mental health and substance  use disorders.  These sub‐grantees are experienced providers of behavioral health and social service  delivery recommended by SAMHSA for use with homeless individuals with co‐occurring disorders.  The subrecipients of CABHI‐States II include ReStart (VOA), Help of Southern Nevada – Shannon West  Homeless Youth Center, Clark County Social Service: SOAR, New Frontier Treatment Center, and The  Children’s Cabinet. HELP of Southern Nevada will serve 210 unduplicated clients, ReStart (VOA) will  serve 90 unduplicated clients in the northern Region, and New Frontier Treatment Center will serve 60  unduplicated clients in the 3‐year term of this project. As individuals are deemed eligible for Medicaid  and other entitlement programs, that will open up seats for additional homeless individuals to be  served. 

C. Housing Component    A.Funding Source 

Housing Type1

HELP of Southern Nevada 

Scattered Site

70



New Frontier Treatment  Center 

Congregate/project‐ based 

20

10 

ReStart (VOA) 

Scattered Site

30



 

1 2

Total # of  Units 

# of Persons Served this  Reporting Period2 

scattered, congregate/project‐based, or mixed  explain if the number of persons served reflects turn over in units or multiple occupancies per unit 

  B. Funding Source 

 

WestCare  1 2

Housing Type1

Total # of  Units 

Scattered Site

50

# of Persons Served this  Reporting Period2  34 

scattered, congregate/project‐based, or mixed  explain if the number of persons served reflects turn over in units or multiple occupancies per unit 

   

C. Funding Source 

Housing Type1

Washoe County Social  Services 

Scattered Site

The Children’s Cabinet 

Scattered Site

Total # of  Units 

# of Persons Served this  Reporting Period2 

  80



  20



   

 

32   

  List and describe any changes to required housing (i.e. additional housing secured, loss of  housing, and any other challenges faced) during the reporting period.     

Rural Nevada Housing Authority closed its application system and no further housing  vouchers were available to NFTC since February 2016.   The City of Reno continued to provide funding for CABHI clients in Year 3 of the project  for ReStart (VOA).   HELP of Southern Nevada continued to receive housing support funding from the City of  Las Vegas, Henderson, and North Las Vegas.  WestCare received notification of 50 housing vouchers for the Vivo Project from a grant  secured by Clark County Social Service. 

According to the Nevada Housing Division’s 2015 Housing Report, average vacancy rates  declined for the second year in a row. Over two years, rents at both market rate and affordable  properties increased more than ten percent, while Nevada’s wages only increased three percent  over the past two years. The demand for units with rental assistance is high. The following  charts have been excerpted from the 2015 Taking Stock Housing Report: 

Figure 1 Comparison of 4th quarter market and Low Income Housing Trust Fund vacancy rates 

 

  Figure 2 Properties with a waiting list by presence of rental assistance and by year first built 

33   

 

D. Mainstream Benefits     Site visits are normally used to sample client records at each sub grantee site however, site visits  were not conducted during this reporting period as they had recently been completed in  September 2015 and additional visits will be scheduled in May 2016. The SOAR Coordinator  collects and tracks data regarding client access to mainstream resources. The SOAR Coordinator  indicated the following:     Nineteen individuals in Nevada have completed all aspects of the training which was an  increase of one from the previous reporting period.    Thirty‐eight CABHI personnel have enrolled in the online course and 23 have passed the  online course.   For the period of 10/1/15 to 3/31/16, four SSI/SSDI initial applications were approved  during that period with one application denied.    The average number of days to initial decision was 227 days.    The SOAR Coordinator also provided progress towards their training and technical assistance  goals and objectives for the reporting period:  Y1Q1

Y2Q1

Y2Q2 

(10/1/14‐ 12/31/14) 

(10/1/15‐12/31/15) 

(1/1/16‐3/31/16) 

  Prepare and provide training  and individual technical  assistance and guidance to  community case managers  working with sub‐awardees;  

None 

See Training Data  Below: 

See Training Data  Below: 

Training  curriculum  developed in  previous reporting  period and  updated ongoing 

Training curriculum  developed in previous  reporting period and  updated ongoing 

  Provide Fundamentals training  to northern/rural Nevada at  least 2x/year. 

None  

none  

1 No. NV  Fundamentals Training  provided (next class to  be scheduled for Q4)  (22 attendees, 10  graduates) 

  Schedule monthly technical  assistance calls and bi‐monthly  meetings to assist community  case managers writing Medical 

None 

1 site visit with VA 

4 Site Visits Conducted  with Well care Group,   

 

Training and Technical  Assistance Goals & Objectives 

  Ongoing  telephonic  34 

 

 

1 site visit with  Washoe County SS  

   

Training and Technical  Assistance Goals & Objectives 

Y1Q1

Y2Q1

Y2Q2 

(10/1/14‐ 12/31/14) 

(10/1/15‐12/31/15) 

(1/1/16‐3/31/16)   

 2 SOAR meetings  consultation  provided, however  Ongoing telephonic  incidents were not  consultation provided,  tracked  however incidents  were not tracked 

Summaries in SOAR  applications  Work closely with clients, case  managers and treatment  providers to ensure that SOAR  cases are initiated in a timely  manner to expedite clients’  access to mainstream benefits  (SSI/SSDI)     

Status of Benefit 

  Mainstream 

Benefits  approved 

Benefit Type  Medicaid*  SSI/SSDI 

4   53 

General  Assistance** 

 

TANF  Other (specify) 

Appeal filed Benefits Denied

53  

Food Stamps 

Veteran’s  Benefits/Pension 

Benefit  application  filed

12

2

1

2  Not Applicable   

* HMIS does not have the ability to track if a Medicaid application has been filed, if an appeal has been filed or if  benefits were denied as these statuses are not part of the HMIS data standards. Providers are only able to see if  benefits were approved.   **Churchill County, Washoe County and most rural counties do not have this option. 

 

35   

 

E. Interim Financial Status  1. Report of grant expenditures through the end of the reporting period. Report  expenditures, not obligations. For instance, if you have a contract with an evaluator  for $50,000 a year, but pay it out monthly, report the amount actually paid, not the  amount obligated. [In the ‘Total Funding’ cell, please enter the total amount of grant  funding drawn down since the initiation of the grant.] Calculate ‘Remaining Balance’  by subtracting total cumulative expenditures to date from the total funding amount.    Interim financial status as of March 31, 2016.     

Total Funding: $711,181 Expenditures 

Expense  Category 

Staff salaries 

Expenditures This  Period

Cumulative Expenditures to date 

$115,457.68

$115,457.68 

Fringe  Contracts 

  $120,552.79

Equipment  Supplies  Travel 

  $10,000

$10,000 

$2,236.36

$2,236.36 

Facilities  Training  Other  Total direct  expenditures  Indirect costs  Total  expenditures 

  $245.09

$245.09 

$6,985.50

$6,985.50 

$255,477.42

$255,477.42 

$4,697.84

$4,697.84 

$260,175.26

$260,175.26 

Remaining balance 

$451,005.74 

       

36   

$120,552.79 

  2. Describe any “significant budget modification(s)” during the reporting period (i.e., shift funds  originally budgeted for one purpose, such as Personnel, to another, such as space). A “significant”  modification is any amount greater than 25% of your total award, or any amount $250,000 or greater.  Specify and document SAMHSA approval prior to implementation of the change(s).     There were no significant budget modifications during this period.    3. Describe other budget modifications less than 25% of the total award or below $250,000.    There were no other budget modifications during this period.       

 

37   

 

III. Attachments  The following attachments are included in the submission of this biannual report:   1. 2. 3. 4.

Nevada Governor’s Interagency Council on Homelessness March meeting minutes  2016 6 Month CABHI Evaluation Report   Nevada Division of Housing 2015 Housing Report  CABHI – HMIS API Year 3: Annual Report 10/1/15 – 3/31/16   

38