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Table of Contents Stanley Cup cheers troops in Kandahar; Symbol of hockey glory accompanied by former NHL players lifts spirits of soldiers on visit t...

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Table of Contents Stanley Cup cheers troops in Kandahar; Symbol of hockey glory accompanied by former NHL players lifts spirits of soldiers on visit to Afghanistan....................................................................................1 Hillier says troops dismayed by torture controversy; Canada's top soldier defends decision to sign prisoner−exchange deal.....................................................................................................................................3 Injured soldier recalls deadly blast...................................................................................................................4 Letters | Make deployed spouses proud............................................................................................................6 Hillier: Torture allegations bringing down the troops....................................................................................8 Day remark bolsters human rights case; Abuse claims broad hearsay, say federal lawyers......................9 Making light of a sad situation; Solar lamps tribute to soldier....................................................................11 Full−contact warfare vs. comforts of home; Troops grinding it out in the desert laugh at soft life of KAF...................................................................................................................................................................12 Court asked to halt prisoner transfers; Ottawa's acknowledgment about Afghan torture allegations could help case..................................................................................................................................................15 Soldier's family brings light to a dark world; Papua New Guinea program established in memory of fallen Canadian Goddard...........................................................................................................................17 Corporal describes attack that killed six Canadians.....................................................................................19 Civilian deaths frustrate Karzai; Afghan president facing rising public anger over violent U.S., NATO campaigns.............................................................................................................................................21 Afghanistan mission spinning out of prime minister's control.....................................................................23 Don't politicians have more important work to do?......................................................................................25 Former NHLers cheer troops; Hockey heroes bring Stanley Cup to Afghanistan.....................................27 Family gives gift of light; Parents of fallen soldier mark her birthday by illuminating island nation.....28 N.S. soldier hurt in blast tells of ordeal...........................................................................................................30 A Cup of cheer in Afghanistan; Stanley Cup and veterans of hockey wars provide boost for troops.....33 Hillier defends prisoner deal; General says troops in Afghanistan dismayed by torture controversy.....34 Couple use lights to honour late daughter's war duty...................................................................................35

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Table of Contents Injured Canadian soldier describes blast as 'deep pool'; Corporal talks about Afghan bombing that killed six colleagues..........................................................................................................................................37 Harper on the defensive, Dion on the hot seat................................................................................................39 Malpeque MP tables petition supporting Forces members..........................................................................41 A 'piece of Canada' in Kandahar; Former NHLers accompany trophy on morale−building visit to troops.................................................................................................................................................................42 No more civilian deaths, Afghans warn NATO..............................................................................................44 Martin gov't cleared detainees deal: memos; Civil liberties groups ask court to block transfer of prisoners to Afghan gov't................................................................................................................................45 Soldier's grieving family brightens world; Parents remember Capt. Nicola Goddard by lighting aid stations in impoverished nation......................................................................................................................47 Martin gov't signed deal on detainees.............................................................................................................49 Canada's diplomats failing...............................................................................................................................51 Stanley Cup, former NHLers cheer Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan......................................................53 Hillier says soldiers in Afghanistan unhappy about focus on detainees claims..........................................55 Hillier defends prisoner deal, says troops dismayed by torture controversy..............................................56 N.S. soldier injured in Afghanistan says he'd go back right now if he could..............................................58 He shoots, he trips! Politicians seldom score when playing politics with hockey.......................................59 Afghan, coalition forces kill 13, including 2 women in Kandahar: official.................................................62 Afghan−Violence−Update (No Canadians)....................................................................................................63 Afghan−Civilian Deaths−Update (Karzai).....................................................................................................64 Afghan−Violence...............................................................................................................................................65 BC−Afghan−Violence−Update (Karzai comments).......................................................................................66 Another story that no one is talking about.....................................................................................................67 Some abuse 'possible,' envoy says; Kabul ready to act if there's credible case of human rights violations: Ambassador...................................................................................................................................69

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Table of Contents Harper takes cheap shot...................................................................................................................................71 Regrets? Hillier has none as detainee furor grows; Defends decision to hand over captured Taliban as 'right thing to do'.........................................................................................................................................72 Stanley Cup goes to 'war'.................................................................................................................................75 Penalty for pandering.......................................................................................................................................77 Conservatives taking a bad rap over Afghan prisoner issue........................................................................78 Stanley Cup makes pit stop in Kandahar; Morale booster. 'It's nice to see a piece of Canada come to us'..................................................................................................................................................................80 Afghan detainee deal pinned on Martin; Two years ago. Liberal PM approved Graham negotiations.......................................................................................................................................................82 We Stand on Guard for Stanley......................................................................................................................85 Afghanistan takes a stand on civilian deaths..................................................................................................86 Martin approved transfer negotiations two years ago; Documents clear Hillier to sign detainee deal....87 Crusading MPs deserve a misconduct............................................................................................................89 Soldier's parents share light; Goddards launch solar project a year after Nichola's death......................91 Ottawa has no sense of priorities.....................................................................................................................93 Stanley Cup in Kandahar Trophy, ex−NHLers called big morale boosters...............................................95 Ottawa has no sense of priorities.....................................................................................................................97 Tories to defend POW policy in court.............................................................................................................99 Lord Stanley pays a visit NHL vets give troops a thrill in Kandahar........................................................100 Frontpage ON GUARD FOR STANLEY Ex−NHLers bring hockey's Holy Grail to boost spirits of our sports−starved troops in Afghanistan...................................................................................................102 Ottawa has no sense of priorities...................................................................................................................103 PoW policy put to test Amnesty International takes feds to court to halt transfers................................105 Cup, NHL heroes give troops a lift................................................................................................................107

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Table of Contents Martin approved detainee process; Afghan prisoner protocol set in June 2005......................................108 Liberals approved Afghan detainee deal; Agreement contained no guaranteed access to prisoners by Canada.......................................................................................................................................................110 Cup boosts troops' morale..............................................................................................................................112 Canada's foreign service faltering at a dangerous time..............................................................................114 Liberals OK'd Afghan detainee deal; Ex−PM Martin gave defence minister approval to negotiate transfer agreement.........................................................................................................................................116 Canadian soldiers get the chance to spend quality time with Stanley.......................................................118 Hillier has no regrets signing controversial deal..........................................................................................120 Federal Court to consider detainee affair; Groups want transfers halted until full trial delivers ruling...............................................................................................................................................................121 Karzai condemns civilian deaths...................................................................................................................123 Ottawa has no sense of priorities...................................................................................................................124 Top soldier defends prisoner deal Soldiers are frustrated the issue distracts from the mission.............126 More civilian casualties spark Afghan protests...........................................................................................128 Stanley Cup visit thrills the troops................................................................................................................129 Tories called on carpet over detainees..........................................................................................................130 Ottawa has no sense of priorities...................................................................................................................131 Prisoner deal defended Top soldier calls exchange pact right move at the time......................................133 Ottawa has no sense of priorities...................................................................................................................134 Brighter future emerges from tragedy..........................................................................................................136 PRISONERS IN AFGHANISTAN Top soldier changes tack, expresses doubt on deal Standing by detainee pact, Hillier concedes it lacks safeguards to prevent torture......................................................138 AFGHAN DETAINEES Court to hear transfer−injunction arguments today........................................141 AFGHANISTAN: IN THE COURTS Responsibility doesn't end with the torturer Until Canada receives greater assurances, the transfer of detainees has to stop.............................................................143

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Table of Contents AFGHANISTAN: ON THE GROUND And torture doesn't end with monitoring..................................145 A policy to rule them all.................................................................................................................................147 Top soldier defends detainee deal..................................................................................................................148 Martin gov't signed off on Afghan detainee deal, leaked documents show...............................................150 A policy to rule them all.................................................................................................................................152 The missed opportunity of the election that never came.............................................................................153 Martin approved a detainee policy; Cabinet correspondence; Negotiations for transfer agreement with Afghans...................................................................................................................................................155 CUP FEVER! Hockey night in Kandahar....................................................................................................158 Hillier 'comfortable' signing prisoner deal...................................................................................................159 Gift of light honours Nicola; Soldier's parents launch solar aid project in Papua New Guinea.............160 Stanley Cup brings joy to Canadian soldiers...............................................................................................162

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Stanley Cup cheers troops in Kandahar; Symbol of hockey glory accompanied by former NHL players lifts spirits of soldiers on visit to Afghanistan IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: KEYWORDS: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030082 Times &Transcript (Moncton) 2007.05.03 News C1 TTNEWS; TT NEWS © 2007 Times &Transcript (Moncton) 426

Armed with a gleaming symbol of hockey glory, Canada's top soldier led a brigade of former National Hockey League players on a mission yesterday to boost the morale and lift the spirits of war−weary, sports−starved Canadians in Afghanistan. Surrounded by hockey heroes that included enforcers like Bob Probert and Dave (Tiger) Williams, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier looked like a kid in a candy store as the Stanley Cup was wheeled out and placed on display on the tarmac at Kandahar Airfield. "This is the cup that's coming back to Canada," Hillier said, a reference to the two Canadian teams left in the playoffs, the Ottawa Senators and the Vancouver Canucks. Soldiers posed for photos and chatted with some of the players, including goaltender Ron Tugnutt, two−time Cup winner Mark Napier and Montreal Canadiens legends Rejean Houle and Yvon Lambert. "I got the chance to be close to the Cup, take a picture with it − it was a great moment for me," said Cpl. Lisa−Marie Guernon, 29, from Montreal, a Canadiens cap on her head. "Especially here in Afghanistan − those types of things are pretty special for us." Hillier and the players arrived aboard a C−130 Hercules that performed a low, tight banking turn before coming in for a landing − an experience Tugnutt said he won't soon forget. "It's a good thing I went to Disney last week with the family; it prepared me for the ride in," he said. "I went on all the big roller coasters, and that experience − plus a few Gravol − prepared me for that flight. It was very intense, actually, and (the soldiers) said, 'That was nothing'." Tugnutt said he was thrilled to be asked to visit with the Canadians. "When we were offered to come and do this, it was a great honour," he said. "To be able to come and experience this and meet the soldiers, it's been incredible − talking to them, hearing their stories." Later in the day, the group travelled to Camp Nathan Smith, just outside Kandahar city, to visit with members of Canada's provincial reconstruction team, where they signed autographs and mugged for more photos.

Stanley Cup cheers troops in Kandahar; Symbol of hockey glory accompanied by former NHL players 1 lifts sp

"Tens of thousands of Canadians want to pass on their best wishes to you − their prayers, their thoughts, all of which are with you, and their immense appreciation for what you're doing here in Afghanistan," Hillier told the assembled soldiers. "Everywhere you go in the country right now ... you'll see it, that Canadians, as never before in my life or my history or my time in uniform, support you."

Stanley Cup cheers troops in Kandahar; Symbol of hockey glory accompanied by former NHL players 2 lifts sp

Hillier says troops dismayed by torture controversy; Canada's top soldier defends decision to sign prisoner−exchange deal IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: KEYWORDS: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030061 Times &Transcript (Moncton) 2007.05.03 News C4 TTNEWS; TT NEWS © 2007 Times &Transcript (Moncton) 561

Canada's top soldier stood by his decision to sign a prisoner− exchange deal with the Afghan government, saying yesterday that it felt right at the time but may not have been sufficient to prevent detainees from being tortured in Afghan jails. Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier, who shook hands and posed for pictures with soldiers out to see the Stanley Cup brought to Kandahar to boost morale, said some of his soldiers are angry with the political firestorm back home over allegations of detainee torture. They're saying the controversy is distracting attention from the work they do Afghanistan, he said. But Hillier defended his decision to sign the deal − in part a consequence of convenience, he said, as he was in the country at the time − as the right move for Afghanistan and for Canada's role in helping the fledgling Afghan government find its feet. "At the time, we felt that was the right thing to do, that we were comfortable with our approach," Hillier said, a backdrop of military vehicles behind him. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient." The agreement, which did not include any provisions to allow human rights officials to visit prisoners once they'd been handed over by Canadian soldiers, helped to foster Canada's effort to support the local government, to build its capacity and strengthen local police and military forces, he said. Those soldiers are now growing frustrated that the gathering storm clouds are obscuring the work they're doing on behalf of the Afghan people. "They're angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here − the focus back in Canada specifically − on the enormous amount of good that's being done, on the incredible things that are happening here in Kandahar province and the rest of Afghanistan," Hillier said. "I met some soldiers this afternoon who, in their opinion, are (expletive deleted) because the focus has moved because of issues that are being addressed." Hillier denied knowing anything about allegations of detainee abuse until the day before the story broke last Monday. He refused to discuss a report in the Globe and Mail citing anonymous sources who say he pressed ahead with the deal despite the concerns of the Department of Foreign Affairs. "In the case of the agreement that I signed on behalf of Canada, the Department of National Defence articulated that agreement with the Department of Foreign Affairs, who had the lead," he said. "They shaped the agreement, I signed it."

Hillier says troops dismayed by torture controversy; Canada's top soldier defends decision to sign prisoner−e 3

Injured soldier recalls deadly blast IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: KEYWORDS: BYLINE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030067 The Daily Gleaner (Fredericton) 2007.05.03 News A7 DGNEWS; DG NEWS The Canadian Press © 2007 The Daily Gleaner (Fredericton) 454

When a roadside bomb ripped through the light−armoured vehicle he was riding in west of Kandahar City, killing six of his fellow soldiers, Cpl. Shaun Fevens says he felt like he was surrounded by water. "When the blast hit, I didn't go unconscious," Fevens, a 24−year−old reservist with the Halifax−based Princess Louise Fusiliers, recalled Wednesday. "The pressure of the blast was like jumping into a deep pool of water. It was bright, so I couldn't see anything, and psychologically my ears had shut off. You can hear stuff, but it's not clear." Sitting in a wheelchair, Fevens recalled his experience in Afghanistan and described his recovery during an informal news conference in Halifax. He was the most seriously injured of the four soldiers who survived, suffering a broken ankle and leg, burns, and shrapnel wounds in his wrist. Fevens, one of the few soldiers trained in advanced battlefield first aid, known as tactical combat casualty care, instructed another survivor how to treat his leg, which was bleeding profusely. He told the other soldier how to check the seriousness of his wounds, and then how to bandage his broken leg. "He was more concerned about hurting me, but I was trying to comfort him because I definitely had more issues than worrying about a bandage," Fevens said. "If it didn't happen that quickly, I don't think it would have been a life− or−death matter, but definitely early and initial first aid, I'm sure it helped me in the end." Cpl. Brent Poland, Master Cpl. Christopher Stannix, Sgt. Don Lucas, Cpl. Aaron Williams, Pte. Kevin Kennedy and Pte. David Greenslade were killed instantly in the explosion. Fevens said he knew his colleagues had died before he was rushed away for treatment. "I witnessed it all − I could see the back of the LAV and it was pretty obvious," he said. "I heard (about the deaths) on the radio, and the medic quickly shut it off because most patients that wouldn't be as calm as I was would tend to panic more. But I knew at the instant." Fevens underwent surgery in Afghanistan to stabilize him before he was transferred to a U.S. military hospital Injured soldier recalls deadly blast

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in Landstuhl, Germany. He arrived back in Canada on April 13 and has since undergone more surgery and physiotherapy. Fevens expects to begin walking on his right leg soon and hopes to be able to run again in a year. Three days after the Easter explosion, two more Canadian soldiers − Master Cpl. Allan Stewart and Trooper Patrick Pentland − were killed in a similar attack about 40 kilometres west of Kadahar City, marking the worst week for Canadian casualties in combat since the Korean War. A ninth soldier, Anthony Klumpenhouwer, 25, who served with elite special forces, died two weeks ago after he fell from a communications tower while conducting surveillance in Kandahar City. Since 2002, 54 Canadian soldiers and one Canadian diplomat have been killed in Afghanistan.

Injured soldier recalls deadly blast

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Letters | Make deployed spouses proud IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: KEYWORDS: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030006 The Daily Gleaner (Fredericton) 2007.05.03 Opinion B7 DGOPINION; DG OPINION © 2007 The Daily Gleaner (Fredericton) 703

I challenge all spouses of deployed Canadian Troops to participate in this worthwhile cause. Are you proud of your deployed spouse? No doubt you answered yes. I challenge you to make your spouse proud of you, too. While he or she is deployed and fighting terrorism, come join a fight of your own. This fight is near and dear to some of us − it is the fight against cancer. On June 8, you can make a difference by joining Oromocto's Relay for Life. You can sit after reading this article and make a thousand excuses for not attending: you're too busy; you're alone with the kids; you've got to work; the list goes on. I, too, have kids, three precisely, whom I have recruited to join me in the relay. After losing my father, an aunt, an uncle, several dear friends over the years, I will do this with my family and hopefully make it an annual tradition. Teaching our children at a young age to overcome adversity not only displays our strength as parents, but also teaches our children the importance of giving of themselves. We are our children's first teachers and what better impact than to participate in such a worthwhile cause while enjoying free entertainment, food, and, most importantly, the feeling of being an integral part of the community. Cancer will touch each and every one of us at one point in our lives. Let's help increase the number of survivors, not only for our generation, but for that of our children. While I await the arrival of my fiancée from Afghanistan on June 9, I will be circling the track with a heart full of pride not only in my fiancée and his devotion to our country, but also for me and my children, Sam, Alex, and Rachael and the beginning of a wonderful family tradition. I truly hope to see you there. To register, please call Betty Damery at 446−4609 or Helene Boyko at 357− 5400. Melinda Anthony Burton, N.B. Mental diagnosis a shock I was utterly shocked by a psychiatrist's finding that Gregory Allan Despres will not stand trial because he has a psychosis.

Letters | Make deployed spouses proud

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Why did the court reject the initial assessment? Didn't they realize providing Despres with further exposure to legitimate mental health patients would give him another learning opportunity? Human behaviour is learned. I believe someone could learn enough about psychosis in order to manipulate doctors and the court. This case did not address public safety concerns. Too often, people found not fit to stand trial on heinous crimes slip out of the public's attention because the courts do not always pursue them after they've been found unfit. It's happened before that one day a psychiatrist decides someone deemed unfit to stand trial has been "cured" and is safe to leave the detention facility where he is being "treated." This kind of nonsense has happened before and will happen again. I urge everyone to call on our MLAs and MPs to make a law calling for long terms of incarceration in cases such as this. Unfortunately, our current system is a mess. The victims are usually forgotten, but their loss is real and their torment permanent. What can we do for the families devastated by this horrendous crime? How will our broken judicial system compensate them? We must pray for the families of those who lost their mother and father. I pray they will eventually get their day in court. Randall Kimm Fredericton Drop speed limit drop emissions The federal government has come up with a simple suggestion for lowering our greenhouse gas emissions: the use of more efficient light bulbs. Great idea. Everyone can help with very little effort. Here is another easy suggestion that would save much carbon dioxide from being spewed into the air: the feds lower the speed limits on all our roadways by 10 kilometres an hour. Think of the savings. A fine of $ 1,000 for the first offence, $5,000 for the second and loss of vehicle on the third. All this money would be used to pay for the extra RCMP needed to enforce this new law. Results: lower CO2 emissions, longer vehicle life, safer roads, fewer accidents, more RCMP patrols, fewer drunk drivers. Need any more be said? Bernie Landry Rexton, N.B.

Letters | Make deployed spouses proud

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Hillier: Torture allegations bringing down the troops PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: SOURCE: BYLINE: WORD COUNT:

The Chronicle−Herald 2007.05.03 World A6 The Canadian Press James Mccarten 298

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan − Canada's top soldier stood by his decision to sign a prisoner−exchange deal with the Afghan government, saying Wednesday that it felt right at the time but may not have been sufficient to prevent detainees from being tortured in Afghan jails. Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier, who shook hands and posed for pictures with soldiers out to see the Stanley Cup brought to Kandahar to boost morale, said some of his soldiers are "pissed−off" with the political firestorm back home over allegations of detainee torture. They're saying the contro−versy is distracting attention from the work they do Afghanistan, he said. But Hillier defended his decision to sign the deal − in part a consequence of convenience, he said, as he was in the country at the time − as the right move for Afghanistan and for Canada's role in helping the fledgling Afghan government find its feet. "At the time, we felt that was the right thing to do, that we were comfortable with our approach," Hillier said, a backdrop of military vehicles behind him. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient." The agreement, which did not include any provisions to allow human rights officials to visit prisoners once they'd been handed over by Canadian soldiers, helped to foster Canada's effort to support the local government, to build its capacity and strengthen local police and military forces, he said. Those soldiers are now growing frustrated − "pissed off," in his words − that the gathering storm clouds are obscuring the work they're doing on behalf of the Afghan people. "They're angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here − the focus back in Canada specifically − on the enormous amount of good that's being done, on the incredible things that are happening here in Kandahar province and the rest of Afghanistan," Hillier said.

Hillier: Torture allegations bringing down the troops

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Day remark bolsters human rights case; Abuse claims broad hearsay, say federal lawyers PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: SOURCE: BYLINE: WORD COUNT:

The Chronicle−Herald 2007.05.03 Canada A6 The Canadian Press Murray Brewster 388

OTTAWA − Human rights groups trying to stop the Canadian military's handover of Afghan detainees may have been given some unexpected ammunition by Stockwell Day. The public safety minister's acknowledgment that Canadian correctional officers heard allegations of torture by Afghan officials appears to contradict one of the principal arguments federal lawyers will make in court today. A federal judge will be asked to grant an injunction, halting the transfer of captured Taliban fighters from the Canadian army to Afghan authorities. The case comes as the Conservative government reels under the allegations of torture and abuse, which included accusations that Prime Minister Stephen Harper misled the Commons. In their draft written response to the court action by Amnesty International and the B.C. Civil Liberties Union, Justice Department lawyers contend that claims of abuse within the Afghan prison system are based on "broad hearsay" statements in newspaper articles that have not been investigated or verified. "Canadian officials have not received any notification of mistreatment or torture of detainees transferred from Canada to Afghan authorities," said the submission filed with the Federal Court on May 1 and obtained by The Canadian Press. On Monday, Day told reporters that corrections officers had "talked to detainees about the possibility, if they were tortured or not. They've actually had a couple incidents where detainees said they were." But he was quick to point out the allegations had not been verified and was unable to say if they had been investigated by Canadian or Afghan authorities. He was also unable to say whether the prisoners in question had been captured by Canadian, Afghan or NATO forces. The assertion, contradicting earlier statements from the Conservative government, strengthens the case of human rights groups, a spokesman for Amnesty International said Wednesday. "He bolstered the case that there has been a problem with torture in Afghan prisons," said spokesman John Tackaberry. If Day has undercut the government's case, it would be the latest in a series of missteps involving the abuse claims. Day remark bolsters human rights case; Abuse claims broad hearsay, say federal lawyers

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Since allegations surfaced that at least 30 detainees, captured by Canadians and turned over to Afghan authorities, might have been abused, the Conservatives have offered confusing and contradictory explanations. Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor last week told a Commons committee that a deal has been struck to allow Canadian authorities access to captured prisoners. He was contradicted the next day by Harper and Afghanistan's ambassador to Canada, who both said the arrangement was still being negotiated. Opposition parties were outraged that the oral report from corrections officers − obtained by Day last week − was not clearly laid before the Commons.

Day remark bolsters human rights case; Abuse claims broad hearsay, say federal lawyers

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Making light of a sad situation; Solar lamps tribute to soldier PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: SOURCE: BYLINE:

The Chronicle−Herald 2007.05.03 Canada A6 The Canadian Press Bill Graveland Tim and Sally Goddard's Light Up Papua New Guinea project isa tribute to their ILLUSTRATION: daughter, Nichola Goddard, 27, who was the first female Canadian soldier to be killed in combat. (Jeff McIntosh / CP) WORD COUNT: 214 CALGARY − Out of the darkness of their daughter's death in Afghanistan a year ago, the family of Capt. Nichola Goddard has found some light to shine in the country of her birth. Goddard died last May 17 in a grenade attack by Taliban insurgents in the war−torn country's Panjwaii district. A member of the 1st Regiment of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, she was Canada's first female combat soldier to die in battle. To date, 54 Canadian soldiers have lost their lives on the Afghanistan mission. The young captain was described as an outstanding leader and caring friend by her comrades and as a loving daughter by her parents. Wednesday would have been her 27th birthday. "We want to remember. We don't want to wallow and if we can make this a positive outcome . . . (if) we can help a country, then something good is coming out of this. Because there's not a heck of a lot else that's coming out of it that's good,"" said Tim Goddard as he and his wife, Sally, launched an aid project in Papua New Guinea to honour their daughter. Under the program, solar−powered lights will replace hazardous kerosene lamps in nearly 2,000 first−aid posts across the island nation. In a country close to the equator, it is dark 12 hours a day.

Making light of a sad situation; Solar lamps tribute to soldier

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Full−contact warfare vs. comforts of home; Troops grinding it out in the desert laugh at soft life of KAF PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: WORD COUNT:

The Chronicle−Herald 2007.05.03 Front A1 Chris Lambie Staff Reporter 1241

CANADA ISN'T the only place with two solitudes. When I first landed at Kandahar Airfield a month ago, I figured this was life−or−death Afghanistan. Turns out I was wrong. After spending a few weeks with troops who spend most of their time outside the wire, it became obvious that the massive base everyone here refers to as KAF is not a particularly unpleasant or dangerous hardship post. Sure, it's hot, dusty and halfway around the world from family and friends. And yes, the Taliban do launch occasional rocket attacks at night. But after you hear one whiz and a thump far off in the distance, the novelty wears off pretty fast. It doesn't take long to realize that, since the odds of a direct rocket strike are slim, it's easier not to think about it, roll over and go back to sleep. On the amenities front, KAF isn't half bad. It features all−you−can−eat salad bars and freezers full of ice cream. Dining hall menus boast steak and lobster one night and crab legs the next. Plus, there's a boardwalk full of fast−food outlets where you can buy anything from a burger to Korean food. There's even a pizza place that delivers right to your tent. Contrast that with life on a small Canadian patrol base where danger is imminent, showers are limited, shade is hard to find and most meals come ready to eat from a bag. "This is the real army shit, working out here," says a medic who has experienced both worlds. "Being in KAF is pretty sweet." Soldiers in the field have a relatively low opinion of the folks they refer to as KAFers. "They don't leave and it drives me nuts. They get paid the same as us," says Pte. Matthew Oakley of Lower Sackville. "People are in there every day playing hockey, going to Tim Hortons and stuff. And we're out here." He sighs long and hard. "But we suck it up." The 19−year−old is a rifleman with India Company. During the three months he's been in Afghanistan, Pte. Oakley has only spent four days at KAF. During a recent interview, he munched toast and drank coffee while sitting in a dusty tent at Patrol Base Wilson.

Full−contact warfare vs. comforts of home; Troops grinding it out in the desert laugh at soft life of KAF 12

"When we first got over here we were at a strong point. It was less than this," he says. "It was just sandbag bunkers and no showers. We got fresh meals brought to us every couple of days, but it was rations most of the time." Strangely enough, soldiers who spend most of their time in the field seem to prefer the austere lifestyle. "I'm glad I'm out here because if I was in there, I'd be broke all the time and time would go much slower," says Pte. Oakley, adding the past three months has gone by "super fast." The army argues the people at the pointy end of the battle group couldn't do their jobs if it weren't for the soldiers who support them from the rear. And it's unlikely that many front−line soldiers, despite their often bitter complaints, would switch the back of a dirt−crusted light armoured vehicle for hot showers, iced cappuccinos, continuous Internet, cable TV and an air−conditioned gym. "We couldn't live in KAF," Sgt. Peter Nyitrai−Hacz of Springhill said after an eight−kilometre foot patrol that started at 3 a.m. "Out here everything is different. Every day is something new. If we do something different like this every day, the weeks just fly." War is normally full of contradictions, and this one is no different. Canada is spending billions on new tanks and planes for the war in Afghanistan. Yet some soldiers here had to buy their own boots because the army wouldn't cough up for a model that's comfortable in the desert. "There's a lot of people upset over the boots," one soldier says. "Boots are a pretty important thing. We do a lot of walking. You would think that they would have good footwear for us at least." Afghanistan is one of the most heavily mined countries in the world. It's no secret that each step Canadian soldiers take outside the wire could be their last. But everyone tries to force such thoughts out of their minds. "If you think about it, you'll go crazy," says Cpl. Matt Elliott, of Dartmouth. "And if you spend all your time looking down at the ground, then you're going to miss what's happening around you, which is equally dangerous." Canadian generals and politicians often talk about how the presence of NATO's International Security Assistance Force has made it safe here for children to go to school. But most of the schools in Zhari district that were destroyed or abandoned during last year's fighting in Operation Medusa have yet to reopen. Civil−military cooperation officers say they can't build new ones until the area is secure. The delay has left thousands of children at loose ends in Zhari. "If they don't go to school they will get weapons and start killing," says Sarber Mohammad, the principal at Pashmul Middle School. Narcotics present another paradox for Canadians in Afghanistan. It's impossible to ignore the fact that fields of opium poppies and marijuana are growing everywhere. Canada doesn't officially endorse the watered−down eradication programs here, but we do train and equip the forces carrying them out. At the same time, we also finance irrigation projects that help farmers grow their dope. When eradication came up at a brief news conference held here recently by Josee Verner, Canada's minister of Full−contact warfare vs. comforts of home; Troops grinding it out in the desert laugh at soft life of KAF 13

International Co−operation, she suddenly had a plane to catch. As if to highlight the incongruity of the whole sticky drug mess here, the Zhari district leader tells me Afghan authorities are clamping down on the poppy trade. Seconds later, a local police officer brings him a poppy plant from a nearby field. He inspects the pod, peels it and eats the seeds inside, nodding as if to say, 'Hmm, not bad.' Even the Afghan interpreters who work with Canadian troops smoke pot, says one sergeant. And the smell of hashish was wafting out of a mechanic's bay at Camp Nathan Smith one recent Friday night as locals worked on vehicles. Even the senses are bombarded with confounding messages. The nasty smells of sweat, garbage, cheap tobacco, urine and rotting feces are ever−present. Large groups of Afghans in the countryside often carry a deep funk that lies somewhere between wet wool and teenage locker room. And after a few days in the field, Canadian soldiers pack an olfactory punch of their own. But when the wind is blowing off the Arghandab River just before dawn, it smells almost like a Nova Scotia beach in the spring. And the breezes wafting over massive fields of marijuana carry a sweet aroma that makes the hardest soldiers here giggle. All Canadians are advised not to drink the water in Afghanistan. But soldiers never seem to refuse the sweet chai tea served at almost every gathering. That might have something to do with the gastrointestinal bug floating around the Canuck camps. At best, soldiers can hope for diarrhea with a low−grade fever. At worst, they're barfing their guts up for a few days and wind up with intravenous drips in their arms to ward off dehydration. Medical officials try to limit the damage by relegating sick soldiers to their own latrines and placing bottles of alcohol−based hand sanitizer everywhere. But the germs march on. The heat pounds down here like a sledgehammer. But the shade is so instantly cool, it's almost impossible to believe. And a stiff evening breeze makes taking off the body armour the best part of anyone's day. "It's like 30 seconds of heaven," says Warrant Officer Kendall McLean, from Lakeville, N.B. Like any place where people are in jeopardy, soldiers rely on caustic, often bawdy humour to keep themselves sane. With 54 soldiers and one diplomat killed here since 2002, Canadian troops obviously take this mission seriously. But they also tease each other relentlessly, and I'm not spared for a second. As we return from a long patrol to a remote village, some guys from India Company razz their sergeant for being old. They offer to get him a cane. Then I make the mistake of asking him his age. "Thirty−eight," he says. Stupidly I tell him I just turned 39. His face brightens considerably and he instantly gets on the radio: "Get out the wheelchair, boys."( )

Full−contact warfare vs. comforts of home; Troops grinding it out in the desert laugh at soft life of KAF 14

Court asked to halt prisoner transfers; Ottawa's acknowledgment about Afghan torture allegations could help case IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: DATELINE: SOURCE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030161 The Record (Kitchener, Cambridge And Waterloo) 2007.05.03 Final Front A3 OTTAWA Canadian Press © 2007 Torstar Corporation 443

Human rights groups trying to stop the Canadian military's handover of Afghan detainees may have been given some unexpected ammunition by Stockwell Day. The public safety minister's acknowledgment that Canadian correctional officers heard allegations of torture by Afghan officials appears to contradict o ne of the principal arguments federal lawyers will make in court today. A federal judge will be asked to grant an injunction, halting the transfer of captured Taliban fighters from the Canadian army to Afghan authorities. The case comes as the Conservative government reels after allegations of torture and abuse, which yesterday included accusations that Prime Minister Stephen Harper misled the Commons in his defence of Day's comments. In their draft written response to the court action by Amnesty International and the B.C. Civil Liberties Union, Justice Department lawyers contend that claims of abuse within the Afghan prison system are based on "broad hearsay'' statements in newspaper articles that have not been investigated or verified. "Canadian officials have not received any notification of mistreatment or torture of detainees transferred from Canada to Afghan authorities,'' said the submission filed with the Federal Court Tuesday. On Monday, Day told reporters that corrections officers had "talked to detainees about the possibility, if they were tortured or not. They've actually had a couple (of) incidents where detainees said they were.'' But he was quick to point out the allegations had not been verified and was unable to say whether they had been investigated by Canadian or Afghan authorities. He was also unable to say whether the prisoners in question had been captured by Canadian, Afghan or NATO forces. The assertion, contradicting earlier statements from the Conservative government, strengthens the case of human rights groups, a spokesperson for Amnesty International said yesterday. "He bolstered the case that there has been a problem with torture in Afghan prisons,'' said John Tackaberry. Day's office did not respond to a request for comment yesterday.

Court asked to halt prisoner transfers; Ottawa's acknowledgment about Afghan torture allegations 15 could help

In Kandahar, Canada's top soldier stood by his decision to sign a prisoner− exchange deal with the Afghan government, saying that it felt right at the time but may not have been sufficient to prevent detainees from being tortured in Afghan jails. Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier said he signed the deal as the right move for Afghanistan and for Canada's role in helping the fledgling Afghan government find its feet. "At the time, we felt that was the right thing to do, that we were comfortable with our approach,'' Hillier said, a backdrop of military vehicles behind him. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient.'' The agreement, which did not include any provisions to allow human rights officials to visit prisoners once they'd been handed over by Canadian soldiers, helped to foster Canada's effort to support the local government, to build its capacity and strengthen local police and military forces, he said.

Court asked to halt prisoner transfers; Ottawa's acknowledgment about Afghan torture allegations 16 could help

Soldier's family brings light to a dark world; Papua New Guinea program established in memory of fallen Canadian Goddard IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030150 The Record (Kitchener, Cambridge And Waterloo) 2007.05.03 Final Front A5 Photo: CANADIAN PRESS / Tim Goddard uses one−watt LEDs tolight up his face in ILLUSTRATION: Calgary yesterday. ; DATELINE: CALGARY SOURCE: Canadian Press COPYRIGHT: © 2007 Torstar Corporation WORD COUNT: 417 Out of the darkness of their daughter's death in Afghanistan a year ago, the family of Capt. Nicola Goddard has found some light to shine in the country of her birth. Goddard died last May 17 in a grenade attack by Taliban insurgents in the war−torn country's Panjwaii district. A member of the 1st Regiment of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, she was Canada's first female combat soldier to die in battle. To date, 54 Canadian soldiers have lost their lives on the Afghanistan mission. The young captain was described as an outstanding leader and caring friend by her comrades and as a loving daughter by her parents. Yesterday would have been her 27th birthday. "In a perfect world, we'd obviously just prefer to be sitting down and cutting a cake,'' said Tim Goddard as he and his wife, Sally, launched an aid project in Papua New Guinea to honour their daughter. Under the program, solar−powered lighting systems will replace hazardous kerosene lamps in nearly 2,000 first−aid posts across the island nation. In a country close to the equator, it is dark 12 hours a day all year round. "We decided that it would be better to do it on her birthday rather than her death day,'' said Sally Goddard. "We want to remember. We don't want to wallow, and if we can make this a positive outcome . . . (if) we can help a country, then something good is coming out of this (her daughter's death). Because there's not a heck of a lot else that's coming out of it that's good.'' The Goddards met and married in Papua New Guinea, an impoverished country off the northeast coast of Australia, while they were working as teachers with community leaders building new schools. Nicola was born there and lived there until she was three. It's a project that Nicola would have approved of, say the Goddards, and makes the first birthday without her a little easier to get through.

Soldier's family brings light to a dark world; Papua New Guinea program established in memory of17 fallen Can

"It's bittersweet, obviously. If things had been different, this would be a very different day, but you can't change what's happened, right?'' said her father. "How do you make the best of it? How do you find something positive in something so awful? I think of the other 53 people and their families, and every day of the year there's somebody going through this.'' In a country where 80 per cent of its six million people live in rural areas, the solar lights will make a major difference, said Evan Paki, Papua New Guinea's ambassador to North America. "A lot of the aid posts operate simply from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. If somebody comes at 6 p.m., they would say, 'Sorry,' because there are no lighting fixtures to administer medical treatment."

Soldier's family brings light to a dark world; Papua New Guinea program established in memory of18 fallen Can

Corporal describes attack that killed six Canadians IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030149 The Record (Kitchener, Cambridge And Waterloo) 2007.05.03 Final Front A5 Photo: CANADIAN PRESS / Canadian Forces medical technicianDaphne Goyetche has her picture taken with the Stanley Cup in Kandahar yesterday. Nineteen former NHLers −− among them Bob Probert, Dave (Tiger) Williams, Rejean Houle and Yvon Lambert ILLUSTRATION: −− brought the Cup to the Canadian base to show support for the Canadian troops and play a little tarmac hockey with them. ; Photo: Cpl. Shaun Fevens suffered a broken ankle and leg, burns and shrapnel wounds in his wrist when a roadside bomb ripped through his light−armoured vehicle on April 8. ; DATELINE: HALIFAX SOURCE: Canadian Press COPYRIGHT: © 2007 Torstar Corporation WORD COUNT: 331 When a roadside bomb ripped through the light−armoured vehicle he was riding in west of Kandahar City, killing six of his fellow soldiers, Cpl. Shaun Fevens says he felt like he was surrounded by water. "When the blast hit, I didn't go unconscious,'' Fevens, a 24−year−old reservist with the Halifax−based Princess Louise Fusiliers, recalled yesterday. "The pressure of the blast was like jumping into a deep pool of water. It was bright, so I couldn't see anything, and psychologically my ears had shut off. You can hear stuff, but it's not clear.'' Sitting in a wheelchair, Fevens recalled his experience in Afghanistan and described his recovery during an informal news conference in Halifax. He was the most seriously injured of the four soldiers who survived, suffering a broken ankle and leg, burns, and shrapnel wounds in his wrist. Fevens, one of the few soldiers trained in advanced battlefield first aid, known as tactical combat casualty care, instructed another survivor how to treat his leg, which was bleeding profusely. He told the other soldier how to check the seriousness of his wounds, and then how to bandage his broken leg. "He was more concerned about hurting me, but I was trying to comfort him because I definitely had more issues than worrying about a bandage,'' Fevens said. Cpl. Brent Poland, Master Cpl. Christopher Stannix, Sgt. Don Lucas, Cpl. Aaron Williams, Pte. Kevin Kennedy and Pte. David Greenslade were killed instantly in the explosion. Fevens said he knew his colleagues had died before he was rushed away for treatment. "I witnessed it all −− I could see the back of the LAV and it was pretty obvious,'' he said. Corporal describes attack that killed six Canadians

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"I heard (about the deaths) on the radio, and the medic quickly shut it off because most patients that wouldn't be as calm as I was would tend to panic more. But I knew at the instant.'' Fevens underwent surgery in Afghanistan to stabilize him before he was transferred to a U.S. military hospital in Landstuhl, Germany. He arrived back in Canada on April 13 and has since undergone more surgery and physiotherapy. Fevens expects to begin walking on his right leg soon and hopes to be able to run again in a year. When he has fully recovered, he still wants to remain in the Armed Forces. "I plan on going to the air force,'' he said. "It's not because of these injuries. I was in air cadets since I was 12, and I thought then I was going air force. Of course, I got the infantry in my head.'' Since 2002, 54 Canadian soldiers and one Canadian diplomat have been killed in Afghanistan.

Corporal describes attack that killed six Canadians

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Civilian deaths frustrate Karzai; Afghan president facing rising public anger over violent U.S., NATO campaigns IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: DATELINE: SOURCE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030148 The Record (Kitchener, Cambridge And Waterloo) 2007.05.03 Final Front A5 KABUL, AFGHANISTAN Associated Press © 2007 Torstar Corporation 318

Afghans can no longer accept civilian deaths from international military operations, President Hamid Karzai said yesterday amid reports 51 villagers were killed during a U.S.−led offensive against the Taliban in western Afghanistan. Despite claims that women and children were among the dead, the U.S. military insisted it had no reports of civilian casualties. But rising public anger was evident as students staged a fourth day of anti− American protests in an eastern city over civilian deaths. Karzai met with NATO, U.S. and European Union officials, telling them "civilian deaths and arbitrary decisions to search people's houses have reached an unacceptable level, and Afghans cannot put up with it any longer,'' according to a statement from his office. Earlier, Karzai said Afghans had reached their limit after the years of conflict since the Taliban's ouster in a U.S.−led invasion in late 2001. "The intention is very good in these operations to fight terrorism,'' Karzai told reporters. "Sometimes mistakes have been made as well, but five years on, it is very difficult for us to continue to accept civilian casualties . . . the way they occur.'' The U.S.−led coalition said the military operation in western Herat province was conducted between Friday and Sunday by U.S. and Afghan troops in the Zerkoh Valley and killed 136 suspected Taliban rebels. The bloodshed sparked angry anti−U.S. protests earlier this week by villagers. Mohammad Homayoun Azizi, chief of Herat's provincial council, said two council members who visited the area along with Afghan police and intelligence officers reported that 51 civilians had been killed. A man being treated in a hospital yesterday said he was wounded by an air strike that did not hit any insurgents. "There were no Taliban. Ten of my relatives have been killed, including two of my cousins,'' said the man, who gave only his first name, Mohammed.

Civilian deaths frustrate Karzai; Afghan president facing rising public anger over violent U.S., NATO 21campaig

Civilian deaths have deepened Afghans' distrust of international forces and of the U.S.−backed government as they try to combat a resurgent Taliban −− itself accused by human rights groups of indiscriminate attacks that often kill non−combatants.

Civilian deaths frustrate Karzai; Afghan president facing rising public anger over violent U.S., NATO 22campaig

Afghanistan mission spinning out of prime minister's control IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: COLUMN:

200705030132 The Record (Kitchener, Cambridge And Waterloo) 2007.05.03 Final Insight A9 THE NATION Photo: CANADIAN PRESS / Chief of Defence Staff Gen. RickHillier is the architect of ILLUSTRATION: Canada's Afghan mission. ; DATELINE: OTTAWA BYLINE: JAMES TRAVERS SOURCE: TORSTAR NEWS SERVICE COPYRIGHT: © 2007 Torstar Corporation WORD COUNT: 768 Stories are powerful, and no one tells self−flattering tales better than politicians. So there must be a reason why a prime minister in so much trouble over the treatment of Afghanistan prisoners isn't talking about how his government is imposing management order on a chaotic mission. Admittedly, the story Stephen Harper isn't telling is about the usually boring nuts−and−bolts administration of public policy. Still, when the machinery of government is being tested in Parliament daily, explaining what's being done to make it run better should be appealing. But not even the crisis now rocking the ruling party and sending its popularity plummeting is enough to get the prime minister talking about how the problem was tackled months ago. Back in January, Harper named his own foreign and defence policy adviser to co−ordinate Canada's all−of−government effort to put Afghanistan back on its feet. After that, David Mulroney disappeared backstage. One reason is that the smart, seasoned diplomat is also Harper's very busy point person for this summer's G8 summit. Another is that the job may be impossible and discussing it publicly would only focus attention on the administration's problems herding its own cats. If anything is clear in the prisoner treatment fog, it's that one government hand doesn't know what the other is doing. As was first reported last week, Gen. Rick Hillier, Canada's Chief of Defence Staff and the main Afghanistan man for two prime ministers, enjoyed rare autonomy in crafting a detainee agreement now exposed as woefully inadequate. That the once−powerful department of foreign affairs was excluded is symptomatic of a bigger problem. Hillier and the military so dominate Canada's Afghanistan thinking that the much−ballyhooed three−Ds strategy of defence, development and diplomacy now sounds like rhetorical cover for a mission that's mostly about combat and rebuilding the military into a small yet potent fighting force. Harper seemed to acknowledge the imbalance when he moved Mulroney from the secretariat that advises the prime minister to Foreign Affairs. From the Sphinx−like building known here as Fort Pearson, Mulroney is officially expected to add balance by ensuring that the overarching purpose of turning Afghanistan into a Afghanistan mission spinning out of prime minister's control

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facsimile of a modern state isn't lost in killing Taliban. Unofficially, Ottawa is bemused. A town hypersensitive to the pecking order isn't easily convinced that an associate deputy minister working part−time on the file for the widely discounted Peter MacKay has the implied clout to quarterback such a dysfunctional team. Another fact of capital life limits Mulroney's prospects. With the possible exceptions of finance and now the environment, Harper is his own minister of everything important and not much is more important than Afghanistan. An obvious side−effect of the prime minister's infamous control−freak character is that he's on his feet daily defending the government's laissez− faire prisoner policy. Another that's more damaging if not so easily seen is that the cabinet, bureaucracy and officials know Harper makes all decisions that matter and see more risk than reward in being entrepreneurial. Along with sending the destructive signal that the boss doesn't trust the staff, centralizing power creates a system that's ponderously slow and, as the last two weeks demonstrate, a government that can't get its story straight. Day−by−day the prisoner narrative changes, leaving the lasting impression that Conservatives, like the military, consider prisoners a nuisance and miss the point that their humane treatment is an essential manifestation of the values Canadians are in Afghanistan dying to transplant. Mulroney's appointment is a reason for optimism that this government is wiser than it sometimes seems. Recognizing that rescuing a failed state demands a co−ordinated, holistic focus is an essential first step toward the effective application of interdependent policies that over decades just might make a difference. However faint, there's also hope in Harper's small show of confidence in Foreign Affairs. Starved of resources and influence, the department with its wider worldview is a necessary counterweight to the dangerously narrow defence perspective of "scumbags" and "retribution'' offered respectively by Hillier and his gargoyle minister, Gordon O'Connor. Of course, what counts here is power. How much of it flows to Mulroney and to Foreign Affairs depends entirely on a prime minister who behaves as if sharing is a weakness, not a strength. What's worrying is that Conservatives in such desperate need of a good story aren't talking about this one. That suggests they don't believe it themselves and are as half−hearted about controlling the military and co−ordinating the mission as about protecting prisoners. James Travers writes on national issues.

Afghanistan mission spinning out of prime minister's control

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Don't politicians have more important work to do? IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: SOURCE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030093 The Record (Kitchener, Cambridge And Waterloo) 2007.05.03 Final Sports C1 AL COATES RECORD STAFF © 2007 Torstar Corporation 567

Last time we looked, the Canadian dollar had topped 90 cents −− and the nation's industrial exporting heartland was under siege. Jobs by the thousands were flying across the Pacific. Our country's brave soldiers were dying in Afghanistan, being blown to bits by roadside bombs. Canada's natives were living under some form of apartheid in conditions too disgraceful for animals. And our health−care system was in a mess. Oh, yes, almost forgot this, so please stop the press: Two years ago, a hockey player by the name of Shane Doan either did −− or didn't −− call a National Hockey League referee a "f . . . ing Frenchman." The referee, Michel Cormier, insists that Doan committed the deed; Doan, a solid, two−way forward with the Phoenix Coyotes, says he didn't −− and was subsequently cleared by the league. We now move forward two years and discover −− not surprisingly, given that this is Canada −− that the issue of Doan's alleged, unproven slur cannot be allowed to die. Doan, his NHL season over, is now in Russia, having volunteered his time and skills to represent Canada −− all of Canada −− at the world hockey tournament in Russia. Doan is so well regarded by his teammates and coaching staff that he has been selected to captain the team. He has no obligation to play in this tournament. He is under no obligation to help support the Canadian cause in Russia. He is just like every other guy over there, doing his bit to represent his country and to help his team win. But, oh, the firestorm back home. Gilles Duceppe, the block−head leader of the Bloc Quebecois, goes berserk and puts forward a motion in Parliament demanding that officials from Hockey Canada and Sports Canada appear before the House of Commons Official Languages Committee. Every party in the House, all trolling unashamedly for Quebec votes, lend their support. The languages committee votes unanimously to insist that the two sports agencies appear before the committee today to prostrate themselves, to seek forgiveness, and justify their annual grants. And so, let us ask four simple questions: Do these guys not get out much? Do they not have more pressing concerns? Have they ever actually attended a sporting event? And, finally, does the term "trash talk" ring any bells? What, exactly, do they think Matthew Barnaby says and does out on the ice? Or Sean Avery? Or the slightly Don't politicians have more important work to do?

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younger edition of Darcy Tucker? What, precisely, do they think goes on out there on the basketball court when two giant seven−footers play crash−and−burn under the basket? Or out on the football field when two opposing 300−pound linemen are trying to knock each other's blocks off and throw each other off their game? When Lennox Lewis was whaling the tar out of the foul−mouthed, foul− behavioured Mike Tyson a few years back, rest assured that he did not spend his leisure time between right hooks offering Tyson his own kitchen−ready recipe for butter tarts. Do we sound a bit grumpy today? Do we sound a bit sick and tired of life in a nanny state where every little slight −− every teensy nuance of an alleged, unproven insult −− has to be addressed by either a Parliamentary committee or a royal commission? Three words for our gutless Parliamentarians: Get over it. And then get to work saving some jobs. Or fixing health care. Or backing our kids fighting on the o ther side of the world. And, for goodness sakes, just shut up and let Shane Doan go about his business of representing Canada the best way he knows how. Sports editor Al Coates can be reached at [email protected]

Don't politicians have more important work to do?

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Former NHLers cheer troops; Hockey heroes bring Stanley Cup to Afghanistan PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: SOURCE: BYLINE: PHOTO: DATELINE:

Kingston Whig−Standard (ON) 2007.05.03 National/World 9 The Canadian Press James McCarten The Canadian Press KANDAHAR, Afghanistan Canada's Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier (left)poses with Maple Leafs fan Cpl. ILLUSTRATION: Jay McArthur, of Goderich, Ont., and the Stanley Cup at the Provincial Reconstruction Team base in Kandahar, Afghanistan, yesterday. WORD COUNT: 268 Armed with a gleaming symbol of hockey glory, Canada's top soldier led a brigade of former National Hockey League players on a mission yesterday to boost the morale and lift the spirits of war−weary, sports−starved Canadians in Afghanistan. Surrounded by hockey heroes that included enforcers like Bob Probert and Dave (Tiger) Williams, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier looked like a kid in a candy store as the Stanley Cup was wheeled out and placed on display on the tarmac at Kandahar Airfield. "This is the cup that's coming back to Canada," Hillier said, a reference to the two Canadian teams left in the playoffs, the Ottawa Senators and the Vancouver Canucks. Soldiers posed for photos and chatted with some of the players, including goaltender Ron Tugnutt, two−time Cup winner Mark Napier and Montreal Canadiens legends Rejean Houle and Yvon Lambert. "I got the chance to be close to the Cup, take a picture with it − it was a great moment for me," said Cpl. Lisa−Marie Guernon, 29, of Montreal, a Canadiens cap on her head. "Especially here in Afghanistan − those types of things are pretty special for us." Hillier and the players arrived aboard a C−130 Hercules that performed a low, tight banking turn before coming in for a landing. Tugnutt said he was thrilled to be asked to visit with the Canadians. "When we were offered to come and do this, it was a great honour," he said. "To be able to come and experience this and meet the soldiers, it's been incredible − talking to them, hearing their stories." Later in the day, the group travelled to Camp Nathan Smith, just outside Kandahar city, to visit with members of Canada's provincial reconstruction team, where they signed autographs and mugged for more photos.

Former NHLers cheer troops; Hockey heroes bring Stanley Cup to Afghanistan

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Family gives gift of light; Parents of fallen soldier mark her birthday by illuminating island nation PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: SOURCE: BYLINE: PHOTO: DATELINE: ILLUSTRATION: WORD COUNT:

Kingston Whig−Standard (ON) 2007.05.03 National/World 9 The Canadian Press Bill Graveland The Canadian Press CALGARY Tim and Sally Goddard use one−watt LEDs to light up theirfaces after launching the Light Up Papua New Guinea charity in Calgary yesterday.; GODDARD: KILLED IN ACTION. 476

Out of the darkness of their daughter's death in Afghanistan a year ago, the family of Capt. Nicola Goddard has found some light to shine in the country of her birth. Goddard, a graduate of Royal Military College, died last May 17 in a grenade attack by Taliban insurgents in the war−torn country's Panjwaii district. A member of the 1st Regiment of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, she was Canada's first female combat soldier to die in battle. To date, 54 Canadian soldiers have lost their lives on the Afghanistan mission. The young captain was described as an outstanding leader and caring friend by her comrades and as a loving daughter by her parents. Yesterday would have been her 27th birthday. "In a perfect world, we'd obviously just prefer to be sitting down and cutting a cake," said Tim Goddard as he and his wife, Sally, launched an aid project in Papua New Guinea in honour of their daughter. Under the program, solar−powered lighting systems will replace hazardous kerosene lamps in nearly 2,000 first−aid posts across the island nation. In a country close to the equator, it is dark 12 hours a day − each and every day − which makes the gift unique. "We decided that it would be better to do it on her birthday rather than her death day," said Sally Goddard. "We want to remember. We don't want to wallow and if we can make this a positive outcome ... [if] we can help a country, then something good is coming out of this [her daughter's death]. The Goddards met and married in Papua New Guinea while they were working as teachers with community leaders building new schools. Nicola was born there and lived there until she was three. It's a project that Nicola would have approved of, say the Goddards, and makes the first birthday without her a little easier to get through. "It's bittersweet, obviously. If things had been different, this would be a very different day, but you can't Family gives gift of light; Parents of fallen soldier mark her birthday by illuminating island nation

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change what's happened, right?" said her father. "How do you make the best of it? How do you find something positive in something so awful? I think of the other 53 people and their families, and every day of the year there's somebody going through this." The Goddards were in Papua New Guinea when it was just achieving independence from Australia. In a country where 80 per cent of its six million people live in rural areas, the solar lights will make a major difference, said Evan Paki, Papua New Guinea's ambassador to North America. "A lot of the aid posts operate simply from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. If somebody comes at 6 p.m., they would say 'Sorry,' because there are no lighting fixtures to administer medical treatment," he said. "I'm sure that she [Nicola] would have wanted to go back if she had remained alive today. I think it's very fitting that we honour a legacy and try to achieve a part of a dream by launching this project." With the Canadian death toll continuing to rise in Afghanistan, the Goddards hope the government makes an informed decision when it comes time to decide whether to extend Canada's tour of duty there past 2009.

Family gives gift of light; Parents of fallen soldier mark her birthday by illuminating island nation

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N.S. soldier hurt in blast tells of ordeal PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE:

The Chronicle−Herald 2007.05.03 Front A1 Jeffrey Simpson Staff Reporter Cpl. Shaun Fevens speaks at Stadacona in Halifax aboutsurviving a blast in Afghanistan that killed six fellow soldiers. (Matthew Timmins); Cpl. Shaun Fevens speaks at ILLUSTRATION: Stadacona in Halifax about surviving a blast in Afghanistan that killed six fellow soldiers. (Matthew Timmins) WORD COUNT: 745 Cpl. Shaun Fevens felt uneasy as he and his comrades moved out on the back of a light armoured vehicle during an operation in the Afghanistan desert last month. "You always have the bad feeling," Cpl. Fevens, 24, said Wednesday. "The bad feeling doesn't really matter until something happens." And something did. The LAV III drove over a pressure−activated explosive device on that fateful day in the Maywand district of Kandahar province. The blast threw Cpl. Fevens from the back of the vehicle. He didn't lose consciousness, but everything slowed down for a moment. "The pressure of the blast was like jumping into a deep pool of water," he said. "It was bright, so I couldn't see anything. "At the same time, you can hear stuff but it's not clear." He recounted the details for media at Stadacona, part of CFB Halifax, sharing his story publicly for the first time while sitting in the wheelchair he'll have to use until he recovers from his wounds. His most serious injury from the explosion was a fractured tibia; he also broke his left ankle in three places, suffered burns and cut his forehead and ear. Pulling up his shirt sleeve, he revealed several shrapnel scars scattered around a tattoo indicating his blood type. The Halifax soldier, who's from the Princess Louise Fusiliers infantry regiment, was the only one on the back of the LAV III to survive; the blast killed fellow Fusilier Master Cpl. Christopher Stannix and five other members of the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment of CFB Gagetown, N.B. Cpl. Fevens, who's originally from the Barrington area, kept his cool after the blast. Sprawled on the ground, he instructed another soldier on what medical action to take. He credited his lucidity to the result of a year of preparation before deploying, which included extensive battlefield first−aid training. When the soldier attended to him, Cpl. Fevens told him to fetch the pack of special first−aid equipment that had been blown off his leg. Following Cpl. Fevens' directions, Cpl. Greg Robertson used broken scissors from the pack to shear off his right pant leg so he could see if there was arterial damage. There wasn't. So he checked out the other leg before beginning to apply pressure and stop the bleeding. N.S. soldier hurt in blast tells of ordeal

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Initially, Cpl. Robertson was concerned about hurting his comrade. "I definitely had more issues than worrying about a bandage," Cpl. Fevens said. He's certain his first−aid training helped but acknowledged it's difficult to know how much. "I don't think it would have been a life−or−death matter," he said. Lt.−Cmdr. Roxanne Cooper, the base surgeon for CFB Halifax, agreed that his first−aid training came in handy. "There's no doubt the skills that he used are life− and limb−saving skills," she said. "I can't say if he hadn't done it, it would have cost him a leg. "But he had very significant injuries, so there's no doubt the things he did along the way were definitely helpful." Cpl. Fevens knew immediately about what had happened to his comrades. "I could see everything," he said. "I witnessed it all. I could see the back of the LAV. It was pretty obvious." As he sat in the back of the ambulance, he overheard radio conversations that confirmed the soldiers' deaths. "The medic quickly shut it off," he said. Cpl. Fevens said he and his "brothers" knew the worst could happen at any time and often spoke about it. "We always said if it's your turn to go, then it's your turn," he said. "We lived by that and just talking about it every day, it was like we mourned with each other. "At the instant it happened, I was OK with it. I knew I'd be OK." Cpl. Fevens appeared upbeat and displayed a stubborn, independent streak as he spoke about his experiences since the explosion on April 8. He said he often has to swat away the hands of well−meaning people when they try to push his wheelchair, preferring to move around himself. "I was practising my wheelies," he said. "Want me to do a catwalk?" His cast is supposed to come off in two weeks and then he can start putting weight on the leg again. It will probably be about a year before he can run again, but doctors expect him to recover fully. He'd go back to Afghanistan immediately if he were physically able, he said. He hasn't questioned why he survived instead of his comrades, believing that soldiering on is the best way to honour them. "It's what we do," he said. "Bad things happen." But his career path won't include continuing in the infantry after recuperating. "I do plan on going to the air force," he said, explaining that as a former air cadet, it was his original intention anyway. Cpl. Fevens arrived back in Halifax on April 13 after having several medical procedures in Afghanistan and at an American hospital in Germany, where he met many soldiers who were wounded in Iraq. N.S. soldier hurt in blast tells of ordeal

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While convalescing in Europe, he also spent some time flipping through a copy of the Auto Trader and even asked his mother to check the price of a Shelburne County vehicle for him. "I was looking at a Pontiac G6," he said. "I knew I'd be needing a little bit of a bigger car to get into. "Originally, I was planning on getting a sport bike but . . . I don't think I'll be able to ride one for a few months to come yet." He's also planning to perhaps marry his girlfriend, Lana Dormiedy, in the not−too−distant future. "I didn't want to get engaged before we left but I did give her the promise ring," he said.( )

N.S. soldier hurt in blast tells of ordeal

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A Cup of cheer in Afghanistan; Stanley Cup and veterans of hockey wars provide boost for troops PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: SOURCE: BYLINE: DATELINE:

The Guardian (Charlottetown) 2007.05.03 World B7 the canadian press James McCarten KANDAHAR, Afghanistan Canadian military policeman Master Cpl. Mike Lehman, fromGatineau, Que., keeps an ILLUSTRATION: eye on the Stanley Cup as it arrives at the base in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Wednesday. Canadian Press photo WORD COUNT: 256 Armed with a gleaming symbol of hockey glory, Canada's top soldier led a brigade of former National Hockey League players on a mission Wednesday to boost the morale and lift the spirits of war−weary, sports−starved Canadians in Afghanistan. Surrounded by hockey heroes that included enforcers like Bob Probert and Dave (Tiger) Williams, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier looked like a kid in a candy store as the Stanley Cup was wheeled out and placed on display on the tarmac at Kandahar Airfield. "This is the cup that's coming back to Canada," Hillier said, a reference to the two Canadian teams left in the playoffs, the Ottawa Senators and the Vancouver Canucks. Soldiers posed for photos and chatted with some of the players, including goaltender Ron Tugnutt, two−time Cup winner Mark Napier and Montreal Canadiens legends Rejean Houle and Yvon Lambert. "I got the chance to be close to the Cup, take a picture with it − it was a great moment for me," said Cpl. Lisa−Marie Guernon, 29, from Montreal, a Canadiens cap on her head. "Especially here in Afghanistan − those types of things are pretty special for us." Hillier and the players arrived aboard a C−130 Hercules that performed a low, tight banking turn before coming in for a landing − an experience Tugnutt said he won't soon forget. "It's a good thing I went to Disney last week with the family; it prepared me for the ride in," he said. "I went on all the big roller coasters, and that experience − plus a few Gravol − prepared me for that flight. It was very intense, actually, and (the soldiers) said, 'That was nothing'." Tugnutt said he was thrilled to be asked to visit with the Canadians.

A Cup of cheer in Afghanistan; Stanley Cup and veterans of hockey wars provide boost for troops33

Hillier defends prisoner deal; General says troops in Afghanistan dismayed by torture controversy PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: SOURCE: BYLINE: DATELINE: ILLUSTRATION: WORD COUNT:

The Guardian (Charlottetown) 2007.05.03 World B7 the canadian press James McCarten KANDAHAR, Afghanistan Canada's Chief of Defence Staff General Rick Hillier puts aplayful headlock on Master Cpl. Mark Fedorchuk, from Saskatoon, as he obliges his request to have his picture taken with him during a visit to the Provincial Reconstruction Team base in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Wednesday. Canadian Press photo 296

Canada's top soldier stood by his decision to sign a prisoner−exchange deal with the Afghan government, saying Wednesday that it felt right at the time but may not have been sufficient to prevent detainees from being tortured in Afghan jails. Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier, who shook hands and posed for pictures with soldiers out to see the Stanley Cup brought to Kandahar to boost morale, said some of his soldiers are "pissed−off" with the political firestorm back home over allegations of detainee torture. They're saying the controversy is distracting attention from the work they do Afghanistan, he said. But Hillier defended his decision to sign the deal, in part a convenience, he said, as he was in the country at the time, as the right move for Afghanistan and for Canada's role in helping the fledgling Afghan government find its feet. "At the time, we felt that was the right thing to do, that we were comfortable with our approach," Hillier said, a backdrop of military vehicles behind him. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient." The agreement, which did not include any provisions to allow human rights officials to visit prisoners once they'd been handed over by Canadian soldiers, helped to foster Canada's effort to support the local government, to build its capacity and strengthen local police and military forces, he said. Those soldiers are now growing frustrated − "pissed off," in his words − that the gathering storm clouds are obscuring the work they're doing on behalf of the Afghan people. "They're angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here − the focus back in Canada specifically − on the enormous amount of good that's being done, on the incredible things that are happening here in Kandahar province and the rest of Afghanistan."

Hillier defends prisoner deal; General says troops in Afghanistan dismayed by torture controversy 34

Couple use lights to honour late daughter's war duty PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: SOURCE: DATELINE: ILLUSTRATION: WORD COUNT:

The Guardian (Charlottetown) 2007.05.03 Canada A10 CP CALGARY Tim Goddard 468

Out of the darkness of their daughter's death in Afghanistan a year ago, the family of Capt. Nicola Goddard has found some light to shine in the country of her birth. Goddard died last May 17 in a grenade attack by Taliban insurgents in the war−torn country's Panjwaii district. A member of the 1st Regiment of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, she was Canada's first female combat soldier to die in battle. To date, 54 Canadian soldiers have lost their lives on the Afghanistan mission. The young captain was described as an outstanding leader and caring friend by her comrades and as a loving daughter by her parents. Wednesday would have been her 27th birthday. "In a perfect world, we'd obviously just prefer to be sitting down and cutting a cake," said Tim Goddard as he and his wife, Sally, launched an aid project in Papua New Guinea to honour their daughter. Under the program, solar−powered lighting systems will replace hazardous kerosene lamps in nearly 2,000 first−aid posts across the island nation. In a country close to the equator, it is dark 12 hours a day − each and every day − which makes the gift unique. "We decided that it would be better to do it on her birthday rather than her death day," said Sally Goddard. "We want to remember. We don't want to wallow and if we can make this a positive outcome . . . (if) we can help a country, then something good is coming out of this (her daughter's death). Because there's not a heck of a lot else that's coming out of it that's good." The Goddards met and married in Papua New Guinea, an impoverished country off the northeast coast of Australia, while they were working as teachers with community leaders building new schools. Nicola was born there and lived there until she was three. It's a project that Nicola would have approved of, say the Goddards, and makes the first birthday without her a little easier to get through. "It's bittersweet, obviously. If things had been different, this would be a very different day, but you can't change what's happened, right?" said her father. "How do you make the best of it? How do you find something positive in something so awful? I think of the other 53 people and their families, and every day of the year there's somebody going through this."

Couple use lights to honour late daughter's war duty

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The Goddards were in Papua New Guinea when it was just achieving independence from Australia. In a country where 80 per cent of its six million people live in rural areas, the solar lights will make a major difference, said Evan Paki, Papua New Guinea's ambassador to North America. "A lot of the aid posts operate simply from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. If somebody comes at 6 p.m., they would say `Sorry,' because there are no lighting fixtures to administer medical treatment," he said. "I'm sure that she (Nicola) would have wanted to go back if she had remained alive today. I think it's very fitting that we honour a legacy and try to achieve a part of a dream by launching this project."

Couple use lights to honour late daughter's war duty

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Injured Canadian soldier describes blast as 'deep pool'; Corporal talks about Afghan bombing that killed six colleagues PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: SOURCE: DATELINE:

The Guardian (Charlottetown) 2007.05.03 Canada A9 CP HALIFAX Cpl. Shaun Fevens arrives at a news conference at CFBStadacona in Halifax on ILLUSTRATION: Wednesday. Fevens was injured in Afghanistan in an incident that claimed the lives of six Canadian soldiers. Canadian Press photo WORD COUNT: 313 When a roadside bomb ripped through the light−armoured vehicle he was riding in west of Kandahar City, killing six of his fellow soldiers, Cpl. Shaun Fevens says he felt like he was surrounded by water. "When the blast hit, I didn't go unconscious," Fevens, a 24−year−old reservist with the Halifax−based Princess Louise Fusiliers, recalled Wednesday. "The pressure of the blast was like jumping into a deep pool of water. It was bright, so I couldn't see anything, and psychologically my ears had shut off. You can hear stuff, but it's not clear." Sitting in a wheelchair, Fevens recalled his experience in Afghanistan and described his recovery during an informal news conference in Halifax. He was the most seriously injured of the four soldiers who survived, suffering a broken ankle and leg, burns, and shrapnel wounds in his wrist. Fevens, one of the few soldiers trained in advanced battlefield first aid, known as tactical combat casualty care, instructed another survivor how to treat his leg, which was bleeding profusely. He told the other soldier how to check the seriousness of his wounds, and then how to bandage his his broken leg. "He was more concerned about hurting me, but I was trying to comfort him because I definitely had more issues than worrying about a bandage," Fevens said. "If it didn't happen that quickly, I don't think it would have been a life−or−death matter, but definitely early and initial first aid, I'm sure it helped me in the end." Cpl. Brent Poland, Master Cpl. Christopher Stannix, Sgt. Don Lucas, Cpl. Aaron Williams, Pte. Kevin Kennedy and Pte. David Greenslade were killed instantly in the explosion. Fevens said he knew his colleagues had died before he was rushed away for treatment. "I witnessed it all − I could see the back of the LAV and it was pretty obvious," he said.

Injured Canadian soldier describes blast as 'deep pool'; Corporal talks about Afghan bombing that37 killed six c

"I heard (about the deaths) on the radio, and the medic quickly shut it off because most patients that wouldn't be as calm as I was would tend to panic more. But I knew at the instant." Fevens underwent surgery in Afghanistan to stabilize him before he was transferred to a U.S. military hospital in Landstuhl, Germany. He arrived back in Canada on April 13 and has since undergone more surgery and physiotherapy.

Injured Canadian soldier describes blast as 'deep pool'; Corporal talks about Afghan bombing that38 killed six c

Harper on the defensive, Dion on the hot seat PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: COLUMN: BYLINE: WORD COUNT:

The Guardian (Charlottetown) 2007.05.03 Opinion A7 National analysis Hébert, Chantal 682

If their respective polling numbers were not so dismal, the Bloc Québécois, the NDP and the Liberals would be discussing the funeral arrangements of the minority Parliament at their weekly caucus meetings today. Over the past week, Stephen Harper's government has given the opposition parties ample cause to seek its demise. The conflicting versions of the circumstances presiding over the handing of Afghan detainees to local authorities have exposed cracks in the government's facade of competence. They have raised new doubts as to the management of the deployment to Afghanistan. One needs to look no further than the United States, Israel or the United Kingdom to know that there is little that is more politically lethal for a regime than the public perception that it is mishandling a war. To compound that, the latest Conservative plan to fight climate change has earned a failing grade with environmentalists at home and abroad. Former American vice−president Al Gore − the top international crusader on global warming − has dismissed the plan presented by Environment Minister John Baird last week as a fraud. Yvo de Boer, the top official in charge of the climate change file at the United Nations, has joined the chorus of critics of the government. De Boer told La Presse that the climate change strategy lacked ambition. He predicted that it would not significantly curb Canada's greenhouse gas emissions. Minority Parliaments have been brought to the brink for less. Twenty−four months ago, the Martin regime almost fell over testimony about the Liberal sponsorship program. At the time, an early election would essentially have been about punishing the Liberals for past sins. By comparison, the opposition has strenuously argued that a change in direction on the environment and the Afghan mission is both urgent and essential. At the same time, the three parties have just about exhausted all parliamentary means available to force such a change on the government. But Gilles Duceppe is more preoccupied with polishing off his resumé in case the Parti Québécois leadership opens up later this year than with plotting the early demise of the Harper government. A CROP poll pegged Bloc support at 28 per cent, a new historical low for the sovereignist party. As for the NDP, it is as concerned − if not more so − by the Green party as it is by the government's green politics. Neither is expected to take the lead in censuring the Harper government over its climate change strategy. But would the NDP or the Bloc go as far as saving the government from a defeat on its green plan to avoid a late Harper on the defensive, Dion on the hot seat

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spring or early summer election? Liberal Leader Stéphane Dion would certainly like to know. He has to decide whether the risks of plunging his party into an uncertain election campaign this spring are higher than the costs of looking the other way as the Conservative regime weathers the worst crisis of its 14−month existence. Dion has made the environment his personal crusade. If he fails to try to bring the government to account on its climate change plan, he will be seen as a champion with clay feet in many quarters. On the other hand, the Liberals have no momentum in the polls. That may change with the next round of numbers. In the wake of their worst week ever last week, the Conservatives are bracing for a batch of bad polls. But even a Liberal bump in popularity would not make that party election−ready. Almost two years ago to the day since Harper set out to bring down Paul Martin's minority government, Dion finds himself at the same crossroads. In the spring of 2005, the Conservatives were just as unprepared for an election. In hindsight, Belinda Stronach's defection to the Liberals turned out to be a blessing for Harper. It paved the way for the survival of the Martin government for another six months. The rest is history. But if Harper − whose election battle cry was always going to be government ethics − had not been ready to put his money where his mouth was when the occasion first arose, he might not be prime minister today. What is certain is that he would not have gotten the attention of Quebecers the way he did. Harper is on the defensive in Parliament and in retreat in the polls these days, but it is Dion who is in the hot seat. Chantal Hébert is a national affairs. Copyright 2007 Torstar Syndication Services.

Harper on the defensive, Dion on the hot seat

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Malpeque MP tables petition supporting Forces members PUBLICATION: DATE: SECTION: PAGE: COLUMN: WORD COUNT:

The Guardian (Charlottetown) 2007.05.03 Provincial A3 Island digest 93

Malpeque MP Wayne Easter tabled a petition in the House of Commons on Tuesday to support the Canadian Forces. Easter said that due to the nature of recent unfortunate friendly fire incidents in Afghanistan, the integrity, professionalism and reputation of members of the Canadian Forces have been called to question. The petition began after charges were laid on Master Cpl. Robbie Fraser and calls for the minister of National Defence and the prime minister to take immediate action to ensure that members of the Canadian Forces are given the full respect they deserve.

Malpeque MP tables petition supporting Forces members

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A 'piece of Canada' in Kandahar; Former NHLers accompany trophy on morale−building visit to troops IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030170 Edmonton Journal 2007.05.03 Final News A1 / FRONT Colour Photo: The Canadian Press / Master Cpl. Mike Lehman,a Canadian military police ILLUSTRATION: officer from Gatineau, Que., keeps an eye on the Stanley Cup shortly after its arrival Wednesday in Kandahar, Afghanistan. ; DATELINE: KANDAHAR, Afghanistan BYLINE: Jonathan Fowlie SOURCE: CanWest News Service; with files from The Canadian Press WORD COUNT: 416 KANDAHAR, Afghanistan −− Canada's top soldier arrived in Kandahar on Wednesday morning with a special treat for troops: the Stanley Cup. "This is the cup that's coming back to Canada," Gen. Rick Hillier said on the tarmac at Kandahar Airfield, a reference to the two Canadian teams left in the playoffs, the Ottawa Senators and the Vancouver Canucks. Hillier was joined by several former NHL players −− including Bob Probert, Rejean Houle, Dan Daoust and Ron Tugnutt −− and Vancouver Canucks owner Paolo Aquilini. Hillier and the players arrived on a C−130 Hercules that performed a low, tight banking turn before coming in for a landing −− an experience Tugnutt won't soon forget. "It's a good thing I went to Disney last week with the family; it prepared me for the ride in," he said. "I went on all the big roller−coasters, and that experience −− plus a few Gravol −− prepared me for that flight. It was very intense, actually, and (the soldiers) said, 'That was nothing.' " "This is a great morale booster," said Warrant Officer Martin Rousseau, a Canadiens fan originally from Montreal. Sgt. Leighton Hardy, a diehard Toronto fan, was ecstatic to see the cup in Kandahar. "It's nice to see a piece of Canada come to us," said Hardy, who has been in Afghanistan since mid−October. "To actually get to see the cup, it's unique to see it outside of Canada." For the visitors, the event was equally exciting. "I'm here to support our troops. I know they are going through a tough time, they lost people, and I wanted to ... let them know we are behind them and that they are very courageous," said Houle, who won five Stanley Cups. "This is an honour to be here," said Aquilini, who owns the Canucks with his brothers Roberto and Francesco. He said there was no place he'd rather have been, even though his team is fighting for its life in the playoffs. A 'piece of Canada' in Kandahar; Former NHLers accompany trophy on morale−building visit to troops 42

"This is more important for me to be here and to really express my gratitude to the soldiers and everyone here that is doing a great job." Later in the day, the group travelled to Camp Nathan Smith, just outside Kandahar city, to visit with members of Canada's provincial reconstruction team, where they signed autographs and mugged for more photos. The players were set to face off this morning in a ball−hockey game against a team of soldiers that Tiger Williams, for one, knows won't be easy to beat. "These guys play for real, so it's going to be entertaining," chuckled Williams, a custom−made "Tiger" name tag on his military uniform. "We've got Bob Probert on our side, though, so look out, you know?" Hillier said he plans to suit up and play a shift on a line with both Williams and Probert. Brig.−Gen. Tim Grant, the commander of Canadian forces in Afghanistan, said the visit would prove invaluable to the mood and morale of the soldiers, who braved 50 C temperatures Wednesday and are facing a long, hot summer ahead. "From a morale standpoint, there is no equivalent to this," Grant said. "You can't put a price on it."

A 'piece of Canada' in Kandahar; Former NHLers accompany trophy on morale−building visit to troops 43

No more civilian deaths, Afghans warn NATO IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030159 Edmonton Journal 2007.05.03 Final News A4 WAR; TERRORISM; PROPAGANDA; FOREIGN AID; AFGHANISTAN; KEYWORDS: UNITEDSTATES DATELINE: KABUL, Afghanistan SOURCE: CanWest News Service WORD COUNT: 77 KABUL, Afghanistan −− Afghans can no longer accept civilian deaths from international military operations, President Hamid Karzai said Wednesday amid reports 51 villagers were killed during a U.S.−led offensive against the Taliban in western Afghanistan. Despite claims that women and children were among the dead, the U.S. military insisted it had no reports of civilian casualties. But rising public anger was evident as students staged a fourth day of anti−American protests in an eastern city over civilian deaths. Karzai met with NATO, U.S. and European Union officials to protest the deaths.

No more civilian deaths, Afghans warn NATO

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Martin gov't cleared detainees deal: memos; Civil liberties groups ask court to block transfer of prisoners to Afghan gov't IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030141 Edmonton Journal 2007.05.03 Final News A6 Photo: Reuters / Stephen Harper stands to speak in the Houseof Commons on ILLUSTRATION: Wednesday. ; KEYWORDS: POLITICIANS; POLITICAL PARTIES; GOVERNMENT; CANADA DATELINE: OTTAWA BYLINE: Andrew Mayeda and Mike Blanchfield SOURCE: CanWest News Service WORD COUNT: 657 OTTAWA −− Former prime minister Paul Martin gave approval almost two years ago to then−defence minister Bill Graham to negotiate a detainee transfer agreement with the Afghanistan government, government documents obtained by CanWest News Service show. The revelation, contained in cabinet correspondence and Defence Department briefing notes, comes as the Harper government continues to face heavy criticism over allegations that Afghan detainees were abused after being transferred to Afghan authorities. The documents show that Martin, now an ordinary Liberal MP who has yet to speak publicly on the controversy, was briefed on the outlines of the deal more than six months before it was signed. In a May 27, 2005, letter from Graham to Martin, the former prime minister was told Canada planned to negotiate an deal with the Afghan government that would spell out "explicit undertakings" how the detainees would be treated. That same day Graham "authorized the Canadian Forces to seek arrangements with relevant authorities on the transfer of detainees," according to a Defence Department briefing note. "The prime minister concurred with this approach on 10 June 2005," the note states. The documents appear to undermine an increasingly popular view in Ottawa that Gen. Rick Hillier, the chief of the defence staff, acted without proper government authority when he signed the detainee deal on behalf of the Canadian government in Kabul on Dec. 18, 2005. The papers also shed new light how the former Liberal government crafted a deal that has become Prime Minister Stephen Harper's biggest political headache since taking power, sparking daily calls for the resignation of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor. Graham's letter states that the government wanted a deal under which Afghan detainees transferred by Canada

Martin gov't cleared detainees deal: memos; Civil liberties groups ask court to block transfer of prisoners 45 to A

would "be afforded treatment consistent with the standards set out in the Third Geneva Convention, regardless of the legal status of those detainees." The letter also says that Canadians would pass information on detainees to the International Committee of the Red Cross, "which has the mandate and resources to track Prisoners of War and detainees captured during armed conflict." However, it does not clarify whether the ICRC would report to Canada on the condition of the detainees. O'Connor recently apologized for incorrectly telling Parliament the ICRC was reporting to Canada. On May 31, 2005, Graham and Hillier met Afghanistan Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the possibility of a bilateral "framework agreement," according to the briefing note. In a July 28 letter, Hillier asked Graham for authority to work toward the negotiation of a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees. Graham signed off on the plan. In the House of Commons Wednesday, the Conservative government faced continued criticism that it exposed prisoners to torture in Afghan prisons after they were transferred by the Canadian military personnel. Harper insisted Hillier could not have signed a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees without approval from the ministers of the day. CBC News reported Wednesday that Canadian Forces have two separate procedures for handling Afghan detainees, including one that that does not involve any oversight by human rights groups. Military documents viewed by the CBC show that Canadian troops are authorized to hand some detainees directly to Afghan authorities on the battlefield, rather than take them prisoner. The CBC says the battlefield transfers appear to circumvent a complicated set of rules that require Canadian soldiers to notify human rights monitors when they detain Afghan militants. The documents state Canadian soldiers are allowed to decide if they want to detain a militant. Meanwhile in Kandahar, Hillier admitted the agreement may not have been enough to stop the torture of Afghan captives. But he insisted that signing the accord had not been a mistake because it allowed Canada to move forward with its mission. "Truly, at the time we felt that was the right thing to do," Hillier said. The government has since negotiated a new accord giving Canadian officials access to detainees after they are transferred. In Ottawa, meanwhile, Amnesty International Canada and the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association will ask the Federal Court of Canada today to temporarily block the transferring prisoners to the Afghan government on the grounds the practice violates the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Canada's international obligations under the Geneva Convention.

Martin gov't cleared detainees deal: memos; Civil liberties groups ask court to block transfer of prisoners 46 to A

Soldier's grieving family brightens world; Parents remember Capt. Nicola Goddard by lighting aid stations in impoverished nation IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030088 Edmonton Journal 2007.05.03 Early News B8 Photo: The Canadian Press / Nicola Goddard; Photo: The Canadian Press / Tim and Sally ILLUSTRATION: Goddard use one−watt LEDs to light up their faces after launching the Light Up Papua New Guinea charity. ; DATELINE: CALGARY BYLINE: Bill Graveland SOURCE: The Canadian Press WORD COUNT: 608 CALGARY − Out of the darkness of their daughter's death in Afghanistan a year ago, the family of Capt. Nicola Goddard has found some light to shine in the country of her birth. Goddard died last May 17 in a grenade attack by Taliban insurgents in the wartorn country's Panjwaii district. A member of the 1st Regiment of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, she was Canada's first female combat soldier to die in battle. To date, 54 Canadian soldiers have lost their lives on the Afghanistan mission. The young captain was described as an outstanding leader and caring friend by her comrades and as a loving daughter by her parents. Wednesday would have been her 27th birthday. "In a perfect world, we'd obviously just prefer to be sitting down and cutting a cake," said Tim Goddard as he and his wife, Sally, launched an aid project in Papua New Guinea to honour their daughter. Under the program, solar−powered lighting systems will replace hazardous kerosene lamps in nearly 2,000 first−aid posts across the island nation. In a country close to the equator, it is dark 12 hours a day −− each and every day −− which makes the gift unique. "We decided that it would be better to do it on her birthday rather than her death day," said Sally Goddard. "We want to remember. We don't want to wallow and if we can make this a positive outcome ... (if) we can help a country, then something good is coming out of this (her daughter's death). Because there's not a heck of a lot else that's coming out of it that's good." The Goddards met and married in Papua New Guinea, an impoverished country off the northeast coast of Australia, while they were working as teachers with community leaders building new schools. Nicola was born there and lived there until she was three.

Soldier's grieving family brightens world; Parents remember Capt. Nicola Goddard by lighting aid stations 47 in

It's a project that Nicola would have approved of, say the Goddards, and makes the first birthday without her a little easier to get through. "It's bittersweet, obviously. If things had been different, this would be a very different day, but you can't change what's happened, right?" said her father. "How do you make the best of it? How do you find something positive in something so awful? I think of the other 53 people and their families, and every day of the year there's somebody going through this." The Goddards were in Papua New Guinea when it was just achieving independence from Australia. In a country where 80 per cent of its six million people live in rural areas, the solar lights will make a major difference, said Evan Paki, Papua New Guinea's ambassador to North America. "A lot of the aid posts operate simply from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. If somebody comes at 6 p.m., they would say 'Sorry,' because there are no lighting fixtures to administer medical treatment," he said. "I'm sure that she (Nicola) would have wanted to go back if she had remained alive today. "I think it's very fitting that we honour a legacy and try to achieve a part of a dream by launching this project." With the Canadian death toll continuing to rise in Afghanistan, the Goddards hope the government makes an informed decision when it comes time to decide whether to extend Canada's tour of duty there past 2009. But whatever that decision, a kinship with the families of other soldiers who have died in the line of duty has made something very clear to the Goddards. "There's not been one set of parents or friends of the fallen soldiers who has not believed, as we believed, and Nicola believed, that they were doing the right thing and they were there doing good work," said Tim Goddard, who has met many other grieving parents across the country. "It's the club you don't want to be in and you can't volunteer to be part of it. It's your kids that get you in it." The Light Up the World Foundation also has projects in the Peruvian Amazon, refugee camps for tsunami victims in Sri Lanka and a presence in villages on the borders of Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Soldier's grieving family brightens world; Parents remember Capt. Nicola Goddard by lighting aid stations 48 in

Martin gov't signed deal on detainees IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: DATELINE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030098 The Leader−Post (Regina) 2007.05.03 Final Canada &The World A3 OTTAWA Andrew Mayeda and Mike Blanchfield, With files fromJonathan Fowlie CanWest News Service 545

OTTAWA −− Former prime minister Paul Martin gave approval almost two years ago to then−defence minister Bill Graham to negotiate a detainee transfer agreement with the Afghanistan government, government documents obtained by CanWest News Service show. The revelation, contained in cabinet correspondence and Defence Department briefing notes, comes as the Harper government continues to face heavy criticism over allegations that Afghan detainees were abused after being transferred to Afghan authorities. The documents show that Martin, now an ordinary Liberal MP who has yet to speak publicly on the controversy, was briefed on the outlines of the agreement more than six months before it was signed. In a May 27, 2005 letter from Graham to Martin, the former prime minister was told that Canada planned to negotiate an agreement with the Afghan government that would spell out "explicit undertakings" on how the detainees would be treated. The same day as the letter, Graham "authorized the Canadian Forces to seek arrangements with relevant authorities on the transfer of detainees," according to a Defence Department briefing note. "The Prime Minister concurred with this approach on 10 June 2005," the note states. The documents appear to undermine an increasingly popular view in Ottawa's corridors of power that says Gen. Rick Hillier, the chief of the defence staff, acted without proper government authority when he signed the detainee deal on behalf of the Canadian government in Kabul on Dec. 18, 2005. The papers also shed new light on how the former Liberal government crafted a deal that has become Prime Minister Stephen Harper's biggest political headache since taking power, sparking daily calls for the resignation of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor. Graham's May 2005 letter states that the government wanted an agreement under which Afghan detainees transferred by Canada would "be afforded treatment consistent with the standards set out in the Third Geneva Convention, regardless of the legal status of those detainees." The letter also says that Canadians would pass information on detainees to the International Committee of the Red Cross, "which has the mandate and resources to track Prisoners of War and detainees captured during armed conflict." However, it does not clarify whether the ICRC would report back to Canada on the condition Martin gov't signed deal on detainees

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of the detainees. O'Connor recently apologized for incorrectly telling Parliament that the ICRC was reporting back to Canada. On May 31, 2005, Graham and Hillier met Afghanistan Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the possibility of a bilateral "framework agreement," according to the briefing note. In a July 28 letter, Hillier asked Graham for authority to work toward the negotiation of a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees. Graham signed off on the plan. In the House of Commons Wednesday, the Conservative government faced continued criticism that it has exposed prisoners to torture in Afghan prisons after they were transferred there by the Canadian military personnel. Harper insisted that Hillier could not have signed a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees without approval from the ministers of the day. Meanwhile in Kandahar, Hillier admitted that the agreement may not have been enough to stop the torture of Afghan captives. But he insisted that signing the accord had not been a mistake because it allowed Canada to move forward with its mission. "Truly, at the time we felt that was the right thing to do," Hillier said, adding: "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient." Hillier also said that many Canadian soldiers are angry that the detainee controversy is overshadowing the good work they feel they are doing in the country.

Martin gov't signed deal on detainees

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Canada's diplomats failing IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: DATELINE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030021 The Leader−Post (Regina) 2007.05.03 Final News C8 OTTAWA Mike Blanchfield CanWest News Service 413

OTTAWA −− Prime Minister Stephen Harper must dramatically overhaul his understaffed and badly managed Foreign Affairs Department if he wants Canada's voice to be heard on the international stage, the head of a prestigious international affairs school said Wednesday. "If Mr. Harper wants Canada to punch above its weight in international affairs, he will have to look at DFAIT (Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade) problems soon and begin a major overhaul of our diplomatic machinery and institutions," said Fen Hampson, director of the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University in Ottawa. The school is one of Canada's top training grounds for diplomats. Hampson said he was not surprised that Auditor General Sheila Fraser reported that the department faces serious staffing issues −− including a shortage of qualified diplomats working around the world −− and no senior management plan to rectify the problem. In a report tabled Tuesday, Fraser documented how Foreign Affairs will lose 26 per cent of its staff, including 58 per cent of its managers, within three years. Its replacement efforts, meanwhile, lag behind. Fraser said this is hampering Canada's ability to pursue its foreign policy. If the problem is not corrected, it will only get worse. "These issues have been reflected in longstanding problems with morale, recruitment and retention in the department," Hampson said from Europe in an e−mailed response to a series of questions. "A strong and effective foreign policy begins with having an effectively managed and well staffed foreign service." Hampson said the time has come for Harper to make "major changes" to Foreign Affairs, which should include creating a blue−ribbon panel of experts from both within and outside the department. "The reform process should begin with new ideas," he said. Canada should look at the staffing models of its G−8 partners to see how they are coping with the challenges of a changing world, he said. "Some of our problems are by no means unique. Foreign services around the world are all wrestling with the new challenges that globalization poses to foreign policy management," Hampson said. In recent years, Canada's percentage of diplomatic staff actually posted on foreign soil −− as opposed to Canada's diplomats failing

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working from the Ottawa headquarters −− has dropped to one−quarter, making it the lowest in the G−8. The auditor general said the staff shortages are affecting dangerous postings such as Afghanistan because hazard pay and other hardship benefits are not seen as attractive enough. The growing number of diplomatic missions in the United States are also hurting because cost−of−living allowances there are not considered high enough.

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Stanley Cup, former NHLers cheer Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 DEFENCE INTERNATIONAL POLITICS SPORTS cpw 589

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (CP) _ Armed with a gleaming symbol of hockey glory, Canada's top soldier led a brigade of former National Hockey League players on a mission Wednesday to boost the morale and lift the spirits of war−weary, sports−starved Canadians in Afghanistan. Surrounded by hockey heroes that included enforcers like Bob Probert and Dave (Tiger) Williams, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier looked like a kid in a candy store as the Stanley Cup was wheeled out and placed on display on the tarmac at Kandahar Airfield. ``This is the cup that's coming back to Canada,'' Hillier said, a reference to the two Canadian teams left in the playoffs, the Ottawa Senators and the Vancouver Canucks. Soldiers posed for photos and chatted with some of the players, including goaltender Ron Tugnutt, two−time Cup winner Mark Napier and Montreal Canadiens legends Rejean Houle and Yvon Lambert. ``I got the chance to be close to the Cup, take a picture with it _ it was a great moment for me,'' said Cpl. Lisa−Marie Guernon, 29, from Montreal, a Canadiens cap on her head. ``Especially here in Afghanistan _ those types of things are pretty special for us.'' Hillier and the players arrived aboard a C−130 Hercules that performed a low, tight banking turn before coming in for a landing _ an experience Tugnutt said he won't soon forget. ``It's a good thing I went to Disney last week with the family; it prepared me for the ride in,'' he said. ``I went on all the big roller coasters, and that experience _ plus a few Gravol _ prepared me for that flight. It was very intense, actually, and (the soldiers) said, `That was nothing'.'' Tugnutt said he was thrilled to be asked to visit with the Canadians. ``When we were offered to come and do this, it was a great honour,'' he said. ``To be able to come and experience this and meet the soldiers, it's been incredible _ talking to them, hearing their stories.'' Later in the day, the group travelled to Camp Nathan Smith, just outside Kandahar city, to visit with members of Canada's provincial reconstruction team, where they signed autographs and mugged for more photos. ''Tens of thousands of Canadians want to pass on their best wishes to you _ their prayers, their thoughts, all of which are with you, and their immense appreciation for what you're doing here in Afghanistan,'' Hillier told the assembled soldiers. ''Everywhere you go in the country right now ... you'll see it, that Canadians, as never before in my life or my history or my time in uniform, support you.''

Stanley Cup, former NHLers cheer Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan

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Napier, who won a Stanley Cup with Montreal in his rookie season in 1979 and again with the Edmonton Oilers in 1985, said their trip was turning out to be no less a thrill for the players than it was for the troops. ''When we got word they were sending Team Canada over here, we put the word out to a few of the members of our alumni association, and we got about 15 or 20 calls right away from guys wanting to come over here,'' Napier said. ``The next troop, we're going to have to fight them off with a stick, the guys who are going to want to come over here.'' The players are set to face off Thursday morning in a ball−hockey game against a team of soldiers that Tiger Williams, for one, knows won't be easy to beat. ''These guys play for real, so it's going to be entertaining,'' chuckled Williams, a custom−made ``Tiger'' name tag on his military uniform. ``We've got Bob Probert on our side, though, so look out, you know?'' Hillier said he plans to suit up and play a shift on a line with both Williams and Probert. Brig.−Gen. Tim Grant, the commander of Canadian forces in Afghanistan, said the visit would prove invaluable to the mood and morale of the soldiers, who braved 50 C temperatures Wednesday and are facing a long, hot summer ahead. ``From a morale standpoint, there is no equivalent to this,'' Grant said. ``You can't put a price on it.''

Stanley Cup, former NHLers cheer Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan

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Hillier says soldiers in Afghanistan unhappy about focus on detainees claims DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 DEFENCE POLITICS INTERNATIONAL SPORTS cpw 142

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (CP) _ Gen. Rick Hillier says he has talked to some Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan who are ``pissed off'' that allegations over the torture of detainees are distracting attention from their mission. Hillier, the chief of defence staff, is visiting the troops in Kandahar and bringing along with him the Stanley Cup and former NHL hockey players. He tells reporters at the base that he has spoken to some soldiers and they are unhappy that so much news lately has focused on the treatment of detainees handed over to Afghan authorities by Canadian soldiers. There have been allegations that these detainees have been tortured while in Afghan custody. Hillier says Canada is working with the Afghan government to get the facts in these allegations. He says the Foreign Affairs department is taking the lead in dealing with the government in Kabul. He cautions Canadians against taking as fact every allegation that's made in Afghanistan.

Hillier says soldiers in Afghanistan unhappy about focus on detainees claims

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Hillier defends prisoner deal, says troops dismayed by torture controversy DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 DEFENCE INTERNATIONAL POLITICS cpw 542

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (CP) _ Canada's top soldier stood by his decision to sign a prisoner−exchange deal with the Afghan government, saying Wednesday that it felt right at the time but may not have been sufficient to prevent detainees from being tortured in Afghan jails. Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier, who shook hands and posed for pictures with soldiers out to see the Stanley Cup brought to Kandahar to boost morale, said some of his soldiers are ``pissed−off'' with the political firestorm back home over allegations of detainee torture. They're saying the controversy is distracting attention from the work they do Afghanistan, he said. But Hillier defended his decision to sign the deal _ in part a consequence of convenience, he said, as he was in the country at the time _ as the right move for Afghanistan and for Canada's role in helping the fledgling Afghan government find its feet. ``At the time, we felt that was the right thing to do, that we were comfortable with our approach,'' Hillier said, a backdrop of military vehicles behind him. ``Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient.'' The agreement, which did not include any provisions to allow human rights officials to visit prisoners once they'd been handed over by Canadian soldiers, helped to foster Canada's effort to support the local government, to build its capacity and strengthen local police and military forces, he said. Those soldiers are now growing frustrated _ ``pissed off,'' in his words _ that the gathering storm clouds are obscuring the work they're doing on behalf of the Afghan people. ``They're angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here _ the focus back in Canada specifically _ on the enormous amount of good that's being done, on the incredible things that are happening here in Kandahar province and the rest of Afghanistan,'' Hillier said. ``I met some soldiers this afternoon who, in their opinion, are pissed off because the focus has moved because of issues that are being addressed.'' Hillier denied knowing anything about allegations of detainee abuse until the day before the story broke last Monday. He refused to discuss a report in the Globe and Mail citing anonymous sources who say he pressed ahead with the deal despite the concerns of the Department of Foreign Affairs. ``In the case of the agreement that I signed on behalf of Canada, the Department of National Defence articulated that agreement with the Department of Foreign Affairs, who had the lead,'' he said.

Hillier defends prisoner deal, says troops dismayed by torture controversy

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``They shaped the agreement, I signed it.'' Asadullah Khalid, the governor of Kandahar province, met privately Wednesday with Hillier at Camp Nathan Smith, the home of Canada's provincial reconstruction team in Kandahar. Hillier said Khalid expressed disappointment that the allegations appear to have been accepted as fact in Canada. ``We are still in an investigation,'' said Khalid, who continued to insist that the allegations are little more than ``Taliban propaganda.'' He said Canadians and Afghan human rights officials are free to visit the National Directorate of Security prisons where the torture allegedly occurred. ``For sure, if this is true, if this happened, it was a crime and we should investigate them and we should bring these people to court,'' he said. ``We are working very hard and our investigation will be finished very soon.'' The controversy is a reminder that Canada needs to be flexible and responsive to changing circumstances as the rebuilding effort continues, Hillier said. ``That's the lesson we learn every time we do anything in this country in order to help the Afghans build their country, get their families back together and get on with a better life,'' he said. ``We continue to learn lessons and improve each day on how we do that; this is no different.''

Hillier defends prisoner deal, says troops dismayed by torture controversy

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N.S. soldier injured in Afghanistan says he'd go back right now if he could DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 DEFENCE INTERNATIONAL cpw 203

HALIFAX (CP) _ A Nova Scotia reservist who is recovering following a roadside explosion that killed six of his fellow soldiers in Afghanistan says his injuries haven't changed his opinion of the mission. Cpl. Shaun Fevens was among four soldiers who survived after their light−armoured vehicle hit a roadside bomb near Kandahar on April 8. Fevens, a 24−year−old with the Halifax−based Princess Louise Fusiliers, suffered the most serious injuries of the survivors, including a broken ankle, a broken leg and shrapnel in his wrist. Sitting in a wheelchair, he told an informal news conference in Halifax today that he would go back immediately if he didn't face a recovery that could last a year. He says he still supports the mission, but adds that he's prepared to go where Ottawa orders him. He says he's still thinking about his future, but hopes to join the air force after he recovers. The explosion that injured Fevens caused the highest death toll in a single day since Canadian troops arrived in Afghanistan in 2002. Two more soldiers died in a similar blast three days later, marking the worst week for Canadian casualties in combat since the Korean War. A ninth soldier, 25−year−old Anthony Klumpenhouwer who served with special forces, died two weeks ago after he fell from a communications tower while conducting surveillance in Kandahar City. Since 2002, 54 Canadian soldiers and one Canadian diplomat have been killed in Afghanistan.

N.S. soldier injured in Afghanistan says he'd go back right now if he could

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He shoots, he trips! Politicians seldom score when playing politics with hockey DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 POLITICS SPORTS cpw 841

OTTAWA (CP) _ Canadian politicians have a long history of trying to score points off Canada's national game. And Canadian hockey fans have an even longer history of howling for public intervention when they perceive a need, but baying for blood when they think the politicos have skated offside. It's a volatile mix _ sports and politics _ and the record suggests the ice is not tilted in their favour when politicians wobble out into the arena of professional hockey. Now, all four federal parties are blatantly attempting to woo votes in Quebec by questioning the Team Canada captaincy of Shane Doan, based on contested anti−French comments attributed to Doan in an NHL game two years ago. A look back through history suggests stickhandling MPs are in another losing battle. In the spring of 1955, Montreal Canadiens star Maurice Richard was suspended for the entire playoffs after punching a linesman during a late−season game in Boston. ``The suspension of Maurice Richard by the president of the NHL, Clarence Campbell, unleashed probably the biggest public furor in Montreal since the end of the Second World War,'' the Montreal Gazette wrote in a full−page spread on March 17 _ hours before fans began rioting in the streets. One Montreal fan cabled the Queen, asking her to intervene on Richard's behalf. A 48−year−old secretary from Toronto called to tearfully implore Campbell to reinstate the Montreal star. Almost 5,000 people from Quebec's Saguenay region added their names to a telegram protesting Campbell's decision _ a telegram the CN required five hours to transmit. Montreal mayor Jean Drapeau implored Campbell not to attend the March 17 game at the Montreal Forum. It was all for naught. Campbell maintained the suspension, took his place prominently at the game and all hell broke loose. Some historians say the riot marked the beginning of Quebec's Quiet Revolution that saw francophones begin asserting control of the province from the Anglo business elite. When star Bobby Hull was kept off Canada's 1972 Summit Series team because he was not under NHL contract, fans flooded the office of then prime minister Pierre Trudeau and his health minister with telegrams demanding action. Hockey Canada had negotiated the contract that excluded non−NHLers, and Trudeau announced he could not intervene. He did, however, urge Hockey Canada to ``put pressure on the NHL from their end.''

He shoots, he trips! Politicians seldom score when playing politics with hockey

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Hull never did lace up in the seminal series against the Soviet Union, to his lifelong regret and the regret of Canadian hockey fans everywhere. It was another example of government _ and fan _ impotence when it comes to influencing the pro game. In 1991, Conservative prime minister Brian Mulroney chastised an 18−year−old Eric Lindros for refusing to report to the Quebec Nordiques team that drafted him. ``I think anybody that can turn down what appears to be a couple of million dollars a year . . . he's got something going that I don't know about,'' said Mulroney. ``If he's made the choice of Oshawa over Quebec City, well, God bless him.'' Mulroney added that ``Quebec City has survived worse assaults over the last 350 years and they're still standing, doing well.'' Lindros never played for the Nordiques, and the franchise moved to Colorado in 1995. Three years ago, the federal official languages commissioner announced she was investigating CBC hockey commentator Don Cherry for his on−air slights against French Canadians. ``It's time for Don Cherry to stop pushing French−Canadians around,'' fumed Liberal MP Denis Coderre. Still, Cherry emerged relatively unscathed. Conservative MP Jim Abbott called the commissioner's investigation ``an abject waste of taxpayers' money.'' ``It's almost like they've taken lessons from the language police in Quebec itself,'' Abbott said in 2004. ``We live in a country where we pride ourselves on freedom of speech.'' There's no such talk from the Conservative government today. Tories on a parliamentary committee joined with the other MPs to unanimously call Hockey Canada to account for Doan's captaincy. In a minority Parliament, Quebec's 75 seats are critical to the fortunes of at least three federal parties and no one sees an upside in alienating Quebec voters by siding with Doan _ even if, judging by call−in shows and newspaper letters, the vast majority of hockey fans see the furor as a witch hunt. For Prime Minister Stephen Harper, it's a rare occasion when he's offside with English Canada's hockey fraternity. The Conservatives, afterall, have played to the hockey crowd like few governments before. The prime minister and his son, Ben, are genuine fans of the game, and Harper has played up his hockey−dad image by allowing rare, selective glimpes of his private family life. The Conservatives also make a point of saying they're attuned to the Tim Hortons demographic _ a group the coffee−and−donut chain assiduously courts through minor league hockey programs and treacly TV ads with NHL star Sidney Crosby. Finance Minister Jim Flaherty purchased new skates for his son, not new shoes, at a pre−budget photo−opportunity in March. And without government approval, the Stanley Cup would not be in Kandahar, Afghanistan, this week with an assortment of former NHL personalities, all flown in courtesy of National Defence to bolster the troops. He shoots, he trips! Politicians seldom score when playing politics with hockey

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Even when politicians try to help the pro game, they can't seem to win. In January 2000, the Liberal government of Jean Chretien made an ill−fated attempt to assist Canada's cash−strapped small−market NHL teams, specifically the then−Liberal−connected Ottawa Senators. Within three days of the bailout announcement, Industry Minister John Manley was beating a hasty retreat. ``Canadians have made their views known on taxpayers' assistance to professional hockey,'' said a clearly relieved Manley. ``My caucus colleagues have echoed their constituents' opposition. And the prime minister and I want them to know today that this government listens and takes their views very seriously.'' The lesson for politicians? When it comes to hockey, feel−good boosterism appears to be a much safer game plan than impotent interventions.

He shoots, he trips! Politicians seldom score when playing politics with hockey

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Afghan, coalition forces kill 13, including 2 women in Kandahar: official DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 INTERNATIONAL DEFENCE cpw 111

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (AP) _ Afghan and international forces killed 13 people during a clash in southern Kandahar province with suspected Taliban militants riding in three vehicles with women and children, the provincial governor said Wednesday. After the joint forces surrounded the vehicles Tuesday night, the Taliban opened fire, and the ensuing clash left 13 people dead, including two women, said Kandahar Gov. Asadullah Khalid. Twelve people were wounded. ``We don't know how many civilians or insurgents have been killed or wounded. We are investigating,'' Khalid said. An earlier statement from the U.S.−led coalition said five male insurgents were killed in the incident in Maruf district and three escaped. It did not give details of civilian casualties.

Afghan, coalition forces kill 13, including 2 women in Kandahar: official

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Afghan−Violence−Update (No Canadians) DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 INTERNATIONAL DEFENCE bnw 99

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan −− Afghan and international forces have killed 13 people during a clash in southern Afghanistan. The governor of Kandahar province says the incident involved suspected Taliban militants riding in three vehicles with women and children. It's believed the Taliban opened fire after the vehicles they were in became surrounded last night. The governor says the ensuing clash left 13 people dead, including two women. Twelve others were wounded. The investigation continues into how many civilians or insurgents were killed or wounded. An earlier statement from the American−led coalition said five male insurgents were killed in the incident in Maruf district while three escaped. It did not give any details of civilian casualties. A Canadian military official in Kandahar says no Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan were involved. (BN, AP) clt

Afghan−Violence−Update (No Canadians)

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Afghan−Civilian Deaths−Update (Karzai) DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 INTERNATIONAL DEFENCE bnw 102

KABUL, Afghanistan −− Afghan President Hamid Karzai says his country can no longer accept or understand civilian deaths. It comes after word 51 villagers, including women and children, have died in recent fighting in western Afghanistan. However, the American−led coalition says it has no reports of civilian deaths. The coalition says two military operations, including air strikes, conducted Friday and Sunday by U−S and Afghan forces in Herat province killed 136 suspected Taliban. It's the deadliest fighting in Afghanistan since January. The bloodshed sparked angry anti−U−S protests this week by villagers. According to an A−P tally, 151 civilians have been killed in violence in the first four months of this year, including at least 51 killed by NATO and the U.S.−led coalition. That doesn't include the latest figures from Herat. (AP) clt

Afghan−Civilian Deaths−Update (Karzai)

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Afghan−Violence DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 INTERNATIONAL DEFENCE bnw 90

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan −− Afghan and international forces have killed 13 people during a clash in southern Afghanistan. The governor of Kandahar province says the incident involved suspected Taliban militants riding in three vehicles with women and children. It's believed the Taliban opened fire after the vehicles they were in became surrounded last night. The governor says the ensuing clash left 13 people dead, including two women. Twelve others were wounded. The investigation continues into how many civilians or insurgents were killed or wounded. An earlier statement from the American−led coalition said five male insurgents were killed in the incident in Maruf district while three escaped. It did not give any details of civilian casualties. (AP) clt

Afghan−Violence

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BC−Afghan−Violence−Update (Karzai comments) DATE: KEYWORDS: PUBLICATION: WORD COUNT:

2007.05.02 INTERNATIONAL POLITICS DEFENCE JUSTICE bnw 90

KABUL, Afghanistan _ President Hamid Karzai says Afghanistan can no longer accept civilian casualties from NATO military operations. Karzai's remarks came amid reports that dozens of civilians were killed in a U−S led operation in western Afghanistan on the weekend. The U−S military insists it has no reports of civilian casualties in the offensive despite eyewitness claims to the contrary. Afghan government and police who visited the scene say they confirmed 51 civilian deaths, including a number of women and children. Karzai met with NATO, U.S. and European Union officials today. Officials say he told them that civilian deaths and arbitrary decisions to search people's houses have reached an intolerable level. (AP) bmc

BC−Afghan−Violence−Update (Karzai comments)

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Another story that no one is talking about IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: SOURCE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030153 The Toronto Star 2007.05.03 Ont Opinion A23 James Travers Toronto Star © 2007 Torstar Corporation 763

Stories are powerful and no one tells self−flattering tales better than politicians. So there must be a reason why a Prime Minister in so much trouble over the treatment of Afghanistan prisoners isn't talking about how his government is imposing management order on a chaotic mission. Admittedly the story Stephen Harper isn't telling is about the usually boring nuts−and−bolts administration of public policy. Still, when the machinery of government is being tested in Parliament daily, explaining what's being done to make it run better should be appealing. But not even the crisis now rocking the ruling party and sending its popularity plummeting is enough to get the Prime Minister talking about how the problem was tackled months ago. Back in January, Harper named his own foreign and defence policy adviser to co−ordinate Canada's all−of−government effort to put Afghanistan back on its feet. After that David Mulroney disappeared backstage. One reason is that the smart, seasoned diplomat is also Harper's very busy point person for this summer's G−8 summit. Another is that the job may be impossible and discussing it publicly would only focus attention on the administration's problems herding its own cats. If anything is clear in the prisoner treatment fog, it's that one government hand doesn't know what the other is doing. As the Star first reported last week, Gen. Rick Hillier, the Chief of Defence Staff and the main Afghanistan man for two prime ministers, enjoyed rare autonomy in crafting a detainee agreement now exposed as woefully inadequate. That the once−powerful department of foreign affairs was excluded is symptomatic of a bigger problem. Hillier and the military so dominate Canada's Afghanistan thinking that the much−ballyhooed three−D's strategy of defence, development and diplomacy now sounds like rhetorical cover for a mission that's mostly about combat and rebuilding the military into a small yet potent fighting force. Harper seemed to acknowledge the imbalance when he moved Mulroney from the secretariat that advises the Prime Minister to foreign affairs. From the Sphinx− like building known here as Fort Pearson, Mulroney is officially expected to add balance by ensuring that the overarching purpose of turning Afghanistan into a facsimile of a modern state isn't lost in killing Taliban. Unofficially, Ottawa is bemused. A town hypersensitive to the pecking order isn't easily convinced that an associate deputy minister working part−time on the file for the widely discounted Peter MacKay has the implied clout to quarterback such a dysfunctional team.

Another story that no one is talking about

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Another fact of capital life limits Mulroney's prospects. With the possible exceptions of finance and now the environment, Harper is his own minister of everything important and not much is more important than Afghanistan. An obvious side effect of the Prime Minister's infamous control−freak character is that he's on his feet daily defending the government's laissez− faire prisoner policy. Another that's more damaging if not so easily seen is that the cabinet, bureaucracy and officials know Harper makes all decisions that matter and see more risk than reward in being entrepreneurial. Along with sending the destructive signal that the boss doesn't trust the staff, centralizing power creates a system that's ponderously slow and, as the last two weeks demonstrate, a government that can't get its story straight. Day− by−day the prisoner narrative changes, leaving the lasting impression that Conservatives, like the military, consider prisoners a nuisance and miss the point that their humane treatment is an essential manifestation of the values Canadians are in Afghanistan dying to transplant. Mulroney's appointment is a reason for optimism that this government is wiser than it sometimes seems. Recognizing that rescuing a failed state demands a co−ordinated, holistic focus is an essential first step toward the effective application of interdependent policies that over decades just might make a difference. However faint, there's also hope in Harper's small show of confidence in foreign affairs. Starved of resources and influence, the department with its wider world view is a necessary counterweight to the dangerously narrow defence perspective of "scumbags" and "retribution" offered respectively by Hillier and his gargoyle minister, Gordon O'Connor. Of course, what counts here is power. How much of it flows to Mulroney and to foreign affairs depends entirely on a Prime Minister who behaves as if sharing is a weakness, not a strength. What's worrying is that Conservatives in such desperate need of a good story aren't talking about this one. That suggests they don't believe it themselves and are as half−hearted about controlling the military and co−ordinating the mission as about protecting prisoners. James Travers's national affairs column appears Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. jtraver @ thestar.ca

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Some abuse 'possible,' envoy says; Kabul ready to act if there's credible case of human rights violations: Ambassador IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: SOURCE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030141 The Toronto Star 2007.05.03 Met News A06 Bruce Campion−Smith Toronto Star © 2007 Torstar Corporation 660

An Afghan diplomat concedes some abuse may occur in his country's jails and says his government is launching a "high−level" investigation into recent reports of torture that have caused a political firestorm in Canada. "It is possible that at one point or another some people under certain circumstances may have been mistreated. But to claim at this stage that these allegations are true or false, without due process and a professional investigation, is premature," Omar Samad, Afghanistan's ambassador to Canada, said in an interview yesterday. Samad said Afghan authorities were convening an "independent" body that will include non−government bodies to examine the recent reports of abuse and torture in detention facilities in Kandahar. "If there is a credible case of human rights violations, we have announced that we are not only going to investigate, seek help if need be, open all our doors to any monitors under a new arrangement − but also take corrective action and even enforce our laws on those who have committed violations," he said. The ambassador also said there's no evidence so far that prisoners captured by Canadian troops suffered abuse after being transferred into the custody of Afghan authorities. "There is no proof that any of those prisoners who claim and allege to have been mistreated were either turned over by Canadian forces or have even been mistreated," he said. Questions about the treatment of prisoners in Afghan jails have sparked a political storm on Parliament Hill over the past week, and even a demand that Canada's military stop all transfers of prisoners. In the wake of that furor, Canadian officials struck a new deal with local prison officials in Kandahar to gain access to their facilities for follow−up visits with prisoners. Under the terms of the 2005 agreement Canada signed with Afghanistan for prisoner transfers, "there has not been any monitoring taking place until now," Samad said. "We are right now looking at the best mechanism that would ensure not only access but adequate monitoring and follow−up," Samad said in Ottawa.

Some abuse 'possible,' envoy says; Kabul ready to act if there's credible case of human rights violations: 69 Am

But the diplomat also made clear that Afghanistan doesn't favour the solution endorsed by human rights advocates − a detention facility built and operated by NATO allies. "We're not in the business of building extra−territorial prison facilities in Afghanistan, such as Guantanamo−type places, run by a foreign power," Samad said, referring to the U.S. prison camp in Cuba. "Afghanistan has its own institutions and will manage its own institutions but will, if need be, seek assistance," he said. In a wide−ranging interview, Samad acknowledged Afghanistan's troubled history as he laid out the challenges of overhauling government institutions, including the justice system, undermined by years of conflict. "We know what kind of background some of these torture and mistreatment issues have had in Afghanistan in the past 30 years. And no one claims that we now have a clean slate," Samad said. "A country with that kind of a history and still dealing with dangerous and deadly elements in its midst is trying to reform itself and it's going to take time and effort, patience and commitment by all parties." As Afghanistan's man in Canada since late 2004, Samad said he's been "continuously" seeking Ottawa's help in rebuilding Afghan institutions, including law enforcement. And for much of that time, he says his requests got a cold shoulder. "It has not been an easy process," Samad said. "Certain issues that to us were a priority, which we know have far−reaching consequences of nation and state building, were ignored or were shunned." Only in recent months has the federal government been more "engaged" and ready to tackle what Afghanistan sees as its own priorities, he said. "That includes law enforcement, training and we're still looking at other ways to improve all of this. "Afghanistan cannot and will not become a functioning modern country without people who can run it and do so within legal bounds knowing their responsibilities to the Afghan constitution and international law." Meanwhile, Amnesty International and the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association were scheduled to go before a federal judge this morning seeking an injunction to ban the transfer of prisoners to Afghan officials. The two groups filed a court action in February charging that Canada's existing transfer agreement does not ensure detainees will not be tortured by Afghan forces. But federal lawyers will argue there's no evidence of abuse and that the courts have no role in judging military decisions. The federal court could rule on the injunction today.

Some abuse 'possible,' envoy says; Kabul ready to act if there's credible case of human rights violations: 70 Am

Harper takes cheap shot IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030128 The Toronto Star 2007.05.03 Ont Letter A25 © 2007 Torstar Corporation 184

Nazi remark denounced May 2. I find it repugnant that Prime Minister Stephen Harper gave credence to suggestions that Green party Leader Elizabeth May diminished the Holocaust by drawing an analogy between the rise of fascism in Germany and the growing threat of global warming. I am pleased that your coverage of the Prime Minister's comments established that the analogy May used is not radical or insensitive; it is a well−worn argument that has been used by countless politicians, activists and academics to warn of the perils of inaction on a wide range of issues. It was even referenced by Al Gore in his Oscar−winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth. Recognizing patterns from the past allows policy−makers to contextualize concerns in the present to prevent calamities in the future. The events leading up to World War II are ripe with lessons, particularly Neville Chamberlain's failure to recognize the "gathering storm" in Germany. I have faith that objective and thoughtful Canadians will see this for what it is: a cheap attempt by Harper to deflect criticism over his government's handling of the conflict in Afghanistan. Scott Courtice, London, Ont.

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Regrets? Hillier has none as detainee furor grows; Defends decision to hand over captured Taliban as 'right thing to do' IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: SOURCE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030120 The Toronto Star 2007.05.03 Met News A01 Rosie DiManno Toronto Star © 2007 Torstar Corporation 873

The thud of an incoming rocket sent everyone scrambling for the concrete bunkers. But there's more shelter in Afghanistan than there is in Canada at the moment for Gen. Rick Hillier, the country's top soldier and formal signatory to what has proven a sadly impotent bilateral agreement on the disposition of detained Taliban suspects. His name is on the document. That means he wears it. And right now few others are willing to defend the alleged moral weakness of a custodial accord that has soiled Canada's reputation as a stout champion of human rights. No regrets, the general reiterated last night, even though the safeguards may not have been up to scratch, in hindsight. "At the time, we felt that was the right thing to do," Hillier said of the 2005 agreement that directed Canada to hand over to Afghanistan security agencies all captured Taliban, without any provisions to independently monitor their treatment afterwards in Afghanistan's brutal prison system. "We were comfortable with our approach, that the involvement of the International Committee of the Red Cross and the government of Afghanistan, of course, being required to live up to its commitment, were sufficient. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient." Reports of appalling mistreatment suffered by some Taliban suspects once transferred out of Canadian custody has sparked outrage at home, eroded morale among the troops and brought embarrassment to an Afghan government struggling for legitimacy. The fiasco has also shone a harsh light on the original agreement between the two nations, formulated in a hush−hush environment, and now exposed as a blueprint for disaster. Best that could be done at the time, Hillier says. "Of course, circumstances change and perhaps you go on to do something else that's going to be better, more effective." Regrets? Hillier has none as detainee furor grows; Defends decision to hand over captured Taliban 72as 'right

It wasn't a mistake, in its original version, Hillier maintains, even without the oversight caveats that were inserted by other NATO allies in their own detainee agreements with Afghanistan. But ... "As in any agreement, nothing lasts forever. If it gets amended or supplemented by anything else that makes it more effective, then that's excellent." Hillier insists he had no knowledge of alleged torture by Afghan intelligence police of detainees − at least not until just before the story broke with a thunderclap last week, the reverberations still rumbling across Ottawa and Kabul and Kandahar. The Star has revealed that Foreign Affairs officials were made aware of such allegations last year. Hillier says he heard not a word of that. "I was not aware of reports at that time that there were any allegations of abuse of any detainees." And, most of all, there should be no blame or blowback attached to Canadian troops for following the rules of engagement as specified, which haven't changed as a result of recent revelations. Those troops, Hillier said, are mighty disgruntled that their tangibly effective presence here has suddenly been eclipsed by allegations of severe mistreatment by Afghan interrogators of Taliban suspects once handed over. "Let me just come out and say very frankly here that I've met a variety of soldiers who are pissed off." CBC News reports that Canadian Forces have two separate procedures for handling Afghan detainees, including one that that does not involve any oversight by human rights groups. Military documents viewed by the CBC show that Canadian troops are authorized to hand some detainees directly to Afghan authorities on the battlefield, rather than take them prisoner. The CBC says the battlefield transfers appear to circumvent a complicated set of rules that require Canadian soldiers to notify human rights monitors when they detain Afghan militants. The documents state Canadian soldiers are allowed to decide if they want to detain a militant. If commanders think the militant has intelligence value, they can decide to take him prisoner. If not, Afghan security forces officially make the capture. The military documents are part of an affidavit filed before a Federal Court by Amnesty International in a case to be heard today. The human rights group wants to suspend all transfer of prisoners pending a final judicial review of whether the transfers contravene the Geneva Convention and other international laws. The mess can and will be fixed, Hillier stressed. So, indeed, did Kandahar Governor Asadullah Khalid, who met with the general earlier in the day, telling reporters afterwards that the torture allegations are 1) being fully investigated; 2) will result in charges against the perpetrators if substantiated; and 3) are not true anyway but merely the result of effective Taliban propaganda. Canadian officials will, Khalid said, now have unrestricted access to all detainees, including those in the controversial custody of the feared National Directorate of Security. It is not clear whether these Canadians, now in Afghanistan, have actually started these visits. What's worrisome, perhaps, is that Canadian officials − and Hillier himself − may not have gone to any particular lengths in trying to ascertain, earlier, whether detainees were being ill−treated.

Regrets? Hillier has none as detainee furor grows; Defends decision to hand over captured Taliban 73as 'right

As reporters have discovered in the past week, this is not so hard to find out, although substantiating the stories is more complicated. "The allegations have been made, the government of Canada has responded," says Hillier. "They will meet their responsibilities and their obligations. All those things are underway right now. An investigation will determine whether there's substance to them. And, of course, the government of Canada will make the agreement as effective as possible." None of this, however, should reflect poorly on the troops, and that is central to Hillier's concerns right now. "Our soldiers, we believe, handle the detainees with the utmost professionalism, according to the rules of engagement we give them." Asked if his own leadership should be put into question as a result of this imbroglio, the general responded: "Well, that wouldn't be a question to ask me, would it? You'd have to ask the men and women that I lead. And you'd have to ask my Prime Minister, of course." The answer is self−evident.

Regrets? Hillier has none as detainee furor grows; Defends decision to hand over captured Taliban 74as 'right

Stanley Cup goes to 'war' IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: ILLUSTRATION: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030117 The Toronto Star 2007.05.03 Met News A06 ryan remiorz cp Gen. Rick Hillier headlocks Master Cpl. MarkFedorchuk, of Saskatoon, who asked to have his picture taken with the popular commander on a visit to the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team. Hillier also brought the Stanley Cup over for a mid−playoff toast to the troops. ; © 2007 Torstar Corporation 586

The brass brought the silver to Afghanistan yesterday. Gen. Rick Hillier and Lord Stanley's Cup: Canada's top soldier and Canada's most iconic sports trophy. Some particularly belligerent National Hockey League rinks notwithstanding, this marks the first time the cup has ever gone to war. The hardware, under the care of its white−gloved Hall of Fame custodian, was unloaded from the belly of a Hercules transport plane as a gaggle of NHL old− timers disembarked on wobbly legs and green around the gills. The aircraft had, just for the hell of it, made a "combat landing" at Kandahar Airfield − banking steeply and low overhead as it corkscrewed toward the runway. Spies report there was some puking inside the plane just before it disgorged the likes of Tiger Williams, Bob Probert, Rejean Houle and Mark Napier. The ever−effusive Hillier wrapped his arms around the cup after it was un− crated, still on the tarmac, a greeting party of delighted Canadian troops as wide−eyed as children, the trophy sparkling under a blistering Afghan sun. Immediately, cameras came out and posing commenced. "Every boy − and girl − grows up with a vision of playing in the NHL," the suddenly politically correct Hillier told the gathering, as he thanked league commissioner Gary Bettman and the NHL Players' Association for allowing the cup to come halfway around the world, in the middle of the playoffs no less. "We appreciate the opportunity to see it and touch it ... before it comes home to Canada this year with one of our two teams." Hillier played the hockey hoser all day, as the cup was transported from Kandahar Airfield to the Provincial Reconstruction Team satellite Camp Nathan Smith on the outskirts of Kandahar city, this time arriving by Chinook helicopter. The Nathan Smith troops − and in particular the Vandoos (The Royal 22nd Regiment), providing force protection at the base − huddled expectantly, for the cup's arrival. Hillier, clearly beloved by the troops, gave another rousing address, first noting all the positive changes that Stanley Cup goes to 'war'

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had occurred since his last visit to the region in March, drawing attention to schools newly reopened in a district of the province that "was a battlefield last fall. "The way you do your job, your professionalism, your dedication, your courage, makes it easy for me to go around Canada and say that your country needs to support you. And they do." Morale−boosting from the top of the command chain aside, it was otherwise hockeyhockeyhockey on this day. Hillier drew cheers of approval by relating how U.S. air force personnel had, on Kandahar Airfield's tarmac, immediately descended on the cup for photographs. "I tell them: 'I don't want you guys getting too comfortable with that damn cup now because it's coming back to Canada'." The general, a passionate Maple Leaf fan from Newfoundland, also offered his services to either manage or coach the Toronto club, come yet another start− anew season. "I can lose seven games in October, too!" For Tiger Williams, the one−time Leaf enforcer, this is a return Afghanistan engagement. This time he arrived in full combat fatigue kit, having bought his own uniform, rather larger in size than the uniform he wore as No. 22 in Toronto. "It's an honour for all of us to come here and spend time with Canadian troops," said Williams, whose father and grandfather served in the military. He then pointed out the parallels between soldiering and playing hockey. "There's a lot of teamwork involved in both and accepting authority all down the line. You're only as strong as your weakest link." The alumni will play two ball hockey games against a Canadian soldier squad, starting this morning, with veteran broadcaster Brian Williams announcing the line−up. The ex−pros will also cook for the troops at a barbecue − a double beer ration per soldier for the special occasion. The party of hockey players was welcomed to Kandahar by Gen. Tim Grant, commander of Joint Task Force Afghanistan. Then, first off the bat, they all got on a bus and went to Tim Hortons.

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Penalty for pandering IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030069 The Toronto Star 2007.05.03 Ont Editorial A24 © 2007 Torstar Corporation 121

Call it your hard−earned tax dollars at work. Not on Afghanistan, climate change, health care or any other issue you'd expect MPs to discuss. No. Parliament is demanding officials from Hockey Canada appear today before the official languages committee to explain why Shane Doan was chosen captain of the national team representing Canada at the World Hockey Championship. Some opposition MPs contend that Doan is the wrong player to lead the team. The reason: Doan is alleged to have made a slur against a French−speaking referee in an NHL game in 2005. He has denied the charge. Hockey may be our national pastime, but the question of who is the Team Canada captain is hardly a matter for MPs to spend their time, or taxpayers' money, on.

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Conservatives taking a bad rap over Afghan prisoner issue IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: COLUMN: KEYWORDS: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030047 Vancouver Sun 2007.05.03 Final Editorial A17 Barbara Yaffe WAR; TERRORISM Barbara Yaffe Vancouver Sun 618

Canadians should take a deep breath before buying into opposition attacks on the Harper government regarding possible −− indeed, probable −− abuse of Afghan detainees. Liberals, New Democrats and Bloc MPs for weeks have been firing verbal missiles across the Commons aisle at the Conservatives for failing to honour this country's Geneva Convention commitments on the handling of prisoner detainees. They're demanding Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor resign, or be fired. Sidelining O'Connor would be a brilliant idea. But criticism of the government for failing to ensure that Canadian soldiers are guaranteeing the welfare of suspected Taliban fighters is a bit rich. It's important for those who have learned of the so−called scandal to remember that no one has accused a single Canadian soldier of mistreating a single Afghan prisoner. Most definitely, this is not a repeat of the 2004 U.S. scandal involving the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, in which American military personnel were caught in photographs humiliating and torturing prisoners. In fact, the Taliban report they've been well treated by Canadian troops. What is at issue is how the detainees are being treated by Afghan security and police forces. It's also worth keeping in mind, we're talking about possible mistreatment of Taliban suspects, albeit individuals who haven't been convicted in a court of law. If they were taken into custody by our troops, it can be fairly accepted that they were fighting on the side of scum−of−the−earth types who support practices like taking women to public arenas to blow their brains out through their burkas. Here's what we know for certain at present, information put on the record Monday by government spokesman Melisa Leclerc: Two suspected terrorists have made unsubstantiated allegations of torture to two Corrections Canada officials, Ric Fecteau and Linda Garwood−Filbert. The two officials have been in Afghanistan, helping train Afghan prison officials. That there should be allegations of prisoner torture ought not come as a big surprise. Afghanistan is a train Conservatives taking a bad rap over Afghan prisoner issue

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wreck of a country with a basketcase of a government. The reason NATO troops are over there is to help the Afghans develop a civil society, an objective that may not be achievable. The jury is still out on that and on whether our troops have taken on a mission impossible. The folks we really need to be worried about aren't so much the Taliban types, but women in that country who continue to be persecuted for their gender or children who will never get to go to school or Afghan citizens who are victims of government corruption. Nevertheless, it can be argued that Canada should set the gold standard on conduct with respect to abiding by international conventions. Which means ensuring that detainees being transferred to the authority of others are properly treated. But, surely, the detention system in Afghanistan is something Canada can't be expected to reform on its own. Standards for conduct within the Afghan security and defence establishments has to be a task for all NATO nations participating in the Afghan mission. It may involve construction of new prisons in that country as well as intensive training for the entire military and defence contingents over yonder. While Prime Minister Stephen Harper has no apology to make for the role of Canada's soldiers in this debacle, being played up by the opposition for partisan purposes, he should recognize at this point that his defence minister is not up to the task. O'Connor, who performed well as defence critic while the Harper team was in Opposition, has blotted his copybook too frequently to be taken seriously as the key political representative of this nation's armed forces. His public statements and responses on the Afghan detainee dossier have been pathetic and inconsistent. O'Connor has flipped and flopped like a dying fish on the matter of when outside monitoring agencies gained access to prison detainees, and what Ottawa knew, when, with respect to the abuse allegations. Harper clearly understands this, having lately charged Public Security Minister Stockwell Day and Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs Helena Guergis with responding to questions in Parliament. The Conservatives, quite needlessly, have taken a real hit on this file. [email protected]

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Stanley Cup makes pit stop in Kandahar; Morale booster. 'It's nice to see a piece of Canada come to us' IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030184 Montreal Gazette 2007.05.03 Final News A4 Photo: RYAN REMIORZ, CP / Pte. Martin Larochelle (frontleft), from Beauport, and ILLUSTRATION: Cpl. Mathieu Poulin (front right), from St. Jean, wear their Habs jerseys as they pose with the Stanley Cup in Kandahar yesterday. ; KEYWORDS: HOCKEY DATELINE: KANDAHAR, Afghanistan BYLINE: JONATHAN FOWLIE SOURCE: CanWest News Service WORD COUNT: 262 General Rick Hillier, Canada's chief of defence staff, arrived in Kandahar yesterday morning with a special treat for troops: the Stanley Cup. "Canadians, as never before in my life and my time in uniform, support you," Hillier told troops at the camp for Canada's provincial reconstruction team, giving a rousing motivational speech as he unveiled the cup. "The difference you have made in this province and the difference you will continue to make for the people that live here is absolutely incredible," he added. "I am proud of you." Hillier was joined by several retired NHL players − including Bob Probert, Rejean Houle and Dan Daoust − as well as Vancouver Canucks owner Paolo Aquilini. Soon after Hillier's address, soldiers flocked to the stage at the small Kandahar City base to get their picture taken with the legendary trophy. "This is a great morale booster," said Warrant Officer Martin Rousseau, a Canadiens fan originally from Montreal. "It's nice to see something like this," he added. Sgt. Leighton Hardy says he is a diehard Toronto fan and was ecstatic to see the cup in Kandahar. "It's nice to see a piece of Canada come to us," he said, explaining he has been in Afghanistan since mid−October and is happy for the boost. "With the Stanley Cup playoffs going on, and with us being stuck over here a lot of time we don't get to see the games because we are busy with work and stuff," he said.

Stanley Cup makes pit stop in Kandahar; Morale booster. 'It's nice to see a piece of Canada come80 to us'

"To actually get to see the cup, it's unique to see it outside of Canada." For those who came from Canada, the event was equally as exciting. "I'm here to support our troops. I know they are going through a tough time, they lost people and I wanted to make sure that we are here and to let them know we are behind them and that they are very courageous," said Houle, who won five Stanley Cups.

Stanley Cup makes pit stop in Kandahar; Morale booster. 'It's nice to see a piece of Canada come81 to us'

Afghan detainee deal pinned on Martin; Two years ago. Liberal PM approved Graham negotiations IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030158 Montreal Gazette 2007.05.03 Final News A12 Colour Photo: RYAN REMIORZ, CP / Canada's chief of defencestaff, General Rick Hillier, puts a playful headlock on Master Cpl. Mark his request to have his picture taken ILLUSTRATION: with him during a visit to the Provincial Reconstruction Team base in Kandahar, Afghanistan, yesterday. ; KEYWORDS: POLITICIANS; POLITICAL PARTIES; GOVERNMENT; CANADA DATELINE: OTTAWA BYLINE: ANDREW MAYEDA and MIKE BLANCHFIELD SOURCE: CanWest News Service WORD COUNT: 675 As prime minister, Paul Martin gave approval almost two years ago to then− Defence Minister Bill Graham to negotiate a detainee transfer agreement with Afghanistan, government documents obtained by CanWest News Service show. The revelation, contained in cabinet correspondence and Defence Department briefing notes, comes as the Harper government continues to face criticism over allegations detainees were abused after being transferred to Afghan authorities. The documents show Martin, now an ordinary Liberal MP who has yet to speak publicly on the controversy, was briefed on the outlines of the agreement more than six months before it was signed. In a May 27, 2005, letter from Graham to Martin, the former prime minister was told Canada planned to negotiate with the Afghan government to spell out "explicit undertakings" on how detainees would be treated. That same day, Graham "authorized the Canadian Forces to seek arrangements with relevant authorities on the transfer of detainees," according to a Defence Department briefing note. "The Prime Minister concurred with this approach on 10 June 2005," the note states. The documents appear to undermine a widespread view in Ottawa that General Rick Hillier, the chief of the defence staff, acted without proper authority when he signed the deal on behalf of Canada in Kabul on Dec. 18, 2005. The Liberal−crafted deal has become Prime Minister Stephen Harper's biggest headache since taking power, sparking daily calls for the resignation of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor. Graham's May 2005 letter states the government wanted an agreement under which Afghan detainees transferred by Canada would "be afforded treatment consistent with the standards set out in the Third Geneva Afghan detainee deal pinned on Martin; Two years ago. Liberal PM approved Graham negotiations82

Convention, regardless of the legal status of those detainees." The letter also says Canadians would pass information on detainees to the International Committee of the Red Cross, "which has the mandate and resources to track Prisoners of War and detainees captured during armed conflict." However, it does not clarify whether the ICRC would report back to Canada on their condition. O'Connor recently apologized for incorrectly telling Parliament the ICRC was reporting back to Canada. On May 31, 2005, Graham and Hillier met Afghan Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the possibility of a bilateral "framework agreement," according to the briefing note. In a July 28 letter, Hillier asked Graham for authority to begin negotiating a bilateral deal. Graham signed off on the plan. In the House of Commons yesterday, the Conservative government faced continued criticism it has exposed prisoners to torture in Afghan prisons. Harper insisted Hillier could not have signed a bilateral agreement without approval from the ministers of the day. Meanwhile in Kandahar, Hillier admitted the agreement may not have been enough to stop the torture of Afghan captives. But he insisted signing the accord had not been a mistake. "Truly, at the time we felt that was the right thing to do," Hillier said, adding: "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient." Hillier also said many Canadian soldiers are angry that the detainee controversy is overshadowing the good work they feel they are doing in the country. For his part, Kandahar governor Asadullah Khalid continued to deny allegations of detainee torture, which he denounced as "enemy propaganda." He said his government hopes to release details of its investigation into the matter very soon. Unlike agreements reached by the Dutch and British governments, the original Canadian deal with the Afghans did not contain a guarantee that our officials could follow up on transferred detainees. Canada has since negotiated a new agreement under which Canadian officials will have access to detainees after they are transferred. In Ottawa, meanwhile, Amnesty International Canada and the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association will ask the Federal Court of Canada today to temporarily block the Canadian Forces from transferring prisoners to the Afghan government, on grounds that the practice violates the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Canada's international obligations under the Geneva Conventions. The motion argues there are "no territorial limits" to the charter and that its reach extends "to government agents acting in foreign countries." In their court filings, the two civil liberties groups argue the Forces should build their own detention facility in Afghanistan, rather than rely on the Afghan government to warehouse prisoners in jails that have prompted reports of torture from the U.S. State Department, Canada's own Foreign Affairs Department and the United Nations human rights commissioner. The court documents indicate that, between 2002 and 2006, the Forces detained 40 people in Afghanistan. Afghan detainee deal pinned on Martin; Two years ago. Liberal PM approved Graham negotiations83

Jonathan Fowlie of CanWest News contributed to this report

Afghan detainee deal pinned on Martin; Two years ago. Liberal PM approved Graham negotiations84

We Stand on Guard for Stanley IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030231 Calgary Herald 2007.05.03 Final News A4 Photo: Ryan Remiorz, Canadian Press / Canadian militarypoliceman Master Cpl. Mike Lehman keeps close watch on the Stanley Cup as it arrives in Kandahar, Afghanistan, ILLUSTRATION: Wednesday. Nineteen former NHL players accompanied the Cup to give a morale boost to soldiers, who relished the chance to see the silver icon. ; SOURCE: The Canadian Press WORD COUNT: 4 NO TEXT

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Afghanistan takes a stand on civilian deaths IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: KEYWORDS: DATELINE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030230 Calgary Herald 2007.05.03 Final News A4 WAR; TERRORISM; FOREIGN AID; AFGHANISTAN KABUL, Afghanistan Pamela Constable The Washington Post 194

Afghan President Hamid Karzai declared Wednesday his government can "no longer accept" civilian casualties caused by U.S.−led operations, shortly before news spread that as many as 51 civilians may have died during clashes this week in far western Afghanistan. Civilian deaths are "becoming a heavy burden, and we are not happy about it," Karzai told reporters here. His remarks came two days after rioting broke out following a protracted battle in western Herat province, where police said as many as 30 residents had been killed during three days of fighting between U.S.−led forces and the Taliban. Then, on Wednesday, local officials visiting villages in the battle area reported 45 to 51 civilians had died and bodies were still being dug out of mud houses that had collapsed in U.S.−led bombing raids. Karzai, who has previously expressed regret for such deaths, but continued to praise U.S.−led forces for their work in combating insurgents, displayed frustration and anguish when he met with journalists Wednesday. "The intention may be very good to fight terrorism, sometimes mistakes are made, but five years on, it is very difficult for us to continue to accept civilian casualties," Karzai said. "It's not understandable any more."

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Martin approved transfer negotiations two years ago; Documents clear Hillier to sign detainee deal IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: ILLUSTRATION: KEYWORDS: DATELINE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030229 Calgary Herald 2007.05.03 Final News A4 Photo: Paul Martin; Photo: Gen. Rick Hillier ; POLITICIANS; POLITICAL PARTIES; GOVERNMENT; CANADA OTTAWA Andrew Mayeda and Mike Blanchfield CanWest News Service 514

Former prime minister Paul Martin gave approval almost two years ago to then−defence minister Bill Graham to negotiate a detainee transfer agreement with the Afghanistan government, government documents obtained by CanWest News Service show. The revelation, contained in cabinet correspondence and Defence Department briefing notes, comes as the Harper government continues to face heavy criticism over allegations that Afghan detainees were abused after being transferred to Afghan authorities. The documents show that Martin, now an ordinary Liberal MP who has yet to speak publicly on the controversy, was briefed on the outlines of the agreement more than six months before it was signed. In a May 27, 2005 letter from Graham to Martin, the former prime minister was told that Canada planned to negotiate an agreement with the Afghan government that would spell out "explicit undertakings" on how the detainees would be treated. The same day as the letter, Graham "authorized the Canadian Forces to seek arrangements with relevant authorities on the transfer of detainees," according to a Defence Department briefing note. "The prime minister concurred with this approach on 10 June 2005," the note states. The documents appear to undermine an increasingly popular view in Ottawa's corridors of power that Gen. Rick Hillier, the chief of the defence staff, acted without proper government authority when he signed the detainee deal on behalf of the Canadian government in Kabul on Dec. 18, 2005. The papers also shed new light on how the former Liberal government crafted a deal that has become Prime Minister Stephen Harper's biggest political headache since taking power, sparking daily calls for the resignation of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor. Graham's May 2005 letter states that the government wanted an agreement under which Afghan detainees transferred by Canada would "be afforded treatment consistent with the standards set out in the Third Geneva Convention, regardless of the legal status of those detainees."

Martin approved transfer negotiations two years ago; Documents clear Hillier to sign detainee deal87

The letter also says that Canadians would pass information on detainees to the International Committee of the Red Cross, "which has the mandate and resources to track prisoners of war and detainees captured during armed conflict." However, it does not clarify whether the ICRC would report back to Canada on the condition of the detainees. O'Connor recently apologized for incorrectly telling Parliament the ICRC was reporting back to Canada. On May 31, 2005, Graham and Hillier met Afghanistan Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the possibility of a bilateral "framework agreement," according to the briefing note. In a July 28 letter, Hillier asked Graham for authority to work toward the negotiation of a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees. Graham signed off on the plan. In the House of Commons Wednesday, the Conservative government faced continued criticism that it has exposed prisoners to torture in Afghan prisons after they were transferred there by the Canadian military personnel. Harper insisted Hillier could not have signed a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees without approval from the ministers of the day. Meanwhile in Kandahar, Hillier admitted the agreement may not have been enough to stop the torture of Afghan captives. But he insisted signing the accord had not been a mistake because it allowed Canada to move forward with its mission. "Truly, at the time we felt that was the right thing to do," Hillier said, adding: "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient."

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Crusading MPs deserve a misconduct IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: COLUMN: ILLUSTRATION: KEYWORDS: DATELINE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030222 Calgary Herald 2007.05.03 Final News A7 Calgary's Eye on National Politics Colour Photo: Calgary Herald Archive / An alleged comment byShane Doan will be the subject of a parliamentary committee today. ; INTERIM STATEMENT; CLOTHING INDUSTRY OTTAWA Don Martin Calgary Herald 689

The tiny agricultural hamlet of Halkirk, Alta., census population 117, has two claims to fame: Hockey star Shane Doan as a homegrown hero and its annual Bull−a−rama featuring a new beer garden. Today, Doan's hockey career merges with a hefty load of bull before a parliamentary committee crying out for interference and offside penalties. The preoccupation confronting the Standing Committee on Official Languages is Doan's worthiness to remain captain of Team Canada, now chasing the world championship in Moscow. Doan's alleged offence, long ago dismissed by hockey's disciplinarians, is to have muttered "f−−king Frenchmen" at a linesman during the first all−francophone referee lineup in NHL history in December 2005. At risk is the million−dollar contribution −− roughly five per cent of Team Canada's budget −− that taxpayers cough up annually for the organization if its choice of captain is deemed politically incorrect. There's no doubt what they'll hear from Hockey Canada president Bob Nicholson. He previewed his position before Alberta MPs Wednesday, standing solidly behind Doan with a ringing character endorsement. MP Kevin Sorenson fielded a cellphone call during that meeting from Doan's mother, a close family friend who lives in his riding, who questioned the Conservative government's position on the controversy. The correct answer: Who cares? The government has no business on the hockey rinks of the nation, particularly when they're muddying a famous Canadian sports name (his cousin by marriage is speed skating gold medallist Catriona Le May Doan) that was cleared a year ago. Even worse, MPs will be debating an allegation that's before the courts in a slander suit and countersuit between Doan and Liberal MP Denis Coderre. If the truth ever outs, a judge should issue the verdict, not in a committee crying out for meaningful work.

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The Official Languages committee, by the way, boasts a dozen backbench members and another 108 MPs on standby should they have any interest in attending, which, until today, was doubtful. The bulk of their recent business has been taken up privately debating a report nobody will ever read called The Vitality of Official Language Minority Committees. I don't know what that means −− and couldn't care less. Their sudden interest in Doan as captain Canada is inexplicable except as a committee profile booster or as a way for opposition parties to showcase their Quebec sensitivities. Either way, only two people will ever know the truth. One has been cleared of the allegation while the other seems to have trouble writing and perhaps understanding English, to wit the garbled language on his report. Even though NHL players say 'f−−−' more than 'puck' during the average high−intensity game, the laws of probability and balance of proof favour Doan being cleared −− again −− in the courts. Look, these sort of things blow up and promptly fade away as part of the natural tensions of an officially bilingual country. Consider the case of Don Cherry, who dismissed "Europeans and French guys" for wearing eye visors during a 2004 episode of his Coach's Corner telecast. The Official Languages Commissioner of the day was miffed enough to launch her own investigation −− and the matter was never heard from again. But we know for sure that the final word must not, and should not, rest with a committee that applies missionary zeal to concerns like whether Air Canada delivers enough French with its pretzels. After Team Canada brass finish hailing Doan as a dandy fella this morning −− a guy whose jersey hangs in the local school he attended and who regularly visits his parents' Christian kids camp −− there will be nothing for MPs to do except wash their hands of this fabricated controversy. Given that Doan displayed a litigious streak by suing Coderre, they had best not emerge from parliamentary immunity to level empty accusations of francophone racism against the Phoenix Coyotes superstar. And it would be tough to recommend pulling public funding from a team for sticking with a captain who stands convicted of nothing but one person's disproven say−so. That means Parliament should get back to stickhandling emission reductions to save the planet from greenhouse gas suffocation or taking slapshots at the latest spin on what, if any, torture is going on in Afghanistan. To taint the reputation of someone who is proudly defending his citizenship on faraway ice is shameful and unparliamentary misconduct −− in either official language. [email protected]

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Soldier's parents share light; Goddards launch solar project a year after Nichola's death IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: ILLUSTRATION: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030177 Calgary Herald 2007.05.03 Final City &Region B3 Colour Photo: Leah Hennel, Calgary Herald / Sally and TimGoddard show the lights that will replace hazardous kerosene lamps as part of non−polluting, solar−powered lighting systems in nearly 2,000 first−aid posts across the island nation of Papua New Guinea. ; Colour Photo: Nichola Goddard ; Deborah Tetley Calgary Herald 323

Nichola Goddard took her first breath in Papua New Guinea. While her parents helped build schools in isolated, impoverished regions, Nichola learned to crawl and take her first steps. She danced with the villagers, and learned to speak their Kiriwinan language −− even before uttering English. On Wednesday, just days before the anniversary of their darkest hour, Tim and Sally Goddard hoped to shine some light on the struggling region, as a tribute to Nichola, their first−born. For her parents, launching a Light Up the World campaign to improve the lives of people living in Papua New Guinea is bittersweet on this particular day. Capt. Nichola Goddard, Canada's first female soldier killed in combat, would have turned 27 on Wednesday. She was killed May 17 during a rocket−propelled grenade attack by the Taliban in the Panjoway district, just east of Kandahar, Afghanistan. Nearly one year later, her parents can't mask their pain. "In a perfect world, we'd much prefer to be sitting down cutting the cake," said Tim. "We want to remember," Sally added. "We don't want to wallow." The Goddards officially launched the solar lights aid project at the University of Calgary, where Tim has recently accepted a position as vice−provost, international. Prior to that, he was a professor in the faculty of education. The couple met and married in Papua New Guinea after they travelled there in the late 1970s to teach and help the locals build new schools.

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They lived −− without electricity −− in various places in the South Pacific country until Nichola was almost four years old. Kim Veness, CEO of the Light Up The World Foundation, said non−polluting, solar−powered lighting systems will replace hazardous kerosene lamps at nearly 2,000 first−aid posts across the island nation. The posts are the front line of health care in the 20 provinces where the lights will be installed. Because the country of six million is close to the equator, it is dark for 12 hours a day. About 80 per cent of the population lives in isolated rural areas. Veness said babies are delivered and complicated surgeries performed often by pen or candle light in crude palm huts or shacks. "When there's a medical emergency, it's tough to treat people," he said. "I'm looking forward to seeing the health effects in this country." The Goddard family is working with the foundation to help raise money for the project. They say it's an endeavour their daughter would have embraced, given her connection to the country and her humanitarian spirit. "You can't change the world," Tim said. "This is a little contribution, and maybe it will have a big impact." [email protected]

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Ottawa has no sense of priorities SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: COLUMN: WORD COUNT:

0705030357 The Winnipeg Sun 2007.05.03 Final Editorial/Opinion 10 GEOFF MATTHEWS Editorial 277

Let's see. What's big in the news this week? Oh yes, Canada's auditor general says vicious killers may be walking our streets because crime labs are taking too long to process DNA samples. Our country's soldiers are still fighting in Afghanistan, where nearly four dozen of them have given up their lives. The poisons we spew into the environment are affecting our health and threatening an entire way of life in the north. Ordinary citizens can't find a family doctor to treat their everyday ailments and provide them with annual checkups. Gas prices are nearing all−time highs, making it tough for hard−pressed taxpayers to keep their budgets in balance and for businesses to survive. Plenty of stuff for our federal politicians to get their teeth into, right? Sorry, no. In what may go down as one of the biggest mass brain cramps in Canadian history, the men and women we send to represent us on Parliament Hill −− and pay handsomely to do so −− have turned their attention from all of the above to concentrate on a two−word phrase that an NHL player may or may not have uttered two years ago. Got that? May or may not have uttered. Linesman Michel Cormier insists Phoenix Coyotes forward Shane Doan referred to him as a "(expletive) Frenchman" at the end of an NHL game in 2005. Doan says he didn't and a league inquiry found no grounds to punish the player. In today's world of political correctness run amok, however, facts never get in the way of a good rant. A Commons committee has demanded Hockey Canada officials explain their choice of Doan as captain of the national team currently playing at the World Hockey Championship. "We (francophones) have a right to be respected," fumed Quebec MP Marcel Proulx in demanding the investigation.

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Never one to be outdone, NDP leader Jack Layton said the Doan controversy was "taking away from the enthusiasm that everybody wants to have" for the tournament. Incredibly, the all−party committee bought into the nonsense and summoned representatives from Hockey Canada to appear and explain the choice of captain. Sleep easy, Canadians. They stand on guard for thee.

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Stanley Cup in Kandahar Trophy, ex−NHLers called big morale boosters SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

0705030351 The Winnipeg Sun 2007.05.03 Final News 8 photo by Ryan Remiorz, CP Hillier poses with the Stanley Cup along with Gen. Tim ILLUSTRATION: Grant, former Toronto Maple Leafs enforcer Dave (Tiger) Williams, as they arrive at the base in Kandahar. BYLINE: CP DATELINE: KANDAHAR, Afghanistan WORD COUNT: 341 Armed with a gleaming symbol of hockey glory, Canada's top soldier led a brigade of former National Hockey League players on a mission yesterday to boost the morale and lift the spirits of war−weary, sports−starved Canadians in Afghanistan. Surrounded by hockey heroes that included enforcers like Bob Probert and Dave (Tiger) Williams, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier looked like a kid in a candy store as the Stanley Cup was wheeled out and placed on display on the tarmac at Kandahar Airfield. "This is the cup that's coming back to Canada," Hillier said, a reference to the two Canadian teams left in the playoffs, the Ottawa Senators and the Vancouver Canucks. Soldiers posed for photos and chatted with some of the players, including goaltender Ron Tugnutt, two−time Cup winner Mark Napier and Montreal Canadiens legends Rejean Houle and Yvon Lambert. "I got the chance to be close to the Cup, take a picture with it −− it was a great moment for me," said Cpl. Lisa−Marie Guernon, 29, from Montreal, a Canadiens cap on her head. "Especially here in Afghanistan −− those types of things are pretty special for us." Tugnutt said he was thrilled to be asked to visit with the Canadians. 'INCREDIBLE' "When we were offered to come and do this, it was a great honour," he said. "To be able to come and experience this and meet the soldiers, it's been incredible −− talking to them, hearing their stories." Later in the day, the group travelled to Camp Nathan Smith, just outside Kandahar city, to visit with members of Canada's provincial reconstruction team, where they signed autographs and mugged for more photos. "Tens of thousands of Canadians want to pass on their best wishes to you −− their prayers, their thoughts, all of which are with you, and their immense appreciation for what you're doing here in Afghanistan," Hillier told the assembled soldiers. Stanley Cup in Kandahar Trophy, ex−NHLers called big morale boosters

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The players are set to face off this morning in a ball−hockey game against a team of soldiers that Tiger Williams, for one, knows won't be easy to beat. "These guys play for real, so it's going to be entertaining," chuckled Williams. Brig.−Gen. Tim Grant, the commander of Canadian forces in Afghanistan, said the visit would prove invaluable to the mood and morale of the soldiers, who braved 50 C temperatures yesterday and are facing a long, hot summer ahead. "From a morale standpoint, there is no equivalent to this," Grant said. "You can't put a price on it." KEYWORDS=CANADA

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Ottawa has no sense of priorities SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: COLUMN: WORD COUNT:

0705030774 The Toronto Sun 2007.05.03 Final Editorial/Opinion 19 GEOFF MATTHEWS Editorial 271

Let's see. What's big in the news this week? Oh yes, Canada's auditor general says vicious killers may be walking our streets because crime labs are taking too long to process DNA samples. Our country's soldiers are still fighting in Afghanistan, where nearly four dozen of them have given up their lives. The poisons we spew into the environment are affecting our health and threatening an entire way of life in the north. Ordinary citizens can't find a family doctor to treat their everyday ailments and provide them with annual checkups. Gas prices are nearing all−time highs, making it tough for hard−pressed taxpayers to keep their budgets in balance and for businesses to survive. Plenty of stuff for our federal politicians to get their teeth into, right? Sorry, no. In what may go down as one of the biggest mass brain cramps in Canadian history, the men and women we send to represent us on Parliament Hill −− and pay handsomely to do so −− have turned their attention from all of the above to concentrate on a two−word phrase that an NHL player may or may not have uttered two years ago. Got that? May or may not have uttered. Linesman Michel Cormier insists Phoenix Coyotes forward Shane Doan referred to him as a "(expletive) Frenchman" at the end of an NHL game in 2005. Doan says he didn't and a league inquiry found no grounds to punish the player. In today's world of political correctness run amok, however, facts never get in the way of a good rant. A Commons committee has demanded Hockey Canada officials explain their choice of Doan as captain of the national team currently playing at the World Hockey Championship. "We (francophones) have a right to be respected," fumed Quebec MP Marcel Proulx in demanding the Ottawa has no sense of priorities

97

investigation. Never one to be outdone, NDP leader Jack Layton said the Doan controversy was "taking away from the enthusiasm that everybody wants to have" for the tournament. Incredibly, the all−party committee bought into the nonsense and summoned representatives from Hockey Canada to appear and explain the choice of captain. Sleep easy, Canadians. They stand on guard for thee.

Ottawa has no sense of priorities

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Tories to defend POW policy in court SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: ILLUSTRATION: BYLINE: DATELINE: WORD COUNT:

0705030750 The Toronto Sun 2007.05.03 Final News 3 photo of STEPHEN HARPER UNDER FIRE KATHLEEN HARRIS, NATIONAL BUREAU OTTAWA 297

The Conservative government, reeling from accusations it's misleading the public and spiralling in "chaos," will be forced to defend its policy on Afghan detainees in a federal court today. In an unprecedented move, Amnesty International Canada is attempting to halt the transfer of prisoners of war with an interim injunction. The leading human rights organization claims Canada's policy of handing over detainees breaches international law because the prisoners are at risk of torture and abuse. Amnesty spokesman John Tackaberry said government policy spells out different processes for handling prisoners. Those who are deemed to have "intelligence value" may not have any protection. "They fall outside the limited transfer agreement that we already have, which is a serious concern," Tackaberry said. Making a surprise visit to Afghanistan, Gen. Rick Hillier, the chief of defence staff, said troops on the ground are "pissed off" that the prisoner controversy is overshadowing the mission. "They are angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here ... on the enormous amount of good that's being done, on the incredible things that are happening here in Kandahar province and around the rest of Afghanistan, and the additional security and the stability and the hope for a future that we are bringing to millions of Afghans," he said. Hillier brought along the shining Stanley Cup and an entourage of former NHL players as a special morale−booster for the soldiers. But the prisoner issue also raged back home in the House of Commons, where Liberal Leader Stephane Dion accused Prime Minister Stephen Harper of playing fast and loose with the facts on what officials knew when. "He misled the House, pretending that the minister never said that Corrections Canada received allegations of torture. But we know these allegations exist," he said. "We know that it would not be acceptable under the Geneva Convention to send detainees to the Afghan authorities." Harper also brushed off the criticism and more calls for the dismissal of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor. KEYWORDS=NATIONAL

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Lord Stanley pays a visit NHL vets give troops a thrill in Kandahar SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

0705030749 The Toronto Sun 2007.05.03 Final News 3 3 photos by Ryan Remiorz, CP 1. Former Leafs enforcer Dave "Tiger" Williams traded in his hockey uniform for fatigues as he arrives at Kandahar Airfield yesterday. 2. Gen. Rick ILLUSTRATION: Hillier shows off the Cup to Leafs fan Cpl. Jay McArthur, of Goderich. 3. Habs fans get their turn with hockey's Holy Grail. BYLINE: JAMES MCCARTEN, CP DATELINE: KANDAHAR WORD COUNT: 272 Armed with a gleaming symbol of hockey glory, Canada's top soldier led a brigade of former NHL players on a mission yesterday to boost the spirits of war−weary, sports−starved Canadians in Afghanistan. Surrounded by hockey heroes that included enforcers like Bob Probert and Dave (Tiger) Williams, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier looked like a kid in a candy store as the Stanley Cup was wheeled out and placed on display on the tarmac at Kandahar Airfield. "This is the Cup that's coming back to Canada," Hillier said, giving a nod to the two remaining Canadian teams in the playoffs. Soldiers posed for photos and chatted with some of the players, including goaltender Ron Tugnutt, two−time Cup winner Mark Napier and former Canadiens players Rejean Houle and Yvon Lambert. 'GREAT MOMENT' "I got the chance to be close to the Cup, take a picture with it −− it was a great moment for me," said Cpl. Lisa−Marie Guernon, 29, from Montreal, a Canadiens cap on her head. "Especially here in Afghanistan −− those types of things are pretty special for us." Hillier and the players arrived aboard a C−130 Hercules that performed a low, tight banking turn before coming in for a landing −− an experience Tugnutt said he won't soon forget. "It's a good thing I went to Disney last week ... it prepared me for the ride in," he said. "I went on all the big roller coasters, and that experience −− plus a few Gravol −− prepared me for that flight." Later in the day, the group travelled to Camp Nathan Smith, just outside Kandahar city, to visit with members of Canada's provincial reconstruction team, where they signed autographs. Napier said their trip was turning out to be no less a thrill for the players than it was for the troops. "The next (group), we're going to have to fight them off with a stick, the guys who are going to want to come over here." Lord Stanley pays a visit NHL vets give troops a thrill in Kandahar

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KEYWORDS=NATIONAL

Lord Stanley pays a visit NHL vets give troops a thrill in Kandahar

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Frontpage ON GUARD FOR STANLEY Ex−NHLers bring hockey's Holy Grail to boost spirits of our sports−starved troops in Afghanistan SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: ILLUSTRATION: WORD COUNT:

0705030747 The Toronto Sun 2007.05.03 Final News 1 photo by Ryan Remiorz, CP 0

Frontpage ON GUARD FOR STANLEY Ex−NHLers bring hockey's Holy Grail to boost spirits of our 102sports−s

Ottawa has no sense of priorities SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: COLUMN: WORD COUNT:

0705030106 The Ottawa Sun 2007.05.03 Final Editorial/Opinion 14 GEOFF MATTHEWS Editorial 277

Let's see. What's big in the news this week? Oh yes, Canada's auditor general says vicious killers may be walking our streets because crime labs are taking too long to process DNA samples. Our country's soldiers are still fighting in Afghanistan, where nearly four dozen of them have given up their lives. The poisons we spew into the environment are affecting our health and threatening an entire way of life in the north. Ordinary citizens can't find a family doctor to treat their everyday ailments and provide them with annual checkups. Gas prices are nearing all−time highs, making it tough for hard−pressed taxpayers to keep their budgets in balance and for businesses to survive. Plenty of stuff for our federal politicians to get their teeth into, right? Sorry, no. In what may go down as one of the biggest mass brain cramps in Canadian history, the men and women we send to represent us on Parliament Hill −− and pay handsomely to do so −− have turned their attention from all of the above to concentrate on a two−word phrase that an NHL player may or may not have uttered two years ago. Got that? May or may not have uttered. Linesman Michel Cormier insists Phoenix Coyotes forward Shane Doan referred to him as a "(expletive) Frenchman" at the end of an NHL game in 2005. Doan says he didn't and a league inquiry found no grounds to punish the player. In today's world of political correctness run amok, however, facts never get in the way of a good rant. A Commons committee has demanded Hockey Canada officials explain their choice of Doan as captain of the national team currently playing at the World Hockey Championship. "We (francophones) have a right to be respected," fumed Quebec MP Marcel Proulx in demanding the investigation.

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Never one to be outdone, NDP leader Jack Layton said the Doan controversy was "taking away from the enthusiasm that everybody wants to have" for the tournament. Incredibly, the all−party committee bought into the nonsense and summoned representatives from Hockey Canada to appear and explain the choice of captain. Sleep easy, Canadians. They stand on guard for thee.

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PoW policy put to test Amnesty International takes feds to court to halt transfers SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: WORD COUNT:

0705030088 The Ottawa Sun 2007.05.03 Final News 3 KATHLEEN HARRIS, NATIONAL BUREAU 378

The Conservative government, reeling from accusations it is misleading the public and spiralling in "chaos," will be forced to defend its policy on Afghan detainees in a federal court today. In an unprecedented move, Amnesty International Canada is trying to halt the transfer of prisoners of war by seeking an interim injunction. The leading human rights organization claims Canada's policy breaches international law because the prisoners are at risk of torture and abuse after they are handed over to Afghan authorities. Amnesty spokesman John Tackaberry said government policy spells out different processes for handling prisoners. Those deemed to have "intelligence value" may not have any protection. "They fall outside the limited transfer agreement that we already have, which is a serious concern," Tackaberry said. TROOPS 'ANGRY' Making a surprise visit to Afghanistan, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier said troops are "pissed off" that the prisoner controversy is overshadowing the mission. "They are angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here −− the focus back in Canada, specifically, on the enormous amount of good that's being done, on the incredible things that are happening here in Kandahar province and around the rest of Afghanistan, and the additional security and the stability and the hope for a future that we are bringing to millions of Afghans," he said. The prisoner issue also raged back home in the House of Commons, where Liberal Leader Stephane Dion accused Prime Minister Stephen Harper of playing fast and loose with the facts on what officials knew and when. "He misled the House, pretending that the minister never said that Corrections Canada received allegations of torture. But we know these allegations exist," he said. "We know that it would not be acceptable under the Geneva Convention to send detainees to the Afghan authorities." DEFENDS MINISTER Harper brushed off the criticism and more calls for the dismissal of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor.

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"The minister of National Defence is undertaking a very important action on behalf of the Canadian military, rebuilding our Canadian military after years of neglect and denigration by the party opposite," Harper said. NDP MP Dawn Black demanded that Canada stop transferring detainees to Afghan authorities until the mess has been cleared up. "The government is in a state of absolute chaos," Black said. "It's like trying to deal with a three−ring circus trying to figure out who's responsible for what in terms of the prisoner transfer agreement. We've got different answers from different ministers and different answers from Gen. Hillier and all of this needs to be clarified and made clear to the Canadian people." KEYWORDS=NATIONAL

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Cup, NHL heroes give troops a lift SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

0705030087 The Ottawa Sun 2007.05.03 Final News 3 2 photos by Ryan Remiorz, CP Master Cpl. Mike Lehman, a military police officer from Gatineau, guards the Stanley Cup as it arrives in Kandahar yesterday, along with a ILLUSTRATION: handful of former NHLers, including enforcer Dave (Tiger) Williams and former Senator goalie Ron Tugnutt. Besides boosting morale, the players were also set to face off against a team of soldiers for a ball−hockey game this morning. BYLINE: CP DATELINE: KANDAHAR, Afghanistan WORD COUNT: 224 Armed with a gleaming symbol of hockey glory, Canada's top soldier led a brigade of former NHLers on a mission to boost the morale of war−weary, sports−starved troops in Afghanistan. Surrounded by hockey heroes, including enforcers like Bob Probert and Dave (Tiger) Williams, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier looked like a kid in a candy store yesterday as the Stanley Cup was wheeled out and placed on display on the tarmac at Kandahar Airfield. "This is the Cup that's coming back to Canada," Hillier said, a reference to the two Canadian teams left in the playoffs, the Senators and Canucks. Soldiers posed for photos and chatted with the players, including former Senators goalie Ron Tugnutt, two−time Cup winner Mark Napier and Canadiens legends Rejean Houle and Yvon Lambert. "I got the chance to be close to the Cup, take a picture with it −− it was a great moment," said Cpl. Lisa−Marie Guernon, 29, from Montreal, a Canadiens cap on her head. 'INCREDIBLE' EXPERIENCE Hillier and the players arrived aboard a C−130 Hercules that performed a low, tight banking turn before coming in for a landing −− an experience Tugnutt won't soon forget. "It's a good thing I went to Disney last week with the family; it prepared me for the ride in," he said. Tugnutt was thrilled to be asked to visit with the troops: "It's been incredible, talking to them, hearing their stories." The players are set to face off this morning in a ball−hockey game against a team of soldiers that Tiger Williams knows won't be easy to beat. "These guys play for real, so it's going to be entertaining," chuckled Williams, a custom−made "Tiger" name tag on his military uniform. KEYWORDS=NATIONAL

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Martin approved detainee process; Afghan prisoner protocol set in June 2005 IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: ILLUSTRATION: DATELINE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030113 The Windsor Star 2007.05.03 Final News A1 / FRONT Colour Photo: Paul Martin; OTTAWA Andrew Mayeda and Mike Blanchfield CanWest News Service 680

OTTAWA − Former prime minister Paul Martin gave approval almost two years ago to then−defence minister Bill Graham to negotiate a detainee transfer agreement with the Afghanistan government, say government documents obtained by CanWest News Service. The revelation, contained in cabinet correspondence and Defence Department briefing notes, comes as the Harper government faces criticism over its administration of the Afghanis−tan mission and allegations that detainees were abused after being transferred to Afghan authorities. The documents show Martin, who has yet to speak publicly on the controversy, was briefed on the outlines of the agreement more than six months before it was signed. In a May 27, 2005, letter from Graham to Martin, the prime minister was told that Canada planned to negotiate an agreement with the Afghan government that spelled out "explicit undertakings" on how the detainees would be treated. The same day, Graham "authorized the Canadian Forces to seek arrangements with relevant authorities on the transfer of detainees," a Defence Department briefing note says. "The prime minister concurred with this approach on 10 June, 2005," states the note. The documents appear to debunk the notion that Gen. Rick Hillier, the chief of the defence staff, acted on his own and without government supervision when he signed the detainee deal on behalf of the Canadian government in Kabul Dec. 18, 2005. They also shed new light on how the former Liberal government crafted a deal that has become one of Prime Minister Stephen Harper's biggest political headaches since taking power, sparking daily calls for the resignation of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor. The May 2005 letter states that Canada's new detainee policy "proceeds from the same premise" as strategic objectives approved by former prime minister Jean Chretien in November 2001. Chretien was the first prime minister to commit warships and special forces troops to the U.S.−led war on terrorism, one month after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States. Martin approved detainee process; Afghan prisoner protocol set in June 2005

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The government planned to reach an agreement with Afghanistan under which detainees transferred by Canada would "be afforded treatment consistent with the standards set out in the Third Geneva Convention, regardless of the legal status of those detainees," the letter states. The letter, also sent to former foreign affairs minister Pierre Pettigrew, assures that information on detainees "will be passed along in a timely way" to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), "which has the mandate and resources to track prisoners of war and detainees captured during armed conflict." The letter does not specify whether the ICRC will report back to Canada on the condition of the detainees. O'Connor recently apologized for misleading Parliament about the role of the ICRC. He said it was reporting back to Canada, which it doesn't. On May 31, 2005, Graham and Hillier met Afghanistan Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the "possibility" of a bilateral "framework agreement," according to the briefing note. On July 28, Hillier sent Graham a letter asking for his approval "to include language in a proposed Military Technical Agreement with the government of Afghanistan concerning the Canadian Forces plans to negotiate a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees." Graham signed off on the plan. In the House of Commons Wednesday, the Conservative government faced another round of questioning about its handling of the Afghan detainee issue. The government has faced criticism that it has exposed prisoners to torture in Afghan prisons after they were transferred there by the Canadian military personnel, and that it has offered contradictory explanations about the issue. Harper told the Commons on Wednesday that Hillier did not act on his own when he signed the agreement. "It is my clear understanding that any such agreement would have required the approval of the Liberal cabinet ministers of the day." In Kandahar, Hillier told reporters Wednesday that he only signed the agreement after Foreign Affairs and the Defence Department took the lead on it. "They shaped the agreement. I signed it, first of all because I was here in Afghanistan when it was ready to be signed, in the presence of the ambassador, who of course would have signed it if I had not been here," Hillier said, adding that he was asked personally by Afghanistan's defence minister to put his name to the agreement. Unlike similar agreements reached by the Dutch and British governments, the Canadian deal did not contain a guarantee that Canadian officials could follow up on transferred detainees. The government has since negotiated a new agreement with Afghan authorities under which Canadian officials will have access to detainees after they are transferred.

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Liberals approved Afghan detainee deal; Agreement contained no guaranteed access to prisoners by Canada IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: DATELINE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030142 Times Colonist (Victoria) 2007.05.03 Final News A4 OTTAWA Andrew Mayeda and Mike Blanchfield CanWest News Service 736

OTTAWA −− Former prime minister Paul Martin gave approval almost two years ago to then−defence minister Bill Graham to negotiate a detainee transfer agreement with the Afghanistan government, government documents obtained by CanWest News Service show. The revelation, contained in cabinet correspondence and Defence Department briefing notes, comes as the Harper government continues to face heavy criticism over allegations that Afghan detainees were abused after being transferred to Afghan authorities. The documents show that Martin, now an ordinary Liberal MP who has yet to speak publicly on the controversy, was briefed on the outlines of the agreement more than six months before it was signed. In a May 27, 2005, letter from Graham to Martin, the former prime minister was told that Canada planned to negotiate an agreement with the Afghan government that would spell out "explicit undertakings" on how the detainees would be treated. The same day as the letter, Graham "authorized the Canadian Forces to seek arrangements with relevant authorities on the transfer of detainees," according to a Defence Department briefing note. "The Prime Minister concurred with this approach on 10 June 2005," the note states. The documents appear to undermine an increasingly popular view in Ottawa's corridors of power that says Gen. Rick Hillier, the chief of the defence staff, acted without proper authority when he signed the detainee deal on behalf of the Canadian government in Kabul Dec. 18, 2005. The papers also shed new light on how the former Liberal government crafted a deal that has become Prime Minister Stephen Harper's biggest political headache since taking power, sparking daily calls for the resignation of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor. Graham's May 2005 letter states that the government wanted an agreement under which Afghan detainees transferred by Canada would "be afforded treatment consistent with the standards set out in the Third Geneva Convention, regardless of the legal status of those detainees." The letter also says that Canadians would pass information on detainees to the International Committee of the Red Cross, "which has the mandate and resources to track Prisoners of War and detainees captured during

Liberals approved Afghan detainee deal; Agreement contained no guaranteed access to prisoners 110 by Canad

armed conflict." However, it does not clarify whether the Red Cross would report back to Canada on the condition of the detainees. O'Connor recently apologized for incorrectly telling Parliament that the Red Cross was reporting back to Canada. On May 31, 2005, Graham and Hillier met Afghanistan Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the possibility of a bilateral "framework agreement," according to the briefing note. In a July 28 letter, Hillier asked Graham for authority to work toward the negotiation of a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees. Graham signed off on the plan. In the House of Commons yesterday, the Conservative government faced continued criticism that it has exposed prisoners to torture in Afghan prisons after they were transferred there by the Canadian military personnel. Harper insisted Hillier could not have signed a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees without approval from the ministers of the day. Meanwhile in Kandahar, Hillier admitted the agreement may not have been enough to stop the torture of Afghan captives. But he insisted signing the accord had not been a mistake because it allowed Canada to move forward with its mission. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient." Hillier also said many Canadian soldiers are angry the detainee controversy is overshadowing the good work they feel they are doing in the country. For his part, Kandahar governor Asadullah Khalid continued to deny allegations of detainee torture. He added that his government hopes to release the details of its investigation into the matter soon. Unlike similar agreements reached by the Dutch and British governments, the original Canadian deal with the Afghan authorities did not contain a guarantee that Canadian officials could follow up on transferred detainees. The government has since negotiated a new agreement under which Canadian officials will have access to detainees after they are transferred. In Ottawa, meanwhile, Amnesty International Canada and the B.C. Civil Liberties Association will ask the Federal Court of Canada today to temporarily block the Canadian Forces from transferring prisoners to the Afghan government on the grounds the practice violates the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and international obligations under the Geneva Convention. In their court filings, the Amnesty and civil liberties associations argue the Forces should build their own detention facility in Afghanistan, rather than relying on the Afghan government to warehouse prisoners in jails that have prompted numerous reports of torture.

Liberals approved Afghan detainee deal; Agreement contained no guaranteed access to prisoners 111 by Canad

Cup boosts troops' morale IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030141 Times Colonist (Victoria) 2007.05.03 Final News A4 Photo: Sgt. Roxanne Clowe, Canadian Forces /Brigadier−General T.J. Grant, left, Dave (Tiger) Williams, second from left, and Chief of Defence Staff General Rick Hillier, ILLUSTRATION: centre, along with members of Team Canada admire the Stanley Cup after arriving at Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan. ; DATELINE: KANDAHAR, Afghanistan BYLINE: Jonathan Fowlie SOURCE: CanWest News Service WORD COUNT: 297 KANDAHAR, Afghanistan −− Canada's top soldier arrived in Kandahar yesterday morning with a special treat for troops: the Stanley Cup. "Canadians, as never before in my life and my time in uniform, support you," Gen. Rick Hillier told the troops at the camp for Canada's provincial reconstruction team, giving a rousing speech as he unveiled the cup. "The difference you have made in this province and the difference you will continue to make for the people that live here is absolutely incredible," he added. Hillier was joined by several retired NHL players −− including Bob Probert, Rejean Houle and Dan Daoust −− as well as Vancouver Canucks owner Paolo Aquilini. Soon after Hillier's address, soldiers flocked to the stage at the small Kandahar City base to get their pictures taken with the legendary trophy. "This is a great morale booster," said Warrant Officer Martin Rousseau, a Canadiens fan originally from Montreal. Sgt. Leighton Hardy says he is a diehard Toronto fan and was ecstatic to see the cup in Kandahar. "It's nice to see a piece of Canada come to us," said Hardy, who has been in Afghanistan since mid−October. "With the Stanley Cup playoffs going on, and with us being stuck over here a lot of time we don't get to see the games because we are busy with work and stuff." For those who came from Canada, the event was equally exciting. Houle, who won five Stanley Cups, said he wanted to show support for the troops. "I know they are going through a tough time, they lost people and I wanted to make sure that we are here and to let them know we are behind them and that they are very courageous."

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Aquilini, who owns the Canucks with his brothers Roberto and Francesco, said though his team is fighting to stay in the playoffs, there is no place he would rather be than with the cup in Kandahar. "There are important things and there are more important things. This is more important for me to be here and to really express my gratitude to the soldiers and everyone here that is doing a great job."

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Canada's foreign service faltering at a dangerous time IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: COLUMN: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030116 Times Colonist (Victoria) 2007.05.03 Final Comment A12 Susan Riley Susan Riley CanWest News Service 722

It would be rash to draw too close a link between the continuing high−level confusion over the treatment of Afghan detainees and the sorry state of Canada's foreign service, as outlined by Auditor General Sheila Fraser in her report this week. The changing story on what is happening to Afghan prisoners once they leave Canadian military custody suggests that federal departments, and their ministers, are not talking to one another. It is said that the Defence Department feels unfairly burdened, while the Canadian International Development Association is accused of not pulling its weight and Foreign Affairs is nowhere to be found. Significantly, the ambassador to Afghanistan was quietly replaced amid the uproar. But if there is a common thread, it is this: The world is getting smaller and more complicated and Canada's ability to navigate the new dangers seems less assured of late. Ordinarily, this might be a trifling concern. Fraser's descriptions of the problems −− a long−standing staffing crisis in Canada's foreign service, lack of information on the local staff at missions abroad, the difficulty finding people to go to Afghanistan or Haiti because of danger and inadequate compensation −− is less glamorous than tales of envelopes of cash, bogus receipts and personalized golf balls. But a sophisticated, motivated and well−paid diplomatic corps has never been more necessary −− it is at least as vital as a well−equipped, professional army −− in anticipating conflict before it engulfs entire regions and in trying, however modestly, to promote peaceful alternatives to war or terrorism. That's hard to do when 30 per cent of the staff at Canada's 170 foreign missions are "acting," that is, working above their official classifications, because of a long−predicted staffing crunch. Fraser estimates the vacancy rate at 35 per cent; the department puts it at 20 per cent. Whatever, it will get worse. Some 58 per cent of foreign service managers are eligible to retire in three years, at a time when mid−career professionals in foreign postings have been bailing, partly because of poor compensation and family pressures. No wonder, as Fraser reports, the department has trouble finding staff for the embassy in Afghanistan. It took a year for Foreign Affairs to agree to cover life insurance for its Kabul staff, when their private companies balked. Canada's foreign service faltering at a dangerous time

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Fraser highlights other unresolved issues: A proposal to increase danger pay fivefold, enhanced benefits after four months in Kabul, rather than a year, and giving diplomats the same tax exemption offered their military counterparts on dangerous missions. As the death of Glyn Berry underscores, suicide bombers make no special exemptions for diplomats. Fraser even reports difficulties staffing Canada's 22 consulates in the United States, because the living allowance doesn't match what is paid in other foreign postings and ends up penalizing families. Those working in the U.S. have to find their own housing, send their kids to local schools regardless of quality and spend up to 18 per cent more to live, a differential not covered by expenses. Other problems are chronic: The difficulty for spouses in finding jobs abroad, internal economies that lately led to the closing of four foreign missions and an increasing reliance on locally hired staff with spotty accounting for their skills and qualifications (including security checks). As well, stunningly, only 16 per cent of 180 foreign postings that require working proficiency in another language are staffed by qualified people. The department plans to study foreign language training next winter, it told the auditor, "and develop an action plan." What this means is that Canada does not have a modern, flexible and multi−ethnic foreign service and, says Fraser, no plans to replenish its diminished ranks. Attempts to fix it −− notably a plan to move Ottawa−based staff to vacant foreign posts −− ran afoul of an antiquated negotiating system that involves 18 unions, Treasury Board and three other agencies. Insiders insist the problem isn't attracting idealistic young people who are curious about the world to join the foreign service. The problem is keeping them. The pay isn't good enough and the demands on family too great for many. Nor does it help that diplomacy is not highly regarded by the current government −− not as in the days of Lester Pearson, Paul Martin Sr., even Pierre Trudeau. Prime Minister Stephen Harper is clearly more drawn to the military brass than the shrimp−canape set. His choice of the likable but light−weight Peter MacKay as foreign minister only underscores the low profile, and low priority, he attaches to diplomacy −− and it also suggests the decline that Fraser reports isn't likely to be reversed soon.

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Liberals OK'd Afghan detainee deal; Ex−PM Martin gave defence minister approval to negotiate transfer agreement IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030189 The Ottawa Citizen 2007.05.03 Early News A1 / FRONT Andrew Mayeda and Mike Blanchfield The Ottawa Citizen 621

Former prime minister Paul Martin gave approval almost two years ago to then−defence minister Bill Graham to negotiate a detainee transfer agreement with the Afghanistan government, according to government documents obtained by CanWest News Service. The revelation, contained in cabinet correspondence and Defence Department briefing notes, comes as the Harper government continues to face criticism over its conduct of the Afghanistan mission and allegations that detainees were abused after being transferred to Afghan authorities. The documents show that Mr. Martin, who has yet to speak publicly on the controversy, was briefed on the outlines of the agreement more than six months before it was signed. In a May 27, 2005, letter from Mr. Graham to Mr. Martin, the prime minister was told that Canada planned to negotiate an agreement with the Afghan government that spelled out "explicit undertakings" on how the detainees would be treated. The same day as the letter, Mr. Graham "authorized the Canadian Forces to seek arrangements with relevant authorities on the transfer of detainees," according to a Defence Department briefing note. "The prime minister concurred with this approach on 10 June, 2005," states the note. The documents appear to debunk allegations that Chief of Defence Gen. Rick Hillier acted on his own and without proper government supervision when he signed the controversial detainee deal on behalf of the Canadian government in Kabul on Dec. 18, 2005. \ They also shed new light on how the former Liberal government crafted a deal that has become one of Prime Minister Stephen Harper's biggest political headaches since taking power, sparking daily calls for the resignation of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor. The May 2005 letter states that Canada's new detainee policy "proceeds from the same premise" as strategic objectives approved by former prime minister Jean Chretien in November 2001.

Liberals OK'd Afghan detainee deal; Ex−PM Martin gave defence minister approval to negotiate transfer 116 agr

Mr. Chretien was the first prime minister to commit warships and special forces troops to the U.S.−led war on terrorism, one month after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the U.S. The government planned to reach an agreement with Afghanistan under which detainees transferred by Canada would "be afforded treatment consistent with the standards set out in the Third Geneva Convention, regardless of the legal status of those detainees," the letter states. The letter, also sent to former foreign affairs minister Pierre Pettigrew, assures that information on detainees "will be passed along in a timely way" to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), "which has the mandate and resources to track prisoners of war and detainees captured during armed conflict." The letter does not specify whether the Red Cross will report back to Canada on the condition of the detainees. Mr. O'Connor recently apologized for misleading Parliament about the role of the Red Cross. He said it was reporting back to Canada, when that was not correct. On May 31, 2005, Mr. Graham and Gen. Hillier met Afghanistan foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the "possibility" of a bilateral "framework agreement," according to the briefing note. On July 28, Gen. Hillier sent Mr. Graham a letter asking for his approval "to include language in a proposed Military Technical Agreement with the government of Afghanistan concerning the Canadian Forces plans to negotiate a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees." Mr. Graham signed off on the plan. In the House of Commons yesterday, the Conservative government faced another round of questioning about its handling of the Afghan detainee issue. The government has faced criticism that it has exposed prisoners to torture in Afghan prisons after they were transferred there by the Canadian military personnel, and that it has offered contradictory explanations about the issue. Mr. Harper told the Commons yesterday that Gen. Hillier did not act on his own when he signed the agreement. "It is my clear understanding that any such agreement would have required the approval of the Liberal cabinet ministers of the day." Unlike similar agreements reached by the Dutch and British governments, the Canadian deal did not contain a guarantee that Canadian officials could follow up on transferred detainees. The government has since negotiated a new agreement with Afghan authorities, under which Canadian officials will have access to detainees after they are transferred.

Liberals OK'd Afghan detainee deal; Ex−PM Martin gave defence minister approval to negotiate transfer 117 agr

Canadian soldiers get the chance to spend quality time with Stanley IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030171 The Ottawa Citizen 2007.05.03 Final News A4 Photo: Ryan Remiorz, The Canadian Press / Gen. Rick Hillier,right, presents the Stanley ILLUSTRATION: Cup along with former NHL players, Mark Napier, second from left, and a uniformed Dave 'Tiger' Williams, third from right, as they arrive in Kandahar yesterday. ; DATELINE: KANDAHAR, Afghanistan BYLINE: Jonathan Fowlie, with files from Andrew Thompson SOURCE: The Ottawa Citizen WORD COUNT: 261 KANDAHAR, Afghanistan − Canada's top soldier arrived in Kandahar yesterday morning with a special treat for troops: the Stanley Cup. "Canadians, as never before in my life and my time in uniform, support you," Gen. Rick Hillier told the troops at the camp for Canada's provincial reconstruction team, giving a rousing motivational speech as he unveiled the cup. "The difference you have made in this province and the difference you will continue to make for the people that live here is absolutely incredible," he added. "I am proud of you." Gen. Hillier was joined by several retired NHL players −− including Bob Probert, Mark Napier and Dave "Tiger" Williams −− as well as Vancouver Canucks owner Paolo Aquilini. Soon after Gen. Hillier's address, soldiers flocked to the stage at the small Kandahar base to get their pictures taken with the legendary trophy. "This is a great morale booster," said Warrant Officer Martin Rousseau, a Canadiens fan originally from Montreal. "It's nice to see something like this," he added. Cpl. Dave Gagliano, 32, a signals specialist from Ottawa, based at CFS Leitrim, sported an autographed Senators sweater while posing with the trophy. "He is a huge Sens fan," said Cpl. Gagliano,'s wife Carrie, herself attending Ottawa's 3−2 win over the New Jersey Devils last night at Scotiabank Place. The father of two, who deployed to Afghanistan in early−February, stays awake for every game, despite the 81/2−hour time difference. Canadian soldiers get the chance to spend quality time with Stanley

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For those who came from Canada, the event was equally as exciting. "This is an honour to be here," said Mr. Aquilini, who owns the Canucks with his brothers Roberto and Francesco. Mr. Aquilini said that even though his team is fighting for their playoff lives, there is no place he would rather be than with the cup in Kandahar. "There are important things and there are more important things. This is more important for me to be here and to really express my gratitude to the soldiers and everyone here that is doing a great job."

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Hillier has no regrets signing controversial deal IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: DATELINE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030170 The Ottawa Citizen 2007.05.03 Final News A4 KANDAHAR, Afghanistan Jonathan Fowlie The Ottawa Citizen 297

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan − Canada's top soldier said last night that a Canadian detainee agreement may not have been enough to stop the torture of captives in Afghanistan. In an interview in Kandahar, however, Gen. Rick Hillier upheld that it was not a mistake for him to have signed the now−controversial accord back in 2005. "Truly, at the time we felt that was the right thing to do −− that we were comfortable with our approach and the involvement of the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Afghanistan government being required to live up to its commitments of course all were sufficient," Gen. Hillier said. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient," he added. "An investigation will determine whether there is substance to them and, of course, the government of Canada will make the agreement as effective as it possibly can." Gen. Hillier went on to say that signing the agreement was not a mistake, in part because it has allowed Canada to move forward with its mission. "It allowed us to ... support the Afghan government, to help build their capacity to improve their country," he said. Gen. Hillier added that many soldiers he has spoken with since arriving in Afghanistan are angry the detainee issue is overshadowing the good work they feel they are doing in the country. "They are angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here," he said, touting the accomplishments Canadians have made in Kandahar, and especially the Panjwaii region, thus far. "That kind of progress, that kind of stability, brought to an area that was a combat zone in October and November is just incredible," he said of the Panjwaii region, where Canadians fought in Operation Medusa last fall. "If we can bring that kind of stability to what really was thought to be the home of the Taliban ... then surely we can do things around the rest of the country in an incredibly accelerated manner where they are not in kind of strength."

Hillier has no regrets signing controversial deal

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Federal Court to consider detainee affair; Groups want transfers halted until full trial delivers ruling IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030169 The Ottawa Citizen 2007.05.03 Final News A4 Photo: John D Mchugh, Agence France−Presse, Getty Images /Detainees in Afghanistan may be subject to torture or other forms of cruel, degrading or inhuman treatment, says a ILLUSTRATION: Federal Court notice filed by Amnesty International and the B.C. Civil Liberties Association. ; BYLINE: Mike Blanchfield SOURCE: The Ottawa Citizen WORD COUNT: 447 The Canadian Forces should be prevented from transferring prisoners to the Afghan government because the practice violates the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Federal Court of Canada will hear today. The Afghan detainee affair, a major political headache for Stephen Harper's Conservative government, spreads to the legal arena today as Amnesty International Canada and the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association are to ask the Federal Court to impose an injunction that would temporarily suspend the transfer of detainees from the Forces to the Afghans until a full trial could determine whether this violates not only the charter, but also Canada's international treaty obligations under the Geneva Convention. "There is a serious issue to be tried as to whether the detainees transferred into Afghan custody are subject to a substantial risk of torture or other forms of cruel, degrading or inhuman treatment," says the notice of motion filed by lawyers for the two organizations. The motion argues there are "no territorial limits" to the charter and that its reach extends "to government agents acting in foreign countries." Justice Department lawyers, acting for the military and the government, have filed notice with the court that the action be struck down. In their court filings, Amnesty and the civil liberties association argue the Forces should build their own detention facility in Afghanistan, rather than relying on the Afghan government to warehouse prisoners in their own jails and prisons, which have been subject to numerous reports of torture and abuse from groups such as the U.S. State Department, Canada's own Foreign Affairs Department and the United Nations human rights commissioner. The motion cites the Defence Department's own documents, including one titled Prisoner of War Handling Detainees and Interrogation and Tactical Questioning in International Operations. The document used to be available of the Defence Department's website, but has been removed. The manual, a copy of which has been filed as an exhibit in Federal Court, gives instructions to the military on how to build a 500−person prisoner of war compound, as well as smaller holding areas and detainee Federal Court to consider detainee affair; Groups want transfers halted until full trial delivers ruling 121

transfer points. The detailed instructions −−including schematic drawings and personnel needs −−show how to design such compounds. It spells out where to put latrines, sleeping quarters, guard towers and an exercise area, among other things. "Moreover, the respondents already have blueprints for establishing long−term detainee−holding facilities and can construct one quickly. While a larger detention camp or facility may involve cost or inconvenience, such concerns cannot outweigh the potential harm to individuals who may otherwise be tortured," the motion argues. The motion goes on to say that the military has "had years to make arrangements for interning detainees safely." The courts documents indicate the Forces detained 40 people between 2002 and 2006 in Afghanistan.

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Karzai condemns civilian deaths IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: DATELINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030168 The Ottawa Citizen 2007.05.03 Final News A4 KABUL, Afghanistan The Washington Post 163

KABUL, Afghanistan − Afghan President Hamid Karzai declared yesterday that his government can "no longer accept" civilian casualties caused by U.S.−led operations, shortly before news spread that as many as 51 civilians may have died during clashes this week in far western Afghanistan. Civilian deaths are "becoming a heavy burden, and we are not happy about it," Karzai told reporters. His remarks came two days after rioting broke out following a protracted battle in western Herat province, where police said as many as 30 residents had been killed during three days of fighting between U.S.−led forces and Taliban insurgents. Government buildings were stormed by demonstrators, some of whom were wounded by police. Yesterday, officials visiting villages in the battle area reported that 45 to 51 civilians had died and that bodies were still being found.

Karzai condemns civilian deaths

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Ottawa has no sense of priorities SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: COLUMN: WORD COUNT:

0705030679 The London Free Press 2007.05.03 Final Opinion Pages A10 GEOFF MATTHEWS Editorial 277

Let's see. What's big in the news this week? Oh yes, Canada's auditor general says vicious killers may be walking our streets because crime labs are taking too long to process DNA samples. Our country's soldiers are still fighting in Afghanistan, where nearly four dozen of them have given up their lives. The poisons we spew into the environment are affecting our health and threatening an entire way of life in the north. Ordinary citizens can't find a family doctor to treat their everyday ailments and provide them with annual checkups. Gas prices are nearing all−time highs, making it tough for hard−pressed taxpayers to keep their budgets in balance and for businesses to survive. Plenty of stuff for our federal politicians to get their teeth into, right? Sorry, no. In what may go down as one of the biggest mass brain cramps in Canadian history, the men and women we send to represent us on Parliament Hill −− and pay handsomely to do so −− have turned their attention from all of the above to concentrate on a two−word phrase that an NHL player may or may not have uttered two years ago. Got that? May or may not have uttered. Linesman Michel Cormier insists Phoenix Coyotes forward Shane Doan referred to him as a "(expletive) Frenchman" at the end of an NHL game in 2005. Doan says he didn't and a league inquiry found no grounds to punish the player. In today's world of political correctness run amok, however, facts never get in the way of a good rant. A Commons committee has demanded Hockey Canada officials explain their choice of Doan as captain of the national team currently playing at the World Hockey Championship. "We (francophones) have a right to be respected," fumed Quebec MP Marcel Proulx in demanding the investigation.

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Never one to be outdone, NDP leader Jack Layton said the Doan controversy was "taking away from the enthusiasm that everybody wants to have" for the tournament. Incredibly, the all−party committee bought into the nonsense and summoned representatives from Hockey Canada to appear and explain the choice of captain. Sleep easy, Canadians. They stand on guard for thee.

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Top soldier defends prisoner deal Soldiers are frustrated the issue distracts from the mission. SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

0705030672 The London Free Press 2007.05.03 Final News A9 photo by Ryan Remiorz, CP LORD STANLEY VISITS: Canada's Chief of Defence Staff General Rick Hillier poses with Maple Leafs fan Cpl. Jay McArthur, from Goderich, and ILLUSTRATION: the Stanley Cup at the Provincial Reconstruction Team base in Kandahar, Afghanistan, yesterday. BYLINE: JAMES MCCARTEN, CP DATELINE: KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN WORD COUNT: 360 Canada's top soldier stood by his decision to sign a prisoner−exchange deal with the Afghan government, saying yesterday it felt right at the time but may not have been sufficient to prevent detainees from being tortured in Afghan jails. Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier, who shook hands and posed for pictures with soldiers out to see the Stanley Cup brought to Kandahar to boost morale, said some of his soldiers are "pissed−off" with the political firestorm back home over allegations of detainee torture. They're saying the controversy is distracting attention from the work they do in Afghanistan, he said. But Hillier defended his decision to sign the deal −− in part a consequence of convenience, he said, as he was in the country at the time −− as the right move for Afghanistan and for Canada's role in helping the fledgling Afghan government find its feet. "At the time, we felt that was the right thing to do, that we were comfortable with our approach," Hillier said, a backdrop of military vehicles behind him. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient." The agreement, which did not include any provisions to allow human rights officials to visit prisoners once they'd been handed over by Canadian soldiers, helped to foster Canada's effort to support the local government, to build its capacity and strengthen local police and military forces, he said. Those soldiers are now growing frustrated −− "pissed off," in his words −− that the gathering storm clouds are obscuring the work they're doing on behalf of the Afghan people. "They're angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here −− the focus back in Canada specifically −− on the enormous amount of good that's being done, on the incredible things that are happening here in Kandahar province and the rest of Afghanistan," Hillier said. "I met some soldiers this afternoon who, in their opinion, are pissed off because the focus has moved because Top soldier defends prisoner deal Soldiers are frustrated the issue distracts from the mission.

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of issues that are being addressed." Hillier denied knowing anything about allegations of detainee abuse until the day before the story broke last Monday. He refused to discuss a report in the Globe and Mail citing anonymous sources who say he pressed ahead with the deal despite the concerns of the Department of Foreign Affairs. "In the case of the agreement that I signed on behalf of Canada, the Department of National Defence articulated that agreement with the Department of Foreign Affairs, who had the lead," he said. "They shaped the agreement, I signed it." KEYWORDS=NATIONAL

Top soldier defends prisoner deal Soldiers are frustrated the issue distracts from the mission.

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More civilian casualties spark Afghan protests SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: DATELINE: WORD COUNT:

0705030670 The London Free Press 2007.05.03 Final News A9 AP KABUL, AFGHANISTAN 183

Afghans can no longer accept civilian deaths from international military operations, President Hamid Karzai said yesterday amid reports 51 western Afghanistan villagers were killed during a U.S.−led offensive against the Taliban. Despite claims women and children were among the dead, the U.S. insisted it had no reports of civilian casualties. But rising public anger was evident as students staged a fourth day of anti−American protests in an eastern city over civilian deaths. Karzai met with NATO, U.S. and European Union officials, telling them "civilian deaths and arbitrary decisions to search people's houses have reached an unacceptable level, and Afghans cannot put up with it any longer," according to a statement from his office. During a news conference, Karzai said Afghans had reached their limit after the years of conflict since the Taliban's ouster in a U.S.−led invasion in late 2001. "The intention is very good in these operations to fight terrorism," Karzai told reporters. "Sometimes mistakes have been made as well, but five years on, it is very difficult for us to continue to accept civilian casualties." The U.S.−led coalition said the operation in western Herat province was conducted between Friday and Sunday by U.S. and Afghan troops in the Zerkoh Valley and killed 136 suspected Taliban rebels. KEYWORDS=WORLD

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Stanley Cup visit thrills the troops SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: DATELINE: WORD COUNT:

0705030669 The London Free Press 2007.05.03 Final News A9 CP KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN 225

Armed with a gleaming symbol of hockey glory, Canada's top soldier led a brigade of former National Hockey League players on a mission yesterday to boost the morale and lift the spirits of war−weary, sports−starved Canadians in Afghanistan. Surrounded by hockey heroes that included enforcers like Bob Probert and Dave (Tiger) Williams, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier looked like a kid in a candy store as the Stanley Cup was wheeled out and placed on display on the tarmac at Kandahar Airfield. "This is the cup that's coming back to Canada," Hillier said, a reference to the two Canadian teams left in the playoffs, the Ottawa Senators and the Vancouver Canucks. Soldiers posed for photos and chatted with some of the players, including goaltender Ron Tugnutt, two−time Cup winner Mark Napier and Montreal Canadiens legends Rejean Houle and Yvon Lambert. "I got the chance to be close to the Cup, take a picture with it −− it was a great moment for me," said Cpl. Lisa−Marie Guernon, 29, from Montreal, a Canadiens cap on her head. "Especially here in Afghanistan −− those types of things are special for us." Hillier and the players arrived aboard a C−130 Hercules that performed a low, tight banking turn before coming in for a landing −− an experience Tugnutt said he won't soon forget. "It's a good thing I went to Disney last week with the family; it prepared me for the ride in," he said. "I went on the big roller−coasters, and that −− plus a few Gravol −− prepared me for that flight." KEYWORDS=NATIONAL

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Tories called on carpet over detainees SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

0705030592 The Edmonton Sun 2007.05.03 Final News 31 photo by Ryan Remiorz, CP Gen. Rick Hillier presents the Stanley Cup along with Gen. ILLUSTRATION: Tim Grant and retired NHL enforcer Dave (Tiger) Williams, as they arrive yesterday in Kandahar. BYLINE: KATHLEEN HARRIS, NATIONAL BUREAU DATELINE: OTTAWA WORD COUNT: 212 The Tory government, reeling from accusations it's misleading the public and spiralling in "chaos," will be forced to defend its policy on Afghan detainees in a federal court today. In an unprecedented move, Amnesty International Canada is attempting to halt the transfer of prisoners of war with an interim injunction. It claims Canada's policy of handing over detainees breaches international law because the prisoners are at risk of torture and abuse. Amnesty spokesman John Tackaberry said government policy spells out different processes for handling prisoners. Those who are deemed to have "intelligence value" may not have any protection. On a surprise trip to Afghanistan, Gen. Rick Hillier, the chief of defence staff, said troops on the ground are "pissed off" that the prisoner controversy is overshadowing the mission. "They are angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here ... on the enormous amount of good that's being done, on the incredible things that are happening here in Kandahar province and around the rest of Afghanistan, and the additional security and the stability and the hope for a future that we are bringing to millions of Afghans," he said. Hillier brought along the Stanley Cup and an entourage of former NHL players as a special morale−booster for the soldiers. KEYWORDS=CANADA

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Ottawa has no sense of priorities SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: COLUMN: WORD COUNT:

0705030565 The Edmonton Sun 2007.05.03 Final Editorial/Opinion 10 GEOFF MATTHEWS Editorial 271

Let's see. What's big in the news this week? Oh yes, Canada's auditor general says vicious killers may be walking our streets because crime labs are taking too long to process DNA samples. Our country's soldiers are still fighting in Afghanistan, where nearly four dozen of them have given up their lives. The poisons we spew into the environment are affecting our health and threatening an entire way of life in the north. Ordinary citizens can't find a family doctor to treat their everyday ailments and provide them with annual checkups. Gas prices are nearing all−time highs, making it tough for hard−pressed taxpayers to keep their budgets in balance and for businesses to survive. Plenty of stuff for our federal politicians to get their teeth into, right? Sorry, no. In what may go down as one of the biggest mass brain cramps in Canadian history, the men and women we send to represent us on Parliament Hill −− and pay handsomely to do so −− have turned their attention from all of the above to concentrate on a two−word phrase that an NHL player may or may not have uttered two years ago. Got that? May or may not have uttered. Linesman Michel Cormier insists Phoenix Coyotes forward Shane Doan referred to him as a "(expletive) Frenchman" at the end of an NHL game in 2005. Doan says he didn't and a league inquiry found no grounds to punish the player. In today's world of political correctness run amok, however, facts never get in the way of a good rant. A Commons committee has demanded Hockey Canada officials explain their choice of Doan as captain of the national team currently playing at the World Hockey Championship. "We (francophones) have a right to be respected," fumed Quebec MP Marcel Proulx in demanding the Ottawa has no sense of priorities

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investigation. Never one to be outdone, NDP leader Jack Layton said the Doan controversy was "taking away from the enthusiasm that everybody wants to have" for the tournament. Incredibly, the all−party committee bought into the nonsense and summoned representatives from Hockey Canada to appear and explain the choice of captain. Sleep easy, Canadians. They stand on guard for thee.

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Prisoner deal defended Top soldier calls exchange pact right move at the time SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

0705030493 The Calgary Sun 2007.05.03 Final News 20 photo by Ryan Remiorz, CP They're happy about Lord Stanley's mug and 'pissed off' about the ruckus in Canada over prisoner−torture allegations. Private Martin Larochelle, front left, and Cpl. Mathieu Poulin, front right, both of Quebec, wear their Montreal ILLUSTRATION: Canadiens jerseys as they pose with other troops from the 22nd Regiment yesterday in Kandahar with the Stanley Cup. Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier said soldiers in Afghanistan are unhappy with the political furore over allegations of detainee torture. BYLINE: JAMES MCCARTEN, CP DATELINE: KANDAHAR, Afghanistan WORD COUNT: 296 Canada's top soldier stood by his decision to sign a prisoner−exchange deal with the Afghan government, saying yesterday it felt right at the time, but may not have been sufficient to prevent detainees from being tortured in Afghan jails. Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier, who shook hands and posed for pictures with soldiers out to see the Stanley Cup brought to Kandahar to boost morale, said some of his soldiers are "pissed off" with the political firestorm back home over allegations of detainee torture. They're saying the controversy is distracting attention from the work they do Afghanistan, he said. But, Hillier defended his decision to sign the deal −− in part a consequence of convenience, he said, as he was in the country at the time −− as the right move for Afghanistan and for Canada's role in helping the fledgling Afghan government find its feet. "At the time, we felt that was the right thing to do, that we were comfortable with our approach," he said. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient." The agreement helped to foster Canada's effort to support the local government, to build its capacity and strengthen local police and military forces, he said. Those soldiers are now growing frustrated −− "pissed off," in his words −− the gathering storm clouds are obscuring the work they're doing on behalf of the Afghan people. Meanwhile, the Conservative government, reeling from accusations it's misleading the public and spiralling in "chaos," will be forced to defend its policy on Afghan detainees today in court. In an unprecedented move, Amnesty International Canada is attempting to halt the transfer of prisoners of war with an interim injunction. The leading human rights organization claims Canada's policy of handing over detainees breaches international law because the prisoners are at risk of torture and abuse. KEYWORDS=NATIONAL Prisoner deal defended Top soldier calls exchange pact right move at the time

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Ottawa has no sense of priorities SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: BYLINE: COLUMN: WORD COUNT:

0705030484 The Calgary Sun 2007.05.03 Final Editorial/Opinion 14 GEOFF MATTHEWS Editorial 271

Let's see. What's big in the news this week? Oh yes, Canada's auditor general says vicious killers may be walking our streets because crime labs are taking too long to process DNA samples. Our country's soldiers are still fighting in Afghanistan, where nearly four dozen of them have given up their lives. The poisons we spew into the environment are affecting our health and threatening an entire way of life in the north. Ordinary citizens can't find a family doctor to treat their everyday ailments and provide them with annual checkups. Gas prices are nearing all−time highs, making it tough for hard−pressed taxpayers to keep their budgets in balance and for businesses to survive. Plenty of stuff for our federal politicians to get their teeth into, right? Sorry, no. In what may go down as one of the biggest mass brain cramps in Canadian history, the men and women we send to represent us on Parliament Hill −− and pay handsomely to do so −− have turned their attention from all of the above to concentrate on a two−word phrase that an NHL player may or may not have uttered two years ago. Got that? May or may not have uttered. Linesman Michel Cormier insists Phoenix Coyotes forward Shane Doan referred to him as a "(expletive) Frenchman" at the end of an NHL game in 2005. Doan says he didn't and a league inquiry found no grounds to punish the player. In today's world of political correctness run amok, however, facts never get in the way of a good rant. A Commons committee has demanded Hockey Canada officials explain their choice of Doan as captain of the national team currently playing at the World Hockey Championship. "We (francophones) have a right to be respected," fumed Quebec MP Marcel Proulx in demanding the Ottawa has no sense of priorities

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investigation. Never one to be outdone, NDP leader Jack Layton said the Doan controversy was "taking away from the enthusiasm that everybody wants to have" for the tournament. Incredibly, the all−party committee bought into the nonsense and summoned representatives from Hockey Canada to appear and explain the choice of captain. Sleep easy, Canadians. They stand on guard for thee.

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Brighter future emerges from tragedy SOURCETAG PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

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0705030477 The Calgary Sun 2007.05.03 Final News 7 2 photos 1. photo by Jack Cusano, Sun Media The parents of a Calgary soldier killed last year in Afghanistan are helping light up lives in Papua New Guinea. Sally Goddard and Dr. Tim Goddard are teaming up with the University of Calgary's Light Up The World foundation. 2. photo of NICHOLA GODDARD HONOUR FOR HER PABLO FERNANDEZ, SUN MEDIA 313

In life, Nichola Goddard wanted to bring light into the darkest corners of the world −− and in death, her parents hope an initiative in her name will brighten the night in Papua New Guinea. Celebrating their daughter's first birthday since she was killed in Afghanistan last May, Tim and Sally Goddard yesterday teamed up with the University of Calgary's Light Up The World Foundation to bring electric lighting to rural medical aid stations in Papua New Guinea, where Nichola was born and lived until she was nearly four. The foundation aims to improve lives and spur on development in poor countries by providing rural areas with solar−powered LED lighting. In Papua New Guinea, the sun goes down at 6 p.m. and rises at 6 a.m., forcing residents to live half their lives in the dark or to be dependant on toxic kerosene lamps for light, Sally said. Light Up Papua New Guinea is an initiative that would've found a place close to Nichola's heart, she said. "She always believed in development ... and this a great way to honour her and what she believed in," Sally said. The program will benefit some of the very villages where the Goddards lived, said Tim. "You can't save the world ... this is a little contribution and maybe it'll have a little impact," said her father. "But if we all make a little contribution maybe, in the end, something big will happen." The program aims to provide nearly 2,000 medical aid stations throughout the country with a solar panel, two high−output LED lights and a battery/converter unit, at a cost of $200 apiece. On hand for the launch was Papua New Guinea ambassador Evan Paki, who said the initiative will have a profound impact on the quality of medical aid delivered in the rural countryside. "The hydro−electric power we have, we are not able to link to rural areas and because of its portability and simplicity, I think this is going to be very useful," he said. Nichola, who would have turned 27 yesterday, was serving as an officer with the 1st Regiment Royal Brighter future emerges from tragedy

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Canadian Horse Artillery in Afghanistan when she was killed in action against the Taliban last May. "If things had been different, this would've been a very different day," said Tim. "In a perfect world, you'd much prefer to be sitting down cutting the cake." KEYWORDS=ALBERTA

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PRISONERS IN AFGHANISTAN Top soldier changes tack, expresses doubt on deal Standing by detainee pact, Hillier concedes it lacks safeguards to prevent torture PUBLICATION: IDN: DATE: PAGE: BYLINE: SECTION: EDITION: DATELINE: WORDS: WORD COUNT:

GLOBE AND MAIL 071230242 2007.05.03 A1 (ILLUS) GRAEME SMITH AND CAMPBELL CLARK International News Metro KANDAHAR, OTTAWA 1092 1033

GRAEME SMITH AND CAMPBELL CLARK KANDAHAR, OTTAWA General Rick Hillier has distanced himself from the detainee deal he signed with his counterpart in Afghanistan, saying it may have lacked the safeguards necessary to prevent detainees from suffering torture in Afghan custody. The Chief of Defence Staff also said he never saw any of the public reports or government documents that warned last year of detainee abuse. He first learned of such allegations in recent days, he said, as The Globe and Mail investigated stories of torture in Kandahar jails. The government initially reacted to stories of abuse last week by defending the deal that Gen. Hillier signed in December of 2005, sending detainees into Afghan custody without Canadian monitoring. Speaking to reporters last night at Kandahar Air Field, Gen. Hillier was less enthusiastic about the arrangement. "Obviously we'd reassess that as allegations come out, that perhaps that [deal] was not sufficient," he said. Even the fact his signature appears on the agreement was a matter of luck, Gen. Hillier added, responding to comments from government sources who told The Globe the military had pushed diplomats aside while making the deal. The agreement would have been signed by the Canadian ambassador, except that Gen. Hillier happened to be visiting Afghanistan and he was invited to join the ceremony by an Afghan politician, he said. "The minister for defence for Afghanistan, Minister [Abdul Rahim] Wardak, who knows me very well, asked that I participate and sit in," Gen. Hillier said. "So that's why I signed it. Foreign Affairs, of course, had the lead on that throughout." The commander said he still does not consider the agreement a mistake, saying he feels no regret about it. Gen. Hillier emphasized that the stories of abuse are still under investigation, and indicated that his Afghan allies tell him the allegations are false. His soldiers are "pissed off," he said, that the issue is distracting from the mission.

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But he also hinted repeatedly that he would be receptive to a revised arrangement. "Circumstances change, and perhaps you go on to do something else that's going to be better, more effective," Gen. Hillier said. Later, he added: "We continue to learn lessons and improve each day. . . . This is no different." Gen. Hillier evaded a question about why the Canadian mission failed to find the problems earlier. In the year of bloody fighting that followed his signing ceremony, many leading voices on human rights expressed concern that detainees face mistreatment, torture or extra−judicial killings in Afghan custody. Such allegations were publicized by the U.S. State Department, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and Louise Arbour, the Canadian who serves as United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. In private, Canadian diplomats also sent detailed warnings to Ottawa describing the brutality of Afghan prisons. "I was not aware of reports at that time, that there was any allegation of abuse of any detainees," Gen. Hillier said. "Truly, at the time, we felt that was the right thing to do, that we were comfortable with our approach, and that the involvement of the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Afghanistan government being required to live up to its commitments of course, all were sufficient," he said. The Red Cross keeps its findings secret from everybody except the institution it investigates. Earlier this year, Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor was forced to apologize to Parliament for saying, erroneously, that Red Cross monitoring gives Canada a way of checking up on the treatment of detainees in Afghan custody. Gen. Hillier's mention of Afghanistan's commitments refers to the fact that the country is a party to the Geneva Conventions, which forbid torture of war prisoners. The same convention also makes it illegal for Canada to transfer such prisoners to facilities where they face torture or abuse. A helicopter took Gen. Hillier to Kandahar city yesterday for a meeting with Asadullah Khalid, the governor of Kandahar. The two spoke about detainees, and Mr. Khalid said he repeated his assertion that the torture stories were fabricated by Taliban extremists. But Gen. Hillier said he is leaving the latest round of talks about a strengthened detainee agreement to the diplomats. "I have not had those discussions, because Foreign Affairs has the lead," he said. The commander wasn't specific about how he would like to see the negotiations conclude. "As in any agreement, nothing lasts forever," he said. "So if that gets amended or supplemented with anything else that makes it more effective, then that's excellent." In Ottawa yesterday, Bloc Quebecois Leader Gilles Duceppe argued that Gen. Hillier was dodging his responsibility, and should not be complaining that the troops are "pissed off." "Well, I know others who are pissed off, I can tell you. Because this dear general said, 'Listen, I signed an agreement. If it turns out it's no good, it will be up to the Foreign Affairs Department to handle,' " Mr. Duceppe said. "Those undermining morale are people like Gen. Hillier and people like [Defence Minister Gordon] O'Connor not answering questions here. If you're supporting the soldiers, and we do support the soldiers, that doesn't mean you don't have any questions." Opposition leaders charged that the government is in "chaos," with senior civil servants pointing fingers at each other.

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But Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his ministers fought back by noting that the agreement on transferring prisoners to Afghanistan was signed while the previous Liberal government was in office, and accusing the Liberals of undermining Canadian troops. "It's when you keep an incompetent minister in his job that you are not supporting the troops. It's when you see senior civil servants contradicting each other in the media and when you see the chaos that exists in this government that you are not supporting the troops," Liberal Leader Stephane Dion said in the Commons. Mr. Harper also asserted that The Globe reported that Gen. Hillier signed the agreement without political approval, insisting that was wrong. In fact, The Globe did not report that Gen. Hillier signed the agreement without ministerial approval. The Globe reported that senior government officials said that the Defence Department, pushing for the deal, shunted aside diplomats in the Foreign Affairs department, leaving them out of the decisions. Then−defence−minister Bill Graham has said that he approved Canada's agreement with Afghanistan on the transfer of detainees before it was signed. Gen. Hillier signed the deal with Mr. Wardak, the Afghanistan Defence Minister, in Afghanistan during the 2005−06 election campaign. ADDED SEARCH TERMS: GEOGRAPHIC NAME: Canada; Afghanistan SUBJECT TERM:strife; defence; foreign policy; prisoners; human rights; government; political; statements PERSONAL NAME: Rick Hillier ORGANIZATION NAME: Armed Forces; Taliban

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AFGHAN DETAINEES Court to hear transfer−injunction arguments today PUBLICATION: IDN: DATE: PAGE: BYLINE: SECTION: EDITION: DATELINE: WORDS: WORD COUNT:

GLOBE AND MAIL 071230241 2007.05.03 A8 PAUL KORING National News Metro Ottawa ONT 654 654

PAUL KORING OTTAWA The battle over whether prisoners turned over by Canada to Afghan security forces face torture and abuse moves to federal court today where rights groups will seek an injunction ordering an immediate halt to further transfers until the case can be fully heard. The government is fighting back, firing a legal barrage urging the court to reject the claim by Amnesty International Canadian and the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association that the transfers "expose detainees to a substantial risk of torture." Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor, Chief of Defence Staff General Rick Hillier and the Attorney−General want the motion tossed out. The torture claims, they say, are unproven, based on hearsay. "Articles in The Globe and Mail should not be admissible evidence," the government argues in a 32−page brief. That's only one of a host of arguments the government will put to the court opposing the injunction. Among the others: Halting transfers could cause more Canadian casualties; Canadian troops aren't trained or equipped to run a prison camp; building one would require showers and a place to pray; neither Amnesty nor the BCCLA can claim to speak for anonymous detainees and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms doesn't protect unknown foreigners halfway around the world. Perhaps the most powerful arguments are that granting an injunction would interfere with the government's ability to wage war and that the courts should not allow themselves to be used by interest groups to challenge government policy. Today's day−long hearing could be the first step in a long legal process that might end only when the Supreme Court decides the extent to which the Charter of Rights marches with Canadian forces fighting abroad. Or it could amount to the firing of a legal blank, with the court rejecting the efforts of rights groups to assert Charter rights on behalf of unknown detainees facing uncertain fates in a faraway place. Canadian Forces have two separate procedures for handling detainees captured during operations in Afghanistan, including one process that does not involve any oversight by human rights groups, CBC News reported yesterday. AFGHAN DETAINEES Court to hear transfer−injunction arguments today

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Military documents show that Canadian troops are authorized to hand some detainees directly to Afghan authorities on the battlefield, rather than take them prisoner. The battlefield transfers appear to circumvent a complicated set of rules that require Canadian soldiers to notify human−rights monitors when they detain Afghan militants, CBC reported. The documents state that Canadian soldiers are allowed to decide if they want to detain a militant. If commanders think the militant has intelligence value, they can decide to take him prisoner. If not, according to the documents, Afghan Security Forces officially make the capture. The military documents were part of an affidavit filed before a federal court by Amnesty International for a case to be heard yesterday. "The Charter does not apply" the government contends. "The conduct at issue takes place outside Canada . . . it involves unidentified individuals who . . . have no connection to Canada." The government argues that the controversy regarding allegations of torture is "being addressed as a matter of high policy by the government" and that the "the court should not employ the blunt instrument of an injunction to compromise the ability of the Canadian Forces or limit the options available to the government." While no details are revealed about the still−secret number of detainees transferred − first to U.S. prisons and since December, 2005, to Afghan security forces − the government brief discloses for the first time the size of Canada's detainee transit camp at Kandahar air base. "It contains 16 cots in four tents, its maximum capacity is actually eight to 10 persons," says the brief, adding it is unsuitable for long−term use. A prison camp would require "more durable structures, an ablutions area, messing facilities, provision for special religious activity and an area to exercise, none of which exist" in the transit facility. ADDED SEARCH TERMS: GEOGRAPHIC NAME: Canada; Afghanistan SUBJECT TERM:justice; courts; defence; foreign policy; prisoners; human rights; political; government PERSONAL NAME: Gordon O'Connor; Rick Hillier ORGANIZATION NAME: Armed Forces; Taliban; Amnesty International Canadian; British Columbia Civil Liberties Association

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AFGHANISTAN: IN THE COURTS Responsibility doesn't end with the torturer Until Canada receives greater assurances, the transfer of detainees has to stop PUBLICATION: IDN: DATE: PAGE: BYLINE: SECTION: EDITION: DATELINE: WORDS: WORD COUNT:

GLOBE AND MAIL 071230207 2007.05.03 A21 ALEX NEVE AND JASON GRATL Comment Metro 801 764

ALEX NEVE AND JASON GRATL We are in Federal Court today, seeking an order to temporarily halt Canada's transfer of detainees to Afghan officials because of the very real risk that they will be tortured in Afghan prisons. Torture violates one of the world's most crucial human−rights protections, but responsibility doesn't end with the torturer. Transferring someone to face likely torture under another country's jurisdiction contravenes international law. We did not turn to the courts lightly. Beginning in 2002, when concerns emerged about Canadian troops handing prisoners over to U.S. forces in Afghanistan, we began pressing for a different approach. We were concerned that some of those prisoners would be sent to Guantanamo Bay and others possibly abused in U.S. detention facilities in Afghanistan. In 2005, the new policy of handing prisoners over to Afghan officials was adopted. But torture and other rights abuses have long been rampant in Afghan prisons − the new policy just replaced one problem with another. We continued to call for a better approach. We suggested Canada work with allies to develop a NATO detention facility, run in co−operation with Afghan officials, to train staff and improve prisons in the country. Our concerns and recommendations were dismissed. There was no choice: We had to go to court. We launched our court application in February, but we will likely not have a hearing for months. Meanwhile, transfers continue and many people will almost certainly be tortured. And when revelations and allegations of brutal torture of many transferred prisoners came forward last week in The Globe and Mail, we knew we could not wait. That is why we are asking the court to temporarily halt the practice, until the case is fully heard and resolved. Why are we doing this? The government dismisses our concerns with three arguments. First, the concerns about torture are dismissed as groundless and unproven. This position defies belief, in the face of the recent descriptions of torture in this newspaper and the well−established reality of torture in reports from sources that include the United Nations and the U.S. State Department.

AFGHANISTAN: IN THE COURTS Responsibility doesn't end with the torturer Until Canada receives 143 greate

Second, we are assured that there are processes in place to monitor the treatment of prisoners − but monitoring is not the answer when the risk of torture is so widespread. Torture is an insidious, secretive practice that can devastate body and soul within a few short minutes. There is ample time for torture to be inflicted between what would at best be occasional, brief visits from monitors. The solution is to eradicate the torture. It is impossible to have confidence in the current monitoring systems. It is clear that the processes have been exaggerated and misstated. At first, we were told the International Committee of the Red Cross would play that role, but the Red Cross itself said that was not the case. Then it was the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission, whose staff has made it abundantly clear they lack the necessary capacity, are unable to travel to some of the prisons, face security concerns and are unable to meet privately with prisoners. Third, we are told to save our breath because the prisoners are Taliban fighters, responsible for horrifying rights violations and not deserving of protection. Prime Minister Stephen Harper has alleged that those raising these concerns care more about the Taliban than about Canadian troops. Nothing could be further from the truth. Canada is in Afghanistan to restore security, promote rule of law and bolster human rights. Our troops need to be supported at all times to achieve those goals. That support must include policies and practices that ensure they are able to operate in ways that do not indirectly cause human−rights violations. Amnesty International has documented the Taliban's deadly record of rights violations for well over a decade and has always insisted that those responsible be brought to justice. But justice is not delivered through beatings or electric shocks. If we turn a blind eye to torture anywhere, we have essentially said we are willing to tolerate it everywhere. Surely we want to help create an Afghanistan free of torture. The best way to get there is to take a firm stand against today's abuses. We do so by refusing to be complicit in its commission and by working to improve Afghanistan's police and prison systems. That is why we are in court today. We are not being disloyal to the troops. We are certainly not apologists for the Taliban. We are insisting that in the end, Afghanistan's future will only be assured if universally protected rights standards truly flourish there. Canada's efforts should always, unequivocally, be directed to that goal. ALEX NEVE; Secretary−general of Amnesty International Canada JASON GRATL; president of the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association ADDED SEARCH TERMS: GEOGRAPHIC NAME: Afghanistan; Canada SUBJECT TERM:strife; defence; foreign policy; prisoners; human rights; justice ORGANIZATION NAME: Taliban; Armed Forces

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AFGHANISTAN: ON THE GROUND And torture doesn't end with monitoring PUBLICATION: IDN: DATE: PAGE: BYLINE: SECTION: EDITION: DATELINE: WORDS: WORD COUNT:

GLOBE AND MAIL 071230205 2007.05.03 A21 LEWIS MACKENZIE Comment Metro 862 898

LEWIS MacKENZIE Public interest in the capture of insurgents by Canadian soldiers began in January, 2002, with the front−page story in this newspaper of restrained Taliban fighters being unloaded from the back of a U.S. Hercules by soldiers from our elite JTF2 unit. Confusion reigned at the time when prime minister Jean Chretien assured the House of Commons that Canadians were not taking prisoners in Afghanistan. A few days later, it was acknowledged that we were. It was not surprising that the PM didn't know because in the interest of plausible deniability he probably wasn't told. What followed was politically driven, self−serving outrage over the fact we were turning detainees over to "Bush's army." The policy was changed and a new agreement was made to hand over prisoners to the Afghan authorities. Every subsequent agreement regarding detainees has addressed the issue of monitoring their condition while in Afghan custody. This might sound good but, in reality, it's of little consequence as it would not stop the mistreatment of prisoners. In 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006 the Canadian government − more specifically the Department of Foreign Affairs − received in−country reports on Afghanistan stating that prisoner abuse was prevalent throughout the myriad of Afghanistan's detention facilities. Further agreements were drafted and finalized by Foreign Affairs in close consultation with National Defence. Much has been made regarding the last formal agreement signed in December, 2005. That agreement, too, resulted from extensive collaboration over several months between DFAIT and DND, involving several divisions in both departments. Bill Graham, then the Liberal minister of defence, and senior staff at the Privy Council Office signed and approved the document. Parliamentary records confirm that the agreement was signed in Afghanistan by General Rick Hillier, the Chief of the Defence Staff, on behalf of the Canadian government, and by the Afghan Minister of Defence on behalf of the Afghan government. It is important to note that the 2005 agreement specifically cited the Third Geneva Convention in dealing with the treatment of detainees and highlighted the role of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in this regard. (Indeed, in the first three months of this year, the ICRC visited 34 detention locations in Afghanistan holding 6,955 detainees, following up on some 800 persons arrested in relation to the conflict. It is not clear, however, where those detained by Canada are being held.) The current flap emerged when Minister of Defence Gordon O'Connor indicated in the House that the ICRC was keeping Canada apprised of the conditions in the Afghan AFGHANISTAN: ON THE GROUND And torture doesn't end with monitoring

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prisons and their knowledge of any mistreatment of prisoners. In fact, a modest amount of such co−operation had taken place; however, it is not normally revealed in public lest the ICRC's effectiveness on the ground be compromised. The Minister's mistake was to share information with the House that is considered highly sensitive. If we're serious about improving the situation for detainees and protecting our own reputation, we need to face some facts. To start with, certainly, there is torture going on in some of the Afghan detention facilities. You don't change the interrogation techniques of the region in a decade, let alone overnight. Once you accept that, there are few practical options. Currently there is a deafening call for enhanced visitation rights and monitoring of the Afghan facilities by coalition countries' representatives. Such a move would have little effect. It's too easy to hide torture from civilian agencies and live−in monitors could easily be duped. As well, the entire system would likely grind to a halt as it became jammed by every prisoner protesting his treatment. Many would beat each other in order to have the bruises and breaks to "qualify" for intervention by the monitors. Then too, what happens if enhanced monitoring does confirm that torture is taking place. Do we admonish the senior officials in the institution? Do we try to convince Afghan President Hamid Karzai to remove them in spite of assurances from his own officials that there has been no torture? Do we cut off aid? Do we try to reclaim from the general prison population the detainees we turned over while other coalition partners leave the ones they captured there? None of the above would be effective. The fact is that if enhanced monitoring fails to ward off torture, and it probably will fail, Canada does not have a problem − NATO does! Canada cannot and should not operate unilaterally. The alliance, which to date has avoided the problem, needs to mobilize its diplomatic component and stop leaving the problem with its militaries. There are any number of NATO members who are not even close to pulling their weight in Afghanistan who could work together and take over an existing Afghan detention facility and operate it as a model and example to the emerging Afghan police/correctional service. Not an ideal solution, but one that might just be necessary in the interests of letting political leaders, diplomats and military commanders return to the task of rebuilding Afghanistan. LEWIS MacKENZIE, Retired major−general, first commander of UN peacekeeping forces in Sarajevo ADDED SEARCH TERMS: GEOGRAPHIC NAME: Canada; Afghanistan SUBJECT TERM:strife; defence; foreign policy; prisoners; human rights ORGANIZATION NAME: Armed Forces; Taliban

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GLOBE AND MAIL 071230189 2007.05.03 A20 PEGGY MASON Letter to the Edit Metro Kinburn, Ont. 80 112

Peggy Mason former Canadian Ambassador for Disarmament Kinburn, Ont. The UN Independent Expert on Human Rights in Afghanistan, Cherif Bassiouni, delivered a devastating report on conditions in Afghan prisons after travelling throughout the country in 2005 (Hillier Pushed Flawed Detainee Plan − May 2). It is a disgrace that NATO has not insisted on a countrywide detainee policy, in strict conformity with the Geneva Conventions, for all nations contributing to the NATO−led force, instead of leaving it up to each individual troop contributor to do as it sees fit. ADDED SEARCH TERMS: GEOGRAPHIC NAME: Afghanistan; Canada SUBJECT TERM:strife; prisoners; human rights ORGANIZATION NAME: Armed Forces; North Atlantic Treaty Organization

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Top soldier defends detainee deal IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030020 The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2007.05.03 Final World C4 Photo: CP / Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier puts aplayful headlock on Master ILLUSTRATION: Cpl. Mark Fedorchuk of Saskatoon Wednesday in Kandahar ; DATELINE: KANDAHAR, Afghanistan BYLINE: Jonathan Fowlie SOURCE: CanWest News Service WORD COUNT: 585 KANDAHAR, Afghanistan −− Canada's top soldier said Wednesday a Canadian detainee agreement may not have been enough to stop the torture of captives in Afghanistan. In an interview in Kandahar, however, Gen. Rick Hillier upheld that it was not a mistake for him to have signed the now−controversial accord back in 2005. "Truly, at the time we felt that was the right thing to do −− that we were comfortable with our approach and the involvement of the International Committee of the Red Cross, the Afghanistan government being required to live up to its commitments of course all were sufficient," Hillier said. "Obviously, we would reassess that as allegations come out that perhaps that was not sufficient," he added. "An investigation will determine whether there is substance to them and, of course, the government of Canada will make the agreement as effective as it possibly can." Hillier went on to say that signing the agreement was not a mistake, in part because it has allowed Canada to move forward with its mission. "It allowed us to . . . support the Afghan government, to help build their capacity to improve their country," he said. Hillier added that many soldiers he has spoken with since arriving in Afghanistan are angry the detainee issue is overshadowing the good work they feel they are doing in the country. "They are angry that these allegations have detracted from the overall mission here," he said, touting the accomplishments Canadians have made in Kandahar, and especially the Panjwaii region, thus far. "That kind of progress, that kind of stability, brought to an area that was a combat zone in October and November is just incredible," he said of the Panjwaii region, where Canadians fought in Operation Medusa last fall. "If we can bring that kind of stability to what really was thought to be the home of the Taliban . . . then surely we can do things around the rest of the country in an incredibly accelerated manner where they are not in that kind of strength." Top soldier defends detainee deal

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After landing in Afghanistan on Wednesday morning, Hillier met with Kandahar governor Asadullah Khalid, who continues to emphatically deny any allegations of detainee torture. "I'm sure it was not true at all," Khalid said of the allegations after the meeting with Hillier, going on to call them "enemy propaganda." "If this is true, if this happened, it is a crime and we should investigate this and we should bring these people to court and we should stop this," he added, saying his government hopes to release the details of its investigation into the matter very soon. Although Hillier spent most of his press conference Wednesday night addressing the detainee issue, his main business in Kandahar was to bring the Stanley Cup, and 19 ex−NHL hockey players, as a morale booster for the troops. Several soldiers had an opportunity Wednesday to have their picture taken with the legendary trophy and today a select few will be able to play ball hockey against the NHL players. "It's a tension breaker, it's a stress reliever," Hillier said, touting the importance of the game. "That connection to Canada, brought to our men and women here tells them that they are important they are appreciated that they are not forgotten and that they are not alone," he added. In a speech to some of the troops, Hillier said he is "proud" of them and what they are doing. "Canadians, as never before in my life and my time in uniform, support you," Hillier said, before letting the soldiers take their pictures with the cup. Hillier was joined at the event by several retired NHL players −− including Bob Probert, Rejean Houle, Tiger Williams and Dan Daoust −− as well as Vancouver Canucks owner Paolo Aquilini. Soon after Hillier's address, soldiers flocked to get their pictures taken with the cup. "This is a great morale booster," said Warrant Officer Martin Rousseau, a Canadiens fan originally from Montreal. "It's nice to see something like this," he added. Sgt. Leighton Hardy says he is a diehard Toronto Maple Leafs fan and was ecstatic to see the cup in Kandahar. "It's nice to see a piece of Canada come to us," he said, explaining he has been in Afghanistan since mid−October and is happy for the boost.

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Martin gov't signed off on Afghan detainee deal, leaked documents show IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030002 The StarPhoenix (Saskatoon) 2007.05.03 Final National D7 Photo: CNS File Photo / Gen. Rick Hillier (left) poses withformer prime minister Paul ILLUSTRATION: Martin ; DATELINE: OTTAWA BYLINE: Andrew Mayeda and Mike Blanchfield SOURCE: CanWest News Service WORD COUNT: 702 OTTAWA −− Former prime minister Paul Martin gave approval almost two years ago to then−defence minister Bill Graham to negotiate a detainee transfer agreement with the Afghanistan government, say government documents obtained by CanWest News Service. The revelation, contained in cabinet correspondence and Defence Department briefing notes, comes as the Harper government continues to face criticism over its conduct of the Afghanistan mission and allegations that detainees were abused after being transferred to Afghan authorities. The documents show that Martin, who has yet to speak publicly on the controversy, was briefed on the outlines of the agreement more than six months before it was signed. In a May 27, 2005, letter from Graham to Martin, the prime minister was told that Canada planned to negotiate an agreement with the Afghan government that spelled out "explicit undertakings" on how the detainees would be treated. The same day as the letter, Graham "authorized the Canadian Forces to seek arrangements with relevant authorities on the transfer of detainees," according to a Defence Department briefing note. "The prime minister concurred with this approach on 10 June, 2005," states the note. The documents appear to debunk a growing narrative in Ottawa's corridors of power that Gen. Rick Hillier, the chief of the defence staff, acted on his own and without proper government supervision when he signed the controversial detainee deal on behalf of the Canadian government in Kabul on Dec. 18, 2005. They also shed new light on how the former Liberal government crafted a deal that has become one of Prime Minister Stephen Harper's biggest political headaches since taking power, sparking daily calls for the resignation of Defence Minister Gordon O'Connor. The May 2005 letter states that Canada's new detainee policy "proceeds from the same premise" as strategic objectives approved by former prime minister Jean Chretien in November 2001. Chretien was the first prime minister to commit warships and special forces troops to the U.S.−led war on Martin gov't signed off on Afghan detainee deal, leaked documents show

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terrorism, one month after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States. The government planned to reach an agreement with Afghanistan under which detainees transferred by Canada would "be afforded treatment consistent with the standards set out in the Third Geneva Convention, regardless of the legal status of those detainees," the letter states. The letter, also sent to former foreign affairs minister Pierre Pettigrew, assures that information on detainees "will be passed along in a timely way" to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), "which has the mandate and resources to track prisoners of war and detainees captured during armed conflict." The letter does not specify whether the ICRC will report back to Canada on the condition of the detainees. O'Connor recently apologized for misleading Parliament about the role of the ICRC. He said it was reporting back to Canada, when that was not correct. On May 31, 2005, Graham and Hillier met Afghanistan Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the "possibility" of a bilateral "framework agreement," according to the briefing note. On July 28, Hillier sent Graham a letter asking for his approval "to include language in a proposed Military Technical Agreement with the government of Afghanistan concerning the Canadian Forces plans to negotiate a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees." Graham signed off on the plan. In the House of Commons Wednesday, the Conservative government faced another round of questioning about its handling of the Afghan detainee issue. The government has faced criticism that it has exposed prisoners to torture in Afghan prisons after they were transferred there by the Canadian military personnel, and that it has offered contradictory explanations about the issue. Harper told the Commons on Wednesday that Hillier did not act on his own when he signed the agreement. "It is my clear understanding that any such agreement would have required the approval of the Liberal cabinet ministers of the day." In Kandahar, Hillier told reporters Wednesday that he only signed the agreement after Foreign Affairs and the Defence Department took the lead on it. "They shaped the agreement. I signed it, first of all because I was here in Afghanistan when it was ready to be signed, in the presence of the ambassador, who of course would have signed it if I had not been here," Hillier said, adding that he was asked personally by Afghanistan's defence minister to put his name to the agreement. Unlike similar agreements reached by the Dutch and British governments, the Canadian deal did not contain a guarantee that Canadian officials could follow up on transferred detainees. The government has since negotiated a new agreement with Afghan authorities under which Canadian officials will have access to detainees after they are transferred. (Ottawa Citizen)

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GLOBE AND MAIL 071230188 2007.05.03 A20 HARRY RAYMOND Letter to the Edit Metro Toronto ONT 57 82

Harry Raymond Toronto The Globe has chosen to stir a tempest in a teapot about 30 detainees captured by the Canadian Forces in Afghanistan and transferred to the country's jailers. You have created an international outcry that will besmirch the army and Canada's citizens. The 30 detainees are alive and complaining. Canada's dead soldiers can say nothing. ADDED SEARCH TERMS: GEOGRAPHIC NAME: Afghanistan; Canada SUBJECT TERM:strife; prisoners; human rights ORGANIZATION NAME: Armed Forces; North Atlantic Treaty Organization

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The missed opportunity of the election that never came PUBLICATION: IDN: DATE: PAGE: BYLINE: SECTION: EDITION: DATELINE: WORDS: WORD COUNT:

GLOBE AND MAIL 071230187 2007.05.03 A21 LAWRENCE MARTIN Comment Column Metro 718 716

LAWRENCE MARTIN The people get their way. They didn't want a spring election. There won't be one. The country is thankfully spared. Only a month ago, the governing party was calling in the media and opening the doors to the granddaddy of all campaign headquarters − acres of new computers and TV studios and war rooms. With candidate schools and ad campaigns and the like, the Conservatives staged one of the biggest election buildups, sans election, ever. Preparations were so far down the line, many Tories were saying then, there could be no turning back. But turn back they did. They were at the post, and now they're off − back to the stables, leaving many to wonder whether they missed their best chance for the big win they so craved. They may never have the Liberals and Stephane Dion in as weakened a condition as they were to begin the year. They may never have Stephen Harper as strong as he was at that time. The reasons for the pullback seem obvious now. The budget has stirred up lots of opposition, as has their green plan and their handling of Afghanistan. But these are more recent developments. The optimum election time was earlier. "The time they really had us on the ropes," a senior Liberal strategist admitted the other day, "was back in February and March. That's when they could have nailed us to the wall." That's when, in retrospect, the luck of the Liberals struck. It was then that Quebec Premier Jean Charest, prompted by a couple of favourable polls, decided to call a provincial election. That campaign meant there could be no federal election. It closed the Conservatives' best window. After the Quebec campaign, the news turned grim for the Harper government and has grown grimmer since. A few days ago, Environment Minister John Baird, after having his green plan repudiated by Al Gore, told a friend: "This is one of the worst weeks I've ever had in my life." What's happening to the Harper government, says Senator David Smith, a veteran Liberal campaigner, is nothing new. Time, he said, exposes weaknesses in every government. The first year is always so much easier. Then it's never the same. John Diefenbaker fared well enough in his first year, as did Pierre Trudeau. Brian Mulroney kept the bellyachers at bay in his inaugural season and, in 1994, Jean Chretien was on cruise control. Ditto the Harper government. The PM got good reviews for his first year, and his party was brimming with confidence. Mr. The missed opportunity of the election that never came

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Dion was sinking fast, the Liberals had no election platform at the ready, morale was low and they were scared stiff. A well−executed campaign and Mr. Harper could very well have pushed the numbers into majority territory. Now, as they say in the business, all bets are off. Unless something strange happens, the earliest call to the polls − given an Ontario election in the fall − will be at the end of the year. Given that the Conservatives have already thrown many of their biggest policy punches, it's hard to see what they can put forward to carry them to support numbers substantially higher than what they reached. And given their origins on the right of the political spectrum, they face the handicap of having a considerably smaller voter pool to draw from than their Liberal opponents. Conditions have to be ideal − and how, they might wonder, can they get much better than they were in the late winter? The Conservatives can take some solace in knowing that, in not forcing an election, they have acted in the public interest. Canadians are relieved at not having to go through yet another campaign. They can also take solace in the fact that the Grits, stuck for months in the 30−per−cent zone of popularity, are hardly catching on themselves. In Question Period, most of their MPs are so deficient in memory skills that they have to read their questions from sheets of paper. And for every challenge they put forward to the government record, their own record is hurled back to haunt them. But there's no doubt they're breathing easier these days. The big scare came, and the big scare went. [email protected] ADDED SEARCH TERMS: GEOGRAPHIC NAME: Canada SUBJECT TERM:government; elections; political PERSONAL NAME: Stephane Dion; Stephen Harper ORGANIZATION NAME: Conservative Party of Canada; Liberal Party

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Martin approved a detainee policy; Cabinet correspondence; Negotiations for transfer agreement with Afghans IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: ILLUSTRATION: DATELINE: BYLINE: SOURCE: WORD COUNT:

200705030150 National Post 2007.05.03 National Canada A6 Black &White Photo: Corporal Brian Walsh / A member ofParachute Company, 3rd Battalion, leads an Afghan detainee from a residential compound north of Kabul in March. ; OTTAWA Andrew Mayeda and mike Blanchfield CanWest News Service, with files from James Cowan, NationalPost 820

OTTAWA − Former prime minister Paul Martin gave approval almost two years ago for then defence minister Bill Graham to negotiate a detainee transfer agreement with the Afghanistan government, say documents obtained by CanWest News Service. The revelation, contained in Cabinet correspondence and Defence Department briefing notes, comes as the Harper government continues to face heavy criticism over its conduct of the Afghanistan mission and allegations that detainees were abused after being transferred to Afghan authorities. The documents show that Mr. Martin, who has yet to speak publicly on the controversy, was briefed on the agreement more than six months before it was signed. In a May 27, 2005, letter from Mr. Graham to Mr. Martin, the then prime minister was told that Canada planned to negotiate an agreement with the Afghan government that spelled out "explicit undertakings" on how the detainees would be treated. The same day as the letter, Mr. Graham "authorized the Canadian Forces to seek arrangements with relevant authorities on the transfer of detainees," according to a Defence Department briefing note. "The Prime Minister concurred with this approach on 10 June 2005," states the note. The documents appear to debunk a growing narrative in Ottawa that General Rick Hillier, the Chief of the Defence Staff, acted on his own and without proper government supervision when he signed the controversial detainee deal on behalf of the Canadian government in Kabul on Dec. 18, 2005. They also shed new light on how the former Liberal government crafted a deal that has become Stephen Harper's biggest political headache since becoming Prime Minister, sparking daily calls for the resignation of Gordon O'Connor, Minister of National Defence. The May, 2005, letter states that Canada's new detainee policy "proceeds from the same premise" as strategic objectives approved by former prime minister Jean Chretien in November, 2001.

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Mr. Chretien was the first prime minister to commit warships and special forces commandos to the U.S.−led war on terrorism, one month after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States. The government planned to reach an agreement with Afghanistan under which detainees transferred by Canada would "be afforded treatment consistent with the standards set out in the Third Geneva Convention, regardless of the legal status of those detainees," the letter states. The letter, also sent to former foreign affairs minister Pierre Pettigrew, assures that information on detainees "will be passed along in a timely way" to the International Committee of the Red Cross, "which has the mandate and resources to track Prisoners of War and detainees captured during armed conflict." But the letter does not specify whether the ICRC will report back to Canada on the condition of the detainees. Mr. O'Connor recently apologized for misleading Parliament about the role of the ICRC. He said it was reporting back to Canada, when that was not correct. On May 31, 2005, Mr. Graham and Gen. Hillier met Afghanistan Foreign Minister Abdullah Abdullah to discuss the "possibility" of a bilateral "framework agreement," according to the briefing note. On July 28, Gen. Hillier sent Mr. Graham a letter asking for his approval "to include language in a proposed Military Technical Agreement with the Government of Afghanistan concerning the Canadian Forces plans to negotiate a bilateral agreement on the treatment of detainees." Mr. Graham signed off on the plan. In the House of Commons yesterday, the Conservative government faced another round of relentless questioning about its handling of the Afghan detainee issue. The government has faced criticism that it has exposed prisoners to torture in Afghan prisons after being transferred there by the Canadian military personnel, and that it has offered contradictory explanations about the issue. Mr. Harper told the House yesterday that Gen. Hillier did not act on his own when he signed the agreement. "It is my clear understanding that any such agreement would have required the approval of the Liberal Cabinet ministers of the day." Alain Pellerin, executive director of the Conference of Defence Associations and a retired colonel, said a "reliable source" had told him that the Department of Foreign Affairs had been intimately involved in the creation of the detainee transfer agreement. Indeed, the creation of the document had been the result of "intense collaboration" between the Department of National Defence and at least three different divisions within Foreign Affairs, Mr. Pellerin said. "When you have to deal with a foreign nation, Foreign Affairs has the lead," he said. Meanwhile, in Kandahar, Gen. Hillier said he only signed the agreement after Foreign Affairs and the Defence Department controlled it. "They shaped the agreement. I signed it, first of all because I was here in Afghanistan when it was ready to be signed, in the presence of the ambassador, who of course would have signed it if I had not been here," Gen. Hillier said, adding that he was asked personally by Afghanistan's defence minister to put his name to the agreement. Gen. Hillier was well known to Afghan officials because he had commanded NATO forces in Kabul a year earlier.

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Unlike similar agreements reached by the Dutch and British governments, the Canadian deal did not contain a guarantee that Canadian officials could follow up on transferred detainees. The government has since negotiated a new agreement with Afghan authorities under which Canadian officials will have access to detainees after they are transferred. KEYWORDS: POLITICIANS; POLITICAL PARTIES; GOVERNMENT; CANADA

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CUP FEVER! Hockey night in Kandahar IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030115 The Hamilton Spectator 2007.05.03 Final Local A1 Photo: Ryan Remiorz, the Canadian Press / That gleamingsymbol of hockey glory, the Stanley Cup, usually visits war zones like hockey stadiums. Yesterday, it invaded ILLUSTRATION: Kandahar, Afghanistan −− guarded by Private Martin Larochelle, left, and Corporal Mathieu Poulin of the Van Doos. Former NHL players took the cup there on a mission to boost the morale of war−weary Canadian troops. ; SOURCE: The Hamilton Spectator COPYRIGHT: © 2007 Torstar Corporation WORD COUNT: 4 NO TEXT

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Hillier 'comfortable' signing prisoner deal IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE: ILLUSTRATION: DATELINE: SOURCE: COPYRIGHT: WORD COUNT:

200705030107 The Hamilton Spectator 2007.05.03 Final Canada/World A3 Photo:; KANDAHAR, Afghanistan The Canadian Press © 2007 Torstar Corporation 177

Canada's chief of defence staff is defending his decision to sign a controversial prisoner−exchange agreement with the Afghan government. General Rick Hillier said yesterday he was comfortable when he signed the deal in 2005 that it included the necessary safeguards. He says it allowed the Canadian Forces to support the Afghan government and help rebuild the country and its security forces. The deal, which did not allow Canadian officials to monitor detainees, has come under fire amid allegations that prisoners handed over by Canadian troops were tortured in Afghan jails. Hillier concedes that if the allegations are true, the deal will need to be amended, but that work is being led by the Department of Foreign Affairs. In Ottawa today, lawyers for human rights groups will ask a federal judge to grant an injunction halting the transfer of captured Taliban fighters from the Canadian army to Afghan authorities. Stockwell Day may have given the groups some unexpected ammunition. The public safety minister's acknowledgment that Canadian correctional officers heard allegations of torture by Afghan officials appears to contradict one of the principal arguments federal lawyers will make in reply.

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Gift of light honours Nicola; Soldier's parents launch solar aid project in Papua New Guinea IDNUMBER PUBLICATION: DATE: EDITION: SECTION: PAGE:

200705030098 The Hamilton Spectator 2007.05.03 Final Canada/World A7 Photo: Jeff Mcintosh, the Canadian Press / Nicola's parents,Sally and Tim Goddard are ILLUSTRATION: honouring her memory with a charitable aid project. ; Photo: Captain Nicola Goddard ; DATELINE: CALGARY BYLINE: Bill Graveland SOURCE: The Canadian Press COPYRIGHT: © 2007 Torstar Corporation WORD COUNT: 594 Out of the darkness of their daughter's death in Afghanistan a year ago, the family of Captain Nicola Goddard has found some light to shine in the country of her birth. Goddard died May 17, 2006, in a grenade attack by Taliban insurgents. A member of the 1st Regiment of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, she was Canada's first female combat soldier to die in battle. The young captain was described as an outstanding leader and caring friend by her comrades and as a loving daughter by her parents. Yesterday would have been her 27th birthday. "In a perfect world, we'd obviously just prefer to be sitting down and cutting a cake," said Tim Goddard as he and his wife, Sally, launched an aid project in Papua New Guinea to honour their daughter. Under the program, solar−powered lighting systems will replace hazardous kerosene lamps in nearly 2,000 first−aid posts across the island nation. In a country close to the equator, it is dark 12 hours a day which makes the gift unique. "We decided that it would be better to do it on her birthday rather than her death day," said Sally Goddard. "We want to remember. We don't want to wallow and if we can make this a positive outcome ... (if) we can help a country, then something good is coming out of this (her daughter's death). Because there's not a heck of a lot else that's coming out of it that's good." The Goddards met and married in Papua New Guinea, an impoverished country off the northeast coast of Australia, while they were working as teachers with community leaders building new schools. Nicola was born there and resided there until she was three. It's a project that Nicola would have approved of, say the Goddards, and makes the first birthday without her a little easier to get through.

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"It's bittersweet, obviously... but you can't change what's happened, right?" said her father. "How do you make the best of it? How do you find something positive in something so awful? I think of the other 53 people and their families, and every day of the year there's somebody going through this." The Goddards were in Papua New Guinea when it was just achieving independence from Australia. In a country where 80 per cent of its six− million people live in rural areas, the solar lights will make a major difference, according to Evan Paki, Papua New Guinea's ambassador to North America. "A lot of the aid posts operate simply from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. If somebody comes at 6 p.m., they would say 'Sorry,' because there are no lighting fixtures to administer medical treatment," he said. "I'm sure that she (Nicola) would have wanted to go back if she had remained alive today. I think it's very fitting that we honour a legacy and try to achieve a part of a dream by launching this project." With the Canadian death toll continuing to rise in Afghanistan, the Goddards hope the government makes an informed decision when it comes time to decide whether to extend Canada's tour of duty there past 2009. But whatever that decision, a kinship with the families of other soldiers who have died in the line of duty has made something very clear to the Goddards. "There's not been one set of parents or friends of the fallen soldiers who has not believed, as we believed, and Nicola believed, that they were doing the right thing and they were there doing good work," said Tim Goddard, who has met many other grieving soldiers' parents across the country. "It's the club you don't want to be in and you can't volunteer to be part of it. It's your kids that get you in it."

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Stanley Cup brings joy to Canadian soldiers PUBLICATION: DATE: PAGE: SECTION: WORD COUNT:

WINNIPEG FREE PRESS 2007.05.03 A10 Canada Wire 191

CNS KANDAHAR, Afghanistan −− Canada's top soldier arrived in Kandahar on Wednesday morning with a special treat for troops: the Stanley Cup. "Canadians, as never before in my life and my time in uniform, support you," Gen. Rick Hillier told the troops at the camp for Canada's provincial reconstruction team, giving a rousing motivational speech as he unveiled the cup. "The difference you have made in this province and the difference you will continue to make for the people that live here is absolutely incredible," he added. "I am proud of you." Hillier was joined by several retired NHL players −− including Bob Probert, Rejean Houle and Dan Daoust −− as well as Vancouver Canucks owner Paolo Aquilini. Soon after Hillier's address, soldiers flocked to the stage at the small Kandahar City base to get their pictures taken with the legendary trophy. "This is a great morale booster," said Warrant Officer Martin Rousseau, a Canadiens fan originally from Montreal. "It's nice to see something like this," he added. Sgt. Leighton Hardy says he is a diehard Toronto fan and was ecstatic to see the cup in Kandahar. "It's nice to see a piece of Canada come to us," he said, explaining he has been in Afghanistan since mid−October and is happy for the boost. −− CanWest News Service {Kandahar AFGHANISTAN}

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