Table of Contents - Northwest Christian University

Table of Contents - Northwest Christian University

2015-20016 Table of Contents Table of Contents 1 Academic Calendars ...

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2015-20016

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

1

Academic Calendars .................................................................................. i-iii

2

Welcome from the President....................................................................... v

3

Introduction ............................................................................................. 1-6

4

NCU Faculty, Staff & Trustees ................................................................ 7-12

5

Traditional Undergraduate Admission................................................. 13-18

6

Adult Studies Admission ...................................................................... 19-20

7

Graduate Program Admission .............................................................. 21-25

8

Student Finances .................................................................................. 27-44

9

Registration & Academic Policies ........................................................ 45-65

10

Student Development .......................................................................... 67-70

11

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study ................................. 71-122

12

Adult Degree Programs of Study ..................................................... 123-149

13

Graduate Programs of Study ........................................................... 151-161

14

Course Descriptions ......................................................................... 163-228

15

Index................................................................................................. 229-230

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Academic Calendars

2015-2016 Traditional Undergraduate Academic Calendar Fall Semester Classes begin ........................................................................................ August 26, 2015 Labor Day holiday ............................................................................ September 7, 2015 Last day to add or drop classes ....................................................... September 8, 2015 Last day to declare P/NP ................................................................. September 8, 2015 Embrace the City Day (No Afternoon Classes) .............................. September 30, 2015 Mid-semester holiday........................................................................... October 9, 2015 Last day to withdraw .......................................................................... October 30, 2015 Reserved registration for juniors/seniors ..................................... November 2-4, 2015 Registration for next semester .................................................... November 5-25, 2015 Thanksgiving holiday ................................................................. November 26-27, 2015 Academic Creativity & Excellence Day (No morning classes)........... December 1, 2015 Last day of classes ............................................................................ December 4, 2015 Final examinations....................................................................... December 7-11, 2015 Commencement services ............................................................... December 11, 2015 Spring Semester Classes begin ....................................................................................... January 11, 2016 Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday ............................................................ January 18, 2016 Last day to add or drop classes ........................................................... January 22, 2016 Last day to declare P/NP .................................................................... January 22, 2016 Last day to withdraw ............................................................................. March 18, 2016 Spring break..................................................................................... March 21-25, 2016 Good Friday holiday............................................................................... March 25, 2016 Reserved registration for juniors/seniors ................................. March 30-April 1, 2016 Registration for next semester ............................................................. April 4-22, 2016 Academic and Creativity Excellence Day ..................................................April 27, 2016 Last day of classes ....................................................................................April 29, 2016 Final examinations................................................................................... May 2-6, 2016 Baccalaureate services ............................................................................... May 6, 2016 Commencement services ........................................................................... May 7, 2016 Summer Semester Session 1 Classes begin .............................................................................................. May 9, 2016 Last day to drop classes ............................................................................ May 16, 2016 Last day to declare P/NP ......................................................................... May 16, 2016 Memorial Day holiday .............................................................................. May 30, 2016 Last day to withdraw ................................................................................ June 10, 2016 Last day of classes ....................................................................................... July 1, 2016 Session 2 Independence Day Holiday.......................................................................... July 4, 2016 Classes begin ............................................................................................... July 5, 2016 Last day to drop classes ............................................................................. July 12, 2016 Last day to declare P/NP .......................................................................... July 12, 2016 Last day to withdraw .............................................................................. August 5, 2016 Last day of classes ................................................................................ August 26, 2016 i

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Academic Calendars

2015-2016 Academic Calendar for Adult Degree Program (ADP) and Graduate Programs

Fall 2015 August 24, 2015 - December 11, 2015 Registration Begins Admission Deadline Registration Deadline Decision Date for Class Cancellations Classes Begin Labor Day Holiday (no classes) Last Day to Drop/Declare Pass/No Pass Last Day to Withdraw Thanksgiving Holiday (no classes) Academic Creativity and Excellence Day Classes End Commencement

Session 1 8 Week 1

Session 2 8 Week 2

8/24/15 - 10/16/15 7/6/2015 8/10/2015 8/10/2015 8/10/2015 8/24/2015 9/7/2015 8/31/2015 9/25/2015

10/19/15 - 12/11/15 7/6/2015 10/5/2015 10/5/2015* 10/5/2015 10/19/2015

10/16/2015

Spring 2016 January 11, 2016 - May 7, 2016 Registration Begins Admission Deadline Registration Deadline Decision Date for Class Cancellations Classes Begin Martin Luther King Day Holiday (no classes Last Day to Drop/Declare Pass/No Pass Spring Break Last Day to Withdraw Academic Creativity and Excellence Day Classes End Commencement

8 Week 1

8 Week 2

1/11/16-3/4/16 10/26/2015 12/24/2015 12/24/2015 12/24/2015 1/11/2016 1/18/2016 1/19/2016

3/7/16-5/6/16 10/26/2015 2/22/2016 2/22/2016* 2/22/2016 3/7/2016

2/12/2016 3/4/2016

ii

10/26/2015* 11/20/2015 11/26 – 11/27 12/1/2015 12/11/2015 12/11/2015

3/14/2016* 3/21 – 3/25 4/15/2016 4/27/2016 5/6/2016 5/7/2016

2015-20016

Academic Calendars

Summer 2016

8 Week 1

8 Week 2

May 9, 2016 - August 26, 2016 5/9/16-7/1/2016 7/5/2016-8/26/2016 Registration Begins 3/21/2016 3/21/2016 Admission Deadline 4/22/2016 6/23/2016 Registration Deadline 4/22/2016 6/23/2016* Decision Date for Class Cancellations 4/22/2016 6/23/2016 Independence Day Holiday 7/4/2016 Classes Begin 5/9/2016 7/5/2016 Last Day to Drop/Declare Pass No Pass 5/16/2016 7/12/2016* Memorial Day Holiday 5/30/2016 Last Day to Withdraw 6/10/2016 8/5/2016 Classes End 7/1/2016 8/26/2016 Commencement See 2015/2016 December Commencement * students who register in session one for the entire semester must petition with an academic advisor to add or drop classes in session 2 after the session one drop deadline. Petition fees may apply.

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Welcome

A Welcome from the President: Joe Womack Northwest Christian University is a Christ-centered learning community grounded in an appreciation for the liberal arts within a biblical context. For nearly 120 years the NCU campus has been characterized by a unique faculty-student relationship that moves beyond the mere acquisition of information and technical expertise. We believe the best of what we do is manifest in the molding of a college experience that promises superb career preparation within an environment that champions Christ and inspires service in the Church, community, and family. An education at NCU gives students the proficiencies and habits of a well-educated person: the ability to think critically and evaluatively, communicate effectively, work collaboratively, and employ a real sense of purpose in this world. Your experience here, whether you enroll as an undergraduate, adult learner, or graduate student will be richest when you fully engage all NCU has to offer. Please take the time to explore this catalog for a glimpse of the NCU experience through the descriptions of our challenging academic programs and opportunities for personal and spiritual growth. If you are already a member of the NCU community I’m sure you share my enthusiasm for this unique and vibrant institution. If you are a prospective student, parent, educator or pastor, allow me the chance to offer my most sincere greeting on behalf of all of us here at Northwest Christian University.

Blessings,

Dr. Joseph Womack

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Introduction

An Introduction to Northwest Christian University



The Mission, Vision, & Core Themes of NCU



Mission NCU is a University that fosters wisdom, faith and service through excellent academic programs within a Christ-centered community.

Vision

Demonstrate academic excellence by providing quality library and learning resources and academic support services; Demonstrate commitment to excellence in Christian higher education by offering extraand co-curricular activities that complement and enhance scholarship and the integration of faith and learning.

Core Theme 2: Exercise Faithful Stewardship Objectives: Exercising stewardship for sustainability is measurable by the extent to which we achieve the following objectives: • Maintain a fiscally sound educational environment which supports and sustains faculty, staff, and students at every stage of the learning process; • Operate from a position of financial strength and quality facilities; • Achieve steady growth in the development and advancement of donors, donor relations, annual giving, capital funds, endowments, and scholarships; • Increase student enrollment in traditional undergraduate, nontraditional, and graduate programs.

NCU aspires to be a University characterized by its commitment to equip students to discover and answer God's calling in their lives.

Core Themes NCU achieves this vision through academic excellence and faithful stewardship in a Christcentered community that develops purposeful graduates. Our core themes are the following: 1. Manifest Excellence in Christian Higher Education 2. Exercise Faithful Stewardship 3. Foster Life-transformation in Christcentered Community 4. Develop Purposeful Graduates Core Theme 1: Manifest Excellence in Christian Higher Education Objectives: Excellence in Christian higher education at NCU is measurable by the extent to which we achieve the following objectives: • Demonstrate commitment to the authority of the Bible as Holy Scripture; • Demonstrate academic excellence by recruiting, supporting, and retaining qualified faculty; • Demonstrate academic excellence by developing, assessing, improving, and resourcing approved academic programs;

Core Theme 3: Foster Life-transformation in Christ-centered Community Objectives: Fostering life-transformation in Christ-centered community is measurable by the extent to which we achieve the following objectives: • Provide an on-campus Christ-centered community that fosters spiritual, social, leadership, and physical development for all members of the community; • Create partnerships among faculty, staff, churches, and community partners that support 1

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Introduction

In the 1990s, Northwest Christian College began to expand its curriculum beyond ministerial training which had been the major emphasis through most of the twentieth century. By the outset of the twenty-first century, in addition to the continued emphasis upon biblical studies and Christian ministry, the institution offered a broad range of academic programs – undergraduate, graduate, and degree completion – in the liberal arts, teacher education and counseling, and business and management. In recognition of the growth and expansion of curriculum and facilities, Northwest Christian College changed its name to Northwest Christian University on July 1, 2008.

the life-transforming experience of students; Provide a supportive environment that addresses the specific needs of nontraditional adult students.

Core Theme 4: Develop Purposeful Graduates Objectives: Developing purposeful graduates is measurable by the extent to which we achieve the following objectives: • Provide an environment that encourages and trains students towards the practical application of new skills and knowledge; • Provide opportunities for students to investigate and learn about God's calling upon their lives; • Equip students to fulfill their calling in their chosen careers, as well as in their service to God and the world.

Northwest Christian University is the faithful heir of the pioneer conviction that led to the institution’s establishment in 1895.

Church Relationships and Theological Context NCU is closely affiliated with the churches that make up the so-called Stone-Campbell Movement. In particular, the historical roots of NCU lie in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and the Christian Churches/Churches of Christ. Since its beginnings the University has shared human resources with these churches; in return these churches generously support the University with prayers and encouragement, student referrals, financial contributions, and representation on its governing board. Many of the ministers of these congregations and a large number of lay leaders in the Pacific Northwest are alumni of NCU.

The History of NCU History of Our Name: From Divinity School to College to University In 1895 Eugene Divinity School was established adjacent to the University of Oregon campus in order to provide courses in Bible and Christian ministry while allowing students the use of extensive resources at the state institution. The name of the college was changed to Eugene Bible University in 1908; in 1930 the name changed again, to Eugene Bible College.

Due to this Stone-Campbell Movement heritage, NCU also has a strong ecumenical interest. The University offers its resources to students and congregations from virtually every tradition of the Church – locally, nationally, and globally.

On May 10, 1934 Eugene Bible College merged with Spokane University. Established in 1912, Spokane University was forced to close its doors in 1933 as a result of financial difficulties. Following this merger, the name of the institution was changed to Northwest Christian College.

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Introduction

earth is essentially, intentionally and constitutionally one”. Another pioneer, Barton Stone, spoke of Christian unity being the “polar star”. The “Christian” movement was a movement for unity within the fragmented and often hostile and competitive church environment of that time but ultimately became a separate movement. Today there are different conceptions of how Christian unity might be understood and achieved. These range from: commitment to the ecumenical movement, with some involved in dialogue and negotiation with other church families; a belief that there is already an underlying God-given unity despite apparent division; to those who feel that they have discovered what the church should be like and that unity will come through others recognizing this and joining with them.

Characteristics of Our Churches1 The family of churches known as Christian Churches, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), and Churches of Christ grew out of an early 19th Century movement with origins in both the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Today there are congregations related to this Christian World Communion in more than 178 countries. Today, in any Christian World Communion there is great diversity in belief and practice; however, there are also many features of each family that are shared by the whole church of Jesus Christ. What follows is an attempt to create an overall but simple picture of who the Churches of Christ and Christian Churches are. Thus, it needs to be read as a whole. It also needs to be read with the understanding that no attempt is being made to separate this family from the church of Christ universal but rather to describe its place within the whole church.

Commitment to Evangelism and Mission For the Christian Churches and Churches of Christ, unity was never an end in itself. Its desirability came out of the understanding “that the world could be won only if the church became one”. Today that commitment is shown both by emphasizing the need for personal commitment to Jesus Christ and by a concern for peace and justice for all people. Many achieve a balance between these two emphases but often one is emphasized over the other.

It is possible to choose ten major characteristics of the churches that comprise this common heritage:  A concern for Christian Unity  A commitment to Evangelism and Mission  An emphasis on the centrality of the New Testament  A simple Confession of Faith  Believers’ Baptism  Weekly Communion  A Biblical Name  Congregational Autonomy  Lay Leadership  Diversity/Freedom/Liberty

New Testament Emphasis Christian Churches and Churches of Christ are “People of The Book.” They believe that unity can be achieved by “restoring” the New Testament Church—stripping away the accumulation of traditions that brought about division. The authority was the scriptures—not the church. Many still prefer to be referred to as the “Restoration Movement”. Other Christian Churches have difficulty accepting that the New Testament provides a clear unified model for the church. They believe that the

A Concern for Christian Unity In the 1808 “Declaration and Address” Thomas Campbell wrote that the “Church of Christ on 1

“Characteristics of Our Churches” is adapted from a statement prepared by Lorraine & Lyndsay Jacobs, former General Secretaries of the World Convention of Churches of Christ, and is used by permission.

The text may also be found at the World Convention of Churches of Christ website: www.worldconvention.org.

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Introduction

church must also be open to God’s present word measured against the biblical revelation. All members of Churches of Christ and Christian Churches would describe themselves as “biblical” but interpretation of that varies greatly.

church) of Christ, Christian Church or Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). There are also congregations within uniting churches in many areas and countries.

Congregational Autonomy Members of Churches of Christ and Christian Churches live under the authority of Christ, but this authority is seen as being worked out in the local congregation. For many this congregational autonomy is absolute; others guard their autonomy jealously but have established ways of working together; many are organized in regions and/or nationally but still with a very large degree of congregational autonomy. Globally there is very limited organization. Some countries have nationally organized; these countries cooperate through the “Disciples Ecumenical Consultative Council”. The World Convention of Churches of Christ is a global fellowship which endeavors to build up fellowship and understanding within the whole family.

Simple Confession of Faith From Matthew 16:16 comes the cornerstone question for church membership in the Christian Church or Church of Christ: “Do you believe that Jesus is the Christ and accept him as your Lord and Savior?” An affirmative answer is all that is required for membership, though many congregations now have membership classes. This simple question avoided the use of (often divisive) creeds. Many today do not make any use of creeds; others use them as a means of expressing faith—but within the Christian Church or Church of Christ creeds are not used as a test of faith.

Believers’ Baptism Within the Church of Christ only people who have reached an age where they can make their own confession of faith are baptized. The means of baptism is always immersion. Many congregations will now accept (by transfer) into membership those who become church members through other traditions; other congregations are adamant that believers’ baptism is essential. Baptisteries—for immersion—are features of worship facilities.

Lay Leadership

Again, believing that they follow the New Testament model, Christian Churches and Churches of Christ celebrate communion or “The Lord’s Supper” each Sunday.

Belief in the “Priesthood of all Believers” is a mark of all Christian Churches and Churches of Christ. Within the churches this belief is referred to as a “mutual ministry.” Participation by lay people in all aspects of the church’s life is a notable feature. Lay people conduct the sacraments. Women and men are seen as equal by many parts of the family, but others see distinct roles for men and women. Despite the emphasis on lay ministry, there exists within the church an employed and trained ministry, though recognition of this varies from a “paid member” to an expectation of special leadership.

Biblical Name

Diversity

Members of the emerging 19th Century Movement wanted to be known only as “Christians” or “Disciples of Christ”. Slogans such as “Christians only—but not the only Christians” and “Biblical names for Biblical people” captured this emphasis. Congregations use names such as Church (or Churches or

“In essentials unity, in nonessentials liberty, and in all things love” is the best known slogan in our family. Christian Churches and Churches of Christ have always allowed for diversity and much of that diversity has been enriching. Diversity also allows for the possibility of intolerance and division and that unfortunately

Weekly Communion

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Introduction

has been part of our experience. This Christian family is left with the challenge of finding for itself the unity-in-diversity it seeks for the whole church of Jesus Christ.

professional studies. Members are eligible to apply for scholarships, submit literary and academic works for publication, and attend academic conferences. The international motto is ΣΤΔ, Sincerity, Truth, Design. Graduating seniors are entitled to wear a crimson and black honor cord at commencement.

NCU Memberships  Online Consortium of Independent Colleges and Universities (OCICU)  Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU)  Oregon Independent Colleges Association (OICA)  Council of Independent Colleges (CIC)

Lambda Pi Eta Lambda Pi Eta, founded in 1985, is the official communication studies honor society of the National Communication Association (NCA). Lambda Pi Eta became a part of the National Communication Association in 1988, and the official honor society of the NCA in July 1995. The three Greek words that form the name of the society represent what Aristotle described in his book, Rhetoric, as the three ingredients of persuasion: Lambda means logos or logic, Pathos means emotion, and Ethos means character credibility or trustworthiness and ethics. Graduating students may wear a red and white honor cord at commencement.

Honor Societies Sigma Beta Delta Sigma Beta Delta, the international honor society for Business Management and Administration, was established in 1994 to recognize outstanding scholarship by students enrolled in institutions that have regional accreditation. The principles of Sigma Beta Delta are represented by three Greek words, the initials of which form the name of the society,  Sigma is the initial letter of the Greek word  which means wisdom. Beta is the initial letter of the Greek word , which signifies honor. Delta is the initial letter of the Greek word  which signifies the pursuit of meaningful aspirations. The NCU chapter of Sigma Beta Delta was established in November 2006 and resides in the School of Business and Management. The top 20 percent of students (traditional undergraduate, professional studies program undergraduate, and graduate), who have completed at least half of their major, are invited to lifetime membership. Graduating students may wear a green and gold honor cord at commencement.

NCU Accreditation & Educational Philosophy Accreditation NCU is regionally accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU). The association accredits the universities and colleges both public and private in the Northwest. NCU is authorized as a degree-granting institution by The Office of Degree Authorization, Oregon State Board of Licensure. Degree programs in business and management are further accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE). Teacher education and school counseling programs are approved by the Oregon State Teachers Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC). NCU is approved by the U.S. Department of Justice, Immigration, and Naturalization Service for international and non-immigrant students. Programs at NCU are approved for the use of veteran’s benefits.

Sigma Tau Delta Sigma Tau Delta is the international honor society for English and a member of the Association of College Honor Societies. The society’s central purpose is to confer distinction upon students of the English language and literature in undergraduate, graduate, and 5

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Introduction

do as we seek to be one of America’s great Christian liberal arts universities and live out faithfully our vision, mission, and values.

Educational Philosophy NCU is a community of higher learning in which faculty and students strive together for knowledge, understanding, and meaning in relation to the life and teachings of Jesus Christ. The Christian quest for truth relates to all aspects of the liberal arts and sciences, including the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Physical and Life Sciences. The institutional framework and objectives of this community recognize the individual and his/her need for biblical faith, intellectual development, personal effectiveness, and social awareness.

With that commitment, we embrace a continuous and institution-wide strategy of assessing and improving the effectiveness of our programs and activities.

NCU seeks to create learning situations, both in and out of the classroom, where students will have the opportunity to discover their potential and consider their relationships with the many environments of their world. Such learning situations require biblical and general studies be integrated effectively and meaningfully to the issues and needs of society. The faculty assumes that the learning process involves the active participation of students; this participation will increase the student’s capacity to think critically and responsibly in an environment of openness, freedom of expression, and respect for one another. As a Christian liberal arts university, NCU offers a variety of courses of study, ranging from preparation for the ministry to professional programs in business management and teacher education; to liberal arts degrees in areas such as psychology and speech communication; to graduate degree programs in business, education, school counseling, and professional counseling. The University seeks to provide an education that equips men and women for a variety of vocations and professions, while grounding all of its degrees in biblical studies and Christian values. Resolution of Commitment to Excellence and the Assessment of Institutional Effectiveness We, the faculty, staff, and administration of NCU, are committed to excellence in all that we 6

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Faculty, Staff, and Trustees

NCU Faculty Full-Time Faculty John Paul Allee, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., University of Southern Maine, 2005; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 2011. (Since 2015) Michael Bollenbaugh, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Biblical Studies B.A., San Jose Christian College, 1975; M.A., Lincoln Christian Seminary, 1978; B.A., Northwest Nazarene College, 1980; M.A., University of Calgary, 1987; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1994. (Since 1994) Brian Carrigan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics and Mathematics B.S., Villanova University, 1977; M.A., Washington University, 1982; Ph.D., Washington University, 1987. (Since 2015) Abraham Cazares-Cervantes, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Counseling B.A., Central Washington University, 2005; M.S., Central Washington University, 2009; Ph.D., Oregon State University, 2014. (Since 2014) Lanta Davis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English B.A., South Dakota State University, 2004; M.A., North American Baptist Seminary, 2006; Ph.D., Baylor University, 2013. (Since 2013) Troy Dean, M.A., Campus Pastor and Assistant Professor of Christian Ministry B.S., California Polytechnic University, 1991; M.A., Hope International University, 1995. (Since 2010) Karen De Young, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music B.A., Azusa Pacific University, 1984; M.A., Liberty University, 2013. (2013) Peter Diffenderfer, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of Business Department; Professor of Business B.S., State University of New York at Cortland, 1973; M.S., University of Oregon, 1975; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1986. (Since 2014) Scott Gallagher-Starr, M.L.S., Instruction/Reference Librarian; Assistant Professor B.S., Oregon State University, 1989; M.L.S., Syracuse University, 2000. (Since 2007) Steven Goetz, Ph.D., Professor of History and Philosophy B.A., Portland State University, 1975; M.A., Portland State University, 1979; M.A.R., George Fox University, 1979; M.Phil., Drew University, 1984; Ph.D., Drew University, 1986. (Since 2007) Gene James, Ph.D., Dean of Counseling and Education B.A., The Evergreen State College, 2001; M.S., Oregon State University, 2003; Ph.D., Oregon State University, 2007. (Since 2013) Brian Kaelin, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Teacher Education; Program Director of Master of Education B.A., Biola University, 1989; M.A., San Jose State University, 2007; Ed.D., George Fox University, 2013. (Since 2007) Johnny Lake, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Teacher Education B.S., Willamette University; M.Ed., University of Oregon, 2006; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 2011. (Since 2011) Stacey Lewis, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business; Director, Adult Degree Program in Accounting B.A., Harding University, 1995; M.B.A., Harding University, 2007. (Since 2014) Marilyn Montgomery, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Counseling M.Ed, University of Houston, 1979; PhD., Texas Tech University, 1992; M.Ed, Texas Tech University, 1995. (Since 2015) Dennis R. Lindsay, Dr. Theol., Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the School of Bible, Arts and Sciences; Professor of Biblical Studies 7

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Faculty, Staff, and Trustees

B.A., Lincoln Christian College, 1978; M.A., Lincoln Christian Seminary, 1980; M.A., University of Illinois, 1985; Dr. Theology, Eberhard-Karls Universitat, 1991. (Since 2000) Heike McNeil, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry B.S., Linfield College, 1996; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 2000. (Since 2002) Brian J. Mills, M.A., Assistant Professor of Humanities; Director of Assessment B.A., University of Oregon, 2003; M.A., Westminster Seminary California, 2005. (Since 2009) Vivian Moen, M.Ed., Associate Professor and Chair of Teacher Education B.S., Springfield College, 1975; B.E., University of Toronto, 1975; M.Ed., University of Toronto, 1995. (Since 2004) Terrence O’Casey, D.Min., Associate Professor of Christian Ministry B.A., Hope International University, 1979; M.A., Fuller Theological Seminary, 1982; D. Min., George Fox University, 2005. (Since 2007) Keith Potter, D.D., Executive Director for the Center for Leadership and Ethics (CLE); Assistant Professor of Christian Ministries and Leadership B.S., Northwest Christian College, 1984; M.Div., Fuller Theological Seminary, 1991; D.D., Northwest Christian University, (2011). (Since 2014) David Quirk, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business and Management B.S., Florida State University, 1989; M.B.A., Strayer University, 1996. (Since 2007) Steve Silver, M.L.S., Director of Kellenberger Library; Associate Professor B.S., Northwest Christian College, 1987; M.Mus., University of Oregon, 1997; M.L.S., Emporia State University, 2006. (Since 1995) Nani Skaggs, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology B.S., George Mason University, 1990; M.A., George Mason University, 1993; Ph.D., George Mason University, 1996. (Since 2009) Doyle Srader, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Speech and Communication B.A., Baylor University, 1992; M.A., Baylor University, 1993; Ph.D., University of Georgia, 2003. (Since 2007) Timothy Veach, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Business B.A., University of Oregon, 2000; M.B.A., Oregon State University, 2002; Ph.D., Dankook University, 2010. (Since 2015) Constance Wilmarth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics B.S., University of Oregon, 1997; M.S., University of British Columbia, 2001; Ph.D., University of California at Davis, 2008. (Since 2008) Mary Ann Winter-Messiers, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology B.A., University of Oregon, 1980; License, Université de Paris IV – La Sorbonne, 1985; Maitrise, Université de Paris IV – La Sorbonne, 1987; M.A., University of Oregon, 2008; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 2013. (Since 2014) Liza Zehner, M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Teacher Education; Director of Teacher Education B.A., Northwest Christian University, 1999; M.Ed., University of Oregon, 2003. (Since 2013)

Faculty Emeriti Timothy M. Bergquist, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus: Quantitative Analysis (1996-2015) J. Allan Clarke, D.Hum., Academic Dean Emeritus (1979-84) Maud E. Fowler, M.S., Professor Emeritus: English (1964-67) John Hakes, M.A., Professor Emeritus: Music (1991-2012) Ronald Heine, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus: Biblical Studies (2007-2015) Michael Kennedy, D.B.A., Professor Emeritus: Business and Management (1997-2011) George Knox, S.T.D., Professor Emeritus: New Testament, Homiletics (1979-1995) 8

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Faculty, Staff, and Trustees

LeRoy L. Lane, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus: Communication, Management (1969-1997) Anne Maggs, M.B.A., Professor Emeritus: Business and Management (1997-2011) Ernest Mathes, D.Min., Professor Emeritus: Pastoral Ministry (1986-1998) Margaret Sue Rhee, M.L.S., Professor Emeritus: Bibliography and Research Methods (1977-2005) Song Nai Rhee, Ph.D., Academic Dean Emeritus (1984-1998); Professor Emeritus: Biblical Studies, Anthropology (1963-2000) Chuck Sturms, M.A., Professor Emeritus: Intercultural Studies (1990-2012)

President Emeritus James E. Womack, D.Hum., President Emeritus: Basketball Coach/Campus Activities Coordinator, Director of Planned Giving, President (1971-1976, 1986-2004)

Administrative Officers and Staff Office of the President President............................................................................................................ Joseph Womack Executive Administrative Assistant ...................................................................... Carla Aydelott

Academic Affairs V.P. for Academic Affairs and Dean of the School of Bible, Arts & Sciences .. Dennis R. Lindsay Administrative Assistant to the V.P. for Academic Affairs .................................. Erica Clements Director of Assessment ........................................................................................... Brian J. Mills Assistant Dean of Adult Studies/Exec. Director of Program Development........ Melanie Towne Registrar .................................................................................................................. Aaron Pruitt Associate Registrar ..................................................................................................Gillian Heine Academic Advisor ..................................................................................................... Sarah Slater Academic Advisor ................................................................................................. Lauren Kramp Academic Advisor ................................................................................................... Bethany Dilla Teacher Education Licensure Specialist/Academic Advisor ................................ Tammy Hatling Director of Academic Services & Career Development........................................... Angela Doty Assistant Director of Career Development ......................................................... Corynn Gilbert Science Lab Manager .......................................................................................... Timothy Rogers Administrative Assistant for Academic Services and Career Development ........ Mary Jo Goosmann Administrative Assistant for the Dean of Education and Counseling ................. Rachael Morse

Advancement Vice President for Advancement ............................................................... Gregory Strausbaugh Director of University Relations .......................................................................... Jeannine Jones Major Gifts Officer .............................................................................................. Glenda Gordon Alumni Relations & Events Coordinator ............................................................. Heather Hecker Administrative Assistant for Advancement ....................................................... Kasandra Larsen

Business Affairs Vice President for Finance and Administration .................................................. Gene De Young Institutional Research................................................................................................ Greg Battle Staff Accountant / Accounts Payable .................................................................... Philip Rumble Accounts Receivable Manager ................................................................................. Darcy Nolte 9

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Faculty, Staff, and Trustees

Cashier / Student Services Specialist ............................................................. Darlene Vermilyea Payroll & Benefits ............................................................................................... Wendy Yamada Plant Manager ........................................................................................................Oskar Bucher Housekeeping Manager .............................................................................................................. Groundskeeper ...................................................................................................... Kent Willocks

Admissions & Financial Aid Vice President for Enrollment & Student Development ...................................... Michael Fuller Executive Director of Admission ......................................................................... Kacie Gerdrum Senior Enrollment Advisor................................................................................... Bonnie Temple Enrollment Advisor ........................................................................................Heather LeCompte Assistant Director of Undergraduate Admission ..................................................... Mike D’Eliso Assistant Director of Undergraduate Admission .....................................................Kassia Galick Admission Counselor (Daytime Undergraduate) ......................................... Jazzmyne Villarruel Admission Counselor (Daytime Undergraduate) ............................................. Shannon Hartley Admission Counselor (Professional Studies) .................................................... Heath Alexander Admission Counselor (Professional Studies) ....................................................... William Dorsch Admission Counselor (Professional Studies) ........................................................ Johnny Mager Webmaster and Marketing Specialist ..................................................................... David Hubbs Enrollment Services Coordinator ..................................................................... Brittany Hanania Office Manager & Visit Coordinator .................................................................... Brittany Ferrell Director of Financial Aid ....................................................................................... Jocelyn Hubbs Financial Aid Counselor (Daytime Undergraduate) ................................................ Juan Guitron Financial Aid Counselor (Professional Studies) ............................................. Nathan Icenhower

Information Technology Department Analyst Programmer....................................................................................... Andrew Anderson IS Technician/Help Desk Support .......................................................................... Nathan Fuller Network/Systems Administrator......................................................................... Stead Halstead Production and Creative Services Coordinator .................................................... Jeff Wetherell

Kellenberger Library Director..................................................................................................................... Steve Silver Reference Librarian ................................................................................... Scott Gallagher-Starr Public Services Supervisor ........................................................................................ Karen Head Technical Services Supervisor...............................................................................Debbie Du Tell

Student Development & Athletics Vice President for Enrollment and Student Development ................................... Michael Fuller Director of Residence Life and Student Services....................................................... Greg Brock Campus Pastor .............................................................................................................Troy Dean Director of Student Programs ................................................................................. Princess Fox Assistant Director of Residence Life and Coordinator for Student Programs ...... Elyse Crichton Resident Director and Coordinator for Campus Ministry ..................................... Jennifer Little Office Manager and Student Life Specialist ............................................ Karlie Griffith-Solinger Athletic Director ................................................................................................ Corey Anderson Associate Athletic Director .................................................................................. Sarah Freeman Sports Information Director ...................................................................................... Nick Askew 10

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Athletic Trainer ..................................................................................................... Pamela Welsh Athletic Event Coordinator ....................................................................................... Julie Strand

Board of Trustees Northwest Christian University is an Oregon corporation, governed by a board of trustees, whose purpose is to maintain a Christian institution of higher learning. The board of trustees consists of not fewer than 20, nor more than 36 people. Members are elected by the board. Significant representation on the Board must come from members of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and the Christian Churches/Churches of Christ. Significant representation on the Board must also come from the alumni of the University. Additionally, one faculty representative, elected annually by Faculty Forum, and one student representative (current president of ASNCU) serve on the Board as non-voting members. The board of trustees is the policy-making and governing body of the University. On the basis of recommendations made by the president of the University, it establishes a course for the development of the total program of the University and fulfillment of its mission, and it strives to provide essential funds.

Officers/Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees Gary Jurden, chair Bob Hutchins, vice chair Bridget Baker Kincaid, secretary

Clare Buhler, at-large Barbara Olson, at-large Judy Van Scholten, at-large

Sid Voorhees, at-large Clayton Walker, at-large

Members Judi Beard-Strubing, retired assistant vice president, Merrill Lynch, Eugene, Ore. Clare Buhler, senior minister, Harrisburg Christian Church, Harrisburg, Ore. Jim Burge, chief of police, Roseburg, Ore. Kathy Carr, owner/CEO, Front Door Business Services, Payette, Idaho Michelle Cross, vice president/general manager, Harvey & Price Co., Eugene, Ore. Carol Cure, volunteer, Portland, Ore. Bruce Hanna, President and CEO, Coca-Cola Bottling Co., Roseburg, Ore. Bob Hutchins, senior vice president, D.A. Davidson & Co., Medford, Ore. Gary Jurden, senior financial advisor, Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., Eugene, Ore. Bridget Baker Kincaid, corporate public relations director, Guard Publishing Company, Eugene, Ore. Ryan Lee, COO, CBT Nuggets, Eugene, Ore. Barry Lind, senior minister, Northwood Christian Church, Springfield, Ore. Juanita Metzler, convention sales manager, Travel Lane County, Eugene, Ore. Jeff Miller, retired vice president, Pacific Benefit Consultants/Eugene Insurance, Eugene, Ore. Frank Morse, retired Oregon State Senator; retired president, Morse Bros. Inc., Albany, Ore. Barbara Olson, retired administrator, XL Hospice, Inc., Fruitland, Idaho Sandy Park, administrative asst., Renewal Ministries, First Baptist Church, Eugene, Ore. Selene Petersen, CPA/PFS, partner, Henry, Petersen, Berry & Quigley LLP, Eugene, Ore. Gary Pierpoint, retired senior vice president, Umpqua Bank, Eugene, Ore. Cherie Reynolds, volunteer, Albany, Ore. 11

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Faculty, Staff, and Trustees

John Richardson, senior minister, Columbia Christian Church, Vancouver, Wash. Gary Smith, senior minister, Red Rock Christian Church, Boise, Idaho Joan Snow, HR/finance administrator, Sunset Presbyterian Church, Beaverton, Ore. Nat Stock, timber industry broker, Newport Beach, Calif. Judy Van Scholten, volunteer, Eugene, Ore. Sid Voorhees, auctioneer, Eugene, Ore. Clayton Walker, real estate developer, Eugene, Ore. Joseph Womack, president, Northwest Christian University

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Traditional Undergraduate Admission

at least 850 on the Math and Critical Reading sections of the SAT and a 17 on the ACT is preferred. Meeting these minimum standards does not guarantee admission.

Traditional Undergraduate Admissions Undergraduate Admissions Northwest Christian University seeks to enroll academically qualified and motivated students who are eager to learn and develop their faith, gifts, and talents. The application process is essentially designed to assess the student’s preparation for higher education and predict future performance. Meeting minimum standards does not guarantee admission. Applicants are considered for admission on the basis of overall grade performance, adherence to College Preparation Standards, content and difficulty of courses taken, standardized test scores, quality of involvement in an applicant’s church, community, and school activities, and other materials submitted by applicants. NCU reserves the right to request additional information from a student, including, but not limited to updated transcripts, additional essays, and an Admissions interview.

*Students who have not graduated from high school are considered for admission on the basis of their performance on the test of General Educational Development (GED). Home-Schooled students or graduates from a nonstandard or unaccredited high school are considered for admission primarily through proficiency-based admission standards. Please refer to “Graduates of Nonstandard or Unaccredited High Schools and Home-Schooled Students.” Placements The following criteria will be used to determine student placement into specific writing, science, and math courses: English  SAT writing score of 440 or greater, or an ACT score of 17 or greater constitutes a placement in WR 121.  SAT writing score less than 440 or an ACT score less than 17 AND a high school GPA of 3.5 or better will result in a recommendation of placement in WR 90.  SAT writing score less than 440 or an ACT score less than 17 AND a high school GPA less than 3.5 will result in placement in WR 90.

Entrance to NCU is possible at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. Once completed, an application receives prompt and careful consideration. General admission to the University does not constitute admission to the Teacher Education Program. Specific requirements are listed under “Programs of Study: Teacher Education.” Please contact the Office of Admissions for further details.

First-Year Students

Science  Students wishing to take chemistry or physics must have an SAT math score of 500 or better or an ACT of 19 or better, OR a high school GPA of 3.5 or better, or take a college level math course prior to chemistry or physics.

Admission Requirements* To be eligible for admission to NCU, students must have: 



An official transcript showing at least a 2.50 unweighted high school grade point average (GPA) or higher in all high school subjects taken toward graduation.

Mathematics Student test and high school grades will be reviewed individually for placement.

Present minimum test scores of at least 400 per section on the SAT; and a 16 on each subsection of the ACT. A composite score of 13

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Application Procedure To apply for first-year admission, high school students from a standard or accredited high school should submit the following items to the Office of Admissions: 

A completed Application for Admission.



An official high school transcript of all coursework completed at the time of application. The transcript should be signed, dated and mailed to the Office of Admissions by the registrar or designated school official. Note: Admission decisions can be made on the basis of a transcript showing the first six semesters of high school. Enrollment is contingent upon receipt of a final transcript showing evidence of graduation from high school (or equivalent). The minimum grade point average (GPA) to be eligible for admission is a 2.50.





Standardized test scores. NCU accepts either the ACT or the SAT I. A composite score of at least 850 on the Math and Critical Reading sections of the SAT and a total composite of 17 for the ACT is strongly encouraged. To be eligible for admission, students must present minimum test scores of at least 400 per section on the SAT, and 16 on each subsection of the ACT.



Language Arts (4 years): Emphasis on English language study, speech, and expository writing;



Mathematics (3 years): First-year algebra and additional mathematical preparation selected from geometry, trigonometry, advanced algebra, analytical geometry or calculus;



Science (2 years): Biology, chemistry, physics, or physical and earth science; at least one with a laboratory section;



Social Studies (3 years): At least one year of U.S. history; courses in geography, world history, and government are advisable;



Second Language (2 years): Two years of the same foreign language (American Sign Language is an acceptable option);



Other university preparatory coursework such as computer literacy, humanities, and social science, combined with participation in art, drama, or music.

Transfer Students Students who wish to transfer to NCU, have earned a high school diploma or equivalent, and have attended other institutions of higher learning are invited to apply for admission. Applicants with at least 24 semester credits (36 quarter credits) are evaluated on their academic achievement and courses completed at their prior institution(s). The quality of the applicant’s involvement in church, community, and school activities is also taken into account. A minimum 2.25 GPA is required.

An Admissions Interview is strongly encouraged for each applicant, and may be required for an applicant by the Admissions Committee.

College Preparation Standards Students are encouraged to work with their high school advisor in selecting the most appropriate classes to meet their individual career and educational objectives. At the same time, students are urged to pursue a challenging college preparatory program at their high school. College preparatory recommendations are:

Application Procedure To apply for admission, transfer students must provide the following:

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A completed Application for Admission.



An official transcript (signed and dated by the registrar) from each college or university

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attended, regardless of the number of credits taken or whether attempted classes were completed.

exception of eight semester credits in Bible and Christian Ministry.



If fewer than 24 semester credits (36 quarter credits) have been completed, an official high school transcript and ACT or SAT scores must also be submitted and will be considered in the admission decision.

Any veteran receiving GI Bill benefits while attending Northwest Christian University is required to obtain transcripts from all previously attended schools, as well as military transcripts, and submit them to the school for review of prior credit.



An Admissions Interview may be required for an applicant by the Admissions Committee.

Graduates of Nonstandard or Unaccredited High Schools and HomeSchooled Students Students who graduate from nonstandard or unaccredited schools should follow the application procedure outlined for “First-Year Students.” A minimum score of 21 on the ACT or a combined score of 1020 on the Math and Critical Reading sections of the SAT I is strongly encouraged. A minimum 2.50 grade point average (GPA) in all high school subjects taken toward graduation is also required.

Credit Transfer Transfer of prior college or university credit depends on the nature of the previous coursework and the institution from which it was taken. Each official college or university transcript is evaluated according to the degree requirements of NCU once the application and transcript(s) have been received. The Registrar’s Office evaluates and applies the credit toward general education and elective requirements. Credits transferring towards major requirements must be approved by program faculty. All transferable credits are converted to semester units and credit is granted only for classes completed with a grade of C- or higher from a regionally accredited institution.

For home-schooled students, an official graded transcript of the full curriculum from grades 912 is required. Transcripts prepared in conjunction with a diploma program through a local secondary school or by an agency that assesses home school curricula are preferred. If a conventional transcript is not available, a typed list of all home courses studied with grades assigned is acceptable. An official transcript must also be submitted from each high school or college from which classes have been taken.

Credit transfer is considered case-by-case from a school that is not regionally accredited. A student who is accepted as a transfer student from such an institution must complete one full semester of work at NCU before any credit is transferred. A complete evaluation of the work will be made at the end of the first semester. If the student has maintained a C average at NCU, full credit will be given for the transferred work unless otherwise specified by a formal articulation agreement. A maximum of 30 credits may be transferred if approved.

Financial Aid Eligibility for Home-Schooled Students Meeting the requirements for admission may not necessarily qualify the home-schooled student for certain types of financial aid. To qualify for federal aid, the U.S. Department of Education requires all students to show the “ability to benefit” from a post-secondary education. Students with a high school diploma or its equivalent meet this criterion. Recognized equivalents to the high school diploma include a General Education Development (GED)

The Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer (AAOT) degree or a previous bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution satisfies all NCU general education requirements with the 15

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Certificate and a secondary school completion credential issued by the student’s home state. Some states issue a secondary school completion credential to homeschoolers. If this is the case in the state where the student was homeschooled, the student must obtain this credential in order to be eligible for FSA funds.



Completion of an English Proficiency program or satisfactory grades of university courses in English. An interview with an Admission Committee

As part of their application, international applicants also must submit current and reliable documentation of their ability to pay the full cost of education, including all tuition and fees, and living expenses for the entire degree program.

High School Nongraduates Applicants at least 17 years of age who have not graduated from a standard or nonstandard high school (or its equivalent) may be considered for admission on the basis of the test of General Education Development (GED). To be admitted, applicants who have taken the GED prior to 2014 must receive an average score of 510 for the five subtests with no individual test score of less than 450. Applicants who have taken the GED post-2014 must receive a total score of 628 or higher with no individual test score less than 154. Students are expected to complete the first-year student application procedure. An official transcript must be submitted from each high school attended.

The fall deadline for international applications is June 1. To apply for admission, an international applicant should submit the following to the Office of Admissions: 

A completed Application for Admission.



Official transcripts for all coursework taken at schools equivalent to an American secondary school (i.e. grades 9-12) and at any college or university. Each transcript must be an original or certified copy. Note: In order to verify degrees for coursework completed at a foreign high school, college, or university, you should submit original official transcripts to an approved international credentialing service. We recommend AACRAO, World Education Services (WES), or Academic Credentials Evaluation Institute (ACEI) for a course-by-course evaluation or basic statement of comparability. You can complete an individual request form at aacrao.org, wes.org or acei-global.org.

International Students NCU welcomes applications from students of other countries. Evidence of proficiency in the English language is a prerequisite for admission. Applicants from non-English speaking countries are required to provide proof of English proficiency. Adequate forms of documentation include:  Official results from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) A score of 173 (computer based) or 80 (internet based) or 550 (paper based) is required for admission consideration.  Official results from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) showing a score of 6.0 or higher.  A composite score of at least 900 on the SAT with no less than 400 on each subsection.  A composite score on the ACT of at least 19 with no less than 17 on each subsection.

16



Proof of English Proficiency is required if English is not the student’s native language (see above for score requirements).



A letter of recommendation from a minister or pastor detailing the student’s dedication to spiritual growth and service to the community is required to be considered for NCU’s International Student Scholarship.



Documentation of adequate financial resources is required. Students must complete proof of financial documentation

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Traditional Undergraduate Admission

which includes a letter from each individual or organization that is contributing to the student’s education expenses indicating the amount of funds to be given. In addition, from each sponsoring individual, an account statement verifying that sufficient funds are available is required. All letters and statements must be original copies and dated within three months of the application for admission. Contact the Office of Admissions for further details. 

Conditional Admission NCU admits a limited number of students who do not meet admissions standards. Applicants with marginal grades or low ACT/SAT I scores are considered on a case-by-case basis for “conditional” admission if there is other evidence of academic potential. In some cases, additional information will be requested from the applicant in order to make a decision. In order to enroll, the student is required to meet with a designated academic liaison to develop an individual plan for academic success.

An interview with a faculty panel may also be required.

Veterans Programs at NCU are approved for the use of the GI Bill education benefits. To apply for admission, veterans and active duty personnel should follow regular admissions policies and contact the registrar as early as possible to expedite handling of VA forms and to coordinate benefits.

International students who have provided documentation of adequate financial resources and have been approved for admission are mailed a letter of acceptance and Certificate of Eligibility I-20. In order to enroll, international students are expected to pay their bill in full at the beginning of each semester.

NCU participates in the Army Concurrent Admissions Program (ConAP) in which new enlistees may be admitted and enrollment deferred until completion of active military service. Additional information is available through the service recruiting station.

Readmission of Former Students Former students who have not attended NCU in four or more consecutive semesters (two academic years) must complete the full transfer application process in order to be readmitted. Such students are required to meet the academic and graduation requirements in effect at the time of readmission. An appeal letter must accompany the application to be reviewed by the Admissions Committee if the student did not leave the university in good standing.

Advance Tuition Deposit An advance tuition deposit of $200 is required of all incoming students prior to registration. This deposit serves as an indication of sincere intention to enroll at NCU and initiates registration and billing procedures. The deposit is credited to the student’s account to be applied to tuition charges upon enrollment and is refundable until May 1 for fall applicants and December 1 for spring applicants.

Students in good standing who have not been enrolled at NCU for three or less semesters are required to submit an abbreviated readmission application form and official transcripts for any and all courses completed while away from NCU.

Final Transcripts In order to enroll at NCU, a final official transcript must be sent directly from the high school if applying as a first-year student, or from the college or university if applying as a transfer student. It is the responsibility of the student to arrange for the transcript(s) to be sent. The high school transcript must include

Students on approved leave from the University or doing approved study abroad or special studies programs are not required to apply for readmission.

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the date of graduation. If the transcript submitted as part of the application process was final and official, no additional transcript is required.

chapel, and stay as overnight guests in campus housing. Campus visits are easily arranged by contacting the Office of Admissions. All application materials and questions regarding admission should be directed to:

Delayed Enrollment Students accepted for admission to NCU may postpone enrollment for up to two academic years. If students have attended another college or university during that period, they are required to complete the transfer application procedure. The entire admissions process must be repeated if admission is delayed beyond two years. For students admitted through the ConAP program, the admission agreement is in effect for two years following completion of active military service.

Office of Admissions Northwest Christian University 828 E. 11th Avenue Eugene, OR 97401-3745 Phone: (541) 684-7201 or (877) 463-6622 Fax: (541) 684-7317 Email: [email protected] Website: www.nwcu.edu

Standardized Test Policy Both the American College Testing and Assessment (ACT) and the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT I) are acceptable standardized tests for admission and scholarship consideration. If an applicant submits results from both ACT and SAT I, the test on which the student received the highest composite score is used. When an applicant submits results from multiple administrations of the SAT, the highest individual scores are used to achieve the highest possible composite score.

Credit by Examination Students are encouraged to submit test scores from examinations designed to measure college level proficiency in various academic subjects. Any courses that meet bachelor degree requirements using one or both of the College Board sponsored testing programs described in the Academic Policies section can be used for academic credit.

Campus Visits Students considering NCU are encouraged to visit the campus, preferably when classes are in session and students and faculty are readily available. Visitors may tour facilities, attend classes, meet with students and professors, eat complimentary meals in the cafeteria, attend 18

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Adult Degree Program Admission

Certificate Program Admission Policies and Procedures

Adult Degree Program Admission The mission of our Adult Degree Program is to serve adult students by giving them the opportunity to enhance both their personal and professional life through education in a caring, compassionate and faith-based manner. The following policies and procedures help an adult student gain admission into our programs and sustain status for degree completion.

Applicants seeking admission into an adult certificate program must fulfill the following requirements to be considered:  Completed Adult Studies Certificate Application  Official transcripts from a regionally accredited institution showing receipt of a bachelor’s degree  GPA of a minimum of 2.0

Admissions Policies and Procedures

Admission Status An applicant who does not meet requirements for admission may be considered on a case-bycase basis for conditional or provisional admission to the University.. A provisional student or a conditional student will not be advanced to full status until all the admission requirements are satisfied.

Applicants seeking admission to the evening adult program must have a high school diploma or equivalent and fulfill the following requirements to be considered: 

Complete and submit the application form



Submit one official transcript from each college/university attended and military transcripts (an applicant may also be asked to furnish a high school transcript, if he/she has less than 12 college-level semester credits)



Provisional status is defined as a student who is missing a key piece of the admission file, such as an official transcript. Provisional students are not eligible for any Federal Financial Aid programs. Classes must be paid in full while a student is classified as provisional. Provisional status is normally granted for only one semester.

Have a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (if the applicant’s grade point average falls below a 2.0, then he/she may submit a one page statement of purpose to the Admissions Committee explaining the situation and reasons for admission consideration)

Conditional status is defined as a student who does not meet minimum admission requirements, such as a GPA less than 2.0 or having less than two years of work or comparable experience. Conditional students are eligible for Federal Financial Aid programs. Conditional status is normally removed after one semester of taking at least six semester credits and maintaining a GPA of at least a 2.0.

A student must be free from academic or behavioral probation or suspension at all colleges previously attended to be eligible for admission to NCU. All financial holds must also be settled with the Business Office prior to any readmission into the program. Soon after the admission file is completed, the applicant will be notified of the decision made. At this time, an Enrollment Advisor will explain to the admitted student the results of the transfer evaluation and the steps for major transfer consideration, registration and orientation to the program.

Students accepted for admission to the Adult Degree Program may postpone enrollment for one academic year. If students have attended another college or university during that period, they are required to submit official transcripts from each institution. The entire admissions process must be repeated if admission is delayed beyond one year. 19

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Adult Degree Program Admission

Orientation Policy Once a student is registered for classes, the student is required to meet with an Enrollment Advisor and complete the orientation checklist.

Transfer Credit Students who have completed work at other regionally accredited educational institutions and who have submitted official transcripts for evaluation may be entitled to transfer credit. NCU applies the credits toward the general education and electives requirements. Consideration for courses to meet major requirements are reviewed by program directors upon request through your Enrollment Advisor. Only courses in which the student has earned a C- or better are accepted as transfer credit. The Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer Degree will satisfy all general education requirements except Bible (BTH Courses), but it may not necessarily meet school, department, or major requirements with regard to all prerequisite courses for a particular major. For more information please see the Academic Policies section of the catalog. Any veteran receiving GI Bill benefits while attending Northwest Christian University is required to obtain transcripts from all previously attended schools, as well as military transcripts, and submit them to the school for review of prior credit.

Residence Requirements A student must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours in residence for the bachelor's degree.

Withdrawal A student who plans to leave and stop taking further courses for credit must officially notify NCU by going through the withdrawal process. The withdrawal policy is located in the Registration and Academic Affairs section of the catalog. 20

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Graduate Admission

required to obtain transcripts from all previously attended schools, as well as military transcripts, and submit them to the school for review of prior credit.

Graduate Program Admission In a commitment to academic excellence, Northwest Christian University offers master’s degree programs in:

Admission Status An applicant who does not meet requirements for admission may be considered on a case-bycase basis for provisional or conditional admission. A provisional or conditional student will not be advanced to full status until all the admission requirements are satisfied.

   

Business Administration (MBA) Clinical Mental Health Counseling (MA) Counseling (MA) Education in Curriculum and Instructional Technology (M.Ed.) School Counseling (MA)   Teaching (MA)  Theology (M.Phil)

Provisional status is given to students who are missing a key piece from their admission file, such as an official transcript. Provisional students are not eligible for any Federal Financial Aid program. A provisional student will be required to pay in full for classes taken during this status. Provisional status is normally granted for only one semester.

Coursework in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program, School Counseling Program, and Education with Licensure program is completed onsite with classes offered in the evenings and online. Classes are small, discussion-oriented, and presented from a Christian perspective. Practica and internship experiences, in addition to coursework, are part of the counseling programs.

Conditional status is granted to students who do not meet minimum admission requirements, such as a GPA lower than 3.0 or a test score below the recommendation. Conditional students are eligible for Federal Financial Aid programs. Conditional status is normally removed after one semester of taking at least 6 graduate-level credits and maintaining a 3.0 or higher GPA.

Application Process Students should consult the application requirements for the specific graduate program for which they are applying. For application materials and information on individual programs, contact the Office of Admission.

Students accepted for admission into the graduate program may postpone enrollment for one academic year, but may be subject to any program-specific changes in admission requirements. The entire admissions process must be repeated if admission is delayed beyond one year.

All onsite programs have an early admissions deadline of March 15. Completed applications are then reviewed by the Admissions Committee of each program. Applications may be accepted until June 1 for the Master of Arts in Teaching Program, July 1 for Clinical Mental Health Counseling and August 1 for all other programs on a space-available basis.

Each V-Campus student (Master of Business Administration & Master of Education in Curriculum and Instructional Technology) is required to take a competency exam prior to enrolling in their respective program demonstrating proficiency in American Psychological Association (APA) style writing standards. The fee for the exam is waived for

Both online programs (MBA and M.Ed) have rolling admission. All application materials must be received at least two weeks prior to the start of classes. Any veteran receiving GI Bill benefits while attending Northwest Christian University is 21

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Graduate Admission

the student the first time it is taken. A passing grade on the exam is 90% and is required for entry into the program. A training course is available (at the student’s expense) to prepare if a re-take of the exam is necessary.

curriculum and APA writing workshops will be offered to those students who are conditionally admitted or demonstrate a deficiency in a particular academic subject area. Admitted students will be required to take a comprehensive assessment exam early in the program and again at the end of the program.

Admission Requirements for Master of Business Administration (MBA) The Master of Business Administration program is an online program delivered through the NCU V-Campus. Participation in this program assumes an adequate level of computer literacy on the part of the student. Proficiency in word processing, spreadsheet, and website navigation is recommended.

Admission Requirements for Master of Arts (MA) in Clinical Mental Health Counseling In order for an application to be considered for the Clinical Mental Health program, the following materials must be submitted: 1. An application for admission. 2. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework showing a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited four-year college or university, with a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 (if the applicant’s grade point average falls below a 3.0, then he/she must submit an official test score report showing a minimum combined score of 297 (verbal and quantitative) on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or a minimum scaled score of 400 on the Miller Analogy Test (MAT). Scores for either of these exams must be within the past five years). 3. A statement of purpose of two to three pages (double-spaced) showing skills in written communication, articulating interest in counseling as a profession, and demonstrating maturity to work in a counseling setting. 4. Two letters of recommendation, preferably one professional and one personal, highlighting any relevant counseling experience and which speaks to the character of the applicant. 5. A résumé documenting education and experience in psychology, mental health, or related fields.

In order for an applicant to be considered for the MBA Program, the following materials must be submitted:* 1. An application for admission. 2. Official transcripts showing a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited four-year college or university, with a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 (if the applicant’s grade point average falls below a 3.0, then he/she may submit a one page statement of purpose to the Admissions Committee explaining the situation and reasons for admission consideration). 3. A 500-word essay (double-spaced) showing skills in written communication, addressing how an MBA relates to the student’s personal and professional goals. 4. A resume detailing business/management experience. 5. A minimum score of 550 on the TOEFL (213 on the computer TOEFL or an 80 on internet-based TOEFL) for applicants from non-English speaking countries. *On a case-by-case basis, supplemental documentation may be required to demonstrate evidence of academic preparation and potential for successful completion of this graduate program. In addition, at the student’s expense, 22

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6. At their own expense, applicants must obtain and pass a criminal background check. 7. A personal interview with the Admissions Committee. 8. A minimum score of 550 on the TOEFL (213 on the computer TOEFL) for applicants from non-English speaking countries.

Participation in this program assumes an adequate level of computer literacy on the part of the student. Proficiency in word processing, spreadsheet, and website navigation is recommended. In order for an application to be considered for the Master of Education Program, the following materials must be submitted:* 1. An Application for Admission. 2. Official transcripts showing a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited four-year college or university, with a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 (if the applicant’s grade point average falls below a 3.0, then he/she may submit a one page statement of purpose to the Admissions Committee explaining the situation and reasons for admission consideration). 3. A 500 word statement of purpose showing skills in written communication and demonstrating maturity to work in an educational setting. 4. A résumé documenting education and teaching experience and/or alternative experience working with school-age children. 5. A minimum score of 550 on the TOEFL (213 on the computer TOEFL) for applicants from non-English speaking countries. 6. Successfully pass the APA Competency Exam.

Admission Requirements for Master of Arts (MA) in Teaching In order for an application to be considered for the Master of Arts in Teaching Program, the following materials must be submitted: 1. An application for admission. 2. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework showing a Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited four-year college or university. 3. A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 (if the applicant’s grade point average falls below a 3.0, then he/she may submit a one page statement of purpose to the Admissions Committee explaining the situation and reasons for admission consideration). 4. A statement of purpose 2-3 pages double spaced that clearly indicates career history, professional goals and professional guiding principles. 5. Current resume. 6. Three letters of recommendation that specifically address the academic ability, work performance and character of applicant. One of these letters should be from an administrator who has direct evaluation responsibilities. 7. Personal interview with the Admissions Committee.

*On a case-by-case basis, supplemental documentation may be required to demonstrate evidence of academic preparation and potential for successful completion of this graduate program.

Admission Criteria for Master of Philosophy (M.Phil) in Theology

Admission Requirements for Master of Education (MEd) in Curriculum and Instructional Technology

Applicants to the M.Phil. (Theology Concentration) must submit the following items:

The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instructional Technology is an online program delivered through the NCU V-Campus. 23

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1. An application for admission, accompanied by a written proposal (300-500 words) for a research topic; 2. Official transcripts from a regionallyaccredited institution showing receipt of a bachelor’s degree with a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0; 3. Evidence of graduate level preparation (including an appropriate graduate writing seminar, or equivalent) that warrants admission to graduate research in the proposed area(s) of research; evidence of adequate preparation may include (but is not limited to) the following: o Official transcripts from an accredited institution showing the accumulation of a minimum of 15 semester credits of graduate coursework directly related to the proposed research topic, with a minimum grade of “B” for each course; o Advanced specialization at the undergraduate level through a minimum of 20 upper division semester credits in coursework directly related to the proposed research topic, with a minimum grade of “B” for each course; o Evidence of advanced scholarly research activities directly related to the proposed research topic in the form of papers, articles, and reviews in peer-reviewed publications, presentations at professional meetings/societies, published monographs, etc. o Evidence of other substantial and scholarly professional activity directly related to the proposed area of research. o Satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). 4. Two letters of reference from academic experts in the proposed research area,

one of which may be from a prospective NCU faculty supervisor/mentor. 5. Applicants who do not meet prerequisite requirements for admission may be granted conditional admission with a specified plan and timetable for making up deficiencies. Though it may be possible for some prerequisite deficiencies to be absolved through regular course work at NCU, the University does not guarantee the availability of such course work and the making up of prerequisites remains the responsibility of the Student. 6. N.B.: The faculty admission committee, consisting of faculty in the NCU School of Christian Ministry, reserves the right to judge the level of adequacy presented by any or all of the documentation provided.

Admission Requirements for Master of Arts (MA) in School Counseling In order for an application to be considered for the School Counseling Program, the following materials must be submitted: 1. An application for admission. 2. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework showing a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited four-year college or university, with a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0, including the prerequisite course listed below.* (If the applicant’s grade point average falls below a 3.0, then he/she may submit a one page statement of purpose to the Admissions Committee explaining the situation and reasons for admission consideration). 3. A statement of purpose of two to three pages (double-spaced) showing skills in written communication, articulating interest in counseling as a profession, and demonstrating maturity to work in a counseling setting.

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4. A résumé documenting education and teaching experience and/or alternative experience working with school-age children.** 5. A recommendation from a professional reference, preferably a supervisor in an educational setting or another setting working with children. Two additional letters of recommendation, one professional and one personal. 6. A personal interview with the Admissions Committee. 7. A minimum score of 550 on the TOEFL (213 on the computer TOEFL) for applicants from non-English speaking countries. *One prerequisite course in human development (equivalent to NCU’s PSY 320 Human Development) is required for admission to the program. Students need not have taken this prerequisite at the time of application. However, a student will not be fully admitted until documentation of successful completion of this course is received. **Admission to Track I requires documentation of two years of successful licensed teaching experience prior to acceptance into the school counseling program.

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Student Finances Traditional Undergraduate Tuition and Fees for the 2015-16 Academic Year Undergraduate Tuition Cost: 1-11 hours per credit hour:

Fall 2015 $900

Spring 2016 $900

12-18 hours (tuition block with no additional cost per credit hour): 19 + hours per credit hour: Remedial (can be part of 12-18 block with no additional cost): Audit (not available for online classes; can be part of 12-18 block with no additional cost): Credit by examination/course challenge (per credit hour) for all programs: Individual Instruction: Piano/Voice per hour (can be part of 12-18 block and pay only $145 fee): Parking Pass: Annual: Per semester:

$13,550

$13,550

$900 $900

$900 $900

$195

$195

$450

$450

$900

$900

$220 $110

$110

Adult Degree Program Tuition and Fees for the 2015-16 Academic Year Evening and online Tuition Cost

Fall 2015

Spring 2016

Summer 2016

Per credit hour Audit (not available for online classes)

$452 $195

$452 $195

$452 $195

Credit for Prior Learning (per credit submitted for evaluation) Parking Pass

$50

$50

$50

$80 (annual) or $30 each semester (fall, spring, and summer)

Graduate Tuition and Fees for the 2015-2016 Business Administration (MBA) tuition per hour Clinical Mental Health Counseling (MA) tuition per hour Education (M Ed) with licensure and Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) tuition per hour Education (M.Ed) in Curriculum & Instructional Technology Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in Theology School Counseling (MA) tuition per hour Audit per credit (not available for online classes) Parking pass for graduate students

27

$610 $625 $625 $534 $525 $625 $195 $80 (annual) or $30 per semester (Fall, Spring, Summer)

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Registrar’s Fees Late Registration Fee - $50 Late Graduation Application Fee - $25 Diploma Replacement - $25 Official Transcripts - $5 a copy Electronic delivery of Official Transcript $10 a copy Same Day Expedited Transcript(s) - $10

Official Electronic Transcripts - $10 a copy Additional cost to mail overnight – $40 per address Overseas overnight transcript request - $50 per address Petition of the Academic Deadlines - $25 Transcription Fee - $75

Technology Fee( for all programs except MBA and M.Ed in Curriculum and Instructional Technology) $85 per semester Lab Fees Biology: $60 per lab course Chemistry: $60 per lab course All other science lab courses: $30 per lab course MCP 101, MCP 102, MUS 111, MUS 118, MUS 211, MUS 310: $105 per course Private Music Lessons: $145 per credit Education Test Fees EdTPA exam: $300 Civil Rights exam: $130 NES Subskills test 1 & 2: $95 Endorsement test: $95 Finance Charges Outstanding balances are assessed a finance charge of 1.5 percent monthly (18 percent annual rate) computed on the balance at the end of the billing cycle. Kellenberger Library Fines Lost, damaged, or late books and media - $75.00 fee for all lost or damaged items, or items over 30 days overdue. Returned Check Charge Returned checks subject to $25 charge. Room Replacement Key Fees Master - $100, Floor - $50, Room/Apt - $35 2013-2014 Room and Board Residence Hall Single (upon availability only) includes 19 meals per week Residence Hall Double includes 19 meals per week

$9,800 ($4,900/semester)

Mom Richart Apartment, Double includes 5 meals per week

$8,200 ($4,100/semester)

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$8,400 ($4,200/semester)

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Statements are sent each month and new interest accrues until balances are paid. Students with delinquent accounts will be held from registering for the next semester until any balance is paid or a payment plan is developed.

Student Billing Policies Payment Obligation It is the responsibility of the student and their family to meet the financial obligation associated with attendance at NCU. Students are strongly encouraged to submit payment or set up a payment plan for their anticipated balance two weeks before the beginning of classes. The balance is determined by semester and will be calculated by subtracting all applicable financial aid and payments from the semester’s charges (tuition, fees, room and board).

Students are responsible for all unpaid balances whether or not they have received a paper bill from NCU. The student is required to ensure that the Business Office has an accurate and upto-date billing address on file.

Payment Methods

All new students are required to complete a Payment Intent Agreement (on NCU’s website) and a Financial Responsibility Agreement that allows you to determine your anticipated balance for the academic year and provides methods for making payment. Students should not wait for an official bill from NCU before calculating balances or making payments.

Students can pay any balance using one of the following methods: 1. Cash payment in the Billing Office. 2. Check or money order made out to Northwest Christian University. 3. Credit cards in the Billing office, online, or by phone (all major credit cards accepted). Convenience fee charged on all credit card transactions. Monthly payment plans are available.

Billing Statements

Deposits

Billing statements are offered as a service to students and families. Your first statements for both fall and spring semesters will be sent to the primary address NCU has on record before classes for each semester begin. This statement will have Anticipated Semester Financial Aid as listed on the award letter as well as semester charges for tuition and other related expenses, such as room and board. Financial aid will not be officially credited to the student’s NCU account until after the add/drop period for registration (typically two weeks from the start of the semester) has ended.

An advanced tuition deposit is required for students admitted for the first time to the University and must be submitted by May 1 for fall semester admission (December 1 for spring semester admission). This deposit is held in the student’s account and applied to his/her tuition expenses upon enrollment. The advanced tuition deposit is required in order to proceed with advanced class registration or housing arrangements. Full refunds are given for cancellations received in writing by the Admissions Office until May 1 for fall semester admission (December 1 for spring semester admission).

New billing statements are printed between the 15th and the 20th of each month for unpaid balances as well as for any additional or adjusted charges that create a new balance. Payments are due on the 1st of the following month and include a 5-day grace period. Payments received after the 5th of the month are considered late. Late payments are subject to an interest charge of 1.5% per month.

Tuition Refund Policy Upon complete withdrawal or dismissal from the University, students, including veterans, receive a proportional refund for tuition. All student fees are nonrefundable, including but not limited to, music or private lesson fees, vehicle permits, application fees, etc. Until 60 percent of the semester is completed, the 29

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prorated refund applies and after that point no refunds will be given. For example, if the student withdraws in the fifth week of the 15 week semester, the refund would be 33 percent.

party is entitled to recover attorney fees and court costs. The official transcript remains the property of NCU and cannot be issued until all amounts owed the University, including accounts receivable, notes, loans, and other amounts, are paid in full.

All academic withdrawals must be processed in accordance with the policy of the University. Refunds are based on the date of initial contact made with an appropriate school official. Students who do not meet the financial conditions of the University can be administratively withdrawn from their courses at the discretion of the Student Services Office. In order to complete an academic withdrawal, a student must first contact the vice president for student development to perform an exit interview and sign the withdrawal form. The student then takes the signed form to the Student Services Office to be processed. If students fail to contact the vice president for student development and perform the appropriate withdrawal steps, the student may be charged a fee of $100.

Financial Aid Process & Policies The Financial Aid Office is committed to helping students who wish to attend NCU but who may not be able to meet all the expenses from personal and family income. NCU provides a full range of grants, scholarships, student employment, and education loans to help those who qualify. In addition, the Financial Aid Office provides financial aid counseling to students and their families to guide them through the process of applying for and receiving financial aid. Our goal is to provide the service and financing resources needed to enable deserving students to attend NCU.

Refund of Residence Hall Room and Board

Financial aid may be grouped into two broad categories of need-based and non-need aid. All federal and state student aid is based on financial need with the exception of a few federal student loan programs. NCU offers both need and non-need types of financial aid.

Refer to the residence hall contract or the director of residence life for the housing refund policy. The vice president for student development will set any termination penalties required by the contract.

Single Course Drops

Application Procedure

No refunds will be made for single courses dropped after the add/drop period is closed for the semester. Each student is charged in full for all courses listed on their registration at the close of registration each semester. See the Academic Calendar for dates for the close of registration.

To apply for financial aid the student must: 1. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and submit it to the U.S. Department of Education. NCU and the federal school code 003208 should be listed in Step 6. The FAFSA is available online at: www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Account Collections If NCU needs to pursue collection efforts, reasonable attorney fees and collection costs may be added to the account whether or not an action is filed. If an action is filed, the prevailing

Note to late income tax filers: Many of the questions on the FAFSA require income tax information from the most recent year. If taxes have not been filed at the time the FAFSA is 30

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submitted, use estimated data or most recent tax information available.

Student Eligibility Requirements The following is an extensive, though by no means exhaustive, list of various requirements that a student must meet in order to be eligible for state and federal aid.

2. Apply for admission. Students must be accepted for admission to NCU before a financial aid package may be processed.

To be eligible for federal aid a student must: 1. Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen. 2. Have either (a) a high school diploma or its equivalent, or (b) successfully completed at least a two-year program that is acceptable for full credit towards a bachelor’s degree. 3. Attend an approved school participating in a state process for determining academic qualifications. 4. Be accepted for admission. 5. Maintain satisfactory academic progress toward degree requirements (see Satisfactory Academic Progress). 6. Have a valid social security number. 7. Register with the Selective Service or document an exemption (males only). 8. Not be currently in default on a federal education loan. 9. Not owe for receipt of an overpayment of a federal grant.

3. If selected for verification by the federal processor the student is responsible to provide additional information as requested to the Financial Aid Office (see Verification Process). 4. Review for accuracy the Student Aid Report sent from the federal processor to the student after submission of the FAFSA. The Financial Aid Office receives a similar report at the same time. This report is used to calculate the student’s financial need and eligibility for needbased aid. Students must complete and submit a FAFSA for each academic year. Eligibility and level of need are recalculated each year by federal standards. It is important to apply for financial aid early in order to qualify for aid with deadlines and limited funding. The University’s priority deadline is March 1 for students planning to enter fall semester. Students with completed applications by March 1 are assured of optimum consideration and funding for scholarships and financial aid from all sources. Students who miss the priority deadline are not guaranteed institutional assistance. To meet this deadline, it is necessary to submit the FAFSA in early February to allow ample time for the FAFSA to be processed. Estimated income data may be used in completing the FAFSA if taxes have not yet been filed with the IRS. All financial aid awards cover a period of one academic year (or what remains of the academic year if the student is awarded midyear). The process of applying for financial aid, including submission of a FAFSA, is repeated each academic year for which the student seeks aid. Financial aid awards are packaged each year on the basis of current data on a firstcome, first-served basis to all eligible applicants.

Students convicted of possessing or selling illegal drugs may not be eligible for federal aid, depending on when the conviction occurred. They can regain their eligibility early by completing a drug rehabilitation program. More information is available from the Federal Aid Student Information Center at 800-433-3243.

Verification Process The U.S. Department of Education requires additional information from some FAFSA filers, including a completed Verification Worksheet, copies of W-2s and federal tax transcripts or use of the IRS Data Retrieval process on the FAFSA. If required, the Financial Aid Office will notify the student and request the information needed. If verification documents contradict information on the FAFSA, the University will make appropriate corrections and submit them to the federal processor. Any corrections may alter aid amounts or eligibility; therefore, final 31

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and official determination of eligibility and financial aid awards must await completion of the verification process.

earned semester-by-semester, the total number of attempted credits allowed for completing a program of study, and the quality of performance that must be maintained. The maximum number of credits for which a student may receive financial aid is 150 percent of the credits normally required to earn a degree or program of study. A student who has declared his/her intention to pursue a baccalaureate degree of 124 semester credits may receive financial aid for a maximum of 186 attempted semester credits. Part-time students have the same total number of allowable credits but have a longer time frame over which to extend enrollment commensurate with their enrollment status (see Credit Requirements and Enrollment Status).

Unusual Circumstances Financial aid guidelines allow for some adjustment in aid to be made in instances when unusual or extreme circumstances are not adequately taken into account through the routine financial aid application. Cases involving death, divorce, loss of job, or major medical expenses may need to be assessed by a financial aid officer to determine the impact on a student’s need and her/his family’s ability to contribute to education expenses. Any hardship must be of at least two months’ duration before it can be presented for evaluation. Sufficient documentation and justification are required before an adjustment in the student’s aid may be allowed.

All credits attempted at NCU, including up to 30 semester credits of pre-approved remedial courses, and credits transferred from other institutions are counted toward the maximum number of credits allowed, whether or not the student received financial aid funds. The Financial Aid Appeals Committee may make exceptions to limits on total credits and time frame for receiving aid due to extenuating circumstances.

Satisfactory Academic Progress In order to remain eligible for financial aid students are required to maintain “satisfactory academic progress.” The conditions for maintaining satisfactory academic progress include completing a sufficient number of credits semester-by-semester, completing a degree within attempting 150% of the published credits needed, and maintaining a 2.00 minimum cumulative grade point average at all times (3.00 for Graduate students). The Financial Aid Office checks each student’s academic progress at the time aid is awarded at the end of spring semester. Students in a program of 1 year in length or less will have their academic progress checked at the conclusion of each semester. A letter notifies the student if he/she fails to maintain satisfactory academic progress.

Required Grade Point Average

To meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress, a student is expected to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or better at all times. Graduate students are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.00. Satisfactory grades for completing a course include A, B, C, D and P (Pass). Grades of F, N (No credit), I (Incomplete), X (No grade reported), W (Official withdrawal), and AUD (Audit) do not count as completed courses.

The requirements for satisfactory academic progress ensure that students who receive aid are adequately meeting academic standards and are proceeding toward an educational goal (degree or certificate) in a reasonable time frame. Standards are established for the minimum number of credits to be taken and

Credit Requirements and Enrollment Status

To receive financial aid, students are required to complete at least 2/3rds (66.67%) of the number of cumulative credits attempted towards an associates, bachelors, or masters degree. The following table is a sample listing of the number of credits that need to be 32

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completed for the corresponding number of credits attempted. If a student attempts a different number of credits than is listed below, the student will need to complete 2/3rds (66.67%) of the actual number of credits attempted.

Attempted 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65

financial aid. The student is notified in writing of the disqualification and the requirements for reinstatement.

Appeal Process for Reinstatement of Eligibility Students who have lost financial aid eligibility may appeal to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee in order to:

Completed 10 13.33 16.67 20 23.33 26.67 30 33.33 36.67 40 43.33

1. Challenge administrative errors resulting in miscalculation of credits completed or GPA attained. 2. Account for incompletes and describe arrangements to make up credit. 3. Explain extenuating circumstances such as medical problems, family emergencies, learning disability, remedial work requirement, or other unusual or mitigating factors.

Note: The table above is a partial representation of the full schedule. Please see the Satisfactory Academic Progress policy at http://www.nwcu.edu/financialaid/forms for the full schedule.

An appeal must be submitted in writing to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee and should state the reason(s) for not meeting minimum eligibility requirements during the year in question. The letter should also discuss a plan for correcting the problem(s) and meeting satisfactory standards. Any arrangements made with professors to finish coursework or to make up credits should be specified.

Requirements for Maintaining University-Sponsored Scholarships All University-sponsored merit scholarships are one-year renewable awards for a maximum duration of four academic years (or 8 semesters). To maintain eligibility the student must be enrolled continuously in a minimum of 12 credits per semester. Annual renewal of all University-sponsored scholarships is subject to meeting the GPA requirements specified for each scholarship. Renewal decisions are based on the student’s cumulative grade point average at the end of each academic year.

If the appeal is approved, the student is granted an additional semester of financial aid probation or if more time is needed a student may be approved to meet with an academic advisor to set up an individual plan whereby the student would bring up their cumulative grade point average and/or % of credits earned to the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards within in three consecutive semesters. The terms and conditions for continued probation and achieving satisfactory academic progress are indicated in a written response to the student. If the appeal is denied, the student remains disqualified until such time as requirements for reinstatement are met.

Financial Aid Disqualification A full-time undergraduate student who fails to attain a 2.00 cumulative GPA (3.00 cumulative GPA for graduate students) or who fails to complete a proportionate number of attempted credits (see chart under Credit Requirements and Enrollment Status) is ineligible for further 33

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It is the responsibility of the student to initiate an appeal and to do so in a time frame that allows an adequate opportunity for review prior to the beginning of the semester. Without an appeal, disqualification will occur automatically in accordance with our policies and regulations. Unless advised differently, the Financial Aid Office assumes that the student has decided to forego an appeal and accept loss of aid eligibility and disbursements.

count toward course load requirements only if the student obtains written prior approval both from the dean of the respective school and the student’s academic advisor and submits evidence of enrollment. At the end of the semester, the student is also responsible for submitting her/his grade report from the consortium school(s) to the Registrar’s Office to ascertain satisfactory academic progress. Financial aid for consortium courses is acquired by applying for aid through NCU. (See Consortium Courses for a list of participating institutions.)

Reinstatement of Financial Aid Eligibility A student who is disqualified from receiving financial aid for failure to maintain a 2.00 cumulative GPA (3.00 for graduate students) is not eligible for aid again until such time as he/she raises the cumulative GPA to 2.00 (3.00 for graduate students). Likewise, if a student is disqualified from aid for failure to complete the required number of credits, she/he is not until the total number of credits completed is at least 2/3rd of the total number of credits attempted. Once reinstated, the student is again eligible for financial aid during the next semester of enrollment.

Enrollment Status for Credit by Examination For the purpose of financial aid eligibility, college credits granted for credit-byexamination programs (i.e., Advanced Placement [AP], College Level Examination Program [CLEP], International Baccalaureate and course challenge) are not used in determining enrollment status (part-time, fulltime). Such credits do not count toward the minimum number of credits required for each semester nor to the total credits allowed for receiving financial aid.

Courses to raise the GPA or to complete the required number of credits may be taken at NCU or at another institution from which credits are transferred. Completion of a prior Incomplete does not count toward the credits needed for reinstatement. Aid eligibility, once restored, is not retroactive. Regardless of whether credits are completed with or without financial aid or whether they are completed at NCU or at another college or university, all are counted equally toward the limits established for financial aid eligibility (186 credits for undergraduate students). All courses taken at NCU, including those completed without financial aid, are counted in the student’s cumulative GPA.

Remedial Courses Students enrolled solely in remedial coursework or in a remedial program are not eligible for financial aid. Such courses do not count toward enrollment and completed credit requirements for financial aid. However, a student enrolled in one of the University’s approved programs of study, who is taking remedial coursework necessary to pursue that program, is eligible for financial aid, both for the remedial work as well as for the regular coursework. Such remedial coursework deemed necessary by the University may be counted toward requirements for satisfactory academic progress. The maximum number of credits allowed for remedial coursework is 30.

Enrollment Status for Consortium Courses Enrollment requirements may be met by courses taken at an institution with which NCU has a consortium agreement. Such courses may

Remedial coursework not required but taken at the discretion of the student does not qualify 34

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for aid, nor does it figure as credits attempted or credits completed for the purpose of calculating aid.

arrangement is also in place with the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) to enable students to participate in study abroad opportunities sponsored or endorsed by CCCU. To qualify for aid, consortium credits must be for coursework not available at NCU (excluding study abroad). Consortium credits must also apply toward the student’s degree requirements and be pre-approved both by the dean of the respective school and the student’s faculty advisor. Signatures of the advisor and dean of the respective school signifying their approval of consortium courses are collected on an Academic Petition form available from the Registrar’s Office.

Repeated Courses A student may receive financial aid for any class that must be repeated in order to meet graduation requirements or for any class in which he/she is attempting to replace a grade lower than a D. Credits for repeated courses count toward the maximum aggregate number of aid-eligible attempted credits.

Change of Major A student who changes majors is expected to complete the new major within the limits allowed for maximum aggregate number of credits attempted.

Qualified off-campus courses count toward the 12-credit minimum required for receiving NCU sponsored aid; however, NCU-funded aid may not be used to pay for consortium courses. A copy of the schedule and billing for courses taken at the other school must be submitted with the Academic Petition before financial aid can be disbursed.

Dual Major A student attempting a dual major may receive financial aid for credits taken toward a second major provided the requirements for a bachelor’s degree have not already been completed, and the student is within the maximum time-frame and credit limits for financial aid eligibility.

Online Courses The student is eligible to receive financial assistance for online courses offered by NCU only if such coursework is part of a program that leads to a recognized one-year or longer certificate program or degree from NCU.

Post-Baccalaureate Students Students who possess a bachelor’s degree are not eligible for federal or state grants and scholarships. By submitting a FAFSA, postbaccalaureate students are eligible to be considered for University-funded need grants and for the Federal Stafford Loan provided they have not reached the aggregate loan limit for undergraduate students. Post-baccalaureate students may also qualify for Federal Work Study depending on demonstrated need and the availability of funding and positions.

Course Withdrawals A course from which the student withdraws is not counted toward the minimum number of completed credits required to maintain satisfactory academic progress. If by withdrawing from the course, the student does not complete the number of credits for her/his enrollment status, the student is NOT required to increase the course load in subsequent semesters to make up for the deficiency. Each course attempted by the student, including withdrawals for which no academic credit is received, are counted against the credit hour ceiling placed on aid benefits. With repeated withdrawals, aid eligibility may be expended before the student completes her/his degree.

Off-Campus Courses Full-time, degree-seeking students at NCU may receive federal and state aid for courses taken at institutions with which consortium agreements have been established. Cooperating institutions include Lane Community College, the University of Oregon, and Umpqua Community College. A consortium 35

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Courses dropped within the “add/drop” period are not considered withdrawals.

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), and TEACH Grant.

University Withdrawal and Recalculation of Financial Aid

In rare cases, a student may be entitled to a post-withdrawal disbursement of Federal Title IV Funds. A student is entitled to a postwithdrawal disbursement if he or she was eligible for the aid at the time of withdrawal but the aid had not yet been disbursed. The student will be notified in writing of any postwithdrawal disbursement eligibility.

If a student withdraws from school during an academic semester (after the add/drop period, but before the semester ends), they or the school may be required to return or repay all or a portion of the financial aid they received, including aid from federal (Title IV), state, institutional and private sources, depending on the date of withdrawal.

If the student withdraws from the University, charges for tuition, campus housing and food service are assessed in proportion to the number of days completed out of the total number of days in the semester. After 60 percent of the semester has elapsed, charges are no longer prorated and are assessed at 100 percent. The following equation determines the portion of NCU charges retained for the semester:

The withdrawal date is defined as one of the following in order of preference: 1. The actual date the student starts the withdrawal procedure 2. The last recorded date of student attendance 3. The midpoint of the semester if the student leaves without notifying the University. After 60 percent of the semester has elapsed, no funds are returned and all awarded aid for the semester is earned (retained). The following equation determines the portion of financial aid that must be returned if the student withdraws from school before completion of a semester:

Semester Days Elapsed as of Withdrawal Date ÷ Total Days in the Semester = Portion of NCU Charges Assessed. What remains of the student’s aid after returning the required portion must first be used to pay charges at the University and then is refunded to the student if there is any surplus. The student is responsible for paying any balance due if the remaining aid does not cover NCU charges for the semester.

Semester Days Remaining as of Withdrawal Date ÷ Total Days in Semester = Percent of Aid Returned. Any aid to be returned, based on the above calculation, will be removed from the student’s account and sent back to its source no later than 45 days from the determination of a student’s withdrawal. Federal Title IV Assistance will be returned in accordance with the above calculation, in the following order, up to the net amount disbursed from each source: Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Subsidized Stafford Loan, Perkins Loan, PLUS Loan, Pell Grant,

The Financial Aid Award Financial Aid Award Letter Once the Financial Aid Office has received all the required information and the student is admitted to the University, the official financial aid award is determined. The student is considered for all sources and types of financial aid available. First awards notifications are emailed by early March to students who have met the March 1 priority deadline. To decline all or any portion of the award, students must

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indicate the award(s) that they wish to decline using the online financial aid portal (NetPartner) at http://www.nwcu.edu/online-awardinstructions/.

B. Expected Family Contribution (EFC) The amount of financial support expected from the student and his/her family according to the federal processor’s analysis of data provided on the FAFSA.

A student is responsible to notify the Financial Aid Office of any change of data supplied on the financial aid application, including campus housing status. If, after awarding financial aid to the student, the Financial Aid Office learns of subsequent changes in the information originally provided, the student’s aid will be reevaluated. The Financial Aid Office makes any necessary revisions in the financial aid package and sends an amended award notice to the student.

C. Estimated Need The difference between the total cost of the student’s education (Cost of Attendance) and his/her Expected Family Contribution (EFC) COA - EFC = Estimated Need. D. Awarded Funds The total of all financial aid awarded from federal, state and NCU sources. E. Remaining Need Even after all funds are awarded, some need may not be met. Alternate sources of aid may be explored to cover remaining need such as matching grants, education loans from private lenders, federal loans for parents of college or university students, tax credits, and scholarships from outside sources.

All financial aid awards cover a period of one academic year (or what remains of the academic year if the student is awarded midyear). The process of applying for financial aid, including submission of a FAFSA, is repeated each academic year for which the student seeks aid. Financial aid awards are packaged each year on the basis of current data on a firstcome, first-served basis to all eligible applicants.

Disbursing Financial Aid Aid is applied to the student’s account shortly after the semester’s add/drop period. The total aid awarded for the year is divided equally between each semester of enrollment. If a student is a first-time borrower at NCU, loan funds are applied to his/her account only after completing entrance counseling and a Master Promissory Note (MPN). When aid applied to the student’s account for the semester exceeds school charges (tuition, fees, room and board, outstanding balances), he/she is issued a check for the credit balance unless the student gives the school written permission to hold the funds for them. In order to receive NCU-funded grants and scholarships students are required to maintain full-time enrollment (12+ credits). On or off campus housing status may also affect total NCU-funded aid eligibility.

Financial Aid Budget Each year the Financial Aid Office computes an average comprehensive student budget for attending the University, also called the Cost of Attendance. This budget includes both billable expenses such as tuition, technology fees, as well as room and board, and non-billable expenses, such as books, personal expenses and transportation. The following five components are important in determining a student’s financial aid award: A. Cost of Attendance (COA) Comprehensive budget based on cost of tuition, fees, housing, food, books, transportation and personal living expenses. On-campus room and board is based on a full NCU food plan and the average cost of double occupancy campus housing.

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their first 8 years after leaving school (whether the student graduates or not), or the grants will be converted to an unsubsidized Direct loan with backdated interest added from the time of disbursement. Do to the potential for the grant to be converted to a loan, the Financial Aid Office strongly advises students to only choose to access TEACH Grant funds when they know for certain that they plan to enter the teaching profession in a high need field within a low income district.

Financial Aid Programs NCU offers a variety of student aid programs including grants, scholarships, work opportunities and loans to those who qualify. Funding comes from the federal government, the State, NCU, and private sources.

Grants Grants are funds provided for college that do not require repayment. Most are based on need and require submission of a FAFSA. Some are based on particular student characteristics or church affiliation.

Any student wishing to receive a Federal TEACH grant must annually complete an application (available online or from the Financial Aid Office), along with Entrance Counseling and an Agreement to Serve (ATS) which are both available on the Department of Education’s website https://teachats.ed.gov/ats/index.action.

Pell Grant This award is the country’s largest grant program for undergraduate students without a bachelor’s or professional degree. Pell Grants are funded by the federal government, who also sets the level of need required to qualify. Pell Grants currently range from $600 to $5,775 per year. A student may receive a Pell grant for up to 6 years of full time enrollment (600%) before reaching their aggregate Pell grant limit (ie. a student who receives a Pell grant while attending full-time for 6 years will not be eligible to receive a Pell grant for a 7th year of study).

Grants are for up to $4,000 per year. Oregon State Opportunity Grant Undergraduate students who are Oregon residents and meet established criteria for family income qualify for this grant. Any amount listed on a student’s financial aid award letter is estimated and is subject to change. The funding and grant amount are determined by the state each biennium. For 2015-2016, grants are for up to $2,100. Students must file a FAFSA by the end of January to be eligible. Students who declare a major in a course of study leading to a degree in theology, divinity or religious education are not eligible.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) These grants are awarded to Pell Grant recipients with exceptional need. The University awards these grants from an allotment of funds provided each year from the federal government. Funding is limited. Grants range from $125 - $500 per year.

Northwest Christian University Need Grant The NCU Grant is a one-year need based award that is available to traditional undergraduate students who are enrolled full-time. The amount awarded varies according to the student’s total need not covered by other sources of financial aid.

Federal TEACH Grant These grants are awarded to undergraduate and graduate students who are pursuing a degree leading to teaching in a high need field in a low income district, while maintaining a 3.25 or greater cumulative GPA.

Heritage Grant Full-time traditional undergraduate students whose home church is a heritage church at the

TEACH Grant recipients must teach in a high need field in a low income district during 4 of 38

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time of entrance to NCU qualify for this grant. Heritage churches include congregations of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and Christian Churches/Churches of Christ. The annual award is $2,500 and is renewed for each year the student is enrolled full-time at NCU.

SAT score or 19 ACT score and higher. The admissions application as well as the Merit Scholarship Worksheet is required to receive an academic scholarship. Ethical Leadership Development bonuses are contingent upon and in addition to the Academic Base Award. For more information see the Merit Scholarship Worksheet.

Heritage Minister’s/Missionary’s Child Grant Full-time traditional undergraduate students who are dependents of a heritage church minister or missionary (see above) at the time of entrance to NCU qualify for this grant. The annual award is $1,500 and is offered along with the Heritage Grant for a combined total of $4,000. It is renewed for each year of full-time enrollment at NCU.

Ethical Leadership Development Bonus Award (Maximum of $1,000) Additional bonuses of $500 each are awarded to traditional undergraduate students for demonstrated leadership in youth groups, churches, mission trips, student government, athletic, and other programs. For more information see the Merit Scholarship Worksheet.

Church Matching Grant NCU matches the annual contribution from a student’s home church, up to $1,000 for a maximum combined award of $2,000 per year for traditional undergraduate students. A separate application is required and is available online or from the Financial Aid Office. The funds and application must be received prior to the start of the academic year in order to be considered for the match.

Merit Scholarships for transfer students Academic Scholarships ($3,000-9,000) Scholarships are offered to traditional undergraduate students on a sliding scale to students with at least a 3.00 cumulative college or university GPA. For more information see the Merit Scholarship Worksheet. Ethical Leadership Development Bonus (maximum $1,000) Additional bonuses of $500 are awarded to traditional undergraduate students for demonstrated leadership in churches, mentoring programs, university organizations, and other programs. For more information see the Merit Scholarship Worksheet.

Scholarships Scholarships are competitive awards made on the basis of the student’s record of performance or achievement. All scholarships sponsored by NCU are awarded on the basis of merit as determined from admission information and/or the Merit Scholarship Worksheet. All scholarships are renewable upon meeting minimum GPA and course load requirements.

International Student Scholarships ($9,000) Scholarships are offered to traditional undergraduate students who are not U.S. citizens and do not qualify for Federal Title IV financial aid from the FAFSA. This scholarship is given in lieu of all merit scholarship programs.

Merit Scholarships for first-time freshmen Academic Scholarships ($5,000-11,000) Scholarships are offered to traditional undergraduate students on a sliding scale to students with at least a 3.00 unweighted GPA and either a 900 (Math and Critical Reading)

NCU Alumni Scholarship ($1,500) This scholarship is awarded to traditional undergraduate students who are the child or grandchild of an NCU alumnus. The NCU 39

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application is due on March 1st for all scholarships. Summaries and selection criteria for each scholarship are available at http://oregonstudentaid.gov/

alumnus and relation to the student must be indicated on the application for admission. Endowed Named Scholarships An array of named scholarships have been established through the gifts of private foundations and from friends and alumni of the University. Selection criteria and award amounts vary for each scholarship as per the stipulations of the donor. The Financial Aid Office evaluates information from both the students’ admission application and the FAFSA to determine an appropriate match. Each award is for one academic year and applies to traditional undergraduate students only.

Private Scholarships Many community service organizations, churches, and national foundations offer scholarships. Some are based on financial need, but many others are based on academic achievement, leadership ability, special talents, community service, or heritage. NCU provides a non-exhaustive list of private scholarships on our website. Extensive databases of private financial aid resources and scholarships may also be found on the Internet at such websites as FastWeb, FastAid, Wiredscholar, CollegeQuest, and Mach25. Many businesses and corporations also provide scholarships or loans to employees’ children or students who live in the communities in which the company is located. Others offer aid to students majoring in fields related to the company’s products or services. Company personnel offices have application information. In addition, students are encouraged to research on-line for scholarships offered by professional, career, and trade associations in their future career or field of study. Leads also may be listed in magazines related to the student’s interests or skills.

Talent Awards A limited number of scholarships are awarded to traditional undergraduate students with exceptional talent. Such awards are made for music, forensics, men’s and women’s basketball, men’s and women’s soccer, men’s and women’s golf, men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and women’s track, women’s volleyball, and women’s softball. Awarding decisions are made by the music director or by the respective coach and the athletic director on the basis of an evaluation of the student’s ability. Cockerline Memorial Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to traditional undergraduate students with the highest combination of GPA and demonstrated need. Awards are for one year. Eligibility requires Oregon residency and a minimum 2.5 GPA. Funding is limited and requires a separate application. Applications are received and awards made each spring. For more information contact the Financial Aid Office at 541-6847201.

Work Opportunities Work-Study offered as part of a financial aid package requires the student to pursue placement in one of the University’s part-time positions on or off campus. The total number of Work-Study positions is limited and employment cannot be guaranteed; however, students are assisted to compete for jobs available in the library, maintenance department, administrative offices, athletics, Morse Event Center, and academics.

Oregon Private Scholarships The Oregon Office of Student Access and Completion (OSAC) administers more than 450 privately-funded scholarships. Awards range from $500 to the total cost of education. Each has its own eligibility requirements, but the

The amount of Work-Study shown on the financial aid award is based on a combination of need and a projection of earnings possible if the 40

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student works his/her full allotment of hours. Funds are not applied to the student’s account but provided to the student in the form of a paycheck. Earnings are based on Oregon minimum wage and work schedules that vary from 6 - 10 hours per week.

referred to as the “grace” period. No repayment on the principal is required while the student attends school at least half-time or during grace or deferment periods. Borrowers typically have up to 10 years to repay their loans. Subsidized Stafford Loan Subsidized Stafford Loans are awarded to undergraduate students on the basis of demonstrated financial need and carry a 4.29% interest rate during the 2015-16 academic year. The federal government pays the interest on loans while the student is in college and deferment periods. To qualify, students must submit a FAFSA and meet all the requirements for federal student financial aid.

Loans NCU participates in two major federal programs for education: the Direct Loan program and the Perkins Loan program. Both programs provide low-interest loans with favorable repayment terms. The vast majority of financial aid awards from NCU include one or more federal education loans. Many students choose to accept such loans to help finance their education. Private alternative loans are also available to help students and their parents pay for university expenses, but these loans are not federally guaranteed. Alternative loans may be added to the financial aid package if more assistance is needed after exhausting federal, state, University and private student aid opportunities.

Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are not based on financial need, carry a 4.29% (undergraduate students) and 5.84% (graduate students) interest rate and are available to all students, regardless of income or assets. The student is responsible for paying all the interest on the loan, but can choose to allow it to accumulate while in college and during the grace period. To qualify, students must meet the same requirements as those for a subsidized Stafford Loan, except for demonstrating financial need.

Federal Direct Stafford Loans Stafford Loans are the largest source of federal student aid and are available to both undergraduate and graduate students. There are two types of Stafford Loans: subsidized, for which the government pays the interest while students are in school and deferment periods; and unsubsidized, where students pay all the interest on the loan. Undergraduate students may receive both types at the same time, while graduate students are limited to unsubsidized Stafford loans.

Additional Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Additional unsubsidized Stafford Loans are available to independent students to help cover unmet need or replace some of the expected family contribution (EFC). They are also available to dependent students whose parents’ PLUS loan application is denied.

The interest rate on new Stafford Loans is fixed. Origination and insurance fees of up to 4 percent may be deducted from each disbursement. Contact the Financial Aid Office for current information on interest rates, origination and insurance fees. Generally, repayment begins six months after the student graduates, withdraws from school or drops below half-time. This six-month period is

Interest and repayment conditions are the same as for the Unsubsidized Stafford Loan (above). Additional unsubsidized Stafford Loans may be added to an existing subsidized or unsubsidized Stafford Loan.

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Stafford Loan Limits

year (no grace period), but a parent may request a deferment.

Dependent* Students for Subsidized & Unsubsidized Freshman $5,500 Sophomore $6,500 Junior & Remaining Years $7,500 *Dependent students whose parents are unable to obtain a PLUS loan may borrow the same amount in unsubsidized loans as independent students.

To qualify, parents must meet the eligibility requirements for federal financial aid and must pass a credit check. Only parents of dependent students are eligible to apply. Generally, parents must not have any outstanding tax liens or judgments, delinquent or defaulted loan or credit card debt, or any bankruptcy, foreclosure or wage garnishment within the past five years or has one or more debts that are 90 or more days delinquent or that are in collection or have been charged off during the two years preceding the date of the applicant’s credit report.

Independent Students for Subsidized & Unsubsidized Freshman $5,500 $4,000 Sophomore $6,500 $4,000 Junior & Remaining Years $7,500 $5,000 Maximum Amounts for Subsidized & Unsubsidized Freshman $9,500 Sophomore $10,500 Junior & Remaining Years $12,500 Dependent Undergraduates $31,000 Independent Undergraduates $57,500

If parents do not pass the credit check, they may still receive a PLUS loan if they can find a qualified co-signer. Dependent students whose parents do not qualify for a PLUS loan are eligible to substitute an additional unsubsidized Stafford Loan in its place. This type of aid requires the student or parent to specifically initiate the application process online at https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/index.a ction.

Graduate Students Unsubsidized Loans Yearly Amount $20,500 Aggregate (Lifetime) Amount $138,500

Federal Direct PLUS Loans for Parents PLUS loans are available to parents or stepparents of dependent students who need to borrow for their child’s undergraduate education. Those federal loans are not based on need nor are they restricted by family income. Creditworthiness of the parent(s) is a determining factor. Parents may borrow up to the total cost of their dependent student’s education, minus other financial aid the student has received. PLUS loans may be a supplemental source of money for parents whose dependents have a Stafford Loan.

Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan Graduate students are eligible to borrow under the PLUS Loan Program up to their cost of attendance minus other estimated financial assistance. The terms and conditions applicable to Parent PLUS Loans also apply to Graduate PLUS loans. These requirements include a determination that the applicant does not have an adverse credit history, repayment beginning on the date of the last disbursement of the loan, and a fixed interest rate. Applicants for these loans are required to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and entrance counseling. They also must have applied for their annual loan maximum eligibility under the Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Program before applying for a Graduate PLUS loan.

PLUS loans carry a fixed interest rate. Interest begins to accrue from the date loan funds are first disbursed. Origination and insurance fees of up to four percent may be deducted. Generally, repayments start within 60 days of the loan’s final disbursement for the school 42

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Federal Perkins Loans The Perkins Loan program is the second major federal student loan program offered through NCU. Perkins Loans are awarded to students with exceptional financial need. Under regulations governing the Perkins Loan program, undergraduate students could conceivably borrow up to $ 5,500 for each year of undergraduate study, up to $27,500 for undergraduate study. However, because Perkins Loan funds are extremely limited, few, if any, students receive the top award amounts. With Perkins Loans, NCU receives an allotment of funds from the federal government to disburse to students. In this way, NCU assumes the role of the lender.

Private/Alternative Loans Private loans are available from the private sector to help students pay for college. Private loans are one way to provide additional funds to close or eliminate the gap between the student’s financial aid resources and remaining college expenses. Private loans are credit-based and are made to students regardless of need. Although students do not need to apply for federal, state, or NCU financial aid in order to qualify for a private loan, they are strongly encouraged to do so before applying for any private loan. NCU does not incorporate private loans in a student’s initial award package. Private loan counseling must be completed online at http://mappingyourfuture.org/oslc/ before funds can be disbursed to the student account.

The interest rate is fixed at five percent. Students pay no interest on their Perkins Loan while they are enrolled at least half-time and must begin repaying their loan nine months after graduating, leaving school or enrolling less than half-time. Depending on how much is borrowed, students may have up to 10 years to repay. Receiving Student Loan Funds First-time borrowers at NCU must receive loan entrance counseling and sign a loan contract (promissory note) before funds are disbursed. These requirements ensure that the student understands important details about the loan and his/her responsibilities as a borrower. Promissory notes and loan entrance counseling must be completed online at https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/index.a ction for Stafford and PLUS loans and at http://mappingyourfuture.org/oslc/ for Perkins loans.

Educational Benefits Veterans Educational Benefits The Montgomery G.I. Bill provides educational benefits for participating individuals who served in active duty or in the Selective Reserves. Benefits are also available under the postVietnam era Veterans Educational Assistance Program for those who entered the service after December 31, 1976, and before July 1, 1985, and contributed to the VEAP fund while on active duty or had contributions made for them by the military. Service-disabled veterans may be eligible for vocational rehabilitation benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Educational benefits are also available to veterans’ dependents if the veteran (spouse or parent) has died, or was totally and permanently disabled in service, or is listed as missing in action. There is also a Veterans Work-Study and Tutorial Assistance Program. For more information, contact the local office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (in the phone book under U.S. Government Offices), call toll free 888-444-4551, or go to http://www.gibill.va.gov.

PLUS loans for parents of undergraduate students have similar requirements before loan proceeds may be released. Parents who qualify for a PLUS loan must sign a promissory note as an initial borrower. A disclosure statement is sent to the parent(s) informing them of important details about the loan. Loan funds are electronically disbursed to the Financial Aid Office to be applied to the student’s account. 43

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Federal Tax Benefits The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 provided new tax credits for individuals who are paying higher education costs for themselves or for family members. There are also specific benefits related to interest paid on student loans and educational and traditional IRA’s. Education costs paid by an employer are exempt from federal taxes for undergraduate students. To learn more about federal tax benefits for education, visit http://www.irs.gov, call the IRS help line at 800-829-1040, or read IRS publication 970, “Tax Benefits for Higher Education,” available free by calling 800-8293676.

Financial Aid Office Assistance Please do not hesitate to contact the Financial Aid Office toll-free at 877-463-6622, extension 7201 or local 541-684-7201. Many questions may be answered over the phone. We are happy to arrange appointments for students and their families to meet with a financial aid counselor. Questions may be e-mailed to [email protected] The Financial Aid Office is located in the Morse Event Center on the northeast corner of 11th & Alder. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

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The deadline for new student registration for any semester is prior to the first day of class. Late registrations for first-time students will only be accepted upon the approval of the Admissions Advisory Committee.

Registration and Academic Policies Once a student is admitted to Northwest Christian University, the Registrar’s Office will assist the student with registration for classes and other areas related to academic policy and enrollment. To ensure academic order, NCU has created the following procedures and policies related to beginning coursework and sustaining students in their programs. Students should review schedules, advising, and academic policies in order to become familiar with how NCU organizes degree programs and how to begin and complete studies successfully at the University.

Adult degree Students Adult students process their registration by working with an assigned academic advisor. The advisor is assigned to the student during the admissions process. All registration, course selection, add/drops and advising is done by working with an academic advisor. Adult degree students are encouraged to make appointments to meet with their academic advisor to process registration and to get updates on degree progress. For adult degree students, an academic advisor’s signature and approval is required prior to official registration.

Registration Registration materials, forms and course offerings are located online http://nwcu.edu/academics. Students are required to complete and submit the registration form and return it to the Registrar’s Office within the dates listed in the Academic Calendar or a late fee may apply. The following explains how each student population should process registration for any given semester.

Graduate Students All graduate students are assigned an academic advisor whose role is to provide information and assistance for optimal performance and achievement in the program. Students should consult with their academic advisor at least once each semester to review academic progress. Faculty advisors are also available for consultation about students’ personal, professional, and career development as necessary.

Traditional Undergraduate Traditional undergraduate students process their registration form by working with their advisor. An advisor is assigned to the student during the admissions process. Traditional undergraduate students must register for classes for each semester at the times indicated on the Academic Calendar. All signatures are required prior to official registration. If a registration form is submitted without proper signatures or the student has not completed prerequisites for official registration, then registration for those particular classes will not be processed. In this event, an email notification will be sent to the student and advisor. Registration will not be processed until all signatures and approvals are submitted to the Registrar’s Office.

Short-Form Application to Attend NCU Completion of the Short-Form Application to Attend NCU does not constitute formal admission to the University. Students planning to pursue a degree or certificate must complete the formal admissions process. The Short-Form Application allows a student to take up to a certain amount of credits. Because this is considered non-degree seeking student status (the student has not been admitted to a program), a student is not eligible for any part of the NCU Financial Aid program. For nondegree seeking students, payment for a class is due at registration unless other arrangements have been made with the billing office.

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student is charged for the course and given a grade of “WF.” An administrative withdrawal fee may apply.

Changes to Registration Add/Drop Policy Courses may be added or dropped by submitting a completed Change of Registration form to the Registrar’s Office within the dates listed on the Academic Calendar. Drops in relation to tuition charges are determined by the course length:   

Academic Advising Students are required to meet with their advisor to obtain approval before registering for courses each semester. The advisor will work with the individual student to determine academic schedules that will satisfy graduation requirements. Degree progress questions should be directed to an academic advisor.

Drops in 5-week courses can occur with a full tuition refund if dropped by the end of the first week. Drops in 8-week courses can occur with a full tuition refund if dropped by the end of the first week. Drops in 16-week courses can occur with a full tuition refund if dropped by the end of the second week.

Traditional Undergraduate Placement Students are placed in appropriate writing and mathematics courses based on high school transcripts and SAT or ACT scores. Additional information may be required such as a writing sample or completion of the NCU Math Placement Exam. The placement procedure will take place before the student’s initial registration for NCU classes.

Course Withdrawal Policy Withdrawal from a particular class can occur after the drop period and before the last week of class. A “W” will be recorded in the student’s record in the event that the student is not failing at the time of withdrawal, or if no more than two-thirds of the class has elapsed. If the student is failing or more than two-thirds of the course timeframe has elapsed at the time of withdrawal, the grade will be recorded in the student’s record as “WF.” See the “Withdrawal from the University” policy below in the event that a student is dropping all coursework and is not planning to continue at the University.

First-Year Seminar Policy for Traditional Undergraduate Students All first-time freshman students, age 21 and under, are required to complete First-Year Seminar (FYS 101) during their first semester at Northwest Christian University. Transfer students who have completed a minimum of 24 semester credits are exempt from FYS 101 regardless of age. Students receiving a waiver for FYS are still required to meet the total number of credits for graduation (124).

Administrative Drop Students who are registered for a class but are reported after two weeks of coursework as never having attended will be administratively dropped from the course. The course will not appear on the transcript, but an administrative drop fee may apply.

Transfer Evaluation The Registrar’s Office evaluates work transferred from other institutions and determines which courses/credits might apply toward a degree program at NCU. Courses must be college level with the grade of C- or better for undergraduate coursework, and B- or better for graduate coursework in approved programs. Graduate credits must come from a regionally accredited institution, and the maximum number of credits accepted in graduate transfer cannot exceed forty percent of the total credits required for the program. Vocational/technical

Administrative Withdrawal Students who begin a course and stop attending, but fail to clear an official withdrawal through the Registrar’s Office, will be administratively withdrawn from the course. In the event of an administrative withdrawal, the 46

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credits will be accepted for undergraduate if they meet graduation requirements.

Major Classes Transfer An automatic evaluation of major coursework will not occur during a transfer evaluation. It is the student’s responsibility to inform the academic advisor when the student believes he or she has earned credits that might count for major requirements. Credits from Regionally Accredited Institutions All college level credits from such institutions are transferred and appropriately applied toward graduation requirements.

Any veteran receiving GI Bill benefits while attending Northwest Christian University is required to obtain transcripts from all previously attended schools, as well as military transcripts, and submit them to the school for review of prior credit. Transfer Graduates of community colleges with a college transfer track, and transfers from regionally accredited four-year colleges and universities with two years of a well-balanced program in general studies (humanities, social sciences, and sciences) may be exempted from NCU’s general education (core) requirements, except in Bible and Christian Ministry. In some cases such students may be advised to complete additional courses to meet NCU’s general education requirements.

Credits from Institutions Not Regionally Accredited Credits from non-regionally accredited institutions are evaluated by the Registrar’s Office on a case-by-case basis unless otherwise specified by a formal articulation agreement. A student who is accepted as a transfer student from such an institution must complete one full semester of work at NCU before any credit is transferred. A complete evaluation of the work will be made at the end of the first semester. If the student has maintained a C average at NCU, full credit will be given for the transferred work. A maximum of 30 credits may be transferred if approved.

A waiver of any required course does not exempt the student from the general graduation requirements. The total number of credit hours required for graduation must be completed. All other applicable general requirements must be met. The completion of the Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer (AAOT) degree or a similar degree from a regionally accredited institution, satisfies NCU general education requirements except eight credits in Bible and Christian Ministry Studies.

Music Credits A maximum of eight hours of music performance credits may be transferred. No more than two classes with the same course number will be applied to graduation requirements. An exception may be made if a student has music courses that relate to the major.

Articulation Agreements NCU has articulation agreements with a number of institutions, including Cornell Continuing Education Training Institute, Klamath Community College, Lane Community College, Peace Health Oregon Region, Pioneer Pacific College, and Umpqua Community College, and Western Beverages. Details of these agreements can be viewed in full at http://nwcu.edu/undergraduate/transfer?

Physical Education (PE) Credits A maximum of eight hours of PE credits may be transferred. No more than two classes with the same course number will be applied toward NCU graduation requirements. There is a maximum of eight credit hours for physical education courses. Course level for student athletes enrolled in varsity sports for PE credit will be based upon the seasons of eligibility used. Students in their first year of eligibility will

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be enrolled at the 100 level, second year of eligibility at the 200 level, and so on.

Examination as its official guide for approval or disapproval of a test for credit-granting purposes. All accepted credits must fulfill graduation requirements. Contact the registrar for more information.

Advanced Placement (AP) College credits toward a baccalaureate degree are granted to students who receive the grade of three or higher on tests sponsored by the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. The subject area tested and the scores received determine which NCU course requirements are satisfied. Further details are available at http://www.nwcu.edu/academics/registrar/apclep-credits/

Credit by Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) Students accepted into the Adult Degree Program may receive a maximum of 30 credits in a variety of subject areas for learning acquired through experience outside a normal academic setting. For conditions, guidelines, and procedures, contact the registrar’s office. No graduate credits are granted through PLA. All PLA credits must fulfill graduation requirements. No prior learning credit earned through another institution will be accepted.

International Baccalaureate (IB) College credit is awarded to students who have scored five through seven on an individual IB higher level exam in any subject area. Students applying for admission who hold an IB diploma are considered on a case-by-case basis for advanced placement and college credit. More information is available from the Registrar’s Office.

Credit through Military Educational Programs In granting credits earned through military training and experience, the University relies on standards and guidelines established by the American Council of Education (ACE). The ACE, through its Office on Educational Credit and Credentials (OECC), provides credit recommendations for courses and occupational training provided by the armed forces. The ACE evaluates formal military courses and training and publishes credit recommendations in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. Students should request an official transcript from the appropriate branch of the military. See details at http://nwcu.edu/Academics/AcademicServices/ VeteranBenefits/MilitaryTranscripts. All accepted credits must fulfill graduation requirements.

Reporting of Grades from Other Institutions Grades for courses taken at the University of Oregon and/or Lane Community College must be reported to the Registrar’s Office by the second week of the semester after the course was taken. Students whose University of Oregon and/or Lane Community College grades are not submitted by the deadline will not be considered for financial aid. Later reporting of the grades may result in rescinding of any aid given.

Alternative Ways to Earn Credits The faculty of NCU has approved the following alternative methods of earning credit: by examination programs, by prior learning assessment, through military educational programs, and course challenges (some restrictions may apply).

Course Challenge A formally admitted student may challenge certain University courses by examination without actually registering in the courses. 1. The student must petition the registrar and must have the approval of the individual faculty member administering the Course Challenge Contract.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) NCU uses the American Council of Education’s most recent edition of Educational Credit by 48

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2. Arrangements for the examination, including payment of fees, must be completed within the first ten (10) class days of each semester. Applications received later will be processed the following semester. 3. The student must pay, in advance, a special nonrefundable examination fee equal to one-half of the current tuition per semester credit hour, for the course being challenged. This fee is not included as a part of tuition and financial aid awards. 4. The student is allowed only one opportunity to qualify for credit by examination in any given course. 5. The student has the option of credit recorded with a mark of Pass (P) or letter grade. 6. Credit by examination may not be counted toward the satisfaction of the residence requirement. 7. Credit by examination may be earned only in courses whose content is identified by title in the NCU Catalog. 8. A student may not receive credit by examination in courses (a) that would substantially duplicate credit already received; or (b) that are more elementary than courses in which previous credit has been received or status has been established. 9. A student must be a regularly admitted student and registered for classes for the semester in which the examination is administered. 10. Regarding the English writing course challenge, see “Writing Competency Requirement.”

credits constitutes a full-time class load for graduate students.

Class Load

Reenrollment

To be classified as a full-time undergraduate student, a student must be enrolled in a minimum of 12 semester hours. This requirement is the basis for some academic honors and scholarship considerations, and for determining eligibility to participate in student activities and intercollegiate sports. Six (6)

Traditional Undergraduate Former students who have not attended NCU in four or more consecutive semesters (two academic years) must complete the full transfer application process in order to be readmitted. Such students are required to meet the academic and graduation requirements in effect at the time of readmission. An appeal letter

Fifteen to sixteen (15-16) semester hours per semester constitute a normal full-time student load for undergraduate programs. In order to enroll for more than 18 hours in a given semester, the student must secure approval from both his/her advisor and the registrar.

Withdrawal from the University The following rules govern grades and grade points given upon withdrawal from courses: 1. Withdrawal from courses when less than two-thirds of class has elapsed will result in the grade “W” and hours are not considered in calculating grade point average. 2. Withdrawal at any time while doing passing work will result in a grade “W” and the hours not considered in calculation of the grade point average. 3. Withdrawal after two-thirds of class has elapsed and while doing failing work will result in the grade “WF;” hours will be considered in calculating grade point average. 4. Unofficial withdrawal at any time (i.e., failure to clear through the Registrar and Student Services Offices) will result in a grade “WF” and the grade is considered in calculating grade point average. 5. A complete withdrawal with the grade of “W” may be granted at any time for medical reasons or extreme circumstance on the recommendation of the vice president for student development.

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must accompany the application to be reviewed by the Admissions Committee if the student did not leave the University in good standing.

a student will need to contact Enrollment Services for specifics. Graduate students are expected to maintain continuous enrollment in the program to optimize development of knowledge and skills cultivated in the curriculum and important peer relationships with members of the cohort group. However, the University recognizes that circumstances occasionally require that students take a leave of absence. At NCU, such leave cannot exceed three years. Students who have been granted on-leave status are required to pay a continuous enrollment fee equivalent to one credit of graduate tuition each term.

Students in good standing who have not been enrolled at NCU for three or less semesters are required to submit an abbreviated readmission application form and official transcripts for any and all courses completed while away from NCU. Students on approved leave from the University or doing approved study abroad or special studies programs are not required to apply for readmission. Adult Degree Program Adult degree students who have completed at least one semester or session may request a leave of absence (LOA) for one semester. The Leave of Absence request can be submitted to an academic advisor. The submission of the LOA should be completed as soon as the student is aware that he/she will not be able to register for any given semester. The request needs to include the reason for the LOA, expected date of return, student’s signature, and date of request. The Registrar’s Office will grant an LOA if there is sufficient expectation that the student will return. Failure to return from an official and approved LOA results in a withdrawal.

In the event that a leave of absence from the program is necessary, graduate students must consult first with their faculty advisor to develop a letter of request for the leave. This letter must articulate the duration of the requested leave, the reason for on-leave status, and a plan for completing the remainder of the curriculum. Requests for on-leave status are reviewed by the Academic Council at its next regularly scheduled meeting, after which the dean or program chair will communicate the Council’s decision in writing to the student. A student who is granted a leave of absence and fails to return to the program within the specified timeline must reapply to the program, complying with application procedures and admissions criteria in effect at that time. At the time of reapplication, the student on leave may be denied admission back into the program.

Readmission after withdrawal from the adult degree program requires reapplication. Readmission following a withdrawal is subject to approval. If a student has attended any other school during this time, the student is required to submit an official transcript to be evaluated. Students who are readmitted following withdrawal are subject to the requirements of the program under which they reenter unless a petition is granted.

Continuing Thesis Policy Once students have completed all of their requirements, they are allowed to enroll into the thesis class. Students completing a thesis are required to maintain continuous enrollment by registering for an additional graduate thesis credit until the thesis is completed.

Graduate Programs Reenrollment into a graduate program depends on a variety of circumstances. For reenrollment,

Students who have an outstanding balance with the University may not register for credits.

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In some cases, an Incomplete can be granted. If a thesis is not submitted by the end of the predetermined Incomplete timeframe, the student is required to take an additional one credit of thesis to maintain continuous enrollment.

return to NCU must apply for readmission through normal readmission procedures. Academic Probation Regulations Traditional undergraduate students on academic probation and those admitted conditionally are required to complete the University’s current academic success program. Failure to do so may result in academic disqualification. Students in the Adult Studies program will be encouraged to engage in tutoring and other academic support services. Students are not allowed to carry more than 13 credits while on academic probation.

Academic Policies Class Attendance Policies Unexcused absences will result in penalties including lower grades and, in some cases, failing of the course. Penalties are determined by each professor. Absences without penalty may be allowed in the following circumstances: 1. Serious illness 2. Emergencies in family, work, or other extenuating circumstance 3. Recognized commitments with the touring ensemble, NCU Day, or intercollegiate athletics

1. The minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) required for graduation at NCU is 2.00. Transfer coursework is not included in the cumulative GPA calculation. 2. A student whose semester GPA falls below a 2.00, but whose cumulative GPA remains equal to or above a 2.00, is placed on academic warning for the subsequent semester. 3. A student whose cumulative GPA falls below a 2.00 is eligible to continue on academic probation for one semester. During this semester, the student’s cumulative GPA must be raised to a 2.00. 4. A student on academic probation may achieve satisfactory academic standing and be removed from probation by raising his/her cumulative GPA to 2.00 or above. 5. A student receiving veteran educational benefits may remain on academic probation only one semester to continue receiving the benefits. The student’s semester and cumulative GPA must be a minimum of 2.00 by the end of the semester of probation. The Veteran’s Administration will be notified if the student has not met the requirement of probation except under extenuating circumstances. 6. A student is academically disqualified if his or her cumulative GPA remains below 2.00 at the end of the semester on academic probation. A student may also be academically disqualified when the Dean’s

Each professor is responsible for determining the validity of the excuse. In the case of chronic illness, or other continuing emergency situations, the professor may work out appropriate ways for the student to accomplish the course requirements. Regardless of the nature of the absence (excused or unexcused), the student is responsible for knowing all information presented in the class(es) missed. Students involved in University-related activities, such as athletic team participation, should not enroll in a class from which they may have to be absent for more than 30 percent of scheduled class sessions. Late Arrival for Class Students are expected to arrive on time for class. Penalty for late arrivals are determined by each professor. Academic Disqualification A student whose academic performance falls below minimum standards of the University is academically disqualified from taking further NCU courses. Such a student may petition the Academic Council for reconsideration. Once academically disqualified, a student wishing to 51

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Council has determined that he or she can no longer benefit from attendance or succeed academically at NCU.

http://nwcu.edu/academics/studentresources/ disabilityservices/FAQ?

Edward P. Kellenberger Library Academic Success Program The Academic Success Program is designed to assist students in developing skills in goalsetting, action-planning, time management, prioritization, organization, and behavior adjustment in order to achieve academic success. Through regular meetings with the Academic Success Coordinator, students receive both accountability and support in achieving their academic goals. The program is open to all students. Students placed on academic probation or admitted conditionally to the University may be referred to the program as a condition of their enrollment.

The Edward P. Kellenberger Library exists “to connect individuals to information, knowledge, and thought, and to support their development as competent, ethical learners and leaders.” We do this by providing access to a local collection of materials, to online resources, and to materials available regionally and around the world from other libraries. We do this by providing reference assistance and instruction both one-to-one and in the classroom. The librarians and library staff are here to assist you. Please contact them in person, by email, by direct phone or by contacting the circulation desk.

Academic Tutoring NCU seeks to help its students succeed academically. Toward this end, the University provides tutorial services, free of charge, to those who need academic assistance.

Library materials are classified and shelved according to Dewey Decimal classification. Resources to assist in understanding and using Dewey Decimal classification are available online or by asking any library staff member.

Academic Honesty Policy Our University’s mission assumes the highest principles of virtue and ethics in the intellectual life. Plagiarism, cheating, and academic dishonesty are not acceptable and will not be tolerated. If a student cheats on a test or assignment, he/she will receive a zero for that work and, depending on the severity of the offense, possibly a grade of “F” in the course. All incidents will be reported in writing to the vice president for academic affairs and to the vice president for student development, who may consider additional actions, including dismissal from the University and/or denial of application for readmission.

In addition to the general collections, the library has available many special collections which are available for viewing by appointment with the library director. These include the NCU archives, the Disciples Historical and Pacific Northwest collections (both searchable in the online catalogs), the Bushnell Rare Bible and Book Collection, the Guy Wright Bible collection, the Turner Memorial Museum, the Turnbull Fine Editions collection, the William Paul English Bible collection (available in the Reference room), and others. Materials in these collections generally do not circulate. The Primo search interface provided on the library website searches nearly all of the library’s available resources, including online resources, print and audiovisual resources, and the resources of libraries in the OPALL and WIN consortia. For assistance using Primo or any of the more specific search tools available please contact library staff.

Disability Services NCU does not discriminate against qualified individuals with a disability in admission or access to its programs or activities. Prospective and admitted students who need information about programs, services and accommodations should visit the disabilities services website at: 52

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Borrowing Borrowers must complete an application prior to checking out materials for the first time. Students, faculty and staff must present their NCU identification card. Non-NCU affiliates must present their respective school identification card or NCU library card. There is a 15 item limit at any one time.

libraries. University of Oregon policies will apply. NCU students, faculty, and staff also have borrowing privileges at New Hope Christian College. Please contact New Hope for policies and procedures. Interlibrary Loan The Kellenberger Library provides Interlibrary Loan (ILL) services for books and periodical articles not owned by NCU. NCU students, faculty, staff, and patrons may make interlibrary loan requests. Generally interlibrary loans are free of charge. However, if we are charged for items received, the charge is passed through to the borrower. If a borrowed item is lost or damaged the patron is responsible for all replacement costs or repairs.

Loan Period Books Undergraduate students: 3 weeks Graduate students: 2 months NCU staff: 1 month NCU faculty: 3 months Audiovisuals (CDs, DVDs, etc.) Undergraduate students: 7 days Graduate students: 7 days NCU staff: 2 weeks NCU faculty: 1 month Items can be renewed up to 2 times, unless another patron has placed a hold on the item.

Interlibrary Loan Policies:  Students must be primarily NCU students, taking 7 or more hours from NCU. Students whose primary coursework is at another institution (i.e. U of O, LCC) must request materials through their own library interlibrary loan service.  Audio visual materials generally are not available through interlibrary loan and cannot be ordered on a rush basis.  Limits for total interlibrary loans per semester are as follows: o Undergraduate students & patrons: 10 items at a time/unlimited total o Graduate students: 12 items at a time/unlimited total o Faculty & staff: unlimited

Reference materials, journals, and special items generally cannot be checked out. Application Process In order to borrow, renew, and request books and other materials from the library, an application form must be filled out. An application may be filled out in person or by filling out the online Patron Application Form. Please keep your contact information up-todate. Borrowing agreements with other libraries NCU belongs to the OPALL and WIN consortia. Materials from consortia libraries are available in the online catalog and can be requested either directly through the online catalog or by contacting the circulation desk. Availability of items listed in the catalog and loan periods and policies are set by the lending library. OPALL and WIN items are generally not renewable.

Mailing policy to off-campus faculty and students We will mail books or copies of articles to faculty and students who live outside a 20 mile radius of the Eugene area. You must be currently enrolled or teaching and unable to get to the library during our open hours. We will mail items to you at no cost, and you will be responsible for the return mailing cost. Material will be mailed to your home address, so please

NCU patrons may request a current semester sticker (required each semester) from the circulation desk and use their NCU ID card to borrow materials from the University of Oregon 53

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verify that the mailing address in your library account is accurate.

If the patron wishes to renew the book, it must be renewed within the 30 day period.

We will only send your material by US mail, unless reimbursed for rush delivery. Delivery time is subject to mail delivery time schedules and our processing time, about 3-5 work days. We will enclose a mailing label to return the material to the library. It is your responsibility to return the item at your expense and in a timely manner.

All patrons are to pay the library directly. At the end of the semester all outstanding charges will be turned over to the Business Office and placed on the student’s account. The library is under no obligation to notify patrons of overdue library materials; however, as a courtesy, the library will send written notices of overdue items to patrons as the time and resources of the library permits.

Overdue Fines, Fees & Lost Items The patron, the library card holder, is responsible for the care and return of materials checked out from the library. If a minor has materials checked out, the parent or guardian is responsible.

Appealing Charges If you believe the library has made an error resulting in you being charged or if you have a situation that has hindered the return or renewal of library materials, you may file an appeal in the library. The charges may be upheld, reduced or waived.

Patrons are responsible to maintain the library materials they check out of the library and they must remain in a reasonable condition during the time they are checked out. Reasonable condition is defined as: normal wear and usage. Patrons who intentionally write upon, injure, deface, tear, cut, mutilate, destroy or otherwise damage library materials will be billed for the replacement costs of the item.

The following reasons are generally not regarded as valid for appeals:  Forgetting, not knowing or disagreeing with the due date, amount of charges, or the library policy  Loaning the item(s) to a third party  Being too busy or out of town  Not receiving or reading the courtesy overdue reminder  Transportation problems

Students, faculty and staff are responsible for paying their own fines and fees to the University of Oregon Libraries. They can be paid at the U of O Business Office in Oregon Hall. Please note that the U of O charges interest on outstanding fines.

Appeal forms are available electronically or at the circulation desk.

Charges There will be no daily fine for the first 30 days after the due date of the book. Instead there will be a $75.00 charge, per book, after the 30 day grace period. If after the 30 day period the book is returned, the charge will be reduced to $25.00.

Behavior Policy It is the policy of the Kellenberger Library to maintain a safe and pleasant study and work environment for both library users and library employees. While it is understood that a certain level of verbal interaction is necessary for conducting business within the library, all library users are expected to be considerate of others who are reading, studying and working in the library, therefore keeping conversation to an acceptable and appropriate level and length for a library and work setting. Inappropriate and unacceptable behavior will not be tolerated.

If the book is not returned but the patron would like the charge reduced, they must replace the book (subject to librarian approval) and the charge will be reduced to $25.00.

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The Kellenberger Library considers the following to be unacceptable and inappropriate behavior on library premises: 





    

If the library staff determines that the misconduct poses a danger to the patron, others, or library property, or is otherwise blatantly offensive or disruptive, the patron will be asked to leave the library immediately without warning, and with an automatic referral.

Violating student behavior and codes of conduct as outlined in the student handbook (available at the circulation desk or online). Conversation (including on cell phones) which can be heard from library offices or the circulation desk, or that is bothersome to other users. Harassment for any reason. (Harassment refers to unwelcome behavior that is offensive, fails to respect the rights of others, and interferes with work, learning, living, or campus environment.) Use of any sound-producing device in a way such that the volume level is disruptive to other users. Consumption and possession of beverages that do not contain lids. Moving or rearranging library furniture or equipment without permission and without returning it to its proper location. Not disposing of trash or waste properly by using the available trash receptacles located throughout the library. Any other behavior that is disturbing or offensive to other library users or employees.

Anyone refusing to leave the library when asked to, will be escorted out of the library by campus security. Library staff consists of library faculty, staff, and student assistants.

Technology on Campus Purpose The IT department exists to serve and engage the NCU community through the resourceful application of information technologies. Computer Access & Electronic Resources Students may access computers and printing in the library. In addition to the library, the computer classroom features 20 PC workstations used for instruction. Music students have access to an Apple computer lab with software and hardware geared towards music production. Students will be issued an NCU network and email account. All campus offices will use this email account to communicate with the student. The network account also grants the student access to various resources, including online classes, tutoring, wireless internet, and electronic library resources. The main campus network provides resource access for faculty, staff, and students in the main buildings on campus. The dorm network provides internet services for students living in Burke-Griffith Hall, the Mom Richart Apartments, and the Hilyard Apartments. Wireless internet access is available to all faculty, staff, and students across campus.

Consequences of Violation of Policy First-offense patrons are told that they are in violation of the policy and how to correct the behavior. Repeated warnings due to continued violation of policy will result in offending patrons being asked to leave the library for the remainder of the day, which comes with an automatic referral to student development judicial affairs. Subsequent referrals will include additional disciplinary action up to and including loss of library privileges for the remainder of the semester. 55

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If you have questions about NCU’s information systems, you can reach the NCU Helpdesk by calling (541)684-7272, submitting a help ticket at https://myncu.nwcu.edu/help-desk, or visiting them in the basement of the Pomajevich Faculty Building.

Writing Competency Requirement NCU requires six semester hours of English composition, to be satisfied by coursework (with a grade of C- or P or better), or through established exemption and waiver procedures. In the case of coursework, the student must pass two semesters of English Composition (WR 121 and 123) or the approved equivalent.

Credit Hour Definition A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes, and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than: 1) One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or 2) at least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph 1 of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

Late Papers and Assignments Each instructor sets policies regarding papers and other class assignments that are turned in late. Professors reserve the right to set penalties, including lowering of grades, as well as rejection of late papers. Makeup Tests No makeup quizzes, tests, or finals will be allowed except for circumstances granted a legitimate excuse status. In the event that a student cannot take a quiz, test, or final, he/she must present a written statement in person to his/her professor before or within three days of the absence, and the professor will determine whether or not a legitimate excuse status will be granted. When makeup tests are given, the quiz, test, or final exam already given to other students will not be repeated. New tests must be prepared.

Grading and Exam Policies Assessment of Student Learning Assessing student learning outcomes is an essential part of the academic experience, for both students and faculty. In order to measure the level of knowledge, skills, and abilities that students are expected to attain in their academic majors and individual classes, faculty will employ a variety of assessment methods. Individual course instructors enjoy the academic freedom to use the methods they deem most appropriate to assess student learning, including, but not limited to: attendance/participation, papers, journals, assignments, quizzes, tests, exams, and projects (individual and/or group). Some methods may be adopted across courses and majors using rubrics adopted by faculty in the respective Schools.

Final Grades Individual course instructors enjoy the academic freedom to use the methods they deem most appropriate to assess student learning and to assign grades based on those methods of assessment. Grades assigned by individual instructors are final. At a student’s request, the instructor may assign a grade of Incomplete when the student has essentially met all class requirements except some minor matters and has had an emergency situation or experienced other extenuating circumstances at the last minute. Tardiness and lack of selfdiscipline do not constitute a justifiable cause. Changes to a final grade may only occur under the following circumstances:

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removal of an “Incomplete” (either by completion of work or reverting to the earned grade at the end of the course)



instructor error/miscalculation



the assigned grade is a result of identifiable and documented discrimination, harassment, professional incompetence, neglect, or other unfair treatment on the part of the instructor

Registration & Academic Policies

of the paper and presentation (as appropriate) will be submitted by the student for repository in an archive. Faculty advisors may recommend final student papers for publication in a Proceedings journal; these papers will be reviewed by a faculty committee for quality. Failure to complete this capstone presentation requirement will result in not passing the capstone course. Major Field Test Major field tests are used by academic programs to assess how well students learn and understand the material in the program. It is not used to evaluate individual students. All tests are scheduled early in finals week, are web-based involving the Internet, and are a maximum of two hours in length. For those academic programs that have tests (Business/ Accounting, English, History, Mathematics, Psychology), it is a requirement of the capstone course that students take the test in order to pass the course.

If a student wishes to contest a final grade that s/he deems to be unfair the student must first contact the instructor to determine whether there was a reporting error or a miscalculation of the grade. If the student still deems the final grade to be unfair, s/he may submit in writing to the vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty clear documentation of discrimination, harassment, professional incompetence, neglect, or other unfair treatment on the part of the instructor which resulted in the assignment of an unfair grade. The vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty may take counsel, as deemed appropriate, but the decision of the vice president is final. Once assigned by the course instructor, no final grade may be changed without the written approval of the vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty.

Dead Week (The week before finals) The University is vitally concerned about the academic success of its students. Dead Week is designed to give traditional undergraduate students a chance to complete their school work toward the end of each semester. To that end, the following policies have been established: 1. Extracurricular activities involving a significant amount of time, such as a half day or full evening, shall not be held during the Dead Week. University events shall not be planned unless absolutely necessary, and students are expected to refrain from planning events that might interfere with studies. 2. Faculty shall not make assignments or give tests during the Dead Week unless they were clearly stated in the course syllabus.

Capstone Presentations Capstone presentations reflect the culmination of a student’s learning experience by demonstrating results of research or performance. They can involve a variety of presentations including formal exposition, posters, musical performance, or art, for example. Students will make a presentation based on their specific study at the ACE (Academic Creativity and Excellence) Day scheduled during the winter or spring semester in which they take the capstone course. Students will submit the required form by the stipulated deadline and will then be scheduled to make their presentations. An electronic copy

Final Examination Policy Final examinations will not be given before the final exam week nor prior to the scheduled 57

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times shown in the announced final exam schedule. In the following two cases, a student may take the final at a later date.

Graduate School Academic Progress Graduate students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average throughout their master’s studies. Cumulative GPA is calculated on all courses taken at NCU to satisfy specific requirements of the graduate program. In all graduate programs except the Masters of Business Administration (MBA) and the Masters of Education with Licensure (M.Ed with Licensure), courses in which a C+ or lower is earned are not accepted for graduate credit, but are factored into calculation of cumulative GPA. Grades of P (Pass) or N (No pass) are not computed in the student’s cumulative GPA. A maximum of two courses with a grade of C-, C, or C+ are earned in the MBA and M.Ed with Licensure graduate programs. All other courses must have a grade of B- or better. Non-passing courses (those in which C+ or lower or N is earned, minus the two-course MBA /M.Ed with licensure exception) must be repeated at current tuition rates.

1. A student may have more than two finals in one day. In this case the student may arrange with his/her instructor to take the final at a later time during finals week. Permission from the vice president for academic affairs is not required in this case. 2. If a student has a sudden serious illness or grave emergency in the family, the student may be allowed by his/her instructor to arrange a makeup at a later time during finals week. In the event that the illness or emergency lasts longer than the duration of the finals week, the student may be allowed to receive an Incomplete for the semester and take the makeup final at a later date agreeable to the student and the instructor. This provision applies only if the student has completed all course requirements up to finals week. In all other circumstances deviation from the posted finals schedule shall not be allowed.

Students whose cumulative grade point average drops below a 3.0 will be placed on academic probation for the duration of time it takes to complete the next 12 credits in the program., During this time the student must raise his or her cumulative grade point average to 3.0 or higher. A student whose academic performance falls below minimum standards of the University is academically disqualified from taking further NCU courses. Such a student may petition the Academic Council for reconsideration. Once academically disqualified, a student wishing to return to NCU must apply for readmission through normal readmission procedures.

Grade Appeal Process If a student wishes to contest a final grade that s/he deems to be unfair: 1. The student must first contact the instructor to determine whether there was a reporting error or a miscalculation of the grade. 2. If the student still deems the final grade to be unfair, s/he may submit in writing to the vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty clear documentation of discrimination, harassment, professional incompetence, neglect, or other unfair treatment on the part of the instructor which resulted in the assignment of an unfair grade. 3. The vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty may take counsel, as s/he deems appropriate, but the decision of the vice president is final.

Grade System and Grade Point Average Prior to fall 1995, grade points were computed by assigning four points for each credit of A, three for each credit of B, two for each credit of C, one for each credit of D and zero for each credit of F. Marks I and W, and grades N and P are disregarded. The grade point average is calculated by dividing total points by total credit of A, B, C, D, F. For courses taken fall 1995 and 58

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later, the plus sign increases the points assigned to the letter grade by 0.3 per credit (for B, C, and D grades only), and the minus sign decreases the points assigned to the letter grade by 0.3 per credit. No A+ grades are awarded.



Grades at NCU reflect the following definitions: A

4

Excellent

B

3

C

2

D

1

F

0

+

+0.3

Good Satisfactory for undergrad; below passing for graduate (exception: a maximum of two courses will be accepted as passing in the MBA and M.Ed with Licensure grad programs) Inferior Unsatisfactory performance, no credit awarded With B, C, D

-

-0.3

With A, B, C, D

I



Incomplete Satisfactory (C- or above for undergraduate work; B- or above for graduate work)

P

N

Less than satisfactory performance, no credit awarded (D+ or lower for UG work, C+ or lower for graduate work)

AU W WF

Audit; no credit awarded Official withdraw without penalty Withdraw while failing

X

No grade reported by instructor (recorded by registrar)

^ R P/N



Course does not meet NCU graduation requirements Class Repeated Pass/No Pass



P/N (Pass/No Pass) grades are the prerogative of the individual professor. Approval of the instructor must be received by the close of the add/drop period as printed in the catalog. In the A, B, C, D, and F scale, below C- is No Pass. Courses with P grade count toward graduation. This choice, once made, is final and cannot be revoked.



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(See limitations under Four-Year Bachelor Degree Programs.) D or F Grades. The grade of D does not satisfy graduation requirements in an academic major or minor. A student who receives a grade of D or F may repeat the course once. The first grade received will remain on the permanent record, but the second grade, if higher, will be computed in the GPA. Incomplete. The instructor may assign a grade of Incomplete when the student has essentially met all class requirements except some minor matters and has had an emergency situation or other extenuating circumstances at the last minute. Tardiness and lack of self-discipline do not constitute a justifiable cause. Incompletes must be completed 30 calendar days from the last day of instruction, which is determined by the professor of record and recorded on the Incomplete form. In cases of extenuating circumstances, extension may be granted at the discretion of the instructor and the vice president for academic affairs; requests for such extension must be submitted to the vice president for academic affairs for approval before the 30-day period elapses. Students with more than one Incomplete grade per semester and/or a consistent pattern of Incomplete grades in consecutive semesters may be placed on academic probation. When the student fails to demonstrate significant improvement, he/she may be academically disqualified. Grade of WF. The grade of “WF” is given for withdrawal after the 10th week of the semester while doing failing work or for failure to clear an official withdrawal through the registrar and Student Services Office. Grade of X. This grade is initiated by the Registrar’s Office when it finds an error or other problems on grade reports

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submitted by the faculty. The grade is converted when the problem has been resolved or clarified. GPA. Both NCU course credits and transferable credits from other colleges and universities are computed for the cumulative GPA for academic awards and honors. However, the cumulative GPA listed on NCU transcripts only includes courses completed at NCU.

 

STANDARDIZED GRADING SCALE Unless otherwise indicated in an individual course syllabus, NCU’s grading scale shall be as follows:

A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF P N



93% and above 90-92.99% 87-89.99% 83-86.99% 80-82.99% 77-79.99% 73-76.99% 70-72.99% 67-69.99% 63-66.99% 60-62.99% below 60% 70% and above below 70%



Course Designations The course number indicates the difficulty of the course in relation to lower division and upper division work: 50-99

100-299 300-499 500-599

Classification of Students A student’s classification is determined by the amount of credit earned both in hours and grade points. The classification held by a student at the beginning of the academic year will be continued throughout the year.  

Junior: A student who has completed 60 semester hours of college credit by the opening of the fall semester. Senior: A student who has completed 90 semester hours of college credit by the opening of the fall semester. Non-Degree-Seeking: A student who is taking six or fewer semester hours and who does not plan to meet requirements for graduation. A student who acquires 30 semester hours of credit must change from non-degree to regular student status and conform to the usual regulations governing regular students. Graduate: A student who has completed a baccalaureate degree and has been admitted into one of the graduate programs. Post-Baccalaureate: A student who has earned a bachelor’s degree and is pursuing further studies.

600-699

Remedial courses which do not apply toward degree requirements Lower division courses Upper division courses Courses open primarily to graduate students Courses open only to graduate students

Course numbers that end in 08 represent courses taken through the Online Consortium of Independent Colleges and Universities (OCICU). Course numbers that end in 05 represent Reading and Conference courses individually designed to be offered as a co-requisite to an existing course. These courses are available by petition only.

Freshman: A student having 29 or fewer semester hours of college credit. Sophomore: A student who has completed 30 semester hours of college credit by the opening of the fall semester.

The capital letters preceding the course number indicate the area in which the course is offered. 60

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In some instances a single course may be counted as fulfilling the requirement in one or the other of two fields.

Repeat Classes Students may repeat any course once. All grades remain on the permanent record, but no more than one course will show credits earned and only the most recent grade is calculated into the grade point average. A few select courses can be repeated multiple times with credit earned each time. These courses are identified in the catalog as ‘repeatable for credit.’

Courses with a capital “H” following the number designation represent courses taken at “Honors” level. As a rule, students should enroll in courses according to their classification. Exceptions may be made with the consent of the instructor. Academic advisors will help the students develop their program according to the rules under general practice.

Chapel Credits Chapel programs are an integral part of the University’s educational activities and experiences; therefore, the University requires that students enrolled for 12 or more hours, except those in the Adult Degree Program and graduate programs, participate in chapel each semester. The campus pastor supervises monitoring and reporting of chapel attendance.

Cross-Application of Courses Courses used to meet requirements of an academic major or minor may not be applied toward another academic major or minor, but varying cross-application of courses between a major and the general education core is allowed.

1. Each student will be monitored for chapel attendance during any semester that he/she is enrolled for 12 or more hours. 2. Chapel credit is recorded on official transcripts as “P/N” but does not count within total credits required for a degree program. 3. Petitions for possible variance may be filed with the campus pastor in the Morse Event Center. 4. Chapel attendance is taken at all regularly scheduled chapel services. A record is kept by the office of the campus pastor who assigns the appropriate grade at the end of each semester.

Traditional Undergraduate major requirements may also be used to satisfy general education core requirements, whenever the courses are appropriate and approved for both. Adult Degree Program students can cross-apply a maximum of two courses, and they must be satisfying different general education categories. (For example, a humanities and a social science course can be cross-applied, but not two humanities courses.) Adult Degree Program students majoring in Interdisciplinary Studies, however, do not have a limitation to the number of courses that can be cross-applied between the general education core and the Interdisciplinary Studies major.

Second Baccalaureate Degree Persons who hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university may complete a second bachelor’s degree at NCU by completing 8 credits of the Biblical and Christian foundations in the core requirements and an academic major. A minimum of 30 hours from NCU is required.

Any cross-applied course will be counted only once in computation of the total number of credit hours. Thus the student must still complete the total number of credit hours required for the degree program involved, normally by taking additional elective courses.

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upon completion of an additional 30 hours in another subject field at NCU not closely related to a field already completed.

academic requirements and policies in effect at the time of readmission. Academic Grievance Policy Academic grievances are student grievances related to any part of the institution’s academic structure, in which a student feels that he or she has been unfairly treated and/or that his or her academic performance has been adversely affected by a faculty member, a member of academic staff, or an academic department. Students who feel that they have been unfairly treated and/or that their academic performance has been unduly impeded by a member or members of faculty or academic staff have the right to raise their concern and/or to lodge a grievance at any time without fear or consequence of retribution by any member of faculty or staff.

Graduate School Residency Requirements/Transfer Credit Limit Candidates for master’s degrees may transfer a maximum of 10 semester (15 quarter) credit hours in approved programs of regular graduate work completed at another accredited institution provided that: 

 

the work satisfies the requirements of a specific course or practicum experience in NCU’s curriculum, with the approval of the course instructor and dean or program chair of the department; grades of A, B, or P were earned in these courses; the courses were completed within five years of the expected program completion date;

A student with an academic concern or grievance will normally first raise the concern/grievance with the individual faculty member(s) or staff member(s) to whom the concern/grievance relates. If the concern/grievance cannot be resolved in the initial step, or if the student feels unsafe to raise the concern/grievance directly with the respective faculty/staff member(s), the student may seek the assistance of the head of the appropriate school, program advisor of the specific program, or the assistance of another trusted member of faculty or staff. The student may also (be directed to) initiate contact with one of the designated ombudspersons.

The University does not grant graduate credit for prior learning experience nor accept graduate credit earned through prior learning at another institution as transfer credit. Time Limit  Associate degrees must be completed within three years from the date of initial matriculation or that of rematriculation following readmission.  Baccalaureate degrees must be completed within six years from the date of initial matriculation or that of rematriculation following readmission.  Master’s degrees must be completed within five years from the date of initial matriculation. This time limit includes any on-leave time the student may have been granted.

If a concern/grievance cannot be resolved either by direct contact with the respective faculty/staff member(s) or by the arbitration of the ombudsperson(s), the student may lodge a formal grievance with the vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty. A formal grievance must include the following items in writing:

When the time limit has elapsed, the student must reapply for admission. For details regarding readmission, consult the director of admissions. Readmitted students are subject to

1. Clear description of the situation and the specific nature of the concern/grievance.

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2. All available documentation to support the grievance. 3. Clear documentation of prior attempts to resolve the grievance.

for graduation with appropriate academic honor, as follows:

The vice president for academic affairs may choose to refer the grievance to the University Appeals Hearing Board (as described in the Student Handbook). In making a final decision the vice president for academic affairs may take into consideration the following:







Cum laude: for students with 3.50-3.69 cumulative GPA Magna cum laude: for students with 3.703.89 cumulative GPA Summa cum laude: for students with 3.904.00 cumulative GPA

Criteria for these academic honors are as follows:

1. The formal grievance as documented and presented by the student. (A personal interview with the student may also be required.) 2. Any documentation provided by the faculty/staff member(s) to whom the grievance relates. (A personal interview with the faculty/staff member(s) may also be required.) 3. Any documentation provided by the ombudsperson. (A personal interview with the ombudsperson may also be required.) 4. Any recommendation from the University Appeals Hearing Board (if available). 5. The counsel of other individuals or groups of individuals, as appropriate (e.g., Deans Council, Academic Council, President’s Cabinet).

  

Only course credits taken at NCU are computed to determine the cumulative GPA for honors. All grades earned through completion of the degree will be computed. A minimum of 45 credits must be earned from NCU to qualify for these honors.

Awards & Contests President’s Scholastic Award The graduating daytime undergraduate senior, who has attained the highest cumulative GPA, with at least 61 credit hours having been completed at NCU, shall receive the President’s Scholastic Award. All NCU undergraduate grades are computed to determine the cumulative GPA. Kendall E. Burke Memorial Award Annually at Commencement service a special award of a Bible bearing the imprint of the recipient’s name is given to the daytime undergraduate student chosen by secret ballot by the student body and faculty, as the one who has rendered the most outstanding service to the institution. The recipient must have maintained excellence in academic work, be fully approved as to Christian character and convictions, and show a notable record of service to others. This award was instituted by the late Dr. Kendall E. Burke as the “President’s Award” and has been continued by the faculty and administration as the Kendall E. Burke Memorial Award.

The decision of the vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty is final.

Academic Honors Northwest Christian University Dean’s List Each year, traditional undergraduate students who have completed at least 12 graded credit hours at NCU with a GPA of 3.50 or better during fall or spring semester are nominated for inclusion on the Dean’s List. Required courses that grant only Pass/No Pass grades count toward the 12 credit hour requirement. Scholastic Awards for Graduating Seniors Graduating seniors with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher are recommended by the faculty

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Victor P. Morris Memorial Award Each year the Victor P. Morris Award is presented to a graduating Adult Degree Program student considered by the faculty as the most outstanding on the basis of academic excellence and leadership. This award is given in honor of Dr. Victor P. Morris, who encouraged persons of all ages to complete college. He served many years as dean of the University of Oregon School of Business Administration (now Charles H. Lundquist College of Business). Dr. Morris also served with distinction as a member of the NCU Board of Trustees, and twice he served as the acting president of NCU.

plan on participating in commencement until given preliminary clearance by the Office of the Registrar. Students are required to submit the application for graduation on time and be approved by the Office of the Registrar, if they are planning to participate in commencement.

The recipient of the Victor P. Morris Award will receive a copy of a current bestselling management book during the Commencement exercises. The recipient’s name will also be added to a permanent plaque to be kept at the University.

Graduation Participation Final approval for graduation participation is provided by the Office of the Registrar after a graduation audit is completed and before the ceremony.

Graduation Confirmations Graduation audits will be completed by the Office of the Registrar prior to the end of the add/drop period for the final semester of classes if the application is submitted before the end of the pre-registration period preceding the semester of graduation. A copy of the audit will be sent to the student’s academic advisor.

Policy on the Disclosure of Student Records

A number of additional specialized awards are specified by the faculty and staff and are awarded at the annual Honors Convocation.

Complete policies regarding student privacy and records can be viewed at http://nwcu.edu/academics/registrar/recordpolicies? Students’ rights regarding personal information include:

Graduation Commencement/Graduation Activities The main commencement activities are held in May, at the end of spring semester. An additional graduation ceremony is held in December at the end of fall semester. Graduation Application Students who are nearing the completion of their degree requirements and intend to graduate must submit an application for graduation. Applications can be downloaded from http://nwcu.edu/document.doc?id=193 and submitted to the Office of the Registrar. The application must be submitted by the end of registration for the semester immediately preceding the final semester of coursework, regardless of whether or not the student intends to participate in the commencement ceremony. Late applications are subject to a $25 late application fee. Students should not



The right to view material in his/her records filed at NCU, with the exception of those records for which there is a signed waiver of that right;



The right to limit access to personal records (consent of the student must be given for release of any personal or academic records to persons other than NCU faculty and staff having a legitimate official reason or under emergency circumstances); The right to limit personal material (directory type information) printed in publications such as the Student Directory. Directory type information, which could be given out to whoever inquires, includes the student’s full name, local and permanent address(es) and telephone number(s), email



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address, date and place of birth, the fact that the student is or has been enrolled, dates of attendance, class level and academic major, number of credit hours (not grades), degrees and honors awarded, participation in officially recognized activities, heights and weights of members of athletic teams, photographs, and previous institutions attended.

admission. Since the University reserves the right to discontinue courses at any time, course substitutions may be assigned for discontinued courses. The University reserves the right to change fees, rules, and calendars regulating registration at, admission to, conduct in, instruction in, and graduation from the University. Changes go into effect whenever the proper authorities so determine and apply not only to prospective students but also to those who at that time are matriculated in the University.

A student who challenges any item in his/her records shall have opportunity for a hearing. A request for a hearing regarding academic records should be referred to the Registrar’s Office. A request for a hearing regarding financial records should be referred to the Student Services Office.

NOTE: Students are subject to academic requirements and academic policies as described in the University Catalog as well as to other published academic rules and regulations in effect at the time of their initial admission or readmission to Northwest Christian University. When significant changes are adopted in the academic policies and requirements after their admission, students have the option of completing their degree under either the old or the new requirements within the degree time limit.

Non-Discrimination Policy The policy of NCU is to provide equal opportunity for all qualified persons in the educational programs and activities that the University operates. The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, religion, marital status or any other protected status to the extent prohibited by applicable nondiscrimination laws in its admission policy, employment, scholarship and loan programs, educational, athletic, and other activities that it operates.

Active Service Duty Policy Should a student enrolled at NCU be called to active service duty, he/she should report to the Registrar’s Office. The registrar will back the student out of the classes he/she is registered for and refund the student’s fees 100 percent (working in conjunction with Financial Aid if appropriate). Questions regarding this policy may be directed to the office of the vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty.

Catalog Changes and Authority Policy Students whose studies are uninterrupted will graduate under the requirements listed in the Catalog in effect at the time of original 65

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degree is awarded). NCU reserves the right to interpret policy and to apply the intent of the policy judiciously, depending upon circumstances. University policy ensures individual responsibility and an environment that contributes to a learning community. Failure to abide by the policies and procedures as outlined by the Student Handbook may result in disciplinary action and sanctions. Each student associated with NCU is expected to be familiar with and to follow all policies and procedures established by the University.

Student Development Code of Conduct Northwest Christian University is built on the foundation of the Christian faith and is committed to holistic student development in the context of our vision, mission, and values. We have established services, policies, and community guidelines that will foster a livinglearning environment consistent with our values. NCU strives to create an environment that is conducive to academic success, physical wellness, and spiritual growth. It is therefore important to understand community expectations for students while they are members of the NCU community. Standards have been designed to allow for the freedom and flexibility of the individual and to ensure the rights and privileges of the community as a whole. The student may not agree with, or fully understand, some facets of the University’s behavioral expectations. However, by enrolling as a student at NCU, the student agrees to live according to the expectations outlined in the NCU Student Handbook. Non-matriculated students admitted to special programs are also expected to maintain these standards. Any questions regarding these statements should be directed to the vice president for student development and enrollment.

For a complete listing of policies, judicial affairs, and grievance procedures please refer to the Student Handbook posted online at http://www.nwcu.edu/?attachment_id=4583. To obtain a hard copy, please contact the Student Development Office at (541) 684-7345.

Associated Students of Northwest Christian University (ASNCU) The Associated Students of Northwest Christian University (ASNCU) is the official organization that exists to serve the undergraduate students. ASNCU regularly meets and works with the administration, faculty, and staff to represent student perspectives and concerns regarding institutional affairs. We are made up of four Class Representatives, two At-Large Representatives, three Executive Vice Presidents, the Controller, and the ASNCU President under the following mission statement. We, the students of Northwest

Policies and standards for conduct shall apply to conduct that occurs on the University premises, at University-sponsored activities, and off campus when a student’s conduct could adversely affect the University community and/or the pursuit of its objectives. Each student shall be responsible for his or her conduct from the time of application for admission through the actual awarding of a degree, even though conduct may occur before classes begin or after classes end, as well as during the academic year and between the semesters of actual enrollment (and even if their conduct is not discovered until after a

Christian University, strive to ensure a voice in institutional affairs and protect the interests of the students. We do our best to provide for the spiritual, intellectual, physical, and social development of the students of NCU and promote positive communication between students, administration, and staff. ASNCU’s

three standing committees—the Activities Committee, the Academic Committee, and the Campus Environment Committee—work tirelessly to ensure that the voices of Northwest Christian University students are heard. The duties of the committees are the following:

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The Academic Committee addresses issues related to curriculum, learning resources, faculty issues, and educational policies. The Campus Environment Committee addresses issues related to physical campus improvements, residence life, and food services. The Activities Committee hosts events, plans community building events, and encourages broader community involvement, awareness, and service at NCU.

more. For more information, please see http://www.nwcu.edu/ministry/. The department offers: 



ASNCU also grants club and organization status to student groups on campus and assists those organizations with annual funding.



For more information regarding ASNCU, please see http://www.nwcu.edu/asncu/. The ASNCU can also be contacted at [email protected] or call 541-684-7342. The ASNCU office is located on the first floor of the Goodrich Administration Building.

 

Campus Ministries Student Ministries and spiritual development are at the core of the Northwest Christian University experience. We believe the process of building and equipping men and women to be leaders of the future must be grounded in a strong relationship with God (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). Campus Ministries emphasizes developing the whole person: body, soul, and spirit. This spiritual formation occurs through a balanced approach experiences that are focused inward, outward and together. Inward, as we seek to pursue our individual relationship with God; outward, as we extend our lives in service to others in need whether nearby or afar; and together, as we build a genuine community of love and unity. This approach is evidenced in the many activities and opportunities to grow spiritually at NCU, including chapel and worship services, community life, group Bible studies, urban outreach and community service projects, evangelism teams, missions trips, and much

Daytime and nighttime chapel services that aspire to build community, enable worship, and challenge participants to be devoted followers of Jesus Christ. Community Life Groups of four to ten students that meet regularly to encourage accountability to the Lord Jesus Christ, to build community, and to provide a safe and nurturing place to explore our walk with God. Pastoral care when students sense a need for a safe place for encouragement, direction, affirmation, belonging, prayer, and nurturing in the Christian faith. The campus pastor and his staff want to serve the student body of NCU by helping students to become whole in Christ. Assistance for students to connect with local churches during their years at NCU. Opportunities for overseas mission trips and community outreach.

Fitness Center in the Morse Event Center The Fitness Center offers a variety of cardio, weight, and strength training equipment to meet students’ physical health needs. Hours of operation are extensive during the school year. These hours will be posted in the MEC and on the website. Visit http://www.gobeacons.com for more information.

Food Services NCU partners with Ala Carte to provide campus dining and catering. A variety of options are available for breakfast, lunch, and dinner including a short order window, hot buffet entrees, salad bar and cold buffet. Residential students are able to utilize weekly meal plans as a part of the housing agreement while living on campus. Commuter students may purchase a weekly meal plan or individual meal tickets that are sold in the campus coffee shop, the Beacon Beanery. Our food service program is able to customize meal options with individual students 68

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who have special dietary requirements. For more information, please call the Student Life Office at (541) 684-7345.

student may receive ten free sessions with a counselor per year. After ten sessions are completed, students are offered counseling services at a low cost. Students interested in counseling should call (541) 349-7471 to schedule a brief intake appointment.

Health and Wellness At Northwest Christian University, the health and well-being of our students is of utmost importance. Healthcare is available at hospitals, urgent care clinics and medical offices throughout the Eugene/Springfield area. For community resources including facility locations please see http://www.nwcu.edu/healthsafety/healthwellness/.

Intercollegiate Athletics NCU is a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and a member of the Cascade Collegiate Conference. NCU offers fourteen opportunities for collegiate athletics participation. Please see http://www.GoBEACONS.com. Fall Sports: men’s cross country, soccer, golf women’s cross country, soccer, volleyball, golf Winter Sports: men’s basketball women’s basketball Spring Sports: women’s track, golf, softball men’s track, golf

Immunizations Oregon state law requires students born on or after January 1, 1957 who are enrolled in 12 or more credit hours at Northwest Christian University to provide proof of two measles vaccines or meet one of the legal exemptions. Adequate proof is written documentation of the month and year of each dose of measles (the first dose must have been on or after your first birthday and thirty days must have passed between the first and second dose). In accordance with Oregon law, the Office of Student Life collects and reviews submitted immunization documentation. Please review the immunization form for additional information. The Office of the Registrar will be notified of students who are not in compliance with Oregon law. Registration to attend classes will not be permitted for students who fail to complete their documentation requirements.

Residence Life For traditional undergraduate students, Residence life is a significant part of the educational experience at NCU and a good portion of your time will be spent in your hall. The Residence Life team works to create a safe, fun, and strong learning-living environment in which to make your home while you are a student. Please see http://www.nwcu.edu/residence for residency requirements, pictures of the residence areas, and information about housing processes.

Health Insurance Undergraduates enrolled in 12 or more credit hours are required to provide proof of health insurance in order to attend NCU. ADP and Graduate students are not required to carry health insurance.

Student Activities Student activities at NCU are diverse, meaningful, and memorable. The Student Activities team works alongside students to create a fantastic campus culture. From our free Friday night weekly program series, Beacon Nights, to our big signature events like Homecoming and Mr. Beacon, the Student Activities team delivers quality programs that

Counseling NCU offers free counseling services to help support our students’ wellness needs. Mental health counseling services are available to all Northwest Christian University students. Each 69

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make students want to be a significant part of Northwest Christian University. Please see http://www.nwcu.edu/studentprograms/ for descriptions and pictures from events. Current offerings include the following:  





Beacon Nights: a free weekly program that offers exciting events in which students may participate. Signature events including spirit week, Beacon Madness, Late Night Breakfast, Homecoming events, Spring Formal, Family Weekend, etc. A competitive intramural program that offers both league and non-league play in the areas of dodge ball, volleyball, basketball, capture the flag, open gym, and flag football Cultural/ Awareness Programs that include: Alcohol Awareness Week, Disabilities Awareness Week, Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Black History Month, Random Acts of Kindness Week, and more.

Judicial Affairs and Grievance Procedure For a complete listing of policies, judicial affairs, and grievance procedures, please refer to the Student Handbook posted online at: http://www.nwcu.edu/?attachment_id=4583; hard copies are available by request in the Student Life Office, which can be reached at (541) 684-7345

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study In fulfillment of its mission, Northwest Christian University offers a variety of academic programs. NCU offers certificates, associate’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees in such programs as business, education, Christian ministry, and the liberal arts. The following is a full list of NCU’s program areas: Bachelor Degree Programs:  Accounting (B.S.)  Bible & Theology (B.A.)  Biology (B.S.)  Business Administration (B.S.)  Christian Ministry Studies (B.A.) o Missions o Pastoral Ministry o Youth Ministry Communication (B.A.)  o Generalist o Interpersonal o Public Speaking  English (B.A.)  Exercise Science (B.S.)  History (B.A.)  Interdisciplinary Studies (B.A.)  Mathematics (B.S.)  Music (B.A.) o Music Business o Music Industry

 

o Worship Arts Psychology (B.A. or B.S.) Teacher Education (B.A. or B.S.) o Early Childhood & Elementary  ESOL  Multiple Subjects o Middle School Teaching Endorsement  Advanced Mathematics  Basic Mathematics  ESOL  Integrated Science  Language Arts  Social Studies  Spanish o High School Teaching Endorsement  Advanced Mathematics  ESOL  Integrated Science  Language Arts  Social Studies  Spanish

Field Internships Every bachelor’s degree in the traditional undergraduate program at Northwest Christian University includes an internship component as determined by the respective schools. Internships are designed to prepare students for a career in their chosen field by integrating their academic coursework with practical application of theory learned in the classroom. It is also an opportunity for students to acquire knowledge, refine skills and abilities, and obtain valuable work experience. NCU’s Internship Program aligns with the standards outlined by National Association of Colleges & Employers (NACE). Internship is a collaborative process among students, faculty, community partners, and the Career Center. 1. Prior to starting an internship, students must declare a major and complete a minimum of 15 credits of upper division coursework within that major. 2. A completed and approved site contract is required prior to the start of internship experience. 3. For every one credit of internship, 45 clock hours of documented work at an approved internship site are required. 4. Students must complete the required hours during the semester for which they are registered for internship.

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5. Students may not intern at a site where a relative is their designated site supervisor. 6. Students may not use a current employment and/or work study position for internship credit. However, students may participate in a paid internship program. 7. Internship sites, whether on-campus or off-campus, must go through an approval process prior to accepting a student as an intern. Approval is based on the following criteria: a. The site is able to abide by the internship guidelines set by the University. b. The site has the ability to train and supervise undergraduate interns. c. The site is able to provide tasks and projects that align with students’ learning objectives and program of study. d. The site is able to accommodate the minimum number of clock hours necessary for the completion of the credit requirements within students’ disciplines. e. The designated site supervisors possess qualifications and experience in the area over which they are supervising. 8. Maximum number of credits earned in field experience, internship, and practicum: 16 credit hours. Please contact the Career Center for additional information: [email protected]

Study Abroad & Off Campus Programs The purpose of the Study Abroad Program and Off Campus Programs is to enrich the student’s academic experience by providing inter- and cross-cultural opportunities within the context of the student’s interests or major. Recommended during their sophomore or junior year, students have the option to participate in any advisor-approved off-campus or study abroad program available. Students who complete an approved program will: 1. Gain college credit relevant to their academic goals. 2. Experience a life-changing opportunity to live and study in another context. 3. Gain an advantage in career choices. 4. Develop a deeper sense of self and vocational calling. Students must apply and be accepted by both NCU and the program in which they are interested. There is a large selection of approved programs from which to choose. Students will also need to register for and successfully complete the one credit GLST 295 Study Abroad course the semester prior to their study abroad experience. This course will provide assistance to the students as they apply to their desired programs, fit the programs into their majors, and investigate affordability, scholarships, and other details. Each academic year, NCU awards up to six students with a $4,000 scholarship to use towards the tuition of a semester long off campus program. Study Abroad (Collaborative Programs) NCU works in cooperation with numerous programs. One particularly popular program for NCU students is the “Best Semester,” which has programs in the USA (American studies, music, and journalism) as well as Australia, China, Latin America, the Middle East, Oxford, Russia, and Uganda. The Best Semester program is operated by the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU), of which NCU is a member institution. Students have also worked with programs hosted by Trinity Christian College, Ausburg College, the University of Oregon, The American College of Thessaloniki, and other organizations in such countries as Mexico, Guatemala, Spain, Mexico, Greece, and Namibia. 72

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Foreign Language Foreign language at a first year level or higher is required for a number of majors. Students may satisfy the requirement by any one of the following: 1. Successful completion of a college level foreign language course at a first year, second semester level or higher. 2. Successful completion of a minimum of 3 semester credits of an indigenous foreign language while studying at a NCU-approved off-campus study program site. 3. If a Teacher Education major, successful completion of the 12 credit ESOL endorsement. 4. A minimum score of ‘50’ on a CLEP foreign language exam. 5. Demonstrated language proficiency equivalent to that attained at the end of one year of college study, as evaluated and documented by a bona fide and NCU-approved college level instructor of that language. The documentation must be provided directly to the Registrar’s Office by the evaluator. 6. International students who are required to submit TOEFL or IELTS scores will receive a waiver for the requirement if the minimum standards for admission are met.

Honors Program Program Faculty: Dr. Doyle Srader Purpose The purpose of the honors program is to accomplish NCU's commitment to provide all students with educational experiences suited to their gifts and work ethic. Mirroring the mission of academic resources and tutoring programs to help struggling students raise their level of mastery, the honors program provides adept students the more rigorous and in-depth learning experiences required to raise theirs. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Understand the history of one or more big ideas in their chosen academic field, including the research that generated widespread acceptance of the idea, and ongoing critiques of, or flaws in, the idea. 2. Demonstrate proficiency at designing and completing independent, self-paced scholarly projects. 3. Produce substantial academic work in direct collaboration with program faculty. 4. Offer a substantial contribution on multiple occasions to communities beyond the NCU campus, whether those communities are local, faith-based, professional or scholarly. 5. Understand and conform to behavioral guidelines for pursuit of original scholarly work in their academic field, including both ethical standards and standards of professionalism. Honors classes Students need not be admitted to the honors program to take classes for honors credit. Classes can earn honors credit if the following conditions are met: 73

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The class is modified for honors credit in one of the following two ways: o The syllabus includes a "standard contract," approved by the honors program coordinator, consisting of a modified set of readings and/or assignments that render the class suitable for honors credit. o The student and the instructor negotiate a modified set of readings, assignments or other elements of class participation to render the class suitable for honors credit. The contract must be submitted to the honors program coordinator no later than the end of the second full week of the term for review and approval. The instructor is a full-time NCU faculty member, or else the written approval of the program faculty member is secured for the instructor to teach the honors contract. The class is not one of the honors-ineligible classes, which is posted on the university web site. No Academic Dishonesty report resulting from that student’s behavior has been filed with the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

An honors class shall not be transcripted for honors credit, or to complete honors degree requirements, if the instructor records a final grade lower than B+. The honors program Students who wish to complete an honors degree must first qualify for admission to the honors program. Students are admitted on a probationary basis if they meet any of the following criteria:  Students are eligible for probationary status if they qualify for any of the following scholarships:  NCU merit scholarship at or above the median award available, whether first-time freshman or transfer;  The Ford Scholars program of the Ford Family Foundation.  Students transferring to NCU from another college at which they were active participants in the honors program in good standing at the time of transfer are eligible for probationary status.  Students with a 3.7 cumulative GPA, a current grade of P for chapel, and at least two honors classes successfully completed with grades of B+ or higher are eligible for probationary status. Upon completion of one satisfactory term in which 20% or more of attempted hours were honors classes, all passed with a grade of B+ or higher, a 3.7 current GPA, and a P in chapel, students shall be admitted to full privileges in the honors program. Each academic major opts in to the honors program at the program faculty's discretion. A student whose only declared major has not opted in to the program is ineligible for admission to the honors program. A student with multiple majors may be admitted to the honors program if one of the programs participates in the program. Students shall be removed from the honors program for the following reasons:  If the student's current GPA falls below 3.7, or the student receives an NP for chapel, for two consecutive semesters. Students removed for this reason may be restored to probationary status if they meet GPA and chapel attendance requirements listed above, and following a successful term on probation, may be readmitted to full status.

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If an Academic Dishonesty report is filed with the VPAA and upheld on review. Students removed for this reason are not eligible for readmission except in cases where the Academic Dishonesty report is retracted.

The honors degree An honors degree shall be awarded if the student completes each of the following requirements:  At least 30 credits must be honors classes completed with a grade of B+ or higher.  At least 15 of the above 30 credits must be 300 or 400 level.  Students enrolled at NCU prior to the beginning of the Fall 2015 term may earn an honors degree with at least 25 credits of honors classes. At least 13 of those 25 must be 300 or 400 level.  Honors degree candidates must complete an honors thesis, which replaces the senior capstone, and which conforms to the following parameters: o The thesis must be substantially more rigorous than a standard capstone in the major. o The student and advisor should procure the input of at least one second reader who has no direct affiliation with the student’s major program, and who holds a graduate degree in a field relevant to the thesis' topic area. o The student must successfully pass a defense of the thesis. Students undertaking multiple majors must complete an honors thesis in each major to earn an honors degree, with the exception of majors that do not participate in the program.

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Four-Year Bachelor Degree Programs General Requirements for Graduation  Completion of 124 semester credit hours.  Completion of General Studies (the CORE) requirements.  An academic major or concentration.  A minimum of 30 credit hours from Northwest Christian University.  A minimum of 27 credit hours in the upper division of an academic major or concentration (one-third in the case of an academic minor).  A cumulative GPA of 2.00 or better for all coursework completed.  At least a C- or better in academic major and minor classes.  Satisfactory writing competency requirement (grade of “P,” “C-“ or better in WR 121 and WR 123) . Limitations 1. Maximum number of non-graded courses allowed: 12 hours (no P/NP grading option is allowed in the major/minor/certificate programs except in those courses in which P/NP is the only grading option). 2. No set maximum on CLEP and Advanced Placement (AP) credit but all accepted credits must fulfill graduation requirements. 3. Maximum number of credits allowed through Prior Learning Experience (PLA): 30 credit hours. 4. No set maximum on military, fire, or police credit but all accepted credits must fulfill graduation requirements. 5. Maximum number of credits earned in field experience, internship, and practicum: 16 credit hours. 6. Maximum of eight credit hours for activity-based physical education courses. 7. A course used to meet the requirements of an academic major or minor may not be applied toward another major or minor. A substitution of equal credit must be identified for the second major or minor and approved by program faculty, if the same course is listed in the requirements for both. 8. Time limit: 6 years from date of matriculation for bachelor of arts/sciences. General Education (CORE) Requirements Purpose To provide a cohesive body of excellent undergraduate coursework that is a foundation for all NCU’s academic programs. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate their commitment to ethical leadership and the integration of faith and learning. 2. Be conversant across the disciplines with many of the key ideas that have shaped American and world culture. 3. Demonstrate skills of sound reasoning, critical thinking, and ethical decision making in courses that focus on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 4. Demonstrate the capacity to make informed judgments about the place of humanity in the world through social science courses that focus on traditional and contemporary thinkers. 76

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5. Construct and evaluate empirical processes. 6. Demonstrate cultural competency. 7. Demonstrate a general knowledge of the Bible and skills in interpreting the biblical text for the 21st century. 8. Improve physical skills and fitness, and demonstrate knowledge that leads to a healthy lifestyle.



The Requirements Writing ........................................................................................................................................ 6  WR 121 English Composition .............................................................................................. 3  WR 123 English Composition .............................................................................................. 3 *Required prior to enrollment in upper division major courses



Interdisciplinary Studies ........................................................................................................ 11-12 The IDS component of Northwest Christian University’s General Education Core enables students to work with ideas that have been influential in shaping thought and culture in America and in the world. Students in this course will engage with concepts and values as they are expressed across the humanities and social sciences in history, philosophy, literature, art, and music and will learn to “connect the dots” between these various disciplines as they are displayed in contemporary culture. 



  

Choose one of the following ............................................................................................... 3 HIST 151 History of Western Civilization HIST 161 World History IDS 151 Engaging World Thought and Culture Choose one of the following ............................................................................................... 3 HIST 152 History of Western Civilization HIST 162 World History IDS 152 Engaging World Thought and Culture IDS 251 Engaging American Thought & Culture ..................................................................3 IDS 251S Appreciation of American Thought & Culture: Seminar on …............................. 2 FYS 101 First-Year Seminar* ................................................................................................ 1 (*Not required for transfer students with 24 or more earned semester credits.)



Humanities .................................................................................................................................. 6 Structured thinking communicated eloquently is the essence of understanding the humanities. The ability to communicate effectively by means of listening, speaking, reading and writing in diverse situations as a reflection of sound reasoning and critical thinking is the focus of the humanities.  



PHL 210 Ethics ..................................................................................................................... 3 Communications Elective (choose one of the following) ................................................... 3 COMM 212 Public Speaking COMM 213 Interpersonal Communication

Social Sciences ......................................................................................................................... 5–6

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Students enter into a dialogue with traditional and contemporary thinkers and address fundamental questions about the universe and the place of humanity within it through the social sciences. Development of informed judgments about past and present issues, problems, people and situations occurs through the study of psychology and the social sciences.  Choose courses from at least two of the following areas:  Anthropology  Business  Economics  Education  History  Psychology  Religion  Sociology 

Math/Science/Computer.......................................................................................................... 6–9 Understanding the world through scientific and mathematical paradigms brings a quantitative dimension to the humanities and social sciences. Taking courses in the physical and life sciences enables students to understand, construct and evaluate empirical processes and relationships. 



Minimum six credits with at least one course in each of the following areas:  One science course with lab  One college-level mathematics course  One computer course—these NCU courses meet the computer requirement: CIS 110 Media Literacy CIS 123 Word Processing, Spreadsheets and Presentations EDUC 230 Technology for Teaching and Learning MUS 118 Music Technology

Diversity Studies ......................................................................................................... *one course The NCU community is committed to honoring the diversity of persons, backgrounds, and ideas represented on our campus and in our society at large. All students will have the opportunity to explore issues of diversity as they emerge from the core curriculum and from the specific disciplines of an academic major. 

Choose one course from approved electives in the following list: ANTH 210 Cultural Anthropology BTH 240 Christianity in America BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship COMM 220 Intercultural Communication EDUC 210 School Diversity HIST 240 History of the Pacific Northwest RELS 210 The Abrahamic Faiths of Judaism and Islam RELS 220 Living Religious Traditions of the Far East SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology

*Some of the approved courses may also fulfill requirements in other areas of the gen ed core (e.g., communication, social sciences).

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Bible & Christian Ministry Studies............................................................................................... 12 Core courses in Bible and Christian ministry are designed to enable all NCU students to engage with the Bible as Holy Scripture in such a way as to promote the integration of faith in all aspects of academic study and individual vocation. Students will be challenged to study scripture in the context of regular worship and guided service learning. The “Cornerstone Course” in Bible, Engaging with the Bible, provides both an overview of biblical content and an overview of appropriate methods of interpreting the Bible so that students will be well-grounded in how to read the Bible in the 21st century. Other Bible courses build upon this foundation to provide students with detailed biblical knowledge, along with a ‘toolbox’ of interpretive tools to use for future Bible study.   

BTH 101/102 Engaging with the Bible .................................................................................6 *CM 240 All Are Gifted, All Are Called ...............................................................................2 Any BTH electives at the 200 level or above ...................................................................... 4

*EDUC 415 Faith Integration and Teaching Seminar is an approved alternative for Teacher Education majors.



Health/Physical Education............................................................................................................ 2 The physical education program offers physical activity courses for students and staff which emphasize the development of physical skills, improvement in physical fitness levels, and the acquisition of knowledge that contributes to a healthy lifestyle. 

*Choose courses from Physical Education or Sports/Athletics

*EDUC 420 P.E. and Health Methods (2) is an approved alternative for Teacher Education majors. *NUTR 220 Nutrition (3) is an approved alternative for Exercise Science majors.

Minimum General Education CORE for all majors .............................................................................. 48

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Accounting (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Ms. Stacey Lewis Purpose The purpose of the accounting major is to prepare men and women to become effective and ethically responsible as managers and leaders in the business world and public service sectors. The concentration in accounting focuses on financial and operational objectives for business, government and not-for-profit organizations, supported by a strong liberal arts component. Combined with courses in management, economics, managerial finance, law, and ethics, an accounting education provides a solid background for careers and advancement in the business community and in other non-business professions. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts and principles of Accounting. 2. Verify, organize, analyze and apply data and use quantitative decision-support tools to provide effective solutions to accounting problems. 3. Identify ethical issues and apply ethical principles and Christian values for organizational decision making. 4. Demonstrate effective professional communication skills. Prerequisites for the Accounting Major:  ACTG 211 Principles of Accounting I  ACTG 212 Principles of Accounting II  *ECON 201 Microeconomics  ECON 202 Macroeconomics *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for Accounting ..............................................................................................................39  ACTG 341 Intermediate Accounting I ................................................................................. 3  ACTG 342 Intermediate Accounting II ............................................................................... 3  ACTG 345 Cost Accounting ................................................................................................. 3  ACTG 360 Accounting Information Systems ....................................................................... 3  ACTG 430 Federal Income Tax ............................................................................................ 3  ACTG 431 Federal Income Tax – Corporations, Partnerships, Estates, & Trusts ................ 3  ACTG 440 Auditing I ............................................................................................................ 3  ACTG 470 Accounting for Non-Profit Organizations ........................................................... 3  ACTG 495 Internship ........................................................................................................... 3  ACTG 499 Advanced Accounting Capstone ........................................................................ 3  BUS 450 Managerial Finance .............................................................................................. 3  MATH 315 Applied Statistics ............................................................................................... 3  WR 311 Writing in the Workplace ...................................................................................... 3

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Interdisciplinary Business minor (required for Accounting majors) Requirement for Interdisciplinary Business Minor ................................................................................... 18  BUS 310 Principles of Management & Leadership ............................................................. 3  BUS 370 Legal and Ethical Issues in Business & Management ........................................... 3  BUS 499 Business Strategy .................................................................................................. 3  MKTG 330 Marketing .......................................................................................................... 3  Choose two courses from the following ............................................................................. 6 BUS 110 Small Business Management BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship BUS 410 Operations Management BUS 419 Global Business Management

Minor in Accounting Prerequisites for the Accounting Minor:  BUS 310 Principles of Management and Leadership  WR 121/123 English Composition Requirements for Accounting Minor ..................................................................................................18  ACTG 211 Principles of Accounting I ................................................................................... 3  ACTG 212 Principles of Accounting II .................................................................................. 3  ACTG 341 Intermediate Accounting I ................................................................................. 3  ACTG 342 Intermediate Accounting II ............................................................................... 3  ACTG 440 Auditing .............................................................................................................. 3  Choose One ......................................................................................................................... 3 ACTG 455 Forensic Accounting ACTG 470 Accounting for Non-Profit Organizations Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS ACTG 211 ACTG 341 ACTG 440 ACTG 470 ACTG 495 BUS 120 BUS 310 ECON 201 MATH 315 MKTG 330

SPRING EVEN YEARS ACTG 212 ACTG 342 ACTG 345 ACTG 495 ACTG 499 BUS 410 BUS 450 BUS 499 ECON 202 MATH 315

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FALL EVEN YEARS ACTG 211 ACTG 341 ACTG 430 ACTG 440 ACTG 495 BUS 120 BUS 310 ECON 201 MATH 315 MKTG 330

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

SPRING ODD YEARS ACTG 212 ACTG 360 ACTG 342 ACTG 431 ACTG 499 ACTG 495 BUS 370 BUS 419 BUS 499 ECON 202 MATH 315

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SUMMER ODD YEARS BUS 110

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Bible & Theology (Bachelor of Arts) Program Faculty: Dr. Dennis Lindsay Purpose The purpose of the Bible and theology program is to nourish the academic study of the Bible and Christian theology by persons pursuing lay and ordained vocations in the Church. Students majoring in Bible and theology may emphasize either Bible or theology, or may try with their advisor’s help to balance the two. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Display broad knowledge of the Bible’s contents. 2. Engage critically with the Bible and scholarly interpretations of it. 3. Be prepared to enter seminary studies for ministry. 4. Be prepared to enter graduate programs in Bible or theology in preparation for advanced degrees in these areas. 5. Demonstrate facility in one or more of the biblical languages by applying it exegetically to the interpretation of texts if they have chosen to emphasize Bible in their program. 6. Display broad knowledge of the post-biblical Christian theological traditions, and specialization in at least one branch of Christian theology if they have chosen to emphasize theology in their program. Prerequisites for the Bible and Theology Major:  *ANTH 210 or *PSY 200 or *SOC 200  *BTH 101 Engaging With The Bible  *BTH 102 Engaging With The Bible  BTH 213 Christian Doctrine  *RELS 210 The Abrahamic Faiths of Judaism and Islam *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for Bible and Theology .................................................................................................40  BTH 324 History of Theology .............................................................................................. 3  BTH 407 Special Topics ....................................................................................................... 3  BTH 495 Internship ............................................................................................................. 3  BTH 499 Senior Capstone.................................................................................................... 2  CM 380 Preaching ............................................................................................................... 3  Choose one of the following sequences: ............................................................................ 8 GRK 301 and 302 Elementary Greek HEB 301 and 302 Classical Hebrew for Beginners  Additional electives with a minimum of 12 credits at the upper division level ............... 18 Additional BTH electives Additional GRK course Additional HEBR course Any RELS course HIST 331 History of Christianity I HIST 332 History of Christianity II PHL 320 Philosophy of Religion PHL 420 Christian Ethics and Social Responsibility 83

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Minor in Bible and Theology Prerequisites for the Bible and Theology Minor:  *BTH 101 Engaging with the Bible  *BTH 102 Engaging with the Bible *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for Bible and Theology Minor ......................................................................................15  BTH 213 Christian Doctrine ................................................................................................. 2  BTH 407 Special Topics ....................................................................................................... 3  Any BTH electives with a minimum of 3 credits at the upper division level .................... 10 Minor in Biblical Languages Requirements for the Biblical Languages Minor ................................................................................. 19  GRK 301/302 Elementary Greek ......................................................................................... 8  HEB 301/302 Classical Hebrew for Beginners..................................................................... 8  Choose one ......................................................................................................................... 3 GRK 401 Greek Exegesis HEB 401 Hebrew Exegesis Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS BTH 101 BTH 102 BTH 213 BTH 302 BTH 495 BTH 499 GRK 301 HIST 331 PHL 420 PSY 200 SOC 200

SPRING EVEN YEARS BTH 101 BTH 102 BTH 212 BTH 300 BTH 350 BTH 407 BTH 495 BTH 499 CM 380 GRK 302 HIST 332 PHL 320 PSY 200

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FALL EVEN YEARS BTH 101 BTH 102 BTH 213 BTH 320 BTH 328 BTH 495 BTH 499 HEBR 301 PHL 420 RELS 210 PSY 200 SOC 200

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

SPRING ODD YEARS BTH 101 BTH 102 ANTH 210 BTH 322 BTH 324 BTH 370 BTH 407 BTH 495 BTH 499 CM 380 HEBR 302 RELS 220 PSY 200

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Biology (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Paul Allee Purpose The purpose of this biology program is to prepare the student to successfully pursue a professional career in health science, to thrive in graduate level study in the field of biology, to be a proficient instructor of biology in secondary education, or to move confidently into the job market immediately after graduation. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Apply scientific foundations of chemistry and mathematics to the discipline of biology. 2. Demonstrate a solid foundation in biological principals in the areas of general biology, biodiversity, genetics, anatomy, physiology, and cellular biology. 3. Develop an emphasis of study in either cellular biology or ecology. 4. Develop into critical thinkers. 5. Analyze and assess scientific literature. 6. Demonstrate the skills to plan and implement research in a field of emphasis using appropriate scientific methodology. 7. Be able to demonstrate an integration of their faith and learning through an appreciation of their local and global responsibility to humanity. 8. Be able to demonstrate an integration of faith and learning through an appreciation of their local and global responsibility for creation. 9. Be prepared to pursue ongoing professional development in biology or related professional fields through graduate level study, professional schools, and through membership and participation in professional organizations. BIOLOGY MAJOR WITH HONORS 1. Required: minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 2. Required: no major courses below C-, even if repeated 3. Required: presentation of a original research project in Senior Capstone BIOLOGY MAJOR FOR GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL 1. Recommended: one semester of calculus 2. Recommended: two semesters of physics 3. Recommended: one semester of organic chemistry 4. Recommended: one semester of statistics 5. Recommended: completion of a biology major with honors. Prerequisites for the Biology Major:  *BIOL 200/200L General Biology with Lab  BIOL 201 Introduction to Scientific Literature  *BIOL 205/205L Biodiversity with Lab  *CHEM 121/121L General Chemistry with Lab  *CHEM 122/122L Organic and Biochemistry with Lab  *MATH 130 Pre-calculus or MATH 251 Calculus (Recommended)  PHYS 201/201L or PHYS 202/202L *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

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General Requirements for Biology ......................................................................................................40  BIOL 310 Genetics .......................................................................................................... 4  BIOL 311 Human Anatomy and Physiology I .................................................................. 3  BIOL 311L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab ............................................................ 1  BIOL 312 Human Anatomy and Physiology II ................................................................. 3  BIOL 312L Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab ........................................................... 1  BIOL 320 Cell Biology ...................................................................................................... 3  BIOL 499 Senior Capstone ............................................................................................. 2  Choose one ......................................................................................................................... 3 BIOL 495 Internship BIOL 496 Research  MATH 315 Applied Statistics ............................................................................................. 3  Choose from list 17 credits not in your concentration area ............................................. 17 BIOL 317 Case Studies BIOL 330/330L Introductory Microbiology BIOL 340 Endocrinology BIOL 350 Ecology BIOL 407 Special Topics BIOL 410 Advanced Molecular Biology BIOL 420 Advanced Organismal Biology CHEM 321/321L Organic Chemistry with Lab EXSC 310 Kinesiology EXSC 320 Exercise Physiology and Neuromuscular Conditioning EXSC 410 Biomechanics PHYS 201/201L Introduction to Mechanics or PHYS 202/202L Introduction to Electromagnetism (whichever is not fulfilling the prerequisite requirement) Other upper division biology or chemistry Minor in Biology Prerequisites for the Biology Minor:  *CHEM 121/121L General Chemistry with Lab  CHEM 122/122L Organic and Biochemistry with Lab *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for Biology Minor .........................................................................................................21  BIOL 200/200L General Biology with Lab ....................................................................... 4  BIOL 201 Introduction to Scientific Literature ...................................................... 1  BIOL 205/205L Biodiversity with Lab ............................................................................. 4  Any additional 300 or 400 level Biology Courses .............................................................. 12

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Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS BIOL 201 BIOL 205 BIOL 311 BIOL 320 BIOL 340 BIOL 495/BIOL 496 BIOL 499 CHEM 121/121L CHEM 321/321L EXSC 310 EXSC 410 MATH 315 FALL EVEN YEARS BIOL 201 BIOL 205 BIOL 310 BIOL 311 BIOL 350 BIOL 495/BIOL 496 BIOL 499 CHEM 121/121L EXSC 310 EXSC 410 MATH 130 MATH 315 PHYS 201

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

SPRING EVEN YEARS BIOL 200 BIOL 312 BIOL 317 BIOL 365 BIOL 410 BIOL 495/BIOL 496 BIOL 499 CHEM 122/122L EXSC 320 PHYS 202 MATH 315

SUMMER EVEN YEARS

SPRING ODD YEARS BIOL 200 BIOL 312 BIOL 330 BIOL 420 BIOL 495/BIOL 496 BIOL 499 CHEM 122/122L EXSC 320 MATH 315

SUMMER ODD YEARS

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Business Administration (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Peter Diffenderfer, Dr. Timothy Veach, Mr. David Quirk Purpose The purpose of the business administration program is to prepare students for careers as managers and leaders in either private or public sectors. In conjunction with the general education of the University, the program integrates the fundamental theories, concepts, and practices of business with Christian values and ethics. An interdisciplinary minor is also available to complement other majors at the University. Objectives Graduates of this program will be able to demonstrate: 1. A comprehensive knowledge of the core principles and concepts related to business administration; 2. Effective communication, both written and oral, relative to different business environments and situations; 3. A knowledge and understanding of the role of Christian leadership, ethics, and service in effectively addressing business management issues and decisions; 4. Literacy regarding current management trends though the use of leading business information sources, current publications, and other available audio-video, online, or in-text resources; 5. An ability to integrate all aspects of their learning, understanding, knowledge, and skills concerning business through internship projects and a comprehensive capstone course. Prerequisites for the Business Administration Major:  ACTG 211 Principles of Accounting I  ACTG 212 Principles of Accounting II  *BUS 110 Small Business Management or *BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship  *ECON 201 Microeconomics  ECON 202 Macroeconomics  MATH 315 Applied Statistics  WR 311 Writing in the Workplace *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

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General Requirements for Business Administration...........................................................................36  BUS 310 Principles of Management and Leadership ..................................................... 3  BUS 315 Human Resource Management....................................................................... 3  BUS 370 Legal and Ethical Issues in Business & Management ...................................... 3  BUS 419 Global Business Management ......................................................................... 3  BUS 450 Managerial Finance ........................................................................................ 3  BUS 495 Internship ........................................................................................................ 3  BUS 499 Business Strategy and Policy ........................................................................... 3  MKTG 330 Marketing ........................................................................................................ 3  MATH 430 Advanced Data Analysis .................................................................................. 3  Choose from the following list ............................................................................................ 9 BUS 360 Management of Information Systems BUS 410 Operations Management BUS 415 Group and Organizational Behavior MKTG 431 Marketing Research MKTG 432 Branding, Advertising and Promotion MKTG 433 Sales Strategy and Management MKTG 434 Consumer Behavior MKTG 435 Digital Marketing

Minor in Interdisciplinary Business Prerequisite for the Interdisciplinary Business Minor:  *BUS 110 Small Business Management or *BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for Interdisciplinary Business Minor ...........................................................................18  BUS 310 Principles of Management and Leadership ...................................................... 3  MKTG 330 Marketing ......................................................................................................... 3  Choose four courses from the following: ......................................................................... 12 BUS 315 Human Resource Management BUS 360 Management of Information Systems BUS 370 Legal and Ethical Issues in Business & Management BUS 410 Operations Management BUS 415 Group and Organizational Behavior BUS 419 Global Business Management BUS 450 Managerial Finance MKTG 432 Branding, Advertising and Promotion MKTG 433 Sales Strategy and Management

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Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS ACTG 211 BUS 120 BUS 310 BUS 315 BUS 360 BUS 495 ECON 201 MATH 315 MKTG 330 MKTG 431 MKTG 432 FALL EVEN YEARS ACTG 211 BUS 120 BUS 310 BUS 415 BUS 495 ECON 201 MATH 315 MKTG 330 MKTG 431 MKTG 432

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

SPRING EVEN YEARS ACTG 212 BUS 410 BUS 450

SUMMER EVEN YEARS BUS 110 MKTG 434 MKTG 435

BUS 495 BUS 499 ECON 202 MATH 315 MKTG 433 WR 311

SPRING ODD YEARS ACTG 212 BUS 370 BUS 419 BUS 495 BUS 499 ECON 202 MATH 315 MATH 430 MKTG 433

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SUMMER ODD YEARS BUS 110 MKTG 434 MKTG 435

2015-20016

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Christian Ministry (Bachelor of Arts) Program Faculty: Dr. Terrence O’Casey, Mr. Troy Dean Purpose The purpose of the Christian ministry major is to prepare Northwest Christian University students to serve Christ and the Church as God has gifted and called them, both as professionals and as volunteers. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Be prepared to pursue seminary studies leading to ordination and licensure (depending on specific denominational requirements). 2. Have obtained practical skills for ministry and will have exercised these skills through internships (congregational, cross-cultural, or para-church). 3. Display skills in exegetical and hermeneutical methods for sound interpretation and communication of biblical messages. 4. Be prepared to serve the Church as ethical leaders. 5. Display analytical, problem-solving, and communication skills for effective pastoral leadership. 6. Have experienced spiritual development in themselves and have skills in fostering and facilitating spiritual growth in others. Prerequisites for the Christian Ministry Major:  **ANTH 210 Cultural Anthropology or SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology (both are required for missions concentration)  *BTH 213 Christian Doctrine  *COMM 212 or *COMM 213  PSY 200 General Psychology (optional for missions concentration)  GRK 301/302 Elementary Greek or HEB 301/302 Classical Hebrew for Beginners, or another foreign language as approved by the program faculty *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

General Requirements for Christian Ministry ............................................................................... 39-40  BTH 315 Social Justice in the Gospels and the Prophets & the 21st Century ...................... 3  BTH electives at the upper division level ........................................................................... 6  MUS 225 The Worshipping Community ............................................................................. 2  CM 345 Orality: 50 Biblical Stories Essential for Ministry ................................................... 3  CM 470 Leadership Skills for Ministry ................................................................................. 2  CM 495 Internship ............................................................................................................... 6  CM 499 Senior Capstone ..................................................................................................... 2  CM electives at the upper division level ............................................................................. 3  Choose one of the following ............................................................................................... 3 BTH 324 History of Theology HIST 331 History of Christianity I HIST 332 History of Christianity II  Choose one of the required concentrations listed below ............................................. 9-10

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Missions Concentration. ................................................................................................................10  CM 203 Introduction to Missions ................................................................................. 2  COMM 220 Intercultural Communication.................................................................... 3  SOC 410 Global Issues .................................................................................................. 3  Choose one of the following ........................................................................................ 2 RELS 210 The Abrahamic Faiths of Judaism and Islam RELS 220 Living Religious Traditions of the Far East Pastoral Ministry Concentration ..................................................................................................... 9  Choose one of the following ........................................................................................ 3 CM 315 Church Planting and Turning Around Hurting Churches CM 335 Connecting With a Skeptical World  CM 380 Preaching ........................................................................................................ 3  CM 450 Pastoral Ministry ............................................................................................. 3 Youth Ministry Concentration ........................................................................................................ 9  Choose one of the following ......................................................................................... 3 CM 315 Church Planting and Turning Around Hurting Churches CM 335 Connecting With a Skeptical World CM 430 Small Groups and Discipleship  CM 360 Principles of Youth Ministry ............................................................................. 3  Choose one of the following ......................................................................................... 3 CM 380 Preaching CM 450 Pastoral Ministry Minor in Christian Ministry Requirements for Christian Ministry Minor ........................................................................... 18-19  BTH 315 Social Justice in the Gospels and the Prophets & the 21st Century ............... 3  MUS 225 The Worshipping Community ....................................................................... 2  CM 470 Leadership Skills for Ministry .......................................................................... 2  CM 335 Connecting With a Skeptical World ............................................................... 3  Choose one of the following ........................................................................................ 3 CM 360 Principles of Youth Ministry CM 450 Pastoral Ministry  BTH elective at the upper division level ....................................................................... 3  CM elective ............................................................................................................... 2-3

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Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS ANTH 210 BTH 213 CM 335 CM 350 CM 450 CM 495 CM 499 COMM 213 COMM 220 GRK 301 HIST 331 MUS 225 PSY 200 FALL EVEN YEARS BTH 213 BTH 315 CM 203 CM 315 CM 360 CM 470 CM 495 CM 499 COMM 213 COMM 220 HEB 301 PSY 200 RELS 210

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

SPRING EVEN YEARS CM 310 CM 380 CM 430 or CM 440 CM 345 CM 495 CM 499 COMM 212 GRK 302 HIST 332 PSY 200 SOC 410

SUMMER EVEN YEARS

SPRING ODD YEARS BTH 324

SUMMER ODD YEARS

CM 310 CM 335 CM 380 CM 495 CM 499 COMM212 HEB 302 PSY 200 RELS 220

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Communication (Bachelor of Arts) Program Faculty: Dr. Doyle Srader Purpose From the articulate argument of political discourse to the businesses and organizations of the world, people need to be able to communicate competently, clearly, ethically, and eloquently. Blending practical skills into a foundation of theoretical understanding, the Speech Communication Department offers a flexible variety of educational experiences. Speech Communication is a supple program preparing you for a large number of careers. Students learn to be able to speak and write clearly and persuasively in various contexts and with diverse audiences, based on accurate evidence. Regardless of vocation, people need to be competent communicators who effectively influence others. Our democratic republic is based on the idea that individual citizens can and will express their opinions and perspectives in a manner that will change others spiritually, politically, and interpersonally. A rhetorical perspective is taken in all classes where the development of the individual’s character is primary, then the reasoning processes are sharpened, then the eloquence of expression is honed, and finally the fluidity of delivery is perfected. The result is a balanced communicator who is able to “express the truth in love.” Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate holistic and creative thinking from a Christian world view. 2. Be able to communicate engagingly in an influential manner within a variety of contexts. 3. Competently share meaning through a variety of communication channels. 4. Understand and value processes and products of communication. 5. Be able to use communication in professional settings. Prerequisites for the Communication Major:  One year college-level proficiency in a modern spoken foreign language or a non-spoken language. Requirements for Communication ......................................................................................................39  COMM 220 Intercultural Communication .......................................................................... 3  COMM 240 Communication Theory .................................................................................. 3  COMM 370 Listening Behavior ........................................................................................... 3  COMM 495 Internship ........................................................................................................ 6  COMM 498 Pre-Capstone ................................................................................................... 1  COMM 499 Senior Capstone............................................................................................... 2  Choose one of the required concentrations listed below ................................................ 21 Interpersonal Concentration................................................................................................................21  COMM 213 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................................ 3  COMM 380 Communication & Conflict .............................................................................. 3  COMM 413 Advanced Interpersonal Communication........................................................ 3  COMM 430 Nonverbal Communication ............................................................................. 3  Choose 9 credits from the Public Speaking Concentration or any of the following ........... 9 BUS 310 Principles of Management & Leadership 95

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

BUS 415 Group & Organizational Behavior CIS 110 Media Literacy CM 440 Grief & Loss COMM 270 Foundations of Public Relations COMM 280 Acting COMM 320 Advanced Intercultural Communication COMM 341 Organizational Communication COMM 460 Technology, Change and Communication MATH 315 Applied Statistics PSY 320 Human Development PSY 340 Social Psychology PSY 350 Research Methods PSY 380 Theories of Personality Public Speaking Concentration ............................................................................................................21  COMM 212 Public Speaking ................................................................................................ 3  COMM 311 Speechwriting .................................................................................................. 3  COMM 312 Advanced Public Speaking ............................................................................... 3  COMM 441 Rhetorical Criticism.......................................................................................... 3  Choose 9 credits from the Interpersonal Concentration or any of the following .............. 9 CIS 110 Media Literacy COMM 207 Special Topics COMM 270 Foundations of Public Relations COMM 280 Acting COMM 407 Special Topics COMM 460 Technology, Change and Communication CM 380 Preaching EDUC 230 Technology for Teaching & Learning HIST 350 American Public Discourse PSY 330 Psychology of Learning PSY 370 Cognition Generalist Concentration .....................................................................................................................21 In consultation with program faculty, students select 21 credits of courses (minimum of 15 upper division credits) from the above two concentration areas and other approved communication fields. Minor in Communication Requirements for Speech Communication Minor ....................................................................... 18  COMM 212 Public Speaking................................................................................................ 3  COMM 213 Interpersonal Communication ........................................................................ 3  COMM 240 Communication Theory ................................................................................... 3  Choose one ......................................................................................................................... 3 COMM 312 Advanced Public Speaking COMM 413 Advanced Interpersonal Communication  Choose six additional upper division credits from any requirements or options in the Communication major ....................................................................................................... 6

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Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS BUS 310 COMM 207 COMM 213 COMM 220 COMM 341 COMM 460 COMM 495 COMM 498 COMM 499 CIS 110 EDUC 230 HIST 350 MATH 315 MKTG 330 MCV 100 MUS 311 PSY 320 PSY 350

SPRING EVEN YEARS CM 380 CM 430 CM 440 COMM 212 COMM 240 COMM 270 COMM 370 COMM 407 COMM 441 COMM 495 COMM 498 COMM 499 CIS 110 EDUC 230 MATH 315 MUS 312 PSY 330

SUMMER EVEN YEARS

FALL EVEN YEARS BUS 310 BUS 334 BUS 415 COMM 207 COMM 213 COMM 220 COMM 311 COMM 413 COMM 430 COMM 495 COMM 498 COMM 499 CIS 110 EDUC 230 MATH 315 MKTG 330 MCV 100 PSY 340 PSY 350

SPRING ODD YEARS CM 380 COMM 212 COMM 240 COMM 280 COMM 312 COMM 380 COMM 407 COMM 495 COMM 498 COMM 499 CIS 110 EDUC 230 MATH 315 PSY 370 PSY 380

SUMMER ODD YEARS

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

English (Bachelor of Arts) Program Faculty: Dr. Lanta Davis Purpose English has a dual emphasis on literature and writing, and its goal is to emphasize the importance both of understanding and being understood. Literature encourages us to appreciate complexity in life, and it gives us a glimpse into the thoughts of others; writing, on the other hand, helps us try to unravel the complexities, make sense of things, and share our thoughts and experiences with others. The program will thus prepare students to think deeply and communicate effectively. Objectives Graduates of this program will develop: 1. Communication skills: to express one’s ideas with clarity and precision; to identify and be sensitive to one’s audience; to write and speak incisively, persuasively, creatively. 2. Interpersonal skills: to recognize the complexity of human experience as it is depicted in great literature; to identify and dialogue with diverse voices and ideas; to empathize with those who think differently from us. 3. Research skills: to find an appropriate range and depth of sources; to dig deeper and identify intricacies in texts; to categorize ideas; to build upon the wealth of knowledge that already exists. 4. Analytical skills: to see multiple dimensions of a problem; to identify and describe patterns, order, form, beauty, and purpose; to create connections—between the texts and their rich historical, philosophical, and social contexts, between the texts and their real life applications, and between texts and the Christian faith Prerequisites for the English Major:  *WR 123 English Composition  ENG 201 Introduction to Literature  One year of college-level proficiency in a non-native language as required by BA *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for English .....................................................................................................................39  ENG 211 Survey of American Literature ........................................................................ 3  ENG 212 Survey of British Literature.............................................................................. 3  ENG 340 World Literature .............................................................................................. 3  ENG 395 Service Practicum ............................................................................................ 1  ENG 495 Internship ........................................................................................................ 3  ENG 499 Senior Capstone .............................................................................................. 2  ESOL 315 English Grammar and Syntax .......................................................................... 3  Choose one option from the following ............................................................................... 3 ENG 320 The Bible as/in Literature ENG 325 Christianity and Literature  Choose two upper division British or American literature courses .................................... 6 ENG 345 Multiethnic American Literature ENG 417 Studies in American Literature ENG 427 Studies in British Literature

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Choose one option from the following ............................................................................... 3 WR 311 Writing in the Workplace WR 332 Creative Writing WR 351 Creative Non-fiction Writing WR 410 Advanced Writing Workshop  Any additional ENG or WR electives at the upper division level ........................................ 9

Minor in English Prerequisites for the English Minor:  *WR 123 English Composition *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for the English Minor ...................................................................................................18  ENG 201 Introduction to Literature: ................................................................................... 3  ENG 211 Survey of American Literature ............................................................................ 3  ENG 212 Survey of British Literature ................................................................................. 3  Any additional ENG or WR electives at the upper division level ........................................ 9

Minor in Written Communication Prerequisites for the Written Communication Minor:  CIS 123 Word Processing, Spreadsheets and Presentations  *WR 123 English Composition *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for the Written Communication Minor .......................................................................18  COMM 240 Communication Theory ................................................................................... 3  COMM 270 Foundations of Public Relations ...................................................................... 3  WR 311 Writing for the Workplace .................................................................................... 3  WR 410 Advanced Writing .................................................................................................. 3  Choose two of the following ............................................................................................... 6 COMM 311 Speechwriting COMM 441 Rhetorical Criticism HIST 490 Historical Methods and Research Any upper division ENG elective

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Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS CIS 123 ENG 201 ENG 340 ENG 345 ENG 395 ENG 495 ENG 499 ESOL 315 WR 410 WR 123

FALL EVEN YEARS COMM 311 CIS 123 ENG 201 ENG 211 ENG 395 ENG 407 ENG 450 ENG 495 ENG 499 ESOL 315 HIST 490 WR 123 WR 351

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

SPRING EVEN YEARS COMM 240 COMM 270 COMM 441 CIS 123 ENG 202 ENG 320 ENG 417 ENG 395 ENG 495 ENG 499 WR 123 WR 311

SUMMER EVEN YEARS ENG 201 ENG 202

SPRING ODD YEARS COMM 240 CIS 123 ENG 202 ENG 212 ENG 325 ENG 395 ENG 427 ENG 495 ENG 499 WR 332 or WR 351 WR 123

SUMMER ODD YEARS ENG 201 ENG 202

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Exercise Science (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Heike McNeil Purpose The purpose of this exercise science program is to prepare the student for successful graduate level study in the field of exercise and movement science, or to be a competent professional in the allied health or other human movement related professions. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Be able to apply scientific foundations of the individual sub-disciplines to exercise and movement science. 2. Be able to become critical thinkers and competent practitioners. 3. Be able to analyze and assess components of health-related physical fitness such as cardiovascular endurance, body composition, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility. 4. Have skills to plan and implement appropriate exercise prescription for different populations, accounting for necessary modifications due to factors such as environmental or special needs of the person with whom they work. 5. Be able to understand human relations and behavioral issues as they relate to physical performance. 6. Be able to facilitate the integration of positive behavior and the implementation of healthrelated programs. 7. Be prepared to pursue ongoing professional development in exercise science or related professional fields through graduate level study and through membership and participation in professional organizations. Prerequisites for the Exercise Science Major:  *CHEM 121/121L General Chemistry with Lab  *MATH 130 Precalculus  NUTR 220 Nutrition  PHYS 201/201L Introduction to Mechanics with Lab  *PSY 200 General Psychology *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for Exercise Science ......................................................................................................36  BIOL 200 General Biology ................................................................................................... 3  BIOL 200L General Biology Lab ........................................................................................... 1  BIOL 311 Human Anatomy and Physiology I....................................................................... 3  BIOL 311L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab .............................................................. 1  BIOL 312 Human Anatomy and Physiology II...................................................................... 3  BIOL 312 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab ............................................................... 1  CHEM 122 Organic and Biochemistry ................................................................................. 4  CHEM 122L Organic and Biochemistry Lab ......................................................................... 1  EXSC 310 Kinesiology .......................................................................................................... 3  EXSC 320 Exercise Physiology and Neuromuscular Conditioning ....................................... 4  EXSC 410 Biomechanics ...................................................................................................... 3  EXSC 420 Exercise Testing and Prescription ....................................................................... 3 101

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

EXSC 495 Internship ........................................................................................................... 3 MATH 315 Applied Statistics ............................................................................................... 3

Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS BIOL 311/311L CHEM 121/121L EXSC 310 EXSC 407 EXSC 410 EXSC 495 MATH 130 MATH 315 PHYS 201/201L PSY 200 FALL EVEN YEARS BIOL 311/311L CHEM 121/121L EXSC 310 EXSC 407 EXSC 410 EXSC 495 MATH 315 PSY 200

SPRING EVEN YEARS BIOL 200/200L BIOL 312/312L CHEM 122122L EXSC 320 EXSC 420 EXSC 495 MATH 315 NUTR 220 PSY 200

SUMMER EVEN YEARS

SPRING ODD YEARS BIOL 200/200L BIOL 312/312L CHEM 122/122L EXSC 320 EXSC 420 EXSC 495 MATH 315 NUTR 220 PSY 200

SUMMER ODD YEARS

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

History (Bachelor of Arts) Program Faculty: Dr. Steven Goetz Purpose History is an encompassing discipline whose essence is in the understanding of the connectedness of historical events and human experiences. By examining the causes, contexts, and chronologies of past events, students gain an understanding of the nature of continuity and change in human experiences and achieve new insights into contemporary events and issues. In addition, the study of history enhances one’s grasp of the essential elements of liberal learning, such as the acquisition of knowledge and understanding, cultivation of perspective, and development of communication and critical-thinking skills. The history major prepares students for a wide variety of career choices such as further graduate work in history, further studies in law, business, medicine, and ministry. Graduates are equipped to serve in all professions that demand the knowledge, understanding, perspective, skills, and sensitivities gained through studying (e.g. politics, education, government service, and journalism). Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Participate knowledgeably in the affairs of the world around them, drawing upon understandings shaped through reading, writing, discussions, and lectures concerning the past. 2. See themselves and their society from different times and places, displaying a sense of informed perspective and a mature view of human nature. 3. Read and think critically, write and speak clearly and persuasively, and conduct research effectively. 4. Exhibit sensitivities to human values in their own and other cultural traditions and, in turn, establish values of their own. 5. Appreciate their natural and cultural environments. 6. Respect scientific and technological developments and recognize their impact on humankind. 7. Understand the connections between history and life. Prerequisites for the History Major:  *HIST 151/152 History of Western Civilization  *HIST 161/162 World History  *IDS 251S Appreciation of American Thought & Culture: Seminar on …  One year of college-level proficiency in a foreign language (preferably French or German). *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for History.............................................................................................................. 38 Category One - History of U.S. and the Americas  Choose two of the following: .............................................................................................. 6 HIST 240 History of the Pacific Northwest HIST 334 Colonial and Revolutionary America HIST 341 19th Century America HIST 342 America Since 1900 HIST 350 American Public Discourse HIST 430 History of American International Relations HIST 440 Latin American Civilization

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Category Two - European History  Choose two of the following: .............................................................................................. 6 HIST 331 History of Christianity I HIST 332 History of Christianity II HIST 370 Ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean Civilizations HIST 375 Medieval European Culture HIST 380 Modern European Culture and the World Category Three - Non-Western History  Choose two of the following: .............................................................................................. 6 HIST 311 History of Islamic Civilization HIST 410 History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict HIST 420 Modern South Asia HIST 421 History of Modern East Asia  Choose two additional courses from one of the above categories .................................... 6  HIST 490 Historical Methods and Research ........................................................................ 3  HIST 495 Internship ............................................................................................................. 3  HIST 499 Senior Capstone ................................................................................................... 3  Choose any of the following ............................................................................................... 5 BTH 240 Christianity in America BTH 324 History of Theology BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship ENG 211 Survey of American Literature ENG 212 Survey of British Literature ENG 340 World Literature HIST 250 Art as History HIST 390 Philosophy of History HIST 407 Special Topics MATH 365 History of Mathematics MUS 321 Music History MUS 322 Music History PHL 301 History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy PHL 302 History Modern and Contemporary Philosophy Additional classes from categories above, not used to meet other requirements

Minor in History Prerequisites for the History Minor:  Completion of the General Education world and American culture sequences *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for History Minor..........................................................................................................18  HIST 490 Historical Methods and Research ........................................................................ 3  Additional HIST courses 200 level or above, (at least one course from each of the three history categories listed in the major) .......................................................................................... 15

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Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS MUS 321 Category 1 Category 2 Category 3 FALL EVEN YEARS HIST 490 Category 1 Category 2 Category 3

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

SPRING EVEN YEARS MUS 322 Category 1 Category 2 Category 3

SUMMER EVEN YEARS

SPRING ODD YEARS Category 1 Category 2 Category 3

SUMMER ODD YEARS

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Michael Bollenbaugh Purpose NCU offers an interdisciplinary studies program in which students customize their degree programs. The IDS major is ideal for the student who has wide-ranging interests in several academic areas. In consultation with the program advisor, students may design a course of study involving three academic areas, with a minimum of 11 credit hours in each area. At least eight hours of the coursework in each area must come from upper division courses. Importantly, some academic areas require that certain courses from those areas be included in the courses that comprise the IDS major. Students will be made aware of these specific requirements in the advising context. In addition, students must complete three hours of IDS 495 (Internship) and two hours of IDS 499 (Senior Capstone). Students must also write a one page (300 words) essay that describes their rationale for choosing the academic areas that comprise their IDS major. The total number of credit hours required for the major is 38. The degree type (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science) will be determined by the majority of the three selected disciplines. If Bachelor of Arts is the designated degree type, the foreign language policy will apply. Objectives Graduates from the IDS major will: 1. Demonstrate holistic and creative thinking from a Christian worldview. 2. Acquire a basic knowledge and understanding of each academic area that comprises the major. 3. Read and think critically, write and speak clearly and persuasively, and conduct research effectively. 4. Build the foundation to prepare for desired vocations or selected graduate programs. 5. Pursue the goal of transformative leadership in their lives. Prerequisites for the Interdisciplinary Studies Major:  *One year of college-level proficiency in a non-native language as required by BA *Required if degree type is Bachelor of Arts.

Requirements for Interdisciplinary Studies.........................................................................................38  Area 1 ................................................................................................................................ 11 Must include 8 upper division credits  Area 2 ................................................................................................................................ 11 Must include 8 upper division credits  Area 3 ................................................................................................................................ 11 Must include 8 upper division credits  IDS 495 Internship ............................................................................................................... 3  IDS 499 Senior Capstone ..................................................................................................... 2

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Mathematics (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Constance Wilmarth, Dr. Brian Carrigan Purpose The purpose of the Mathematics Program is to provide students with a wide variety of courses touching on the main areas of modern undergraduate mathematics. In strengthening their critical reasoning skills and deepening their mathematical knowledge, students majoring in mathematics will obtain an excellent preparation for challenging and rewarding careers in education, business, and government work. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Exhibit proficiency in the computational techniques of calculus and linear algebra. 2. Demonstrate the ability to make use of technology as part of a problem-solving process. 3. Be able to use mathematics to analyze events and solve real world problems. 4. Be able to communicate undergraduate-level mathematical concepts effectively, both orally and in writing. 5. Demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical nature of mathematics by using inductive and deductive reasoning, and by using logically valid arguments to write proofs. 6. Be prepared to become a qualified teacher of mathematics, continue studies at the graduate level, or to enter the workforce in a position which requires analytical reasoning skills. Requirements for Mathematics ...........................................................................................................35  MATH 230 Discrete Mathematics ..................................................................................... 3  MATH 251 Calculus I.......................................................................................................... 4  MATH 252 Calculus II......................................................................................................... 4  MATH 315 Applied Statistics ............................................................................................ 3  MATH 320 Linear Algebra ................................................................................................. 3  MATH 325 Differential Equations...................................................................................... 3  MATH 355 Multivariable Calculus ..................................................................................... 3  MATH 495 Internship ........................................................................................................ 3  MATH 499 Senior Capstone .............................................................................................. 3  Choose two of the following approved electives ............................................................... 6 MATH 340 Advanced Geometry MATH 365 History of Mathematics MATH 407 Special Topics MATH 420 Topology MATH 430 Advanced Data Analysis MATH 445 Modern Algebra

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Minor in Mathematics Requirements for Mathematics Minor ................................................................................................20  MATH 230 Discrete Mathematics ....................................................................................... 3  MATH 251 Calculus I ........................................................................................................... 4  MATH 252 Calculus II .......................................................................................................... 4  MATH 315 Applied Statistics ............................................................................................... 3  MATH 320 Linear Algebra ................................................................................................... 3  MATH 340 Advanced Geometry ......................................................................................... 3

Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS MATH 320 MATH 315 MATH 445 MATH 495 MATH 499 FALL EVEN YEARS MATH 252 MATH 315 MATH 340 MATH 495 MATH 499

SPRING EVEN YEARS MATH 230 MATH 251 MATH 315 MATH 495 MATH 499

SUMMER EVEN YEARS

SPRING ODD YEARS MATH 315 MATH 325 MATH 355 MATH 430 MATH 495 MATH 499

SUMMER ODD YEARS

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Music (Bachelor of Arts) Program Faculty: Ms. Karen DeYoung Purpose The music program is meant to be a practical degree for those who want to have a career in music and to allow its participants to gain knowledge that a traditional university music program wouldn’t offer by selecting a concentration in Music Business, Music Industry, or Worship Arts. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Possess highly developed performance skills 2. Possess an excellent working knowledge of music 3. Possess significant leadership skills in music and worship 4. Possess additional training as an artist, businessperson or a worship leader. Prerequisites for the Music Major:  MUS 100 Music Fundamentals  MUS 240 The Christian Artist  MUS 175 Piano Proficiency  MCP 101/102 Class Piano I & II  One year of college-level proficiency in a non-native language as required by BA *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

General Requirements for Music ................................................................................................... 53-55  MUS 101 Music Theory I ..................................................................................................... 3  MUS 111 Ear Training & Sightreading I ............................................................................... 1  *MUS 118 Music Technology.............................................................................................. 2  MUS 201 Music Theory II .................................................................................................... 3  MUS 211 Ear Training & Sightreading II .............................................................................. 1  MUS 321 Music History I ..................................................................................................... 3  MUS 322 Music History II .................................................................................................... 3  MUS 351 Conducting and Rehearsing ................................................................................ 2  Applied Music - Primary Performance Medium  100 Level Instruction.............................................................................................. 2  200 Level Instruction.............................................................................................. 2  300 Level Instruction.............................................................................................. 2  400 Level Instruction.............................................................................................. 2  Ensemble............................................................................................................................. 8  MUS 495 Internship ............................................................................................................ 3  MUS 499 Capstone [Senior showcase, business plan/portfolio, or project] ..................... 2  Choose a Concentration............................................................................................... 14-16

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Prerequisite for the Music Business Concentration:  *BUS 110 Small Business Management or BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship Music Business Concentration .............................................................................................................15  BUS 310 Principles of Management and Leadership ........................................................ 3  MKTG 330 Marketing ......................................................................................................... 3  MUS 385 Music Business Practicum .................................................................................. 3  Choose two courses from the following: ............................................................................ 6 BUS 315 Human Resource Management BUS 360 Management of Information Systems BUS 370 Legal and Ethical Issues in Business & Management BUS 410 Operations Management BUS 415 Group and Organizational Behavior BUS 419 Global Business Management MKTG 431 Marketing Research MKTG 432 Branding, Advertising and Promotion MKTG 433 Sales Strategy and Management MKTG 434 Consumer Behavior MKTG 435 Digital Marketing Music Industry Concentration ....................................................................................................... 14-16  BUS 310 Principles of Management and Leadership ........................................................ 3  MUS 310 Arranging & Orchestrating .................................................................................. 2  MUS 319 Audio Engineering ............................................................................................... 3  MUS 386 Concert Production Practicum ............................................................................ 3  MUS 419 Advanced Studio Recording ................................................................................ 3 Or 

CCCU Best Semester ......................................................................................................... 16

Worship Arts Concentration ................................................................................................................15  MUS 225 The Worshipping Community ............................................................................. 2  CM 470 Leadership Skills for Ministry ................................................................................. 2  MUS 310 Arranging & Orchestrating .................................................................................. 2  MUS 335 Worship Theology and Planning ......................................................................... 2  MUS 352 Conducting and Rehearsing II.............................................................................. 2  MUS 375 History of Worship in the Church ........................................................................ 2  MUS 387 Worship Leading Practicum ................................................................................ 3

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Minor in Worship Arts Prerequisite for the Worship Arts Minor:  MCP 101/102 Class Piano I & II  MUS 100 Music Fundamentals  MUS 175 Piano Proficiency Requirements for Worship Arts Minor ...............................................................................................19  *MUS 118 Music Technology.............................................................................................. 2  MUS 321 Music History I ..................................................................................................... 3  Applied Music ..................................................................................................................... 4  Ensemble ......................................................................................................................... 4  Choose 2 of the following ................................................................................................... 6 MUS 225 The worshipping Community CM 470 Leadership Skills for Ministry MUS 310 Arranging and Orchestration MUS 335 Worship Theology & Planning MUS 375 History of Worship in the Church MUS 387 Worship Leading Practicum Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS BUS 120 BUS 310 BUS 315 BUS 336 BUS 360 MCP 101 MKTG 330 MUS 100 MUS 118 MUS 201 MUS 211 MUS 225 MUS 311 MUS 321 MUS 351 MUS 381 MUS 495 MUS 499

SPRING EVEN YEARS BUS 335 BUS 410 BUS 450 MCP 102 MUS 101 MUS 111 MUS 119 MUS 312 MUS 322 MUS 335 MUS 352 MUS 495 MUS 499

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SUMMER EVEN YEARS BUS 110

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FALL EVEN YEARS BUS 120 BUS 310 BUS 334 BUS 415 CM 470 MCP 101 MKTG 330 MUS 100 MUS 118 MUS 201 MUS 211 MUS 310 MUS 365 MUS 411 MUS 495 MUS 499

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

SPRING ODD YEARS BUS 370 BUS 419 MCP 102 MUS 101 MUS 111 MUS 119 MUS 240 MUS 335 MUS 375 MUS 495 MUS 499

112

SUMMER ODD YEARS BUS 110

2015-20016

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Philosophy Minor Program Faculty: Dr. Michael Bollenbaugh Purpose To enable students to: 1. Pursue graduate studies in philosophy. 2. Pursue a professional career, such as law. 3. Move into the job market immediately after graduation. 4. Pursue academics that enrich other NCU majors, e.g. History, Psychology, Theology, English, Mathematics. Objectives Graduates of this program will acquire: 1 A solid foundation in philosophical studies related to their interests. 2 The methodological skills necessary for the discipline of philosophy. Requirements a minor in Philosophy ..................................................................................................18  PHL 210 Ethics ..................................................................................................................... 3  PHL 301 History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy ........................................................ 3  PHL 302 History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy .............................................. 3  Choose 9 credits from the following approved electives: .................................................. 9 BTH 324 History of Theology BTH 326 The Art of Theology BTH 328 Theological Problems HIST 390 Philosophy of History PHL 315 Bioethics PHL 320 Philosophy of Religion PHL 407 Special Topics PHL 420 Christian Ethics and Social Responsibility PSY 440 Psychology of Religion Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS PHL 210 PHL 420

FALL EVEN YEARS BTH 328 PHL 210 PHL 301 PSY 440

SPRING EVEN YEARS PHL 210 PHL 315 PHL 320

SUMMER EVEN YEARS PHL 210

SPRING ODD YEARS PHL 210 PHL 302 PHL 407 BTH 324

SUMMER ODD YEARS PHL 210

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Psychology (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Nani Skaggs, Dr. Mary Ann Winter-Messiers Purpose The emphasis of the psychology major is to equip students with a strong foundation in psychological science. Students will study the scientific study of biological, social, and psychological factors; apply psychology to everyday experiences; learn to read, think, and write critically; and consider psychological science from a Christian perspective. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate a working knowledge base of psychology. 2. Demonstrate scientific inquiry and critical thinking skills. 3. Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological explanations and practices and adopt values that build community in a diverse world. 4. Demonstrate effective communication skills in a variety of formats. 5. Apply psychological knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits. 6. Apply Christian faith to an understanding of psychological science. Prerequisites for the Psychology Major:  *BIOL 111/111L or *130/130L or *200/200L  *MATH 110 College Mathematics  MATH 315 Applied Statistics  *PSY 200 General Psychology  *WR 123 English Composition *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for Psychology ..............................................................................................................39  PSY 320 Human Development ............................................................................................ 3  PSY 330 Psychology of Learning .......................................................................................... 3  PSY 340 Social Psychology .................................................................................................. 3  PSY 350 Research Methods ................................................................................................ 3  PSY 370 Cognition ............................................................................................................... 3  PSY 380 Theories of Personality.......................................................................................... 3  PSY 390 Biological Psychology ........................................................................................... 3  PSY 420 Abnormal Psychology ............................................................................................ 3  PSY 451 Advanced Research Methods................................................................................ 3  PSY 499 Senior Capstone .................................................................................................... 3  Choose one ......................................................................................................................... 3 PSY 490 Research Practicum PSY 495 Internship  Choose two of the following approved electives: .............................................................. 6 PSY 407 Special Topics PSY 430 Psychology of Addictive Behaviors PSY 440 Psychology of Religion PSY 450 Psychometrics PSY 465 Introduction to Counseling Skills PSY 475 Psychology of Trauma 114

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Minor in Psychology Prerequisites for the Psychology Minor:  *PSY 200 General Psychology *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for the Psychology Minor.............................................................................................18  PSY 320 Human Development ............................................................................................ 3  PSY 330 Psychology of Learning .......................................................................................... 3  PSY 340 Social Psychology.................................................................................................. 3  PSY 420 Abnormal Psychology ............................................................................................ 3  Choose two of the following approved electives ............................................................... 6 PSY 370 Cognition PSY 380 Theories of Personality PSY 390 Biological Psychology PSY 440 Psychology of Religion Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS MATH 110 MATH 315 PSY 200 PSY 320 PSY 350 PSY 407 PSY 420 PSY 490 PSY 495 PSY 499

FALL EVEN YEARS BIOL 130/130L MATH 110 MATH 315 PSY 200 PSY 340 PSY 350 PSY 407 PSY 440 PSY 490 PSY 495 PSY 499

SPRING EVEN YEARS BIOL 111/111L BIOL 200/200L MATH 110 MATH 315 PSY 200 PSY 330 PSY 390 PSY 451 PSY 465 PSY 490 PSY 495 PSY 499

SUMMER EVEN YEARS

SPRING ODD YEARS BIOL 111/111L BIOL 200/200L MATH 110 MATH 315 PSY 200 PSY 370 PSY 380 PSY 450 PSY 451 PSY 490 PSY 495 PSY 499

SUMMER ODD YEARS

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2015-20016

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

Teacher Education (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Brian Kaelin, Ms. Vivian Moen, Dr. Johnny Lake, Ms. Liza Zehner The bachelor’s degree in Teacher Education is a Bachelor of Science degree unless the Bachelor of Arts degree type is specifically chosen. To complete the degree as a Bachelor of Arts, the student must either successfully complete the 12 credit ESOL endorsement, or meet the criteria for one year of college-level proficiency in a non-native language. Mission Statement Faculty partner together within an environment of learning to prepare highly qualified teachers who exude and exemplify standards of leadership, professionalism, scholarship, and faith as established within the framework of best educational practices and Christian values. Purpose Consistent with this mission of NCU, the elementary and secondary education majors are offered in a campus environment that is person- and faith-oriented. The curriculum is designed to integrate a broad Christian liberal arts academic preparation with research-based education methods and relevant field experiences in a purposeful and explicit fashion. Preparation addresses the needs and priorities of elementary and secondary schoolteachers for today and in the future. The Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission accredits the NCU teacher preparation program. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Believe in the dignity and worth of each individual. 2. Be academically competent in subjects they are to teach. 3. Exemplify professional communication (speaking, writing, listening) and technology skills. 4. Realize that teaching is both an art and a science. 5. Apply a working knowledge of effective classroom management and the skills of teaching. 6. Motivate students with hands-on, action-based learning opportunities. 7. Utilize a variety of effective teaching methods which synthesize content, knowledge of children and adolescents, and an empowering learning environment. 8. Commit themselves to continuing professional growth to remain effective and the desire to pursue further study. 9. Demonstrate ethical and professional responsibilities of teachers and an understanding of the teacher’s role as a leader in the community. 10. Lead, empower, and motivate every student to enjoy learning and to continue learning for a lifetime. Admission to the Teacher Education Program Prior to admission to the teacher education program students must earn a “C” or better in all general education core requirements and pre-education classes, as well as attain a cumulative GPA of 2.75. Freshman students must enroll in EDUC 110 Foundations of Education which has an embedded schoolbased service learning component. This introductory course is designed to assist students as they begin to inquire about the teaching profession and their potential and disposition to pursue an education major. This course, EDUC 110, can count toward social science core requirements in the general education core.

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Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

During semester three and/or semester four, sophomore students will take two introductory courses: EDUC 210 School Diversity, and EDUC 230 Technology for Teaching and Learning. Within these courses, students will complete the steps to be formally admitted to the NCU teacher education program. EDUC 210 School Diversity can count toward social science or the diversity core requirement within the general education core. EDUC 230 Technology for Teaching and Learning has an embedded schoolbased service learning requirement specifically designed to continue the investigation of teaching as a career. In addition to the teacher education application materials, which include character and youth experience references, the following are required: 1. A formal interview. 2. Students must take the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) Computer Based Test (CBT), or National Evaluation Series (NES). 3. Official scores on the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) Computer Based Test (CBT), or National Evaluation Series (NES). a. The student demonstrates acceptable knowledge of basic skills by meeting minimum score requirements. b. Those with an AAOT or a baccalaureate degree who enroll during the regular academic year must submit passing scores by January 1 in order to register for education coursework offered spring semester. 4. A cumulative GPA of 2.75. 5. For acceptance into the teacher education program, students are assessed in the foregoing areas. In order to be admitted, students must receive a passing score on the Teacher Education Admission Assessment. *Courses taken at a junior/community college may not be used to satisfy program requirements or major course requirements for Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle or Secondary Education unless specified in an articulation agreement.

Students with a bachelor’s degree who want to earn an additional bachelor’s degree and Oregon licensure must complete additional credits in Bible per the catalog year. Post-baccalaureate students may complete the program for licensure only without the Bible requirement. Students are responsible to satisfy the conditions specified in the “Education Program” manual edition current for their catalog year.

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Prerequisites for Teacher Education Major who are in NCU’s program:  *EDUC 110 Foundations of Education  *EDUC 210 School Diversity  EDUC 230 Technology for Teaching and Learning  *PSY 200 General Psychology *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

General Requirements for Education Major ................................................................................. 46-51  EDUC 313 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment ....................................................... 3  Choose one of the following ............................................................................................ 2 EDUC 315 ECE Junior Field Experience EDUC 325 ELE Junior Field Experience EDUC 355 ML Junior Field Experience EDUC 365 HS Junior Field Experience  Choose one of the following ............................................................................................ 2 EDUC 335 ECE Junior Field Experience EDUC 345 ELE Junior Field Experience EDUC 375 ML Junior Field Experience EDUC 385 HS Junior Field Experience  EDUC 321 Classroom Relations & Management ............................................................. 3  EDUC 380 School Law ...................................................................................................... 3  EDUC 415 Faith Integration in Teaching Seminar ............................................................ 2  EDUC 435 Second Authorization Practicum .................................................................... 3  EDUC 437 EdTPA Support Seminar .................................................................................. 3  EDUC 495 Senior Field Experience ................................................................................... 4  EDUC 496 Student Teaching .......................................................................................... 12  Choose one of the required concentrations listed below ..........................................8-13 Prerequisites for the Elementary Teacher Education Major:  *MATH 211 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers  MATH 212 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Early Childhood and Elementary Concentration .................................................................................13  EDUC 330 Child Development ......................................................................................... 3  EDUC 340 Elementary Literacy Methods & Children’s Literature ................................... 3  EDUC 350 Elementary Math & Science Methods ........................................................... 3  EDUC 420 P.E. & Health Methods ................................................................................... 2  EDUC 430 Visual Arts & Social Studies Methods ............................................................ 2

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Prerequisites for the Secondary Teacher Education Major:  *MATH 110 College Mathematics (unless earning a math endorsement) *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Middle Level and High School Concentration ....................................................................................... 9 (Required in addition to content endorsement classes)  EDUC 360 Secondary Literacy Methods ......................................................................... 2  EDUC 370 Adolescent Learners ....................................................................................... 3  Choose one related methods class (not required for Language Arts endorsement) ...... 4 EDUC 362 Secondary Language Arts Methods EDUC 366 Secondary Science Methods EDUC 367 Secondary Math Methods EDUC 368 Secondary Social Studies Methods Course Rotation Schedule FALL ODD YEARS EDUC 110 EDUC 210 EDUC 230 EDUC 315/325/355/365 EDUC 330 EDUC 370 EDUC 380 EDUC 420 EDUC 430 EDUC 435 EDUC 437 EDUC 495 MATH 110 MATH 211 PSY 200

SPRING EVEN YEARS EDUC 110 EDUC 210 EDUC 230

SUMMER EVEN YEARS

EDUC 313 EDUC 321 EDUC 335/345/375/385 EDUC 340 EDUC 350 EDUC 360 EDUC 362 EDUC 366 EDUC 367 EDUC 368 EDUC 415 EDUC 496 MATH 110 MATH 212 PSY 200

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FALL EVEN YEARS EDUC 110 EDUC 210 EDUC 230 EDUC 315/325/355/365 EDUC 330 EDUC 370 EDUC 380 EDUC 420 EDUC 430 EDUC 435 EDUC 436 EDUC 437 EDUC 495 MATH 110 MATH 211 PSY 200

Traditional Undergraduate Programs of Study

SPRING ODD YEARS EDUC 110 EDUC 210 EDUC 230

SUMMER ODD YEARS

EDUC 313 EDUC 321 EDUC 335/345/375/385 EDUC 340 EDUC 350 EDUC 360 EDUC 362 EDUC 366 EDUC 367 EDUC 368 EDUC 415 EDUC 496 MATH 110 MATH 212 PSY 200

Endorsements Each endorsement requires additional coursework, and programs vary from 16-31 credits. Students will work with their faculty advisors and the dean of the school of education and counseling to map out an academic plan. Check each course for prerequisites. For middle level and high school teacher education majors, one of the following endorsement areas must be chosen: Basic Mathematics English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Integrated Science (middle level only) Language Arts Advanced Mathematics Social Studies Spanish Endorsement Pathways English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) ..................................................................................14  EDUC 485 ESOL Practicum ................................................................................................ 2*  ESOL 310 Introduction to Comparative Linguistics ............................................................. 3  ESOL 315 English Grammar and Syntax .............................................................................. 3  ESOL 410 ESOL Theory and Methods .................................................................................. 3  ESOL 425 ESOL Teaching Oral and Literate Skills ................................................................ 3 * This practicum may be waived if the student is able to fit ESOL placement into their practicum or student teaching experience.

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Integrated Science (Middle and High School) .......................................................................................29  BIOL 111/111L Principles of Living Organisms .................................................................... 4  BIOL 112/112L Principles of Biodiversity ............................................................................ 4  CHEM 121/121L General Chemistry ................................................................................... 5  GEOL 110/110L Introduction to Geology ............................................................................ 4  GEOL 210 Historical Geology .............................................................................................. 2  GEOL 310 Meteorology/Oceanography.............................................................................. 3  PHYS 201/201L Introduction to Mechanics ........................................................................ 4  PHYS 122 Meteorology and Astronomy ............................................................................. 3 Language Arts........................................................................................................................................21  ENG 201 Introduction to Literature .................................................................................... 3  ENG 211 Survey of American Literature ............................................................................. 3  ENG 212 Survey of British Literature .................................................................................. 3  ENG 340 World Literature................................................................................................... 3  ENG 350 Multiethnic American Literature ......................................................................... 3  ESOL 315 English Grammar and Syntax .............................................................................. 3  Any ENG upper division elective ......................................................................................... 3 Basic Mathematics ................................................................................................................................17  MATH 110 College Mathematics .......................................................................................4  MATH 130 Precalculus .......................................................................................................4  MATH 211 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers............................................................3  MATH 212 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers............................................................3  MATH 230 Discrete Mathematics ......................................................................................3 Advanced Mathematics (High School) ..................................................................................................20  MATH 230 Discrete Mathematics .....................................................................................3  MATH 251 Calculus I .........................................................................................................4  MATH 252 Calculus II ........................................................................................................4  MATH 315 Applied Statistics ............................................................................................3  MATH 320 Linear Algebra ................................................................................................3  MATH 340 Advanced Geometry .......................................................................................3

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Social Studies ........................................................................................................................................24  Choose one from the General Education Core ................................................................... 3 ANTH 210 Cultural Anthropology SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology  Choose one of the following: .............................................................................................3 ECON 201 Microeconomics ECON 202 Macroeconomics  GEOG 310 World Culture and Political Geography ............................................................. 3  HIST 370 Ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean Civilizations..................................... 3  HIST 380 Modern European Culture and the World......................................................... 3  HIST 430 History of American International Relations ..................................................... 3  PSY 340 Social Psychology ............................................................................................... 3  Choose one of the following ............................................................................................... 3 COMM 220 Intercultural Communication SOC 410 Global Issues Spanish* ................................................................................................................................................30  SPAN 101 First-year Spanish ............................................................................................... 4  SPAN 102 First-year Spanish ............................................................................................... 4  SPAN 201 Second-year Spanish .......................................................................................... 3  SPAN 202 Second-year Spanish .......................................................................................... 3  SPAN 300 Spanish Phonetics............................................................................................... 2  SPAN 310 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition ............................................ 3  SPAN 321 Hispanic Culture and Civilization ........................................................................ 3  SPAN 330 Religion and History of the Americas ................................................................. 3  SPAN 340 Latino Society and Culture in the U.S. ................................................................ 3  SPAN 470 Teaching Foreign Language Methods ................................................................ 2 *Courses may need to be transferred from another 4-year institution.

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Adult Studies and Online Programs The Adult Studies Program at NCU is a unique alternative to the traditional method of pursuing a bachelor’s degree. It is designed for working adults who have significant life experiences and who want to earn a university degree while continuing their employment. The delivery system for the curriculum is based on classes taught one night a week and online. The program utilizes the latest adult learning models and principles to facilitate learning.

3. 4. 5.

The Adult Studies Program is designed and structured for the adult learner. Student performance is most often evaluated by summary papers, class discussion and participation, project work, written exercises, quizzes, and tests. Student involvement in the learning process is featured throughout the program.

6.

7. 8.

6 hours with at least one course each in math, lab sciences, and computer skills.  8 hours biblical studies.  Students with an Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree (AAOT) have met the core requirements (except 8 semester credits of Bible and Christian ministry). An academic major or concentration. A minimum of 30 credit hours from Northwest Christian University. A minimum of 27 credit hours in the upper division of an academic major or concentration (one-third in the case of an academic minor). Cumulative GPA of 2.00 or better for all coursework including those transferred to meet graduation requirements. At least a C- in each course in the major. Satisfactory writing competency requirement.

Limitations for Adult Studies Students 1.

Requirements to Begin Major Coursework Prior to beginning any major coursework, students must have earned 65 total semester credits, and satisfactorily completed the following general education (CORE) requirements (note: this requirement does not apply to the Criminal Justice major): 1. WR 121 and 123. 2. One communications course. 3. One college-level mathematics course (MATH 105 or above).

2.

3.

4.

Graduation Requirements

5.

1. Completion of 124 semester credit hours.

2. Completion of a basic core curriculum:  6 hours of writing competency (WR 121/123 English Composition).  15 hours in humanities (see General Education Core Requirements). • 15 hours in social sciences (see General Education Core Requirements).

6.

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Maximum number of non-graded courses allowed: 12 hours (no P/NP grading option is allowed in the major/minor/certificate programs except in those courses in which P/NP is the only grading option). There is no set maximum on CLEP credit, but all accepted credits must fulfill graduation requirements. Maximum number of credits allowed through Prior Learning Experience (PLE) is 30 credit hours. There is no set maximum on military, fire, or police credit, but all accepted credits must fulfill graduation requirements. The maximum number of credits earned in field experience and practicum is 16 credit hours. There is a maximum of eight credit hours for physical education courses taken at NCU. A course used to meet the requirements of an academic major or minor may not be applied toward another major or minor. The time limit is 6 years from date of matriculation for bachelor of arts/sciences.

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Adult Degree Programs of Study

Web Site: www.nwcu.edu

Student Status in the Adult Studies Program A full-time student in the Adult Studies Program is one who is taking at least 12 credits in each semester. Prior learning credits, AP credits, and CLEP credits are not counted in the total number of credits a student is taking in a semester. Adult Studies students who are less than half time (six credits) per semester may not be eligible for financial aid.

Portfolio Information The portfolio is a compilation of the student’s learning in the areas of academic, personal, and professional experience. Credit from the portfolio is generated in two ways and the process is taught in the PLA 205 Portfolio Analysis: 



Credit for technical and professional training (TPT) may be awarded if it is appropriate and applicable to the student’s career and educational goals. Experiential essays, written lucidly and logically, communicate to faculty the kind and amount of learning gained from specific life experiences.

Students who wish to earn credits for lifelearning experiences should enroll in PLA 205 to determine academic areas in which they could write experiential essays. The assessment process determines the credits to be awarded. Fees are assessed for any credit(s) awarded through the portfolio process that are awarded by NCU. Students may contact the Enrollment Services Office for more information. For additional information, or to schedule a visit, please contact: Enrollment Services Northwest Christian University 828 East 11th Avenue Eugene, OR 97401-3745 Phone: (541)684-7211 Fax: (541)684-7333 E-mail: [email protected] 124

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Two-Year Associate Degree Programs Associate of Arts: General Studies Purpose The associate of arts degree is awarded in general studies and serves as a foundation for continuing on to complete bachelor of arts studies. It also offers enough elective credits to specialize in a particular field.

Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate their commitment to ethical leadership and the integration of faith and learning. 2. Be conversant across the disciplines with many of the key ideas that have shaped Western culture. 3. Demonstrate skills of sound reasoning, critical thinking, and ethical decision making in courses that focus on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 4. Demonstrate the capacity to make informed judgments about the place of humanity in the world through social science courses that focus on traditional and contemporary thinkers. 5. Construct and evaluate empirical processes. 6. Demonstrate cultural competency. 7. Demonstrate a general knowledge of the Bible and skills in interpreting the biblical text for the 21st century. 8. Improve physical skills and fitness, and demonstrate knowledge that leads to a healthy lifestyle.

General Requirements for Graduation 1. Completion of 60 semester credit hours. 2. A minimum of 30 credit hours from Northwest Christian University. 3. A cumulative GPA of 2.00 or better.

Limitations 1. 2. 3. 4.

Maximum number of credits in non-graded courses: 6 credit hours. No maximum on CLEP credit but all accepted credits must fulfill graduation requirements. Maximum number of credits earned through Prior Learning Assessment (PLA): 15 credit hours. No maximum on military, fire, or police credit but all accepted credits must fulfill graduation requirements. 5. Maximum number of credits earned in field experience and practicum: 8 credit hours. 6. Maximum of four graded credit hours for physical education courses taken at NCU. Up to an additional four hours will be graded P/N. 7. Time limit: three years. After three years have elapsed from the time of initial matriculation in the University, the student must apply for readmission.

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Requirements for Associate of Arts Degree 

Writing ........................................................................................................................................ 6  WR 121 English Composition .............................................................................................. 3  WR 123 English Composition .............................................................................................. 3



Humanities ................................................................................................................................ 15 Structured thinking communicated eloquently is the essence of understanding the humanities. The ability to communicate effectively by means of listening, speaking, reading and writing in diverse situations as a reflection of sound reasoning and critical thinking is the focus of the humanities. Must include one course in each area:  Communication  Literature  Ethics  Choose remaining Humanities credits from any of the following areas: Art History/Appreciation Communications History Foreign Languages Literature Music History/Appreciation Philosophy 



Social Sciences ........................................................................................................................... 15 Students enter into a dialogue with traditional and contemporary thinkers and address fundamental questions about the universe and the place of humanity within it through the social sciences. Development of informed judgments about past and present issues, problems, people and situations occurs through the study of psychology and the social sciences.  

Must include one History course Choose remaining Social Science credits from courses in at least one area other than history: Anthropology Business Comparative Religions Criminal Justice Economics Education Geography History Human Services Law Political Science Psychology Sociology

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Adult Degree Programs of Study

Math/Science/Computer.............................................................................................................. 6 Understanding the world through scientific and mathematical paradigms brings a quantitative dimension to the humanities and social sciences. Taking courses in the physical and life sciences enables students to understand, construct and evaluate empirical processes and relationships. 



Minimum six credits with at least one course in each of the following areas:  One college-level mathematics course (MATH 105 or higher)  One science with lab course with lab  One computer science course

Bible & Christian Ministry Studies................................................................................................. 8 Core courses in Bible and Christian Ministry are designed to enable all NCU students to engage with the Bible as Holy Scripture in such a way as to promote the integration of faith in all aspects of academic study and individual vocation. Students will be challenged to study scripture in the context of regular worship and guided service learning. The “Cornerstone Course” in Bible, Engaging with the Bible, provides both an overview of biblical content and an overview of appropriate methods of interpreting the Bible so that students will be well-grounded in how to read the Bible in the 21st century. Other Bible courses build upon this foundation to provide students with detailed biblical knowledge, along with a ‘toolbox’ of interpretive tools to use for future Bible study.



Diversity Studies ......................................................................................................... *one course The NCU community is committed to honoring the diversity of persons, backgrounds, and ideas represented on our campus and in our society at large. All students will have the opportunity to explore issues of diversity as they emerge from the core curriculum and from the specific disciplines of an academic major. The following NCU courses have been approved to meet the diversity requirement, though some may be available only in the daytime. Consult your advisor for actual course offering times and locations. Many of these courses may also fulfill requirements in other areas of the general education core (e.g., Communication, Social Sciences). ANTH 210 Cultural Anthropology BTH 240 Christianity in America COMM 220 Intercultural Communication HIST 240 History of the Pacific Northwest BUS 419 Global Business Management MUS 313 Music of Multi-Cultural America SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology PSY 430 Social Psychology *Some of the approved courses may also fulfill requirements in other areas of the gen ed core (e.g., humanities, social sciences).



Specialization or Electives .......................................................................................................... 10 TOTAL...................................................................................................................................... 60* *NOTE: 60 semester credits are the minimum requirement. If a student with an AA decides to pursue a bachelor’s degree, then the remainder of the General Education (CORE) requirements must be completed.

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General Education (CORE) Requirements for Bachelor Degrees Purpose To provide a cohesive body of excellent undergraduate coursework that is a foundation for all NCU’s academic programs. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate their commitment to ethical leadership and the integration of faith and learning. 2. Demonstrate skills of sound reasoning, critical thinking, and ethical decision making in courses that focus on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 3. Demonstrate the capacity to make informed judgments about the place of humanity in the world through social science courses that focus on traditional and contemporary thinkers. 4. Construct and evaluate empirical processes. 5. Demonstrate cultural competency. 6. Demonstrate a general knowledge of the Bible and skills in interpreting the biblical text for the 21st century. The Requirements 

Writing ........................................................................................................................................ 6  WR 121 English Composition .............................................................................................. 3  WR 123 English Composition .............................................................................................. 3



Humanities ................................................................................................................................ 15 Structured thinking communicated eloquently is the essence of understanding the humanities. The ability to communicate effectively by means of listening, speaking, reading and writing in diverse situations as a reflection of sound reasoning and critical thinking is the focus of the humanities. Must include one course in each area:  Communication  Literature  Ethics  Choose remaining Humanities credits from any of the following areas: Art History/Appreciation Communications History Foreign Languages Literature Music History/Appreciation Philosophy 



Social Sciences ........................................................................................................................... 15 Students enter into a dialogue with traditional and contemporary thinkers and address fundamental questions about the universe and the place of humanity within it through the social sciences.

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Development of informed judgments about past and present issues, problems, people and situations occurs through the study of psychology and the social sciences.  



Must include one History course Choose remaining Social Science credits from courses in at least one area other than history: Anthropology Business Comparative Religions Criminal Justice Economics Education Geography History Human Services Law Political Science Psychology Sociology

Math/Science/Computer.............................................................................................................. 6 Understanding the world through scientific and mathematical paradigms brings a quantitative dimension to the humanities and social sciences. Taking courses in the physical and life sciences enables students to understand, construct and evaluate empirical processes and relationships. 



Minimum six credits with at least one course in each of the following areas:  One college-level mathematics course (MATH 105 or higher)  One science course with lab  One computer science course

Bible & Christian Ministry Studies................................................................................................. 8 Core courses in Bible and Christian Ministry are designed to enable all NCU students to engage with the Bible as Holy Scripture in such a way as to promote the integration of faith in all aspects of academic study and individual vocation. Students will be challenged to study scripture in the context of regular worship and guided service learning. The “Cornerstone Course” in Bible, Engaging with the Bible, provides both an overview of biblical content and an overview of appropriate methods of interpreting the Bible so that students will be well-grounded in how to read the Bible in the 21st century. Other Bible courses build upon this foundation to provide students with detailed biblical knowledge, along with a ‘toolbox’ of interpretive tools to use for future Bible study.



Diversity Studies ......................................................................................................... *one course The NCU community is committed to honoring the diversity of persons, backgrounds, and ideas represented on our campus and in our society at large. All students will have the opportunity to explore issues of diversity as they emerge from the core curriculum and from the specific disciplines of an academic major.

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Adult Degree Programs of Study

The following NCU courses have been approved to meet the diversity requirement, though some may be available only in the daytime. Consult your advisor for actual course offering times and locations. Many of these courses may also fulfill requirements in other areas of the general education core (e.g., Communication, Social Sciences). ANTH 210 Cultural Anthropology BTH 240 Christianity in America BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship COMM 220 Intercultural Communication HIST 240 History of the Pacific Northwest BUS 419 Global Business Management PSY 340 Social Psychology SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology *Some of the approved courses may also fulfill requirements in other areas of the gen ed core (e.g., humanities, social sciences).

Minimum General Education CORE for all majors ........................................................................ 50 NOTE: A maximum of six credits of major courses may be used to fulfill general education requirements in the Humanities and/or Social Science areas, with a maximum of three credits in each area.

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Accounting (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Ms. Stacey Lewis Purpose The purpose of the accounting major is to prepare men and women to become effective and ethically responsible as managers and leaders in the business world and public service sectors. The concentration in accounting focuses on financial and operational objectives for business, government and not-for-profit organizations, supported by a strong liberal arts component. Combined with courses in management, economics, managerial finance, law, and ethics, an accounting education provides a solid background for careers and advancement in the business community and in other non-business professions. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts and principles of Accounting. 2. Verify, organize, analyze and apply data and use quantitative decision-support tools to provide effective solutions to accounting problems. 3. Identify ethical issues and apply ethical principles and Christian values for organizational decision making. 4. Demonstrate effective professional communication skills. Prerequisites for the Accounting Major:  *ACTG 211 Principles of Accounting I  *ACTG 212 Principles of Accounting II  *ECON 201 Microeconomics  *ECON 202 Macroeconomics *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Requirements for Accounting Major (in-class options and online) ............................................... 36  ACTG 341 Intermediate Accounting I ............................................................................... 3  ACTG 342 Intermediate Accounting II .............................................................................. 3  ACTG 345 Cost Accounting............................................................................................... 3  ACTG 360 Accounting Information Systems .................................................................... 3  ACTG 430 Federal Income Tax ......................................................................................... 3  ACTG 431 Federal Income Tax – Corporations, Partnerships, Estates, & Trusts ................ 3  ACTG 440 Auditing I ......................................................................................................... 3  ACTG 470 Accounting for Non-Profit Organizations ....................................................... 3  ACTG 499 Advanced Accounting ...................................................................................... 3  BUS 450 Managerial Finance ......................................................................................... 3  MATH 310 Statistical Applications .................................................................................... 3  WR 311 Writing in the Workplace ...................................................................................... 3

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Adult Degree Programs of Study

Interdisciplinary Business minor (required for Accounting majors) Requirement for Interdisciplinary Business Minor ................................................................................... 18  BUS 310 Principles of Management & Leadership ............................................................. 3  BUS 370 Legal and Ethical Issues in Business & Management ........................................... 3  BUS 499 Business Strategy .................................................................................................. 3  MKTG 330 Marketing .......................................................................................................... 3  Choose two courses from the following ............................................................................. 6 ACTG 495 Internship BUS 110 Small Business Management BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship BUS 410 Operations Management BUS 419 Global Business Management Minor in Accounting Prerequisites for the Accounting Minor:  BUS 310 Principles of Management and Leadership Requirements for Accounting Minor ..................................................................................................18  ACTG 211 Principles of Accounting I ................................................................................... 3  ACTG 212 Principles of Accounting II .................................................................................. 3  ACTG 341 Intermediate Accounting I ................................................................................. 3  ACTG 342 Intermediate Accounting II ............................................................................... 3  ACTG 440 Auditing .............................................................................................................. 3  ACTG 470 Accounting for Non-Profit Organizations ........................................................... 3

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Adult Degree Programs of Study

Business Administration (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Peter Diffenderfer, Mr. David Quirk, Dr. Timothy Veach Purpose The purpose of the business administration major is to prepare students for careers as managers and leaders in either private or public sectors. In conjunction with the general education background that students bring with them when they enter the University, the program integrates the fundamental theories, concepts, and practices of business with Christian values and ethics. Students in the program may choose to emphasize one of two concentrations: Management or Marketing. An interdisciplinary business minor is also available to complement other majors at the University. The program is primarily oriented towards the working adult. Objectives Graduates of this program will be able to demonstrate: 1. A comprehensive knowledge of the core principles and concepts related to business administration; 2. Effective communication, both written and oral, relative to different business environments and situations; 3. A knowledge and understanding of the role of Christian leadership, ethics, and service in effectively addressing business management issues and decisions; 4. Literacy regarding current management trends though the use of leading business information sources, current publications, and other available audio-video, online, or in-text resources; 5. An ability to integrate all aspects of their learning, understanding, knowledge, and skills concerning business through a comprehensive capstone course. Prerequisites for the Business Administration Major:  BUS 110 Small Business Management or BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship  ECON 201 Microeconomics  ECON 202 Macroeconomics  WR 311 Writing for the Workplace Requirements for Business Administration Major..............................................................................39  ACTG 211 Principles of Accounting I ................................................................................ 3  ACTG 212 Principles of Accounting II ............................................................................... 3  BUS 310 Principles of Management and Leadership ..................................................... 3  BUS 315 Human Resources Management ..................................................................... 3  BUS 370 Legal and Ethical Issues in Business & Management ...................................... 3  BUS 419 Global Business Management ......................................................................... 3  BUS 450 Managerial Finance ......................................................................................... 3  BUS 499 Business Strategy and Policy ........................................................................... 3  MATH 310 Statistical Applications .................................................................................... 3  MKTG 330 Marketing ........................................................................................................ 3  Choose from the following list ............................................................................................ 9

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Adult Degree Programs of Study

BUS 360 Management of Information Systems BUS 410 Operations Management BUS 415 Group and Organizational Behavior MKTG 431 Marketing Research MKTG 432 Branding, Advertising and Promotion MKTG 433 Sales Strategy and Management MKTG 434 Consumer Behavior MKTG 435 Digital Marketing

Minor in Interdisciplinary Business Requirements for Interdisciplinary Business Minor ...........................................................................18  BUS 310 Principles of Management and Leadership ...................................................... 3  MKTG 330 Marketing ......................................................................................................... 3  Choose four courses from the following: ......................................................................... 12 BUS 315 Human Resource Management BUS 360 Management of Information Systems BUS 370 Legal and Ethical Issues in Business & Management BUS 410 Operations Management BUS 415 Group and Organizational Behavior BUS 419 Global Business Management BUS 450 Managerial Finance MKTG 432 Branding, Advertising and Promotion MKTG 433 Sales Strategy and Management

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Adult Degree Programs of Study

Criminal Justice (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Purpose The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice is designed adult students and professionals who desire: 1. To complete a baccalaureate degree in the area of criminal justice 2. To enter or advance in careers in law enforcement or corrections 3. And/or to pursue graduate studies in criminal justice and related fields. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the American criminal justice system and the legal, theoretical, and public policy issues that are relevant to it. 2. Be able to articulate an understanding of diversity in terms ethnicity, culture, gender, religion, and other traits, and demonstrate in writing, effects of diversity in the criminal justice system. 3. Be equipped to apply ethical decision making processes in the criminal justice arena. 4. Demonstrate familiarity with current research across sub-disciplines in criminal justice. 5. Demonstrate an ethical, global, and socially just view of criminal justice. Prerequisites for the Criminal Justice Major:  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice  IDS 240 Foundations of Lifelong Learning Requirements for Criminal Justice Major ............................................................................................39  CJ 310 Principles of Law Enforcement ................................................................................ 3  CJ 315 Statistics in Criminal Justice ..................................................................................... 3  CJ 320 Issues in Ethics in Criminal Justice ........................................................................... 3  CJ 330 Corrections in the 21st Century ................................................................................ 3  CJ 331 Criminal Law I .......................................................................................................... 3  CJ 332 Criminal Law II ......................................................................................................... 3  CJ 340 Criminal Investigation .............................................................................................. 3  CJ 350 Police Administration .............................................................................................. 3  CJ 353 Criminology .............................................................................................................. 3  CJ 403 Terrorism and Counterterrorism ............................................................................. 3  CJ 420 Juvenile Justice System ............................................................................................ 3  CJ 431 Comparative Justice ................................................................................................. 3  CJ 440 Victimology .............................................................................................................. 3

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Minor in Criminal Justice Requirements for Criminal Justice Minor............................................................................................18  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice .............................................................................. 3  CJ 320 Issues in Ethics in Criminal Justice ........................................................................... 3  CJ 330 Corrections in the 21st Century ................................................................................ 3  CJ 331 Criminal Law I .......................................................................................................... 3  CJ 420 Juvenile Justice System ............................................................................................ 3  CJ 440 Victimology .............................................................................................................. 3

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Interdisciplinary Studies (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Mr. Brian Mills NCU offers an interdisciplinary studies program that helps students customize their degree programs. This major is ideal for the student who has wide-ranging interests in several academic areas. In consultation with the program advisor, students may design a course of study involving three academic areas, with a minimum of 11 credit hours in each area. At least two-thirds of the coursework in each area must be in the upper division. In addition, students must complete three hours in IDS 495 (Internship) or complete IDS 499 (Senior Capstone). The total number of credit hours required for the major is 36. The degree type (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science) will be determined by the majority of the three selected disciplines. Objectives Graduates from the IDS major will: 1. Demonstrate holistic and creative thinking from a Christian worldview. 2. Acquire a basic knowledge and understanding of each academic area that comprises the major. 3. Read and think critically, write and speak clearly and persuasively, and conduct research effectively. 4. Build the foundation to prepare for desired vocations or selected graduate programs. 5. Pursue the goal of transformative leadership in their lives. Requirements for Interdisciplinary Studies.........................................................................................36  Area I ................................................................................................................................. 11 Must include 9 upper division credits  Area 2 ................................................................................................................................ 11 Must include 9 upper division credits  Area 3 ................................................................................................................................ 11 Must include 9 upper division credits  Choose one of the following: .............................................................................................. 3 IDS 495 Internship IDS 499 Senior Capstone Interdisciplinary Studies areas can be chosen from the following options: Bible and Theology  Choose ................................................................................................................................ 4 BTH 311 Biblical Themes and Perspectives of the Old Testament BTH 312 Biblical Themes and Perspectives of the New Testament  Choose additional from the following ................................................................................ 7 HIST 331 History of Christianity I or HIST 332 History of Christianity II Additional upper division BTH (excluding 311/312) Additional upper division CM course

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Business Administration  BUS 310 Principles of Leadership & Management ............................................................. 3  BUS 330 Marketing ............................................................................................................. 3  Choose an additional 2 classes from the following ............................................................ 5 BUS 110 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management BUS 315 Human Resource Management BUS 360 Management of Information Systems BUS 370 Legal & Ethical Issues in Business and Management BUS 415 Group & Organizational Behavior BUS 419 Global Business Management

Communication  COMM 342 Survey of Communication Theory ................................................................... 3  Choose an additional 3 classes from the following ............................................................ 8 COMM 213 Interpersonal Communication or COMM 220 Intercultural Communication COMM 341 Organizational Communication COMM 380 Communication & Conflict COMM 428 Team Leadership COMM 430 Nonverbal Communication

Criminal Justice  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice .............................................................................. 3  CJ 320 Issues in Ethics in Criminal Justice ........................................................................... 3  Choose an additional 2 classes from the following ............................................................ 6 CJ 330 Corrections in the 21st Century CJ 331 Criminal Law I CJ 353 Criminology CJ 403 Terrorism and Counterterrorism

Mathematics  Choose 11 credits from the following............................................................................... 11 MATH 105 Introduction to College Mathematics or MATH 230 Discrete Mathematics or CIS 218 Systems Analysis and Design MATH 310 Statistical Applications MATH 320 Linear Algebra BUS 410 Operations Management PSY 350 Research Methods Any upper division CIS course

Psychology  PSY 200 General Psychology ............................................................................................... 3  PSY 320 Human Development ............................................................................................ 3  Choose one ......................................................................................................................... 3

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PSY 330 Psychology of Learning PSY 370 Cognition  Choose one ......................................................................................................................... 3 PSY 380 Theories of Personality PSY 420 Abnormal Psychology Upon approval from program faculty, additional areas can be selected from Accounting, Bible and Theology, English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), History, and Teacher Education.

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RN to BSN – Nursing (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Purpose The purpose of the RN to BSN major is to: equip students to pursue a professional role in the health care field, specifically in nursing; prepare students to be immediately impactful in the workplace, positively affecting quality of care and community health; and to equip students with the preparation and opportunity to pursue graduate studies in nursing. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate critical thinking, analytical reasoning, effective communication and ethical discernment based on a solid foundation of nursing and healthcare research, theories, case studies and application. 2. Acquire leadership skills and knowledge necessary to improve health care delivery outcomes and standards through current and past trend analysis, research application and the examination of different leadership models. 3. Develop an ethical, global, and socially just view of nursing as a profession and a ministry. 4. Demonstrate knowledge of ten core competencies that substantiate the course offerings through individual course work and the capstone project. The core competencies are comprised of: a. Human Flourishing: Incorporate the knowledge and skills learned in didactic and clinical courses to help patients, families and communities continually progress toward fulfillment of human capabilities. b. Nursing Judgment: Make judgments in practice substantiated with evidence that synthesizes nursing science and knowledge from other disciplines in the provision of safe quality care and promote the health of patients, families and communities. c. Professional Identity: Express one’s identity as a nurse through actions that reflect integrity; a commitment to evidence-based practice, caring, advocacy, and safe, quality care for diverse patients, families and communities; and a willingness to provide leadership in improving care. d. Spirit of Inquiry: Act as an evolving scholar who contributes to the development of the science of nursing practice by identifying questions in need of study, critiquing published research, and using available evidence as a foundation to propose creative, innovative, or evidence based solutions to clinical practice problems. e. Displays a daily professional commitment to the ministry of nursing. f. Habituates the behaviors outlined in the performance models for staff and leadership (regardless of job title). g. Embodies the core values of an organization. h. Supports shared governance through application of research and leadership principles. i. Validates practice standards through review of best available evidence. j. Improves practice standards through application of research and leadership principles. Competencies a-d are approved by the National League of Nursing (NLN) based on the NLN Education Competencies Model adopted by NCU or the RN to BSN program.

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Prerequisites for the Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing Major  Students must have graduated from an approved Registered Nursing program and currently hold an unencumbered Registered Nursing license. Requirements for Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing major ..................................30  *NURS 310 Foundations for Lifelong Learning in Nursing ................................................. 3  NURS 320 Systems Theory in Nursing .............................................................................. 3  *NURS 330 Leadership in Nursing Practice......................................................................... 3  NURS 340 Role of the Professional Nurse ........................................................................ 3  *NURS 350 Ethics in Nursing .............................................................................................. 3  NURS 410 Community Health Nursing ............................................................................ 3  NURS 420 Organizational Management in Nursing ....................................................... 3  NURS 430 Research in Heath Care and Evidence-based Practice ................................... 3  NURS 440 The Aging Population ..................................................................................... 3  NURS 499 Nursing Capstone .......................................................................................... 3 *Meets General Education Bible and Christian Ministry Studies hours

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Psychology (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Nani Skaggs, Dr. Mary Ann Winter-Messiers

Purpose The emphasis of the psychology major is to d equip students with a strong foundation in psychological science. Students will study the scientific study of biological, social, and psychological factors; apply psychology to everyday experiences; learn to read, think, and write critically; and consider psychological science from a Christian perspective. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Demonstrate a working knowledge base of psychology. 2. Demonstrate scientific inquiry and critical thinking skills. 3. Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological explanations and practices and adopt values that build community in a diverse world. 4. Demonstrate effective communication skills in a variety of formats. 5. Apply psychological knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits. 6. Apply Christian faith to an understanding of psychological science. Prerequisites for the Psychology major  PSY 200 General Psychology  Choose one of the following: BIOL 111 Principles of Biology I BIOL 130 Human Biology BIOL 200 General Biology Requirements for Psychology Major ...................................................................................................36  MATH 310 Statistical Applications ...................................................................................... 3  PSY 320 Human Development ........................................................................................... 3  PSY 330 Psychology of Learning .......................................................................................... 3  PSY 340 Social Psychology .................................................................................................. 3  PSY 350 Research Methods ................................................................................................ 3  PSY 370 Cognition ............................................................................................................... 3  PSY 380 Theories of Personality.......................................................................................... 3  PSY 390 Biological Psychology ........................................................................................... 3  PSY 420 Abnormal Psychology ............................................................................................ 3  PSY 451 Advanced Research Methods................................................................................ 3  PSY 499 Senior Capstone .................................................................................................... 3  Choose one of the following: .............................................................................................. 3 PSY 407 Special Topics PSY 430 Psychology of Addiction PSY 440 Psychology of Religion PSY 465 Introduction to Counseling Skills PSY 495 Internship

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Minor in Psychology Prerequisites for the Psychology Minor:  PSY 200 General Psychology Requirements for Psychology Minor ...................................................................................................18  PSY 320 Human Development ............................................................................................ 3  PSY 340 Social Psychology.................................................................................................. 3  PSY 370 Cognition ............................................................................................................... 3  PSY 420 Abnormal Psychology ............................................................................................ 3  Choose one of the following approved electives ............................................................... 6 PSY 330 Psychology of Learning PSY 380 Theories of Personality PSY 390 Biological Psychology

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Teacher Education (Bachelor of Science) Program Faculty: Dr. Brian Kaelin, Dr. Johnny Lake, Ms. Vivian Moen, Ms. Liza Zehner Mission Statement Faculty partner together within an environment of learning to prepare highly qualified teachers who exude and exemplify standards of leadership, professionalism, scholarship, and faith as established within the framework of best educational practices and Christian values. Purpose Consistent with this mission of NCU, the elementary and secondary education majors are offered in a campus environment that is person- and faith-oriented. The curriculum is designed to integrate a broad Christian liberal arts academic preparation with research-based education methods and relevant field experiences in a purposeful and explicit fashion. Preparation addresses the needs and priorities of elementary and secondary schoolteachers for today and in the future. The Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission accredits the NCU teacher preparation program. Objectives Graduates of this program will: 1. Believe in the dignity and worth of each individual. 2. Be academically competent in subjects they are to teach. 3. Exemplify professional communication (speaking, writing, listening) and technology skills. 4. Realize that teaching is both an art and a science. 5. Apply a working knowledge of effective classroom management and the skills of teaching. 6. Motivate students with hands-on, action-based learning opportunities. 7. Utilize a variety of effective teaching methods which synthesize content, knowledge of children and adolescents, and an empowering learning environment. 8. Commit themselves to continuing professional growth to remain effective and the desire to pursue further study. 9. Demonstrate ethical and professional responsibilities of teachers and an understanding of the teacher’s role as a leader in the community. 10. Lead, empower, and motivate every student to enjoy learning and to continue learning for a lifetime. Admission to the Teacher Education Program Prior to admission to the teacher education program students must earn a “C” or better in all general education core requirements and pre-education classes, as well as attain a cumulative GPA of 2.75. In addition to the teacher education application materials, which include character and youth experience references, the following are required: 1. A formal interview. 2. Students must take the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) Computer Based Test (CBT), or National Evaluation Series (NES). 3. Official scores on the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) Computer Based Test (CBT), or National Evaluation Series (NES). The student demonstrates acceptable knowledge of basic skills by meeting minimum score requirements. 4. A cumulative GPA of 2.75.

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5. For acceptance into the teacher education program, students are assessed in the foregoing areas. In order to be admitted, students must receive a passing score on the Teacher Education Admission Assessment. *Courses taken at a junior/community college may not be used to satisfy program requirements or major course requirements for Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle or Secondary Education unless specified in an articulation agreement.

Students with a bachelor’s degree who want to earn an additional bachelor’s degree and Oregon licensure must complete additional credits in Bible per the catalog year. Post-baccalaureate students may complete the program for licensure only without the Bible requirement. Students are responsible to satisfy the conditions specified in the “Education Program” manual edition current for their catalog year.

Prerequisites for Teacher Education Major who are in NCU’s program:  *PSY 200 General Psychology *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

General Requirements for Education Major .......................................................................................40  EDUC 302 Foundations of Education and Diversity ......................................................... 3  EDUC 322 Classroom Management and Diverse Populations ........................................ 2  EDUC 326 Exceptional Learners....................................................................................... 3  EDUC 415 Faith Integration in Teaching Seminar ............................................................ 2  EDUC 435 Second Authorization Practicum .................................................................... 3  EDUC 437 EdTPA Support Seminar .................................................................................. 3  EDUC 495 Senior Field Experience ................................................................................... 3  EDUC 496 Student Teaching .......................................................................................... 12  Choose one of the required concentrations listed below ............................................... 9 Prerequisites for the Elementary Teacher Education Major:  *MATH 211 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers  MATH 212 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

Early Childhood and Elementary Concentration ................................................................................... 9  EDUC 331 Child Development & Learning Theory ........................................................... 3  EDUC 332 Interdisciplinary Methods............................................................................... 2  EDUC 342 Elementary Literacy Methods ......................................................................... 2  EDUC 369 Elementary Mathematics Methods ................................................................ 2 Prerequisites for the Secondary Teacher Education Major:  *MATH 105 Introduction to College Mathematics *These courses may also fulfill General Education requirements.

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Middle Level and High School Concentration ....................................................................................... 9 (Required in addition to content endorsement classes)  EDUC 360 Secondary Literacy Methods ......................................................................... 2  EDUC 371 Adolescent Learners & Learning Theory ......................................................... 3  Choose one related methods class .................................................................................. 4 EDUC 362 Secondary Language Arts Methods EDUC 366 Secondary Science Methods EDUC 367 Secondary Math Methods EDUC 368 Secondary Social Studies Methods Endorsements Each endorsement requires additional coursework, and programs vary from 14-31 credits. Students will work with their faculty advisors and the dean of the school of education and counseling to map out an academic plan. Check each course for prerequisites. For middle level and high school teacher education majors, one of the following endorsement areas must be chosen: Basic Mathematics English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) *Integrated Science (middle level only) Language Arts *Advanced Mathematics Social Studies *Spanish *Courses may need to be taken as daytime classes or transferred from another 4-year institution.

Endorsement Pathways English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) ..................................................................................14  EDUC 485 ESOL Practicum ................................................................................................ 2*  ESOL 310 Introduction to Comparative Linguistics ............................................................. 3  ESOL 315 English Grammar and Syntax .............................................................................. 3  ESOL 410 ESOL Theory and Methods .................................................................................. 3  ESOL 425 ESOL Teaching Oral and Literate Skills ................................................................ 3 * This practicum may be waived if the student is able to fit ESOL placement into their practicum or student teaching experience.

Integrated Science (Middle and High School) .......................................................................................29  BIOL 111/111L Principles of Living Organisms .................................................................... 4  BIOL 112/112L Principles of Biodiversity ............................................................................ 4  CHEM 121/121L General Chemistry ................................................................................... 5  GEOL 110/110L Introduction to Geology ............................................................................ 4  GEOL 210 Historical Geology .............................................................................................. 2  GEOL 310 Meteorology/Oceanography.............................................................................. 3  PHYS 201/201L Introduction to Mechanics ........................................................................ 4  PHYS 122 Meteorology and Astronomy ............................................................................. 3

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Language Arts........................................................................................................................................21  ENG 201 Introduction to Literature .................................................................................... 3  ENG 211 Survey of American Literature ............................................................................. 3  ENG 212 Survey of British Literature .................................................................................. 3  ENG 340 World Literature................................................................................................... 3  ENG 350 Multiethnic American Literature ......................................................................... 3  ESOL 315 English Grammar and Syntax .............................................................................. 3  Any ENG upper division elective ......................................................................................... 3 Basic Mathematics ................................................................................................................................17  MATH 110 College Mathematics .......................................................................................4  MATH 130 Precalculus .......................................................................................................4  MATH 211 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers............................................................3  MATH 212 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers............................................................3  MATH 230 Discrete Mathematics ......................................................................................3 Advanced Mathematics (High School) ..................................................................................................20  MATH 230 Discrete Mathematics .....................................................................................3  MATH 251 Calculus I .........................................................................................................4  MATH 252 Calculus II ........................................................................................................4  MATH 315 Applied Statistics ............................................................................................3  MATH 320 Linear Algebra ................................................................................................3  MATH 340 Advanced Geometry .......................................................................................3 Social Studies ........................................................................................................................................24  Choose one from the General Education Core ................................................................... 3 ANTH 210 Cultural Anthropology SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology  Choose one of the following: .............................................................................................3 ECON 201 Microeconomics ECON 202 Macroeconomics  GEOG 310 World Culture and Political Geography ............................................................. 3  HIST 370 Ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean Civilizations..................................... 3  HIST 380 Modern European Culture and the World......................................................... 3  HIST 430 History of American International Relations ..................................................... 3  PSY 340 Social Psychology ............................................................................................... 3  COMM 220 Intercultural Communication .......................................................................... 3

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Spanish* ................................................................................................................................................30  SPAN 101 First-year Spanish ............................................................................................... 4  SPAN 102 First-year Spanish ............................................................................................... 4  SPAN 201 Second-year Spanish .......................................................................................... 3  SPAN 202 Second-year Spanish .......................................................................................... 3  SPAN 300 Spanish Phonetics............................................................................................... 2  SPAN 310 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition............................................ 3  SPAN 321 Hispanic Culture and Civilization ........................................................................ 3  SPAN 330 Religion and History of the Americas ................................................................. 3  SPAN 340 Latino Society and Culture in the U.S. ................................................................ 3  SPAN 470 Teaching Foreign Language Methods ................................................................ 2 *Courses may need to be transferred from another 4-year institution.

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Certificate Programs Limitations 1. No P/NP grading option is allowed in certificate programs except in those courses in which P/NP is the only grading option. 2. No certificate requirements can be earned through the use of CLEP or Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) credits. 3. A minimum of three quarters of the certificate coursework must be completed through NCU coursework. 4. Time limit: three years. After three years have elapsed from the time of initial matriculation in the University, the student must apply for readmission unless the student has been in continuous attendance, is pursuing an additional program, and remains within the time limit for that program (e.g. a student pursuing a degree and a certificate at the same time may complete within the allotted timeframe for the degree).

Accounting Certificate This certificate is designed for students who have earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting (or program faculty approved equivalent) and are in need of additional coursework to prepare for the CPA examination or advanced education in this field. Applicants to the Accounting Certificate program must fulfill the following requirements:  Completed Adult Studies Certificate Application  $25 application fee (Note: If the applicant is an NCU student or alumnus, the application fee will be waived.)  Official transcripts from each college/university attended. (Note: Bachelor’s degree must be from a regionally accredited institution.)

Program Requirements:  



Minimum 18 credits of coursework from Northwest Christian University Documented completion of the following seven courses or program faculty approved equivalents: o Intermediate Accounting III o International Accounting o Accounting Theory and Research o Federal Income Taxation II o Ethics for Accounting and Business o Managerial Finance Additional coursework, if required, from the following: o Accounting Information Systems o Corporate Federal Income Taxes o Business Law I o Upper Division Business, Economics or Accounting Electives

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Graduate Programs In a commitment to academic excellence, Northwest Christian University offers master’s degree programs in:  Business Administration (MBA)

    

Clinical Mental Health Counseling (MA) Education in Curriculum and Instructional Technology (M.Ed.) School Counseling (MA) Theology (M.Phil) Teaching (MAT)

Coursework in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program, School Counseling Program, and Education with Licensure program is completed onsite with classes offered in the evenings, online, and occasional on Saturdays. Classes are small, discussion-oriented, and presented from a Christian perspective. Practica and internship experiences, in addition to coursework, are part of the counseling programs. Each V-Campus student (Master of Business Administration & Master of Education in Curriculum and Instructional Technology) is required to take a competency exam prior to enrolling in their respective program demonstrating proficiency in American Psychological Association (APA) style writing standards. The fee for the exam is waived for the student the first time it is taken. A passing grade on the exam is 90% and is required for entry into the program. A training course is available (at the student’s expense) to prepare if a re-take of the exam is necessary.

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Master of Business Administration (MBA) Program Faculty: Dr. Peter Diffenderfer Purpose The purpose of the Master of Business Administration (MBA) Program is to assist students in the study and integration of business administration theory. The 12-month online program is designed for those who want to expand their knowledge, skills, and abilities in business. In addition, the program’s intent is to also complement the student’s work experiences and expand their career opportunities. As the capstone for the program, students are required to develop a Business Portfolio over the duration of the 12 offered courses. Near graduation time, the final aggregated project will be evaluated by Business faculty. Once the project is approved and signed off, the student will receive their diploma. The 36-credit curriculum consists of 12 three-credit courses. Courses offered relate to the business administration core:  Strategy and Managerial Decision-making,  Marketing Strategy,  Managerial Statistics  Business Ethics  Leadership Strategies  Managerial Finance,  Managerial Economics,  Organizational Behavior,  Human Resource Management, and  Operations and Service Management.

Program Objectives Upon completion of the Master of Business Administration Program, candidates will be able to demonstrate:  A comprehensive knowledge of the core principles and concepts related to business administration;  Effective communication, both written and oral, relative to different business environments and situations;  A knowledge and understanding of the role of Christian leadership, ethics, and service in effectively addressing business management issues and decisions;  Literacy regarding current management trends through the use of leading business information sources, current publications, and other available audio-video, online, or in-text resources;  An ability to integrate all aspects of their learning, understanding, knowledge, and skills concerning business. Graduates of the Accounting concentration will:  Demonstrate significant understanding of accounting practice and theory  Make business decisions using sound ethical theory and principles and will act on their faith and values when focusing on these decisions  Employ quantitative methods and skills in solving business problems  Utilize effective oral and written communication skills  Demonstrate respect for others in our society 152

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Requirements for Master of Business Administration ................................................................. 36  BUS 525 Leadership Strategies ...................................................................... 3  BUS 530 Marketing Strategy ......................................................................... 3  BUS 565 Managerial Statistics ....................................................................... 3  BUS 625 Business Ethics ................................................................................ 3  BUS 665 Strategy and Managerial Decision Making ..................................... 3  BUS 690 Business Portfolio............................................................................ 0  ECON 555 Managerial Economics .................................................................... 3  Choose one ......................................................................................................... 3 BUS 550 Managerial Finance BUS 663 Corporate Financial Management  Choose a Concentration....................................................................................... 15 Accounting Concentration ....................................................................................................................15  ACTG 630 Advanced Taxation .......................................................................... 3  ACTG 645 Strategic Cost Management ............................................................ 3  ACTG 667 Attestation and Assurance Services ................................................ 3  ACTG 673 Business Law ................................................................................... 3  ACTG 680 Advanced Financial Accounting Theory and Practice ..................... 3 Management Concentration.................................................................................................................15  ACTG 545 Managerial Accounting ................................................................... 3  BUS 501 Organizational Behavior .................................................................. 3  BUS 615 Human Resource Management ...................................................... 3  BUS 610 Operations and Service Management ............................................ 3  BUS 635 Corporate Sustainability.................................................................. 3

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Master of Arts (MA) in Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program Faculty: Dr. Gene James, Dr. Abraham Cazares-Cervantes, Dr. Marilyn Montgomery Purpose The Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling degree (previously known as Community Counseling), trains students in the art and science of counseling. The program is approved by the Oregon Board of Licensed Professional Counselors and Therapists. Although the program is not yet CACREP (Counsel for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs) accredited, the curriculum is equivalent to the curriculum standards of CACREP. Together with a Christian frame of reference and Christian faculty, our program is distinctive in several important ways. First, students gain a solid foundation of counseling skills, procedures, and theories based on current research. Building upon that base, students are encouraged to develop a theoretical orientation to counseling that matches their own personality and value system. Students implement and refine their personal approach to counseling in their second year, seeing clients and undergoing clinical supervision in NCU’s onsite counseling training center. Additionally, students individualize their own program through electives and internship site. In their third year, students focus on a special population, clinical issue, or effective treatment modality. Thus, students gain a balance between a broad perspective of counseling and a "specialization" in an area of interest. Graduates of the program meet the academic standards leading to Oregon licensure as a professional counselor (LPC). LPCs offer counseling services to individuals, groups, organizations and the general public in private or other settings. These services may be in the areas of personal-social concerns, educational programs, and career decisions. Counseling services include the use of recognized counseling techniques, appraisal and assessment methods, and research activities. The 60-credit curriculum consists of core coursework in counseling theories and approaches, courses in the specialty area of clinical mental health, and applied clinical experience of practica (minimum 150 clock hours/20 direct hours) and internship experience in the community (minimum 700 clock hours/280 direct hours). Classes are small, discussion-oriented, and geared to practical application. The delivery format of coursework includes face-to-face, online, and hybrid (combination of face-to-face and online instruction). All program faculty are professional clinicians who provide diverse theoretical backgrounds and assist students in developing their own personal approach to counseling. In the final stage of the program, students undergo a three-semester, 14 credit internship when they work 15 hours per week (approx.) in a counseling agency in the community and receive supervision from professional counselors or psychologists. As the capstone for the program, students are required to complete a final clinical project. The project includes a professional goal statement, an ethical adherence statement, and a professional disclosure statement. It is evaluated by the program faculty. Once the clinical project is signed off, the student is advanced to candidacy and may apply for graduation.

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Program Objectives Upon completion of the Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Program, candidates will be able to:  Develop and exhibit a professional identity as a clinical mental health counselor, as evidenced by membership in relevant professional organizations, active preparation for licensure, and obtaining relevant counseling credentials. (membership in ORCA (required) and ACA (optional), students should be active in both).  Verbalize a personal theoretical orientation to counseling.  Conduct a comprehensive mental health assessment including a DSM diagnostic impression.  Formulate an evidence-based treatment plan for counseling.  Deliver supervised counseling services to individuals and groups, and document a minimum of 700 clock hours (280 direct hours) of supervised clinical experience.  Model professional ethical practices and adherence to legal requirements for counselors.  Demonstrate an awareness of social, spiritual, and cultural issues impacting clients, and integrate that awareness into culturally competent counseling practice.

Personal Growth Requirement All Clinical Mental Health students are required to participate in a minimum of 10 sessions of individual counseling as a client during the course of the program. Counselors under consideration must be licensed in Oregon (LPC, LMFT, LCSW, or Licensed Psychologist) and must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor or the Program Director. This requirement reflects the belief that it is important for developing counselors to experience counseling first hand from a client perspective. Additionally, it is important to ongoing personal identity development and to increasing self-awareness, both of which are critical in the work of counseling (American Counseling Association Code of Ethics, Sect. A; A.4.a.; A.4.b). Requirements for Clinical Mental Health Counseling ............................................................................... 60  CMHC 500 Professional Orientation .............................................................................. 3  CMHC 511 Personality and Counseling Theory.............................................................. 3  CMHC 520 The Helping Relationship ............................................................................. 3  CMHC 530 Ethical and Legal Issues ................................................................................ 3  CMHC 540 Research and Evaluation .............................................................................. 3  CMHC 550 Group Dynamics and Theory ........................................................................ 3  CMHC 560 Human Growth and Development ............................................................... 3  CMHC 570 Lifestyle and Career Development............................................................... 3  CMHC 590 Counseling in a Multicultural Society........................................................... 3  CMHC 601 Family Systems ............................................................................................. 3  CMHC 611 Diagnosis and Psychopathology ................................................................... 3  CMHC 612 Testing and Appraisal ................................................................................... 3  CMHC 620 Addiction Counseling .................................................................................. 3  CMHC 630 Crisis, Trauma, and Grief Counseling ........................................................... 3  CMHC 685 Clinical Practicum I ....................................................................................... 3  CMHC 686 Clinical Practicum II ...................................................................................... 3  CMHC 695 Clinical Internship....................................................................................... 12  CMHC 699 Capstone ...................................................................................................... 0

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Master of Education (MEd) in Curriculum and Instructional Technology Program Faculty: Dr. Brian Kaelin

Purpose NCU offers a master of education degree suitable for individuals who currently hold an initial teacher’s license but are seeking advanced content knowledge and application. Candidates will concentrate on a combination of curriculum -design and instructional technology. This degree provides the practitioner requisite skills to demonstrate mastery in designing, developing, implementing and evaluating instructional solutions in various educational and professional settings.. The master’s degree in education provides an emphasis in instructional technology designed to train professionals to improve learning and instruction through the coordinated use of instructional materials, human resources, and technology. Through this one-year professional program. Classes are offered in eight-week sessions in a completely online format. The program is designed for a cohort model but is sufficiently flexible to accommodate individual educational plans.

Program Objectives Upon completion of the Master of Education Program, candidates will be able to:  commit to continuing professional growth to remain effective and to pursue additional investigation;  demonstrate ethical and professional responsibilities of teachers as leaders in the community;  self-evaluate and recognize the need for dispositional change as an element of effectiveness;  utilize research skills to continue the acquisition of professional knowledge and meet the needs of the professional learning community;  reflect upon professionalism and impact made within the learning environment;  actively demonstrate leadership behaviors in becoming a change initiator representative of community groups;  differentiate and develop instructional skills for diverse student populations;  utilize 21st-century skills within the learning environment in becoming leaders demonstrating best-practice implementation of instructional technology; and  teach in an environment that is culturally responsive to student, parents, and colleagues. Requirements for MEd in Curriculum & Instructional Technology .......................................... 36  EDUC 507 Action Research ........................................................................................... 3  EDUC 510 Alternative Learning Strategies .................................................................... 3  EDUC 535 Special Populations ...................................................................................... 3  EDUC 540 Web Enhanced Learning .............................................................................. 3  EDUC 545 Educational Law ........................................................................................... 3  EDUC 560 Contemporary Education Issues .................................................................. 3  EDUC 575 Ethical Leadership in Education ................................................................... 3  EDUC 580 Curriculum Design and Instruction .............................................................. 3  EDUC 610 Educational Assessment............................................................................... 3  EDUC 620 Graphic Instructional Design ........................................................................ 3  EDUC 630 Instructional Multi-Media Development ..................................................... 3  EDUC 660 Advanced Educational Psychology ............................................................... 3

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Graduate Programs of Study

Master of Philosophy (M.Phil.) in Theology Program Faculty: Dr. Dennis Lindsay

Purpose The M.Phil. in Theology provides an opportunity for students with advanced graduate standing to complete a rigorous research degree program in an area of focused, personal interest. Upon acceptance into the program, M.Phil. candidates will work under the supervision and mentorship of an approved NCU faculty member to develop and conduct a course of substantial, original research culminating in a master’s thesis. Primarily, the program will accommodate ministers, lay leaders, and other church and para-church professionals who have completed some level of graduate studies and who 1) have not yet completed a graduate degree in theology; or 2) wish to complete an additional degree to enhance career and/or education opportunities; or 3) simply wish to continue their pursuit of life-long learning.

Program Objectives Graduates of the M.Phil. in Theology will:  Demonstrate expertise in original research and writing at the graduate level by producing a master’s thesis of publishable quality;  Contribute substantively to their respective professions (specifically) and to the discipline of theology (in general) through conducting original and innovative research;  Gain new opportunities for personal and professional advancement;  Seize new and enhanced opportunities for service to the Church. Requirements for the M.Phil. in Theology: .............................................. 21 Credits (Minimum)  BTH 507 Foundation Studies (determined on an individual basis) ....................6-12 Credits  PHL 651 Supervised Research ............................................................................................. 3  PHL 652 Supervised Research ............................................................................................. 3  PHL 653 Supervised Research ............................................................................................. 3  PHL 654 Supervised Research ............................................................................................. 3  PHL 690 M.Phil. Thesis ........................................................................................................ 3

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Master of Arts (MA) in School Counseling Program Advisor: Dr. Abraham Cazares-Cervantes

Purpose NCU offers a master of arts degree in school counseling, which trains students to become successful school counselors in K-12 public or private schools. The program is accredited by the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) in conjunction with the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century. Together with a Christian frame of reference and Christian faculty, this program provides students with a solid foundation of counseling skills and theories to promote the academic, social, and emotional development of children based on current research. Building upon that base, students learn to develop a comprehensive school counseling program and a professional identity as a school counselor that reflects their values as to the welfare of children, quality of academic performance, and safety in schools. Additionally, students individualize their own program through choices of topics on papers and presentations in their required coursework and through choice of authorization level (early childhood/elementary or middle level/high school) and internship site.

Program Objectives Upon completion of the Master of Arts in School Counseling Program, candidates will:  Demonstrate ethical and legal consideration specifically related to the practice of school counseling.  Demonstrate knowledge of theories and processes of effective counseling and wellness programs for individual students and groups of students.  Demonstrate multicultural competencies and advocacy in relations to diversity, equity and opportunity in student learning and development.  Understand the influence of multiple factors that may affect the personal, social, and academic functioning of students and the use of various forms of assessments for these.  Demonstrate how to critically evaluate research relevant to the practice of school counseling and apply those research findings to the field.  Understand and evaluate programs designed to enhance student academic, school to work transition, career planning, social and emotional development.  Know strategies and methods for collaborating with school staff, parents, families and community members to empower them to act on behalf of their children.  Understand the school counselor’s role in student assistance programs, school leadership, curriculum and advisory meetings. 

*Required Prerequisite Course: PSY 320 Human Development or an equivalent upper division course in human development and behavior. This course may be taken concurrently in the first semester of coursework. Requirements for School Counseling Track I........................................................................... 48-51  SCOUN 510 Child/Adolescent Development and Mental Health .................................... 3  SCOUN 518 Introduction to the Counseling Profession .................................................. 3  SCOUN 520 Counseling Theories and Skills I ................................................................... 3  SCOUN 530 Counseling Theories and Skills II .................................................................. 3 158

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Graduate Programs of Study

SCOUN 540 Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling ......................................................... 3 SCOUN 560 Crisis Management ...................................................................................... 3 SCOUN 570 Group Counseling ......................................................................................... 3 SCOUN 580 Counseling Diverse Populations ................................................................... 3 SCOUN 620 Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention.................................................. 3 Choose one or both ......................................................................................................... 3-6 SCOUN 622 Early Childhood/Elementary Counseling SCOUN 624 Middle School/High School Counseling SCOUN 630 Introduction to Family Systems ................................................................... 3 SCOUN 660 Career Development and Counseling .......................................................... 3 SCOUN 670 Academic/Behavioral Appraisal and Intervention ....................................... 3 SCOUN 680 Research and APA Writing ........................................................................... 3 SCOUN 695 Internship/Group Supervision...................................................................... 6

Requirements for School Counseling Track II.......................................................................... 54-57  SCOUN 510 Child/Adolescent Development and Mental Health .................................... 3  *SCOUN 515 Instructional Strategies and Classroom Management ................................. 2  *SCOUN 516 Curriculum Development and Technology .................................................. 1  *SCOUN 517 Student Teaching Practicum ........................................................................ 3  SCOUN 518 Introduction to the Counseling Profession .................................................. 3  SCOUN 520 Counseling Theories and Skills I ................................................................... 3  SCOUN 530 Counseling Theories and Skills II .................................................................. 3  SCOUN 540 Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling ......................................................... 3  SCOUN 560 Crisis Management ...................................................................................... 3  SCOUN 570 Group Counseling ......................................................................................... 3  SCOUN 580 Counseling Diverse Populations ................................................................... 3  SCOUN 620 Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention.................................................. 3  Choose one or both ......................................................................................................... 3-6 SCOUN 622 Early Childhood/Elementary Counseling SCOUN 624 Middle School/High School Counseling  SCOUN 630 Introduction to Family Systems ................................................................... 3  SCOUN 660 Career Development and Counseling .......................................................... 3  SCOUN 670 Academic/Behavioral Appraisal and Intervention ....................................... 3  SCOUN 680 Research and APA Writing ........................................................................... 3  SCOUN 695 Internship/Group Supervision...................................................................... 6 *These courses are required for Track II students who have a valid teaching license but have less than two years full-time documented teaching experience.

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Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Program Faculty: Ms. Liza Zehner

Purpose The Northwest Christian University School of Education and Counseling Master of Arts of Teaching (MAT) is designed for those seeking a master’s degree and initial teaching licensure in the State of Oregon. The courses and standards have been outlined and approved by TSPC. We will provide a strong foundation in ethical thinking needed by licensed teachers in serving diverse children, families and educational communities. Faculty in the program are experienced classroom teachers who support the philosophy that students construct their learning as they grow and develop. With this philosophy in mind, candidates will be able to apply additional skills to enhance the teaching and learning process in their own classrooms. In this program, you will learn to implement strong classroom management, best teaching practices, well-crafted lesson plans, and useful assessment tools. You will also get a strong understanding of what is expected of teachers and students for state standards and benchmarks. All this takes place in a liberal arts Christian university where your knowledge is broadened, your faith is deepened, and your ethics are grounded.

Program Objectives Upon completion of this program, candidates:  Are academically competent in subjects they are to teach  Exemplify professional communication (speaking, writing, listening) and technology skills  Apply a working knowledge of effective classroom management and the skills of teaching  Motivate students with hands-on, action-based learning opportunities  Demonstrate ethical and professional responsibilities of teachers and an understanding of the teacher’s role as a leader in the community Requirements for Master of Education (includes licensure) ....................................................... 36  EDUC 502 Foundations of Education & Diversity ......................................................... 3  EDUC 521 Classroom Relations & Management .......................................................... 2  EDUC 525 Exceptional Learners .................................................................................... 2  EDUC 615 Faith Integration in Teaching Seminar ......................................................... 2  EDUC 635 Second Authorization Practicum.................................................................. 3  EDUC 637 EdTPA Support Seminar I ............................................................................. 3  EDUC 695 Field Experience ........................................................................................... 3  EDUC 696 Student Teaching ......................................................................................... 8  WR 500 Graduate Writing Seminar ........................................................................... 1  Choose Elementary (13 credits) or Secondary Teaching Concentration (7 credits) ........... 9 Elementary Teaching Concentration ......................................................................................... 9  EDUC 530 Child Development & Learning Theory ........................................................ 3  EDUC 531 Interdisciplinary Methods ............................................................................ 2  EDUC 541 Elementary Literacy Methods & Children’s Literature ................................ 2  EDUC 551 Elementary Mathematics Methods ............................................................. 2

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Secondary Teaching Concentration........................................................................................... 9  EDUC 561 Secondary Literacy Methods........................................................................ 2  EDUC 570 Adolescent Learners & Learning Theory ...................................................... 3  Choose one related methods class ..................................................................................... 4 EDUC 562 Secondary Language Arts Methods EDUC 566 Secondary Science Methods EDUC 567 Secondary Mathematics Methods EDUC 568 Secondary Social Studies Methods Endorsement Pathways English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) ..................................................................................14  EDUC 685 ESOL Practicum ................................................................................................ 2*  ESOL 510 Introduction to Comparative Linguistics ............................................................. 3  ESOL 515 English Grammar and Syntax .............................................................................. 3  ESOL 610 ESOL Theory and Methods .................................................................................. 3  ESOL 625 ESOL Teaching Oral and Literate Skills ................................................................ 3 * This practicum may be waived if the student is able to fit ESOL placement into their practicum or student teaching experience.

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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions Accounting ACTG 170 Introduction to the Accounting Cycle (3) This course introduces fundamental principles of double entry accrual accounting for a sole proprietorship. Students will analyze and record transactions and adjustments, and prepare financial statements for service and merchandising firms. Students will also learn accounting for payroll transactions for any form of business. ACTG 211 Principles of Accounting I (3) This course examines the basic concepts and principles underlying preparation and use of financial statements, including income determination, cash flow analysis and asset valuation, and the interrelationships between financial statements. ACTG 212 Principles of Accounting II (3) This course continues to review basic concepts and principles of accounting, including paid-in capital, partnership issues, management accounting, job order costing, CVP analysis, ABC analysis, and budgeting. Prerequisite: ACTG 211. ACTG 341 Intermediate Accounting I (3) This course provides an in-depth look at financial statements and the information found on them. Various accounting issues are examined with emphasis on assets, liabilities, and problem solving techniques. Prerequisite: ACTG 212. ACTG 342 Intermediate Accounting II (3) This course is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I with an emphasis on equities, problem solving techniques, and ethical issues in accounting. Prerequisite: ACTG 341. ACTG 345 Cost Accounting (3) This course provides a study of the basic cost accounting concepts and procedures, with emphasis on the development, interpretation, and application of managerial accounting information for planning, control, and decision making. Prerequisite: ACTG 212. ACTG 360 Accounting Information Systems (3) This course provides an introduction to the field of accounting information management. Students will examine key accounting processes and how information systems support the execution of and management of these processes. Students will learn how to structure and analyze data that may be found in an information system by using the spreadsheet software, Microsoft Excel, and the database management system, Microsoft Access. Prerequisites: ACTG 211, CIS 123 or CIS 124. ACTG 430 Federal Income Tax (3) This course examines the basic federal income tax laws as they relate primarily to individuals. Prerequisite: ACTG 212. ACTG 431 Federal Income Tax – Corporations, Partnerships, Estates, & Trusts (3) An introduction to federal income taxation of business corporations. The course reviews the tax considerations relevant to the various life cycles of a corporation, from incorporation through liquidation. The course also introduces tax laws pertaining to flo-through entities such as S-corporations and partnerships and a review of tax laws as they apply to estates and trusts. Prerequisite: ACTG 430. ACTG 440 Auditing I (3) In this course students are exposed to the philosophy and environment of the profession, with special attention focused on the nature and economic purpose of auditing and 163

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assurance services, professional standards, professional ethics and conduct, audit planning, internal control, and audit sampling and documentation. Prerequisite: ACTG 342, MATH 310 or MATH 315. ACTG 441 Auditing II (3) A continuation of Auditing 440 with specific emphasis on auditing various sections of a company’s balance sheet and the statements of income and stockholders equity and obtaining audit evidence for the various financial statement amounts. Emphasis is on a risk-based approach stressed in recent AICPA, PCAOB, and International standards. Prerequisite: ACTG 440. ACTG 450 Fraud Examination (3) Fraud examination will cover the principles and the mythology of fraud detection and deterrence. The course includes such topics as skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, noncash misappropriations, corruption, accounting principles and fraud, fraudulent financial statements, and interviewing witnesses. Prerequisite: WR 123. ACTG 455 Forensic Accounting (3) This course will examine fraud in the business sector with a focus on case analysis. Topics include the nature of fraud, who commits fraud and why, fraud prevention, fraud detection, fraud investigation, management fraud, resolution of fraud, and other topics of fraud. The goal is to provide an awareness of how much fraud exists, why fraud is so prevalent, and to have a basic knowledge of how to prevent and detect fraud. Prerequisite: ACTG 342. ACTG 460 Corporate Financial Management (3) The objective of this course is to further a student’s understanding of the decisions made by finance managers in organizations. Topics include cash flow analysis under uncertainty, time value of money, equity markets and stock valuation, capital investment decisions, capital market theory, cost of capital, dividends and dividend policy. Prerequisites: ACTG 342 ACTG 470 Accounting for Non-Profit Organizations (3) This course will focus on the external financial statements for government and other non-profit organizations and will include a discussion of fund accounting and non-profit reporting requirements. Prerequisites: ACTG 211. ACTG 480 Accounting Theory (3) Statements and Pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the American Accounting Association, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the International Accounting Standards Board and the Government Accounting Standards Board are studied and analyzed. Advanced theory in mergers and acquisitions are also studied. Prerequisites: ACTG 342 and ACTG 499 or Department approval. ACTG 495 Internship (3) Field internships provide an opportunity for students to gain practical work experience in accounting. Internship students work at a designated business or public organization under close supervision of a faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit. ACTG 499 Advanced Accounting Capstone (3) This capstone course is a study of consolidation accounting, foreign transactions issues, the SEC, and other special topics, including a capstone project. Prerequisite: ACTG 342. ACTG 545 Managerial Accounting (3) The use of accounting tools as a source of data for managerial decision making including cash flow, general accounting ledgers, income, financial position, cash, receivables, investments, inventories, liabilities, reconciliation and financial statements. ACTG 607 Special Topics (1-3) 164

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ACTG 630 Advanced Taxation (3) This course examines the federal tax system as it applies to corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts. The course analyzes the tax considerations relevant to the various life cycles of a corporation, from incorporation through liquidation. The course also covers tax laws pertaining to pass-through entities such as S-corporations and partnerships and a review of tax laws as they apply to estates and trusts. ACTG 645 Strategic Cost management (3) This course focuses on the concepts and processes of managerial accounting with a focus on the application of decision and control models, ethics, relevant costs, cost-volume-profit analysis, target costing, performance measurement and management control. ACTG 667 Attestation and Assurance Services (3) This course provides a study of current auditing theory and techniques including audit planning and procedures, role of internal control, risk, ethics, and reporting. Prerequisite: ACTG 342 ACTG 673 Business law (3) This course will provide a cursory review of the American judicial system and then concentrate on Property and negotiable Instruments. Product liability, contract law, negotiable instruments secured transactions, creditors’ rights, and other provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code are covered. Other topics can also include bankruptcy, real estate law, sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. This course provides a comprehensive review of topics covered on the Uniform CPA examination. ACTG 680 Advanced Financial Accounting Theory and Practice (3) This course examines and analyzes statements and pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board, the International Accounting Standards Board, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the American Accounting Association, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Government Accounting Standards Board as they relate to accounting practices and financial reporting. Advanced theory in mergers, acquisitions, and international accounting procedures are also studied. Prerequisite: ACTG 342.

American Sign Language ASL 101 American Sign Language I (4) This course introduces the basics of American Sign Language and Deaf Culture. It is designed for students who have limited or no knowledge of ASL. The course will focus on receptive and expressive skills in basic conversation, dialogue and vocabulary development. ASL 102 American Sign Language II (4) This course expands knowledge of Deaf Culture and American Sign Language skills. It is designed to develop communicative competence at a novice-mid level.

Anthropology ANTH 210 Cultural Anthropology (3) An introduction to cultural anthropology, including definitions and terminology. This includes such ideas as culture, anthropological methodology, and general categories of culture. This course meets diversity study requirements. ANTH 310 Ethnographic Interview (3) This course prepares students to explore socio-cultural situations they encounter in the U.S.A. and throughout the world by enabling them to help people they encounter 165

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to become aware of what they know about language and culture. The techniques of ethnographic interviewing can help bring knowledge into focus, making that knowledge explicit. Prerequisites: one of the following: ANTH 210, ENG 290, LING 310, SOC 200, PSY 200. ANTH 460 Cross-cultural Issues (3) This course focuses on cross-cultural issues and problems involved in working in foreign contexts. Emphasis will be on international development, humanitarian aid and ministry. Prerequisite: ANTH 210, COMM 220.

Bible and Christian Theology BTH 101/102 Engaging With the Bible: How to Read the Bible in the 21st Century (3, 3) This course is designed for first-year students as a foundation for subsequent studies in the NCU Bible and General Education Core. Spanning an entire year, Engaging with the Bible provides students with an overview of biblical content by highlighting key biblical themes. Prerequisite for BTH 102: BTH 101. BTH 203 Great Hebrew Stories (2) This course explores the narrative art of selected Hebrew stories, focusing on the development of close reading skills. Prerequisite: BTH 101. BTH 212 Acts of the Apostles (2) This course explores Luke’s description in Acts of the formative period of Christian history. It will take special notice of the Pauline itinerary presented in the second half of the book relating this to the various letters written by Paul and thus provide a framework for the study of individual Pauline letters. Prerequisites: BTH 101, 102. BTH 213 Christian Doctrine (2) This course introduces the student to the basic doctrines of the Christian faith. Prerequisites: BTH 101, 102. BTH 230 Old Testament and Archaeology (2) A study of archaeological methods and discoveries in Bible lands that have important bearings on the history, literature, and religion of the Old Testament. Prerequisites: BTH 101, 102. BTH 240 Christianity in America (2) This course is designed to help students examine their own personal experience of the Christian Church within the context of the rich theological diversity of Christianity in America as a whole. Students will explore the theological and historical roots of the particular Christian denomination with which they identify most closely, and they will engage in dialogue with other Christian traditions represented on this campus and in the broader community. BTH 245 History and Theology of the Stone-Campbell Movement (2) This course explores the historical context and the theological foundations of the Stone-Campbell Movement. Emphasis will be placed on reading and analysis of key primary source material. BTH 300 The Prophets (3) A study of the Israelite prophetic writings of the classical period (8th to 5th centuries BCE). Special attention is given to understanding the prophets as both bearers and interpreters of prophetic tradition, and proclaiming God’s message in particular historical circumstances. Prerequisites: BTH 200.

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BTH 302 Book of Genesis (3) This course focuses on selected texts from the first book of the Bible, viewed from a variety of different perspectives. Specific perspectives include comparative ancient Near Eastern mythology, Jewish and Christian interpretation history, and historical-critical interpretation. BTH 315 Social Justice in the Gospels and Prophets & The 21st Century. (3) We will enter the stories of Jesus’ & the Prophets’ (including the prophets as Samuel and Nathan etc.) watching their interaction & reading their writings which deal with the injustices ranging from issues of race, to sexuality and divorce, to power, poverty and genocide. We will also look at Biblical passages that are often understood to justify a variety of topics such as slavery, rape and genocide. Our goal will be to peer deeply into the history and culture of these passages and then apply them to 21st century needs. The vocational outcome will be to prepare men and women in Pastoral, Youth and Missions work to apply locally and globally these principles in real life settings grounded in a Christian World View. Prerequisite: BTH 101 and 102. BTH 320 Romans (3) This course is an exegetical study of Paul’s epistle to the Romans. Special attention is given to the important theological themes which appear in the epistle such as the relation between the gospel and the law, faith and righteousness, sin and salvation, the letter and the spirit, and Jews and Gentiles. Prerequisites: BTH 101, 102 & 212. BTH 322 Epistle to the Hebrews (3) This course examines the background and content of the book of Hebrews. The major doctrinal themes in the book are emphasized. Special attention is given to the use of the Old Testament in Hebrews including the way the author interprets and applies it to both Christ and the Christian life. Prerequisites: BTH 101, 102. BTH 324 History of Theology (3) This course surveys the history of Christian theology from the 2nd century through the 20th century by focusing on the major theologians who shaped this history. Prerequisites: BTH 101, 102. BTH 326 The Art of Theology (3) In the 20th century, modernist approaches to historical studies, dominated by evolutionary, developmental models, tended to fragment humanities higher education. Historians treated art, history and theology as individual “sub-species”, carving out areas of specialization with distinct academic majors. Postmodernism has begun to redress this problem of fragmentation and to pursue approaches to history, which acknowledge the intimate web of relationships between church, state, and culture in the pre-modern Western world. Using the gains of art history, historical theology and biblical studies, “It’s Art, for God’s Sake”, will explore the settings, contents, and meanings of great works in Western art, with a view to the lessons and inspiration this precious heritage holds for the contemporary church. BTH 328 Theological Problems (3) This course will treat various issues in theological studies such as the doctrine of the Trinity, Christology, etc. The specific topic to be studied will be announced each time the course is offered. Prerequisites: BTH 101, 102, 324. BTH 345 Old Testament Wisdom and Ethics (4) This course is a study of the wisdom literature of the Old Testament. The course covers definitions and methods for studying ethics in biblical wisdom literature. It also discusses the ethics prescribed by the biblical wisdom literature and applies these principles in a contemporary context.

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BTH 350 Johannine Literature (3) This course examines the literature in the New Testament traditionally associated with the apostle John: the Gospel, Epistles, and Apocalypse. The approach is an exegetical and historical exploration of the way this literature presents the story of Jesus and understands the nature of a life lived in relation to that story. Prerequisites: BTH 101,102. BTH 365 History of the Bible in English (2) This course will explore the history of the Christian Bible, in particular the history of English translations. The time period from the original writing of the Biblical books to the present will be considered. Students will become familiar with key themes, personalities, and historical developments involved in this history. Familiarity with the basic structure of the Bible (e.g. Testaments, books in the Bible), as well as research writing skills will be assumed. BTH 370 The Book of Psalms (3) A study of selected portions of the Hebrew Psalter with special attention given to their literary genre and their life setting in ancient Israel. BTH 495 Internship (3-6). Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. BTH 499 Senior Capstone (2) Students will work with their respective advisors to develop a project of research and writing that reflects their own areas of interest and integrates significant strands of their previous undergraduate studies, service learning activities, and professional internships. Students will present their oral project before faculty and peers at ACE Day. Limited to students in their senior year. BTH 507 Foundation Studies (6-12 credits) To be determined by research focus requirements and individual student needs or deficiencies.

Biology BIOL 100 Medical Terminology (1) This course introduces elements of medical terminology, such as the etymology of words used to describe the human body and proper terminology for major pathological conditions. This course identifies and explains the terms used for the integumentary, respiratory, nervous, reproductive, endocrine, urinary, digestive, lymphatic, hematic, immune, and musculoskeletal systems, as well as describing the function of each of these body systems. The course is designed primarily as independent online study, but an instructor will be available to assist students and monitor progress. BIOL 111 Principles of Living Organisms (3) An introduction to the fundamental principles of life, including the similarity and diversity of living things; the structure and function of cells; the chemical and genetic basis of life; and evolution. Co-requisite: BIOL 111L. Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. BIOL 111L Principles of Living Organisms Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Principles of Living Organisms. Co-requisite: BIOL 111. BIOL 112 Principles of Biodiversity (3) Basic principles of biodiversity as explored through eukaryotic kingdoms. Topics include the structure and function of plant cells and the plant body, structure and physiology of vertebrates as well as natural history and ecology of the different organisms. Co-requisite: BIOL 112L. Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section.

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BIOL 112L Principles of Biodiversity Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Principles of Biodiversity. Corequisite: BIOL 112. BIOL 130 Human Biology (3) An introduction to the function and structures of the human body. Covers organization, maintenance, movement, control, reproduction, and diseases. Co-requisite: BIOL 130L. Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. BIOL 130L Human Biology Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Human Biology. Co-requisite: BIOL 130. BIOL 200 General Biology (3) Introduces students to the generalized human cell including its structure, function, basic genetics and reproduction. The chemistry of the cell and its components will be examined through the course. Prerequisite: CHEM 121. Co-requisite: BIOL 200L. Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. BIOL 200L General Biology Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany General Biology. Co-requisite: BIOL 200. BIOL 201 Introduction to Scientific Literature (1) A theme topic will be discussed and reviewed using different types of biological articles, starting with general audience material, review articles, and peerreviewed primary research articles. Students will give both oral and written critiques and summaries of assigned articles. BIOL 205 Biodiversity (3) A survey of the basic concepts of diversity and ecological biology. This course introduces students to evolution, systematics, taxonomy, and the biology of representatives from the domains of Eubacteria (true bacteria), Archaea (methanogenic bacteria, etc.), and Eukarya (protists, fungi, plants and animals). This course is designed for students who intend to major in the sciences. Corequisite: BIOL 205L. BIOL 205L Biodiversity Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Biodiversity. Co-requisite: BIOL 205. BIOL 310 Genetics (4) An introduction to classical Mendelian and contemporary molecular genetics. Topics include Mendelian patterns of inheritance, transmission genetics, chromosome structure and function, genetic mutation, chromosomal aberrations, the structure, function and control of genes, techniques in genetics and model organisms, cell-cycle dynamics, recombinant DNA mechanisms, population genetics, etc. Prerequisites: BIOL 200 & 205. BIOL 311 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3) A study of the structure and function of the human body using a systems approach combined with case studies and critical thinking applications. The following systems will be covered: cells, tissues, integument, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. Co-requisite: BIOL 311L. Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. BIOL 311L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Co-requisite: BIOL 311. BIOL 312 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3) A study of the structure and function of the human body using a systems approach combined with case studies and critical thinking applications. The following systems will be covered: skeletal, muscular, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 311. Co-requisite: BIOL 312L. Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. 169

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BIOL 312L Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Co-requisite: BIOL 312. BIOL 315 Bioethics (3) A survey of biotechnological advances and a review of ethical theories. A series of guest lecturers explore various facets of biotechnology and ecology as viewed from each particular discipline. These include issues viewed from research science, ecology, genetics, reproduction technologies, ethics, sociology and politics. Prerequisites: Any laboratory science course. BIOL 317 Case Studies (1) Anatomy and Physiology Case Studies (2) Medical case studies examining pathology of the structure and/or function of organ systems including the integument, cardiovascular, skeletal, muscular, digestive, endocrine, and nervous systems. BIOL 320 Cell Biology (3) A study of processes common to life at the cellular level. This course deals primarily with the structure and function of eukaryotic cells and their organelles. Prerequisites: BIOL 310. BIOL 325 Origins (2) This course is designed to inform students of competing views of origins from a Chrisitian perspective and to prepare students for graduate school. Biblical, classical and current theories of origins will be surveyed, with an emphasis on modern synthetic theory of organic evolution, including mechanisms, adaptations and phylogeny. Prerequisites: Any laboratory science course. BIOL 330 Introductory Microbiology (3) A medically oriented survey of bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms, body defenses, immunology, sterilization and disinfection, and a discussion of representative infectious diseases. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. Co-requisite: BIOL 330L. Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. BIOL 330L Introductory Microbiology Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Introductory Microbiology. Corequisite: BIOL 230. BIOL 335 Immunology (3) An introduction to the immune system and the basics of immunology. Begins with a survey of the cells and organs of the immune system, innate and adaptive immunity, lymphocyte development, and effecter mechanisms of both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Concludes by integrating basic immunological concepts with regulatory interactions between different components of the immune system, effects of aberrant immune processes and the immunopathology of various disease states. Prerequisite: BIOL 310. BIOL 340 Endocrinology (3) A study of the structure and function of the endocrine system, as it interacts with the nervous system and organs of the body to maintain homeostasis. Prerequisite: BIOL 310. BIOL 345 Botany (3) A survey of the structure, function, ecology and systematics of avascular and vascular plants. Representative taxa from the Pacific Norwest will provide context for these explorations. Prerequisite: BIOL 310. BIOL 350 Ecology (3) A study of the interactions between environment, flora and fauna at the population, community and ecosystem levels, including current theory and application. Prerequisite: BIOL 310.

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BIOL 355 Studies in Histology (2) A supervised practical survey of normal animal cells and tissues. This is a microscopic laboratory study of all the organ systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 200, BIOL 205. BIOL 360 Vertebrate Zoology (3) Vertebrate Zoology (3) A survey of the structure, function, ecology and systematics of vertebrates. Representative taxa from the Pacific Northwest will provide context for these explorations. Prerequisite: BIOL 310. BIOL 365 Developmental Biology (3) An in-depth study of the processes of vertebrate development and reproduction. Gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, organogenesis and histological differentiation are discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 310. BIOL 370 Invertebrate Zoology (3) This course surveys the invertebrate phyla, emphasizing morphology, physiology, phylogenetic relationships, and relationship with human agriculture and health. BIOL 375 Neurobiology (3) A broad survey of neuroscience, including gross anatomy of the nervous system and the molecular and cellular bases of neurons and their function. BIOL 380 Vertebrate Comparative Physiology (3) A comparative study of the basic functional principles of vertebrate organs and systems, with emphasis placed on humans. With BIOL 340, can substitute for anatomy and physiology. Prerequisites: BIOL 200 & 202. BIOL 380L Vertebrate Comparative Physiology Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Vertebrate Comparative Physiology. Co-requisite: BIOL 380. BIOL 385 Marine Biology (3) This course is an introduction to the marine environment, including near shore, benthic, and open ocean ecosystems and their inhabitants. BIOL 390 Vertebrate Comparative Anatomy (5) A comparative study of all classes of vertebrates, including organ and organ systems levels of comparison. With BIOL 342 can substitute for anatomy and physiology. Prerequisites: BIOL 200 & 205. BIOL 396 Research (1-3) Involves the participation of the students with a faculty member in an group investigative project or literature review. This course may be repeated for up to 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 201. Pass/no pass grading option only. BIOL 410 Advanced Molecular Biology (3) This course introduces students to advanced concepts of molecular biology. One of the larger goals of modern molecular biology is to elucidate the connections between the genotype (the sequence of nucleotide base-pairs in the organism’s genome) and the phenotype (observable traits and behaviors) of all organisms in terms of a general and comprehensive molecular theory. Topics include molecular structure of genes and chromosomes, transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of gene expression, cell signaling, metabolism of proteins and lipids, apoptosis, cancer, molecular genetic techniques, etc. Prerequisite: BIOL 320. BIOL 420 Advanced Organismal Biology (3) A study of the interactions between organisms and the environment. Study may include flora and fauna in the lab and field. Various techniques such as estimating abundance, evaluating spatial patterns, sampling and estimating community parameters, will be applied and technologies such as geographical information systems (GIS) and the global positioning system (GPS) will be explored. Prerequisite: BIOL 350.

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BIOL 495 Internship (1-3) The internship is designed to give students practical work in a professional setting. Required only for biology majors not completing BIOL 496 Research. Repeatable for credit. BIOL 496 Research (1-3) Involves the participation of the students with an NCU faculty member, or a NCU approved research mentor, in a supervised, faculty monitored individual investigative project in one of the many fields of biology. A contract form must be completed prior to registering. Students are responsible for securing the research position with a faculty member. This course may be repeated for up to 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 201. Pass/no pass grading option only. BIOL 499 Senior Capstone (1-2) Honor students completing the B.S. in Biology with Honors must prepare written and oral presentations of original research completed in BIOL 395 or over the summer. Other students may prepare written and oral presentations of original research or an in depth literature review.

Business BUS 110 Small Business Management (3) This award winning, online course uses innovative features to introduce students to the basic topics and issues of small business management. Using an educational novel as the primary text, students follow the main character’s learning curve to gain enough knowledge to resolve the central dilemma of the story. Using web-based resources and a workbook, students explore issues of leadership, business ethics and social responsibility, economics, legal forms of business, accounting, finance, marketing, e-commerce, operations and human resource management, and communication. BUS 120 History of Entrepreneurship (3) The learning outcome of this course is the student’s development of an entrepreneurial mindset centered in Christian values culminating in a project to solve contemporary social issues in a globally connected world. Using an educational novel as the primary text, students study those innovative individuals throughout history who have acted as catalysts to human progress. Using web-based resources and a workbook, students explore issues of entrepreneurship, business ethics, social responsibility, economics, historical development of western capitalism and its financial sectors, legal forms of business, and the innovative use of information technology in a globalized environment. BUS 310 Principles of Management and Leadership (3) This course provides an analysis of the organizational environment and the processes of management, including leadership concepts, in business enterprises. The course focuses on the concepts, methods, and techniques of the planning, organizing, directing, and controlling functions of the modern manager and the impact of these processes upon effective interpersonal relations, global matters, and ethical issues. BUS 315 Human Resource Management (3) The focus of this course is on the policies and practices of recruitment, selection, training, development, and compensation of employees. Special attention is given to employee relations, including Equal Employment Opportunity and affirmative action legislation and requirements. Prerequisite: BUS 310. BUS 360 Management of Information Systems (3) The focus of this course is how to manage information systems in today’s global environment. Topics include technology (hardware and software), applications (end user, operations, managerial decision-making, and strategy), and the development and 172

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management of information systems in business situations, including ethical considerations and the global environment. BUS 370 Legal and Ethical Issues in Business & Management (3) This course focuses on the legal and ethical issues related to businesses and organizations. Students will examine how government, business, and society interact by reviewing the forms of business organizations, business transaction laws, employment laws, international trade treaties, and corporate and social responsibility. BUS 399 Business Strategy and Finance Training (2) To train and develop managers, supervisors, and employees to better understand corporate mission and strategy and the impact of such decisions on the financial performance of a company. BUS 410 Operations Management (3) This course examines planning and control of production and operations with respect to products/services, processes, technology, and personnel. Topics include strategy, quality, forecasting, capacity, location, layout, the supply chain, Just-in-Time manufacturing, and inventory activities. Prerequisites: BUS 310, MATH 310 or MATH 315. BUS 415 Group and Organizational Behavior (3) This course examines issues related to individual and group behavior in complex organizations. Topics include the influence of motivation, organizational situations, and management practices on individual and group work behavior with special emphasis on situational leadership models. BUS 419 Global Business Management (3) This course explores topics related to managing an organization in a global, multinational environment. Special areas to be examined include the social, cultural, economic, and political environments, as well as ethical and legal issues. Matters dealing with trade, business operations, and monetary systems will also be explored. Prerequisite: BUS 310, WR 311, ECON 201 or ECON 202. BUS 450 Managerial Finance (3) This course surveys the financial problems associated with the life cycle of a business and with personal finance needs. Topics covered include financial analysis, financial planning, capital budgeting, cost of capital, the sources and uses of business funds, and the instruments utilized in raising funds. Prerequisite: ACTG 212. BUS 490 Management ePortfolio (0) As a summative assessment, students register for this course either during their last term of enrollment at NCU or after completing all required Management Concentration courses. BUS 495 Internship (3) Field internships provide an opportunity for students to gain practical work experience in management or marketing, depending on the student’s concentration area. Internship students work at a designated business or public organization under close supervision of a faculty advisor. Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. BUS 499 Business Strategy and Policy (3) This capstone business course examines the interdependence of the different functions of a business. Through the use of computer simulations, students gain a comprehensive and integrated view of business operations and the role of top management in analyzing the environment, setting goals, and implementing plans with special emphasis on ethical issues. Business students take this course in the final semester of their senior year. Prerequisites: BUS 310, 315, 330, 370, 450. 173

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BUS 501 Organizational Behvior (3) This course will present a comprehensive approach to the way in which total organizational effectiveness is conceptualized, measured, and realized in practice through the understanding of individual and team behavior/effectiveness. It will also explore how improvement can be initiated, managed, and sustained throughout the organization. BUS 525 Leadership Strategies (3) Provides students an opportunity to investigate, analyze, and apply various theories of leadership and associated concepts. These include, but are not limited to, effective leadership qualities and human relations, power of vision, leadership ethics, communication and empowerment of personnel through goal-oriented professional development. BUS 530 Marketing Strategy (3) A course designed to focus on the importance of modern organizations being market driven and globally competitive. The course examines the role of marketing through the discussion of comprehensive marketing concepts and case analysis better equipping managers to make decisions. BUS 550 Managerial Finance (3) This course will use financial management as a tool for observing current financial positions of an organization through the analysis of financial data such as cash flow, profit & loss reports, and financial statements. This course is also designed to assist managers while strategically making decisions to improve the future financial position of an organization using tools such as the time value of money, risk and rates of return, stocks, and budgeting. BUS 565 Managerial Statistics (3) The course examines the statistical concepts used for decision-making in the business environment. The emphasis is on the use of statistical information. BUS 610 Operations and Service Management (3) Operational aspects of both manufacturing and service organizations will be explored in this course. Issues to be examined include strategy, production processes, technology, capacity planning, facility location and layout, production planning systems, and quality management. Specific quantitative tools will also be examined, including quality control, forecasting, inventory methods, and project management. BUS 615 Human Resource Management (3) This course provides an overview that addresses challenges such as recruitment and selection, training and development, as well as performance appraisals and compensation administration. Additionally this course incorporates a manager’s perspective of HRM relative to the strategic planning process. BUS 625 Business Ethics (3) This course will begin by examining the meaning of ethics through the review of several philosophical approaches. Students will identify internal and external stakeholders affected by ethical decision making. The course seeks to help develop an awareness and appreciation for ethical consideration in personal and professional decision making. The content of this course is designed to expand critical thinking to analyze how individual and business decisions affect our society. BUS 635 Corporate Sustainability (3) This is a project-based course to learn to conduct a comprehensive organizational assessment of corporate sustainability. Using the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, which has been recognized as a "best practice" initiative for organizations, students will assess and ensure that their chosen organization’s sustainability performance is competitive in the global marketplace.

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BUS 663-Corporate Financial Management (3) This course covers topics that involve the theories and analytical tools used in the business community to make sound financial decisions. Capital budgeting, dividend policy, international financial management, mergers and acquisitions, and cost of capital are some of the topics covered. Prerequisite: ACTG 662. This course would be offered to MBA students with a major in Accounting or Business. BUS 665 Strategy & Managerial Decision Making (3) This course will expose the adult learner to the examination of strategic processes that influence and determine the direction of an organization. Students will analyze the organizational mission and objectives, identify organizational strengths and environmental opportunities, examine the components of competitive advantage, and develop strategies and policies to achieve the organization’s mission. Students will complete analysis of current organizations and/or case studies. BUS 690 Business Portfolio (0) As the Capstone for the program, students are required to develop a Business Portfolio over the duration of the 12 offered courses. Near graduation time, the final aggregated project will be evaluated by Business Faculty. Once the project is approved and signed off, the student will receive their diploma. Prerequisite: Completion of 10 classes of graduate business coursework and Registrar approval.

Chemistry CHEM 121 General Chemistry (4) The purpose of this course is to introduce the concepts of general chemistry and beginning organic chemistry. Students will learn how to solve problems using the scientific method. Critical thinking and semiquantitative understanding of chemistry rather than detailed theory is emphasized. The topics covered include the fundamental quantities and measurements, atoms, sub-atomic particles, orbitals, chemical bonding, reactions, states of matter, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, reaction rates and equilibria, radiochemistry, acid and base chemistry, structure of basic organic compounds and nomenclature, petrochemistry, polymerization, alkanes and alkenes. Beginning laboratory techniques pertaining to these topics will be taught. Prerequisite: MATH 96. Corequisite: Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. CHEM 121L General Chemistry Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany General Chemistry. Co-requisite: CHEM 121. CHEM 122 Organic and Biochemistry (4) Includes lab. In a continuation of CHEM 121, students will continue to learn the concepts and terminology of organic chemistry, including aromatic compounds and their reactions, chiral atoms and compounds, alcohols and phenols, amines and related compounds, aldehydes and ketones and carboxylic acid. Structure, nomenclature, reactions and characteristic behavior will be discussed. The principals of biochemistry will be covered, including the structure and chemical significance of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins as well as their specific metabolisms. Enzymes, the structure and function of nucleic acids, the common metabolism and the electron transport chain, and hormone function will be discussed. Beginning laboratory techniques pertaining to these topics will be taught. Prerequisite: CHEM 121. Co-requisite: Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. CHEM 122L Organic and Biochemistry Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Organic and Biochemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 122. 175

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CHEM 321 Organic Chemistry (3) This course covers the nomenclature, structure, relativity, and stereochemistry of the important classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Elementary theoretical organic chemistry will be discussed with an emphasis on reaction mechanisms, synthesis, and analysis. Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. Prerequisite: CHEM 122. Co-requisite: Students must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. CHEM 321L Organic Chemistry Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Organic Chemistry. Co-requisite: CHEM 321.

Christian Ministry CM 100 Chapel. Pass/no pass grading option only. CM 203 Introduction to Missions (2) A course designed to introduce the student briefly to the major elements in the church’s cross-cultural ministries. This course also addresses an analysis of how a church structures and organizes itself to do cross-cultural ministries. CM 240 All Are Gifted, All Are Called (2) This class will consider several aspects of vocation, with special attention given to the relationship between work and calling. Building on the foundation that “All are gifted, all are called,” students will be encouraged to explore questions such as, “What is God’s call for my life, and how do I discern that call? How can I understand my career as ministry? How do I live out my call in the face of difficult moral challenges? How can I use my life to impact the world in a meaningful way?” Prerequisite: FYS 101. CM 310 Wonder & Creation Care in the Scriptures and the 21st Century (3) We will examine Genesis, the Psalms and other texts that speak of the origins, purpose and protection of creation. We will examine the lives of a number of Christians who have been instrumental in Creation Care from John Muir’s founding of Yosemite to local pastors seeking to establish their church grounds as an oasis in busy urban settings to engaging in local and global issues of environment. We will be learning to first develop a wonder and awe of God’s creative genius. This awe will be instrumental in our protection and restoration of Creation. We will have recognized leaders, superintendents of National Parks and groups like AROCHA teaching us how to restore people and places. The vocational outcome will be to prepare students to lead people where they work to appreciate creation and develop ministries of Re-Creation with Scripture and Science informing. Also, to bring to the local church, classes, field trips and work projects and an ethos of the importance of Creation. This class will meet for 8 weeks on campus, then one weekend in the mountains. Prerequisite: BTH 101 and 102. CM 315 Church Planting and Turning Around Hurting Churches (3) Working closely with Church planting organizations, we will walk the students through the process of assessment to become a church planter, and the steps for funding and finding a team to start congregations both rural and urban. We will also work with “Turn Around” experts on how to help struggling churches regain spiritual health and vitality. The vocational outcome will be preparing students for jobs in planting and replanting churches, networking them into fields of employment with actual placement during the class in new churches and turn around churches. Prerequisite: BTH 101 and 102.

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CM 335 Connecting With a Skeptical World (3) This class will help students to become conversant with the New Atheists, questions regarding the authority of scripture, genocide, science & faith, the role of the church, etc. Much of the training in this class will be developing a relational attitude, not a combative nature, along with deep scholarships that will open doors of conversation. The class will involve debates on major issues bringing in guest speakers from divergent views. We will study individuals such as C.S. Lewis, who remained an agnostic until his 30’s; Anthony Flew and his latter views, the leading Atheists, as well as studying scholars as Bart Ehrman’s with his concerns about the integrity of Scripture. The vocational outcome will be to prepare students to be intellectually honest, ready, kind and missional about their faith whether in the context of the local church, as a youth pastor training students for the Secular Academy, or Mission workers headed off the areas of divergent views from Christianity. Prerequisite: BTH 101 and 102. CM 345 Orality: 50 Biblical Stories Essential for Ministry (3) 4 billion of the 6 billion people in the world are either totally or “preferenced” oral learners. Our goal is to be bi-lingual, learning not only Greek and Hebrew, but the language of those whose learning style is primarily oral as well as through literature or literate structures. Our missional goal is not to teach the Chinese English so they can read the Bible, or oral learners to be literate, but to learn the language or preferred learning style of the people we are reaching. Currently most seminaries train and test students’ future success in ministry (in a largely oral culture, even in the U.S.!) by seeing how well they can write! Instead we also, note, also need to learn the art of Biblical storytelling, drama, songs, visual arts, poetry, chants and music. These are the most effective methods for reaching the four billion oral learners of this world with the gospel of Christ. This class will observe orality in the Bible (and its formation), understand the pedagogic importance studying the Jesuit Scholar Walter Ong, and case studies from the field. The vocational outcome will be for students to learn the art of equipping “lay” people to be powerful messengers by tooling them with Chronological Stories of Scripture. They will be tested in front of audiences, small and larger on all, yes, all these stories. CM 350 Nurture & Discipleship (2) A survey of the discipleship methods, curriculum materials, and resources available for ministering to adolescents through adults in their Christian nurture and development. Significant attention is given to the discussion and practice of classic spiritual disciplines in the lives of class participants. CM 360 Principles of Youth Ministry (3) Considers the basic guidelines for establishing a strong ministry to the youth of the church. Attention will be focused on the beginning years of youth ministry and to responding appropriately when pastoring to teens in crisis. Topics include the youth minister’s spiritual foundation, building relationships, resolving conflict, working with volunteers, evaluating curriculum, and identifying church and community resources for troubled teenagers. CM 380 Preaching (3) A course in sermon preparation and delivery, including wedding and funeral sermons. Students will explore homiletical techniques with an emphasis in worship leadership and proclamation. Prerequisite: COMM 211 or COMM 212. CM 430 Small Groups and Discipleship (3) Actively explores small group theory and effective application for faith renewal, evangelism, inductive Bible studies, recovery/healing groups and leadership development. Experiencing a small group with a defined purpose is a high priority in this course. Prerequisite: CM 330 or consent of instructor.

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CM 440 Grief and Loss (3) A study of the process of grieving in association with traumatic events such as death, accidents, and loss of job or relationships. Attention will be given to dealing effectively with the emotional, psychological, and physical aspects of bereavement from the point of view of various helping professions. Prerequisite: PSY 200. CM 450 Pastoral Ministry (3) This class will explore the roles and responsibilities of pastors in the local church, providing an overview along with practical experience in the diverse responsibilities inherent to the pastoral ministry. Special attention will be given to the minister’s role in spiritual formation of the congregation. CM 470 Leadership Skills for Ministry (2) This course examines the theories and practice of pastoral leadership, including a focus on church administration and ministerial ethics. Attention will be given to biblical models of leadership, staff relations, financial oversight, risk management, and conflict resolution. CM 495 Internship (3-6) P/NP This is designed to give opportunity for supervised practice of various phases of Christian ministry in a local church. Required for Christian ministry majors. Others must have the consent of the instructor. Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. CM 499 Senior Capstone (2)

Clinical Mental Health Counseling CMHC 500 Professional Orientation (3) This course provides an overview of the clinical mental health counseling profession, including the history, roles, functions of counselors, and clinical supervision. Students learn about professional organizations, licensure, and credentialing and develop their own professional development plans. Professional counseling ethics and Oregon law pertaining to counselors is emphasized. Finally, students are introduced to advocacy models, including advocacy for the profession. CMHC 501 Graduate Writing Seminar (1) This course is an introduction to graduate level writing and APA style. It provides students the skills, knowledge and understanding necessary to write graduate-level papers. The writing instruction focuses on APA manuscript style and methods for strengthening academic writing, and integrating support for ideas with current research literature. CMHC 511 Personality and Counseling Theory (3) This course explores the origin, progression, and current application of major counseling theories, such as Psychodynamic, Adlerian, Person-centered, Cognitive-Behavioral, Gestalt, Existential, Narrative, Family Systems, and Post-Modern theories, along with applications specific to children and adolescents. The course also focuses on specific childhood/adolescent diagnoses, such as ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and others. CMHC 520 The Helping Relationship (4) Students’ preparation for clinical practica experience begins with this course. Students learn the basic microskills of counseling, including attending behavior, listening and structuring skills, and reflecting skills, and practice those skills in simulated counseling sessions built around role-plays. Students integrate knowledge from the Theories of Counseling course and develop a personal theory of counseling and a conception of how the skills fit into that model. Students must

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successfully complete this course prior to any clinical practica experience. Prerequisite CMHC 511, CMHC 530. Pass/no pass grading option only. CMHC 530 Ethical and Legal Issues (3) This course is designed to expose students to the myriad of ethical issues that surface in counseling settings as well as legal requirements of counselors. Topics include privacy and confidentiality, duty to warn, abuse reporting procedures, licensure and certification, marketing, boundaries in therapeutic relationships, and counselor health and welfare. Oregon statute, rules, and the ACA Code of Ethics are reviewed. Students must successfully complete this course prior to any clinical practica experience. CMHC 540 Research and Evaluation (3) In this course students learn to be critical consumers of counseling research. Introductory statistical concepts, such as measures of central tendency and variability, standard scores, and hypothesis testing are reviewed. Students are introduced to basic research methodology as well as to current outcome studies. They gain familiarity with research journals in the fields of counseling and psychology and learn to conduct a literature search and compile a bibliography using APA style. They also learn to apply research to clinical cases and clinical treatment dilemmas, forming an evidence-based method to practice. CMHC 545 Shame & Grace (1) This course is designed to therapeutically address societal and familial shame, guilt, and grace. Definitions, characteristics, and change strategies for shame in clients, both individuals and families, will be discussed. Models of grace and healing for shame will be identified. There will be significant emphasis on the student's own experience of shame and grace. The examination of psychological theories on shame informs the need for a more holistic approach to grace that can complement the shortcomings of limited therapeutic resources pervasive in our 21st Century shame-based culture. CMHC 550 Group Dynamics & Theory (3) This course is intended to introduce students to the ethics of group therapy, the dynamics of group process, and a variety of techniques for working with specific groups. Students practice facilitating groups in simulated sessions and gain an awareness of their own personal process in a group setting as they take part as members in those simulated group sessions. CMHC 560 Human Growth and Development (3) This course is an advanced review of physical, social, cognitive, and moral development of persons throughout the lifespan. Research regarding factors affecting development, such as divorce, daycare, and exposure to violence, are explored. CMHC 565 Domestic Violence: Issues and Interventions (2) This course provides an introduction to the complex issues of domestic violence and partner abuse. Attention is given to understanding the psychological, emotional, physical, and spiritual impact of domestic violence on individuals and families. Also addressed are multicultural concerns, legal and ethical issues, and the impact on counselors when working with this type of trauma. CMHC 570 Lifestyle and Career Development (3) This course is designed to investigate the concept of career by providing an overview of the career development field and the practice of career counseling. Students learn theories of career development as well as strategies, information, and resources to facilitate career decisions (e.g., assessment tools, technology, labor market information, research trends). Related topics such as career exploration at various developmental levels, career counseling with multicultural populations, and special issues in careers are explored. Students will reflect on their personal career development in an effort to increase self-growth and empathetic relating to clients. 179

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CMHC 575 Counseling in Managed Care Systems (2) This course teaches students to work effectively in managed care settings. History, laws (both state and national) and acts pertaining to managed care will be reviewed. Current best practices for billing, client privacy, working in triage, and working with medical personnel will be covered. CMHC 580 Social, Cultural, and Spiritual Foundations (2) This course allows students to investigate current social problems, such as crime and violence, homelessness and unemployment, child abuse, and sexual abuse, to broaden their cultural awareness and assist them in working with clients who are coping with these kinds of issues. The challenge of dealing with spiritual issues, such as guilt, forgiveness, and value conflicts, which often arise in counseling, will be emphasized. CMHC 590 Counseling in a Multicultural Society (3) In this course students investigate attitudes and perspectives regarding gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and other cultural differences. Particular emphasis will be placed upon biblical, historical, and cultural perspectives and the impact current views have on the counseling relationship. Students will be encouraged to expand their points of view of diverse populations leading toward successful therapeutic relationships and an acceptance of all persons. CMHC 601 Family Systems (3) This course explores the nature of family systems, addresses family assessment, and surveys the major theories and techniques related to family therapy, including Multigenerational, Adlerian, Human Validation Process Model, Experiential, Structural, Strategic, Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, Narrative and other Social Construction models, and CognitiveBehavioral Family Therapy. The course also compares/contrasts application of these theories to the practice of family therapy. The course will also explore intervention techniques for Couples Counseling, including styles of communication and resolving conflict, intimacy issues, and assessment. CMHC 611 Pathology and DSM Diagnosis (3) This course is an introduction to the principles of assessment, including reliability and validity of instruments, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of selected tests, and the ethics of the use of those instruments, especially with special populations. Types of tests explored include intelligence and general ability tests, achievement and aptitude tests, career and interest inventories, and personality measurements. CMHC 612 Testing and Assessment (2) In this course students gain competence in using the DSM-IV-TR & DSM-V as a diagnostic guide in assessing psychopathology with the goal of planning treatment. Strategies for treatment based on different theoretical perspectives are presented. Students learn to identify common forms of mental disorders, write a treatment plan, and complete other clinical documentation. CMHC 620 Addiction Issues in Counseling (3) This course explores the nature of addiction, both chemical and behavioral. Areas of focus include the impact of addiction on family systems, the neurobiology of addiction, theories of addiction, spiritual issues in addiction, and treatment and recovery. Students are required to develop their own personal definition of addiction and explore how their beliefs/experiences may impact the counseling process. CMHC 630 Crisis, Trauma, and Grief Counseling (3) This course is an overview on how the impact of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events impact individuals, cultures, and systems. Students learn the foundations of emergency management systems within the scope of clinical mental health 180

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counseling. They learn theories and models of culturally competent counseling during and after traumatic events. CMHC 640 Psychopharmacology (2) This course introduces students to the basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly prescribed psychopharmacological medications so that appropriate referrals can be made for medication evaluations and so that the side effects of such medications can be identified. CMHC 650 Licensure Exam Training (1) This course will prepare students to take this national exam that is needed for licensure. Pass/no pass grading option only. Pass/no pass grading option only. CMHC 685/686 Clinical Practicum I, II (3, 3)-75 clock hours/20 direct hours each semester. Clinical practica experiences involve students as counselors-in-training working under close supervision of faculty supervisors. Students begin their practicum experience by seeing one or two clients from the community weekly in the program’s on-site training facility. As students demonstrate satisfactory clinical skills, they are assigned additional clients, reaching an average of three to four clients per week. In addition to seeing clients and completing the necessary paperwork, students meet with their faculty supervisor 2:1 (triadic supervision) 60 minutes per week and in group supervision 90 minutes. In supervision sessions, students learn to conceptualize individual cases, to consider ethical and legal implications, and to apply their foundational coursework. Students must complete two terms of practica (4 credits) prior to internship. Prerequisites: CMHC 511, CMHC 530, CMHC 541, CMHC 620. Pass/no pass grading option only. CMHC 690 Portfolio (2) Students will create and present a portfolio of clinical and academic work which demonstrates proficiency in the eight core counseling competencies required by the Oregon Board of Licensed Counselors & Therapists (OBLPCT). CMHC 695 Internship (12)-700 clock hours/280 direct hours, 1 credit = 50 clock hours. Internship is the capstone of the students’ training in becoming clinical mental health counselors. It is the experience in which the previous coursework and practica are applied in the real world of clinical mental health counseling. Students generally begin their internship during Semester 6, and they are encouraged to choose a site that is congruent with their desired specialization area(s). At their internship site, they complete a total of 700 hours that includes a minimum of 280 direct clinical hours over the course of 2-3 semesters. Students receive clinical supervision on site but also are monitored closely by a faculty supervisor. Prerequisites: successful completion of Clinical Practicum I and II. Pass/no pass grading option only. CMHC 699 Capstone (0) This theoretical orientation presentation course requires students to articulate and disseminate his or her theoretical Orientation in a one-hour oral defense. The student presentation will incorporate how his or her theoretical orientation evolved throughout the program and how their theoretical orientation served clients. Which populations are best served or not when a student practices his or her theoretical orientation in a counseling ecology? Additionally, students must address limitations and strengths of her or his theoretical orientation, provide a succinct literature review, and provide faculty with recommendations for future research.

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Communication COMM 102 Expressive Reading & Storytelling (2) A performance class focused on oral interpretation of literature and expressive delivery of spoken narrative, with emphasis on extemporaneous delivery. COMM 205 Reading and Conference (1-3) Studies individually designed for students who desire instruction, projects and readings in a specific area of communication. (May be repeated for credit.) Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent. COMM 212 Public Speaking (3) Students will learn how to prepare and deliver effective public speeches. Development of speaking, critical thinking, clarity of ideas, articulation of content, listening, and adaptation to the audience will be emphasized. (Satisfies the communication elective requirement in the General Education Core.) COMM 213 Interpersonal Communication (3) This course seeks to develop the student’s understanding of, and ability to use, interpersonal communication skills. While emphasizing the fulfilling nature of intimate communication, the course will lead students to understand the nature of communication within relationships. (Satisfies the communication elective requirement in the General Education Core.) COMM 220 Intercultural Communication (3) A study in the problems of effective communication of concepts across cultural barriers, values and world views. COMM 240 Communication Theory (3) A survey of entire theories of communication, drawn from interpersonal, public, organizational, mass, and intercultural communication. This course includes attention to the characteristics of different kinds of theory as well as criteria for judging theories. Prerequisites: COMM 211 or 212 or 213, or instructor’s consent. COMM 270 Foundations of Public Relations (3) Introducing the field of public relations in profit and nonprofit organizations with an overview of the challenges and responsibilities of public relations professionals. COMM 280 Acting (3) (offered as needed) A class for developing skills in communicative arts closely related to drama; practice in acting exercises and public reading of dramatic literature. COMM 311 Speechwriting (3) An introduction to the speechwriting profession, followed by a writingintensive sequence of assignments with emphasis on writing for listeners, not for readers. Prerequisite: COMM 212 or instructor approval. COMM 312 Advanced Public Speaking (3) Building on the skills introduced in COMM 212, students will deliver specialized speeches that are specific to the needs of particular subject areas, as well as longer speeches, speeches with question-and-answer sessions, and speeches to audiences from outside the university. Prerequisite: COMM 212 or instructor approval. COMM 320 Advanced Intercultural Communication (1-3) Students will deppen their understanding of principles and techniques of intercultural communication through field research during a study abroad trip. Students will write in response to country-specific assigned readings, as well as write narrative

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accounts of intercultural encounters. Prerequisite: COMM 220. Corequisite: Participation in a study abroad program. COMM 321 Forensics (2) Oral interpretation, public speaking, and debate team. Designed to give students practical instruction and skill in clearly articulating eloquent argument (can be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: Earning junior status in forensic competition. COMM 341 Organizational Communication (3) This course focuses on the principles and concepts of communication in church and business organizations, with particular emphasis on upward, downward, horizontal channels to convey information and coordinate activities in furthering the organization’s mission. Prerequisites: One communication course and one writing course, or instructor’s consent. COMM 342 Survey of Communication Theory (3) A comprehensive examination of the enduring major theoretical work done in different areas of the Communication field, including relationships, persuasion and social influence, group and organizational behavior, and gender and culture. Students will synthesize the various theories and review recent applications of the theories. Prerequisite: Admission in ADP program or instructor approval. COMM 370 Listening Behavior (3) An in-depth examination of past and present research into listening. This course includes a detailed analysis of the listening process, as well as projects and skill work to enhance each student’s ability to listen without succumbing to distraction or misunderstanding. COMM 380 Communication & Conflict (3) An introduction to the expression and resolution of conflict in interpersonal communication. Students will learn to recognize, understand, fully analyze, and manage conflict in personal and professional relationships. COMM 412 Professional Presentations (1) This course prepares students to deliver a presentation in a professional setting. Students contact multiple professionals in their intended field to learn field-specific expectations for such presentations, then work with their major advisor to select a project. This is designed to be taken as a preparation for a capstone presentation, but may be taken by non-capstone presenters under special circumstances. Prerequisites: Instructor permission. COMM 413 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3) Development of in-depth understanding and skills with regard to the complex features of interpersonal communication within relational and professional contexts. Prerequisites: COMM 213 and COMM 240. COMM 421 Forensics (2) Oral interpretation, public speaking, and debate team. Designed to give students practical instruction and skill in clearly articulating eloquent argument. (May be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent. COMM 428 Team Leadership (3) This course examines leadership and its impact on team development, communication, quality of decision-making and performance. Course activities and discussion explore types of teams, leadership roles, member selection, team development and culture, trust and collaboration, barriers to performance, performance feedback and leading global teams. COMM 430 Nonverbal Communication (3) (offered every other year) Introducing students to practical applications of research findings and theories of nonverbal communication with particular emphasis on how they influence visual, vocal, temporal, and spatial cues. 183

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COMM 441 Rhetorical Criticism (3) Students enrolling in this course will learn both classical and contemporary approaches to rhetorical criticism. Discussions focus on both written and oral forms of persuasion. Prerequisite: COMM 240 or instructor permission. COMM 460 Technology, Change, and Communication (3) This course requires students to explore how advancements in technology have impacted the way we communicate. Students read and analyze literature pertaining to sociological shifts in communication all through the lens of the Christian faith. Students also explore podcasting and blogging. Prerequisites: COMM 240, or instructor’s consent. COMM 470 Research Methods in Communication (3) An introduction to social science research methods in interpersonal communication, both quantitative and qualitative. Students will design and carry out a small-scale study. Prerequisites: COMM 240. COMM 495 Internship (3-6) This course is designed to give students practical work in a professional setting. Required of communication majors, others must have consent of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. COMM 498 Pre-Capstone (1) Students are guided through preparatory phases of the senior capstone. Projects include preparing a portfolio, selecting a capstone topic, authoring a review of literature, framing a working hypothesis, designing a method and securing IRB approval. COMM 499 Senior Capstone (2) Prerequisite: COMM 498.

Computer Information Sciences CIS 110 Media Literacy (2) This course provides the tools, ideas, and skills to help students navigate in and engage with a media-saturated world. The class will cover individual and industry perspectives on audience effects, economies and ownership of mass media, entertainment, advertising, interactive media, news, media effects, violence, sports, and privacy. CIS 123 Word Processing, Spreadsheets and Presentations (2) This course provides an intermediate skill level in word processing (MS Word®), spreadsheets (MS Excel®), and presentation (MS Powerpoint®) software applications. The class has a decidedly business orientation, but the applications are also applicable for processing and analyzing data in hard science and social science research. Topics cover Word Processing - how to create complex documents including reports, resumes, brochures, and newsletters; Spreadsheets - include additional functions, macros, pivot tables, and three dimensional formulas; Presentations - how to create robust, multimedia presentations by adding multimedia elements to slides, including animations, audio, and video. CIS 124 Advanced Microsoft Office (3) This course provides an intermediate to advanced level of proficiency in word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and database software applications. The emphasis will be on applications for business, such as letters, memos, newsletters, reports, manuals, and presentations skills, as well as the processing and analyzing of data for hard science and social science research. Not available to students who have taken CIS 123.

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CIS 130 Introduction to Computer Sciences and Organization Theory (4) Capabilities, applications, benefits, liabilities, and economics of information systems are discussed in this course. Emphasis is on the use of the computer to solve problems, management information systems, computer-based decision support, and the use of standard support application packages. This course also introduces algorithms and programming concepts. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of program design, development, testing, implementation, and documentation. CIS 135 Introduction to C++ Programming (2) This course is designed as an introduction to programming using the C++ language. It emphasizes structured design and programming as well as the overall program development cycle including problem definition, design, coding, testing, and documentation. CIS 150 Object Oriented Programming with Java (4) This course is an introduction to object-oriented design and programming using Java and UML. Also covered are the fundamental concepts of objectoriented programming languages, including data abstraction and typing, class inheritance and generic types, prototypes and delegation, concurrency control and distribution, object-oriented databases, and implementation. Prerequisite: CIS 130.

Criminal Justice CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) This course provides students with an understanding of criminological, systematic and environmental theories of crime and criminal behavior. The historic development of law enforcement, courts, corrections and the modern operations of law enforcement agencies will be covered. CJ 310 Principles of Law Enforcement (3) This course focuses on the development of policing across the United States, stressing the relationship of the police in local politics and the effects of civil service, reform movements and technological change. CJ 315 Statistics in Criminal Justice (3) This course will include descriptive and inferential statistics covering univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical techniques. The focus will be on probability theory, significance testing and inferential statistics used for quantitative data analysis by criminal justice researchers and administrators. Prerequisite: MATH 105. CJ 320 Issues in Ethics in Criminal Justice (3) This course provides an in-depth examination of ethical and decision-making dilemmas facing law enforcement and criminal justice professionals. Professional standards of behavior are identified and discussed in regards to law enforcement unethical behavior. CJ 330 Corrections in the 21st Century (3) This course focuses on the different types of correctional institutions, the residents, programs and the management of these facilities. Discussion will include the special problems associated with corrections and the correctional institutions. History, philosophy and development of adult and juvenile probation, and parole will also be addressed. CJ 331 Criminal Law I (3) This course offers an overview of the theoretical issues and functions of the law involved in the controlling of criminal behavior in society. Historical foundations and the limits of the law will be covered with a correlation of constitutional law.

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CJ 332 Criminal Law II (3) This course focuses on the definitions and development of criminal law, criminal procedure and criminal rights with special emphases in constitutional theory and practice. The discussion will also include investigations, arrests, search and seizures, pre-trial processes, trial rights, sentencing, and the appeals process. CJ 340 Criminal Investigation (3) This course will focus on the student’s ability to accomplish a myriad of criminal investigations upon learning the facts of cases and the evidence as presented. Students will understand the relevant components of a successful and ethical investigation and be able to summarize evidentiary procedure by articulating their information in various investigative reports. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to train in the field with experienced training investigators. They will be able to recognize and evaluate evidence and generate a complete written report ready for the judicial system. CJ 350 Police Administration (3) This course focuses on the variety of police functions, organizational structures, resources management, operational techniques, professional ethics, leadership principles and their implications for generalized and special units. CJ 351 Introduction to Forensic Science (3) Overview of general principles of forensic science, techniques, equipment, and methodologies as used in crime laboratories. Focus on fingerprint and firearm identification, trace evidence (hair, fiber, paint, glass), blood, DNA evidence, forensic documentation examination, crime scene kits, and forensic microscopy. CJ 353 Criminology (3) This course examines the major criminological issues. This would include definitions of crime and development of theories of crime causation relative to legal, social, political and psychological perspectives. CJ 400 Drugs and Criminal Justice (3) An introduction into how drugs are related to crime looking at the variety of connections including the possession, manufacture, or distribution of drugs. Explores the relationship of crime to the effects they have on the user’s behavior and by generating violence and other illegal activity in connection with drug trafficking. CJ 402 Cyberspace Criminal Activity (3) Explores legal issues and challenges faced by the criminal justice system in response to computer/cyberspace criminal investigations. Emphasis is placed upon various forms of crime perpetrated in cyberspace. Topics include forms of electronic criminal activity, enforcement of computer-related criminal statues, constitutional issues related to search and seizure, privacy concerns, application of the First Amendment in cyberspace, and laws pertaining to electronic surveillance. CJ 403 (3) Terrorism and Counterterrorism This course examines the indigenous and external sources of terrorism to include the declared and implied objectives or strategies operations, tactics, and countermeasures that are created. This course will explore the various levels of how terrorism is prioritized while focusing on international and foreign policy objectives. CJ 404 Fraud Investigations (3) Provides an introduction and overview of fraud investigations. A primary focus of this course will be various types, causes, impacts, and laws related to fraud. Students in this course will work on analyzing current examples of fraud and applying best practices to investigations. In addition, students will work collaboratively to develop educational outreach information for the surrounding community. 186

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CJ 405 Serial Killers (3) A course that will outline the cultural, family, religious, and psychological profiles of serial killers as well as how they choose their victims. Stereotypes and myths will also be explored. CJ 420 Juvenile Justice System (3) This course introduces the theoretical foundations of delinquency causation. This course will trace the American juvenile justice system and study the rationale of the court system, its jurisdiction, police interaction with juveniles, and the correctional strategies for young offenders. CJ 431 Comparative Justice (3) This course will examine various crimes on an international level. Students will identify, analyze and compare the criminal justice systems nationally with those in other countries. This course will explain the various philosophies of law and justice, the arrangements for crime prevention and law enforcement, to include the methodology of identifying the judges and juries around the world. CJ 440 Victimology (3) This course introduces students to the world of crime victims. Students will explore policy developments and practical applications which stem from the concern over victims. They will examine the progression from a criminal to the victim justice system. This course will also present an overview of conceptual and substantive issues in victim-centered theory and research, including the impact of crimes upon the victim and the role of the victim. CJ 450 Introduction to Courts (3) A look at the basic structure of the court system and court process. An up-to-date coverage highlighting several recent trends of the court system. CJ 460 Crisis Management (3) The course develops managerial skills in crisis avoidance, management, and recovery. Students learn how to respond to situations creating danger to organizations, their employees, and the public. CJ 495 Internship (1-6). Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only.

Economics ECON 201 Microeconomics (3) This course is an introduction to microeconomics, both business and personal. Topics include opportunity cost, the market system, supply and demand, cost, competition, monopoly, oligopoly, labor markets, and public goods. Prerequisite: knowledge of elementary algebra. ECON 202 Macroeconomics (3) This course is an introductory course in macroeconomics. Topics of business and personal concern including business cycles, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policy, the balance of payments, and economic growth are examined. ECON 555 Managerial Economics (3) This course helps business students become architects of business strategy, and is meant to review concepts of managerial economics and introduce the students to new ways of thinking, enhancing overall analytical skills.

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Education EDUC 110 Foundations of Education (3) This course is a comprehensive overview of the history of education and curriculum development and design. It is a course investigating historical, economic, legal, and philosophical foundations to provide pre-service teachers with a clear understanding of the events and leaders who preceded the issues and controversies confronting American education today. Course content will include an examination of curriculum foundations and the theory of a variety of curricular models. NCU’s service learning is embedded in this course, and students complete 15 hours of service in area schools as part of the course grade. EDUC 210 School Diversity (3) This course is designed to be an introduction to understanding the complex and diverse communities represented in our contemporary schools. This class facilitates student growth in intercultural skills. It is designed to lead students through a program that provides ample opportunity for exposure to a variety of educational settings and perspectives. The projected outcome is a student who engages in effective interactions with people from diverse cultures. The means for assessing and evaluating student performance in this class consists of active participation in class, a narrative log of experiences in a variety of settings, and critical response papers to readings and guest speakers from representatives of diverse cultures. Documentation of student growth in cultural competence is through the development of a reflective journal. EDUC 230 Technology for Teaching and Learning (3) This course provides information and develops skills in selecting, producing and integrating technology to support teaching and learning. Primarily an online course, students learn how to support reading, writing, and math instruction in an educational setting. Students learn to critically review student and teacher software applications and identify Internet resources to support curriculum and instruction. EDUC 302 Foundations of Education & Diversity (3) This survey course provides an overview of the major laws and principles regarding the historical and contemporary purposes, roles and functions of education in American society as well as an overview of the major concepts, theories and research related to curriculum, instruction and assessment. Effective instructional strategies that ensure active and equitable participation of all learners, as well as modifications for diverse learners with exceptionalities are introduced. EDUC 313 Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment (3) This course is designed to guide future teachers to develop skills in designing and organizing lessons and curricular units that involve students in developmentally appropriate learning activities. Students learn and practice a variety of instructional structures, methods, and models including direct instruction and cooperative learning strategies. A study of informal and formal assessment methods includes the cycle of reflective teaching inherent in pre-and post-assessment of learning goals. Students apply the basic components of the work sample by developing a modified work sample. Students become knowledgeable about the Oregon Standards and Benchmarks and create an original unit of study. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 315/325/355/365 ECE/ELE/ML/HS Junior Field Experience (2) Students observe, expand, and extend upon the elements of curriculum and learner outcomes as these are presented in area classrooms at their respective authorization level. Focused assignments are presented in classes and must be completed during this field experience. The use of personal reflection to critically analyze

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theory in relation to practice is emphasized. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. Pass/no pass grading option only. EDUC 321 Classroom Relations & Management (3) Classroom management approaches and techniques for elementary, middle and high school students are taught with an emphasis on relational factors that contribute to behavior changes. The logistics of managing transitions and learning spaces, preventative strategies supported by classroom routines and protocols, and problem solving methods are presented. Students review social skills curriculum and approaches to character education. Advisory programs, classroom meetings, and peer mediations are some of the constructs taught as additional supports at the secondary level. Students learn to communicate classroom rules and behavioral expectations that provide a safe and orderly environment for learning, are appropriate to the level of development of students, and are consistent with laws governing student rights and responsibilities. Students develop a “Classroom Management Plan” as a precursor to this work sample component. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 322 Classroom Management & Diverse Populations (2) Classroom management approaches and techniques for elementary, middle and high school students are taught with an emphasis on relational factors that contribute to behavior changes. The logistics of managing transitions and learning spaces, preventative strategies supported by classroom routines and protocols, and problem solving methods are presented. Students review social skills curriculum and approaches to character education. Advisory programs, classroom meetings, and peer mediations are some of the constructs taught as additional supports at the secondary level. Students learn to communicate classroom rules and behavioral expectations that provide a safe and orderly environment for learning, are appropriate to the level of development of students, and are consistent with laws governing student rights and responsibilities. Students develop a “Classroom Management Plan” as a precursor to this work sample component. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 326 Exceptional Learners (2) This survey course provides an overview of the major educational practices, theories, and research regarding diverse learners with disabilities. Emergent issues and best practices including Response to Intervention (RTi), differentiated instruction, curricular adaptations and modifications, compliance with laws, ethical concerns, and characteristics and needs of learners with disabilities will be examined. Principles of effective collaborative and interdisciplinary teaming, positive behavior supports, and inclusive educational programming are addressed. EDUC 330 Child Development (3) This course is designed to introduce students to developmental perspectives of elementary age and early adolescent children and the learning theories as they apply to different ages. Personal, social, moral, and cognitive development is explored. The study of learning theories includes behavioral, social, and cognitive approaches. The implications of developmental theories are explored including impacts on interests, motivation, and achievement with emphasis given to the role of the family, socialization, and the supportive influence of teachers and schools, including the needs of at-risk and exceptional learners. As students apply concepts from the class, they are encouraged to consider cultural and individual differences in development and learning styles. EDUC 331 Child Development & Learning Theory (3) This course is designed to introduce students to developmental perspectives of elementary age and early adolescent children and the learning theories as they apply to different ages. Personal, social, moral, and cognitive aspects of development are explored. The study of learning theories includes behavioral, social, and cognitive approaches. The implications of developmental theories are explored including impacts on interests, motivation, and 189

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achievement with emphasis given to the role of the family, socialization, and the supportive influence of teachers and schools, including the needs of at-risk and exceptional learners. As students apply concepts from the class, they are encouraged to consider cultural and individual differences in development and learning styles. EDUC 332 Interdisciplinary Methods (2) This methodology course emphasizes a cross-curricular approach to content-based instruction through critical thinking skills, basic analysis skills, study skills and specific teaching strategies and methodology for active forms of learning. The process of interrelation of ideas and information within and across science, social studies, health and physical education utilizing the academic content standards is emphasized. Included in this course is the integration of reading, writing, listening and speaking across content areas. Instruction is aligned to the state adopted content standards (K-8) and the language needs of all learners. This course includes intentional practice of classroom management, active and equitable participation for culturally, ethnically, linguistically and academically diverse learners, lesson planning, and formative assessment to differentiate instruction for all learners. Modifications for diverse learners and learners with exceptionalities are researched and applied. Technology for teaching and learning is integrated in the course. EDUC 335/345/375/385 ECE/ELE/ML/HS Junior Field Experience (2) Students observe and reflect upon instructional strategies and assessment methods, as these are evident in area classrooms. Focused observation assignments are presented in classes and must be completed during this field experience. The use of personal reflection to critically analyze theory in relation to practice is emphasized. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. Pass/no pass grading option only. EDUC 340 Elementary Literacy Methods and Children’s Literature (3) This course provides methods and materials for language arts teaching in the areas of reading and writing, with an emphasis of decoding using phonics, syntax, and morphology, fluency, and comprehension with special attention given to student performance and learning needs. In addition, students will review children’s literature from literary and social perspectives through a variety of topics, such as folklore, oral literature, fantasy, allegory, Newberry and Calecott medalists, and literature. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 341 Web Enhanced Learning (3) This course provides application of relevant theory to developing and implementing web-based resources for supporting classroom instruction. This course provides students with the opportunity to further develop their skills in technology. Students will work within a group to design and develop effective assignments to use in classrooms. EDUC 342 Elementary Literacy Methods (2) This course provides methods and materials for language arts teaching in the areas of reading and writing, with an emphasis of decoding using phonics, syntax, and morphology, fluency, and comprehension. Special attention is paid to the assessment of student performance and learning needs. Pre-service teachers will determine developmentally appropriate content, skills, and processes that will assist students in accomplishing desired unit outcomes, and design learning activities that lead to their mastery. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 350 Elementary Math & Science Methods (3) This course examines and utilizes national standards and Oregon state standards for mathematics and science at the elementary authorization level. A large portion of the course will focus on developmentally appropriate practices to enhance conceptual knowledge, process skills, and application of concepts. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major.

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EDUC 360 Secondary Literacy Methods (2) Students learn strategies for teaching the language arts with emphasis on reading and writing in the content areas. Students learn methods for integrating instruction in support of inferential and evaluative comprehension. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 362 Secondary Language Arts Methods (4) Apprises middle and high school teacher candidates with a wide range of skills and concepts specifically supportive in teaching language arts. Expands teacher candidates’ knowledge of methods, materials, assessment strategies, remediation techniques, and motivational tools that will enhance their ability to teach language arts. Emphasizes research-based teaching and evaluation methods, such as the Smarter Balanced exam, and studies Common Core Standards. EDUC 366 Secondary Science Methods (4) This course introduces beginning educators to the standards, strategies, resources and technology appropriate to science curriculum and instruction at the secondary level. Particular emphasis is placed on state standards, research-based teaching and evaluation methods, and issues regarding the safe management of a laboratory classroom. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 367 Secondary Math Methods (4) This course examines and utilizes national standards and Oregon state standards for mathematics and science at the secondary school authorization level. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 368 Secondary Social Studies Methods (4) It is the intent of this course to help prospective teachers build a perspective for judging the appropriateness of social studies teaching activities and to develop, teach, and evaluate social studies courses at the middle and high school levels. The essential question addressed in the course is, “How do you teach social studies?” Teaching strategies are presented that help learners work through the interplay of facts, concepts, and main understandings that enable them to learn knowledge in social studies. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 369 Elementary Mathematics Methods (2) This course examines and utilizes national standards and Common Core state standards for mathematics at the elementary authorization level. A large portion of the course will focus on developmentally appropriate practices to enhance conceptual knowledge, process skills, and application of concepts. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 370 Adolescent Learners (3) This course is designed to introduce students to developmental perspectives of middle and high school age children and the learning theories as they apply to different ages. Personal, social, moral, and cognitive developments are explored. The study of learning theories includes behavioral, social, and cognitive approaches. The implications of developmental theories are explored including impacts on interests, motivation, and achievement with emphasis given to the role of the family, socialization, and the supportive influence of teachers and schools, including the needs of atrisk and exceptional learners. As students apply concepts from the class, they are encouraged to consider cultural and individual differences in development and learning styles. EDUC 371 Adolescent Learners & Learning Theory (3) This course is designed to introduce students to developmental perspectives of middle and high school age children and the learning theories as they apply to different ages. Personal, social, moral, cultural, and cognitive aspects of development are explored. The implications of developmental theories are explored including impacts on interests,

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motivation, and achievement with emphasis given to the role of the family, socialization, and the supportive influence of teachers and schools, including the needs of at-risk and exceptional learners. EDUC 380 School Law (3) Students study the levels of influence on schools with attention to the factors that promote or create potential barriers to teaching and learning. Primary emphasis is on school law including student and teacher rights, teacher licensure requirements, and special education law. The implications of the First Amendment will be explored. The Oregon state definition of a competent and ethical educator will be examined in depth. Discussions will include professional standards to interact constructively with colleagues, administrators, support personnel, and parents. Pre-service teachers will become aware of, and act in accordance with, school policies and practices. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 415 Faith Integration in Teaching Seminar (2) Students network each week to share and support each other in the development and implementation of their second (major) work sample. This course also provides the support and encouragement and involves the search of a personal definition of the integration of faith and teaching in a public setting as an integral part of curriculum. Students replicate professional work by designing typical communicative materials expected of first-year teachers. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 420 P.E. & Health Methods (2) This required specialized academic education course is designed for the study of methods, materials, and practices of teaching physical education and health to elementary school children. Emphasis is given to the teacher’s responsibilities in the areas of health services, healthful school environment, and instruction in a comprehensive school health and wellness program. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 430 Visual Arts & Social Studies Methods (2) Fine Arts Methods is designed to assist students in developing integrated curricula that are based on concepts drawn from social studies and the fine arts. Students will develop differentiated lesson plans for exceptional learners, and for students with varying cultural, social, linguistic and socio-economic backgrounds. Special emphasis will be placed on identifying appropriate social studies methods and strategies for integrated and differentiated instruction, which support the Oregon Standards and Benchmarks. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 435 Second Authorization Practicum (3) This school-based practicum takes place in the student’s second age-authorization level and extends classroom instruction through the development of a minor work sample with supervised support. Students will use a variety of research-based educational practices that reflect how students learn and are sensitive to individual differences and diverse cultures. Course may be taken multiple times for credit. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. EDUC 437 EdTPA Support Seminar (3) This course is designed to assist future teachers to apply the curricular, instructional and assessment strategies learned in previous courses as the student develops and implements their first (minor) work sample. Students learn about the learning needs of special populations in today’s schools including special needs students, talented and gifted learners, and learners who are speakers of other languages. Work sample development will reflect adaptations for students with varying cultural, social and linguistic backgrounds to forward the equitable application of a variety of instructional strategies, assessment methods, and classroom management systems with regard to the demographics of classroom and school communities. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. 192

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EDUC 485 ESOL Practicum (2) In this school-based practicum, the student will work closely win an ESOL certified teacher and create a minor work sample with supervised support. Students will use a variety of research-based educational practices that reflect how students learn and that are sensitive to individual differences and diverse cultures. This practicum may be waived if the student is able to fit ESOL placement into their practicum or student teaching experience. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. Pass/no pass grading option only. EDUC 495 Senior Field Experience (4) Starting the school year and continuing in a single classroom, second year students provide small group and whole class instruction and participate in building-level activities, staff development experiences, and parent-teacher conferences. Pre-service teachers work to emphasize instructional techniques that promote critical thinking and problem solving and that encourage divergent, as well as convergent, thinking. Course may be taken multiple times for credit. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. Pass/no pass grading option only. EDUC 496 Student Teaching (12) This class is a continuation of ED 495, Student Teaching I, including the gradual responsibility for classroom instruction. This culminating experience provides a demonstration of students’ knowledge and skill in the preparation, implementation, and assessment of instruction that includes a positive classroom environment that employs developmentally appropriate practices and the use of technology. Pre-service teachers will monitor the engagement of students in learning activities, and the progress they are making, to determine if the pace or content of instruction needs to be modified to assure that all students accomplish lesson and unit objectives. Course may be taken multiple times for credit. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. Pass/no pass grading option only. EDUC 502 Foundations of Education & Diversity (3) This survey course provides an overview of the major laws and principles regarding the historical and contemporary purposes, roles and functions of education in American society as well as an overview of the major concepts, theories and research related to curriculum, instruction and assessment. Effective instructional strategies that ensure active and equitable participation of all learners, as well as modifications for diverse learners with exceptionalities are introduced. EDUC 507 Action Research (3) This course provides the graduate student with the opportunities to review action research literature, explore both quantitative and qualitative paradigms in action research, and develop basic skills in action research methodology. Candidates will select contemporary issues in education including transforming schools, character development and student assessment in all content areas as the basis for their research. Candidates will identify a problem, develop a strategic plan of action, implement the plan, evaluate the plan and reflect on the results of the evaluation and research process. EDUC 510 Alternative Learning Strategies (3) The course will provide opportunities to develop and articulate theories of learning after thorough and critical examinations of carefully and critically examining existing and competing learning theories. The study of motivation and its effect on learning, including the use of teaming, understanding of the brains’ function, different and alternative strategies in learning and teaching, and classroom management, will be explored. EDUC 511 Brain Based Teaching Strategies for Diverse Learners (1) This course will offer researchedbased information on learning styles, teaching strategies, and problem-solving methods for active, attention-challenged students in regular or special education classrooms. The course will deliver 193

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instruction on meeting the needs of diverse learners. The course will challenge some of the assumptions and practices currently used with students having diverse learning needs. EDUC 512 Creating Wonderful Readers and Brain Gym® Unite (1) This course is an overview of the why (theory), the what (method), and the how (application) of helping struggling readers through a constructivist approach. This class will teach how to instruct small groups and individuals in eliminating reading problems. Brain Gym® is a system of physical movements, strategies and activities that increase learning through their effects on the brain. Brain Gym® has been documented to improve basic skills and standardized test scores. EDUC 513 Reading Assessment: An Integrative Approach (1) This class will teach how to assess reading using an integrative approach. A Running Record is used as an assessment tool in order to include accuracy, fluency, and comprehension while encouraging a natural reading pace. This is a fresh and productive look at “running records.” Research is presented to support the efficacy of this particular methodology. Criteria for assessing and choosing materials will also be addressed. EDUC 514 All About Struggling Readers (1) This course will be an overview of the why (theory), the what (method), and the how (application) of helping struggling readers through a constructivist approach. This class will teach how to instruct small groups and individuals in eliminating reading problems, argue for a fresh look at the efficacy of using “running records” as an assessment tool, and speak to the issue of criteria for choosing materials for assessing and tutoring. Methodologies and materials will be presented for one-to-one tutoring and for a small group application. EDUC 515 Meeting the Needs of Diverse Learners (1) This course will deliver instruction on meeting the needs of diverse learners. It prepares regular classroom teachers to recognize and understand the broad range of diversity in classrooms including handicapping conditions, cultural, ethnic, racial diversity, gender, and the gifted learner. Assists regular and special education teachers in adapting curriculum, instruction, management, and assessment in order to meet the needs of all learners. EDUC 516 Humor in the Classroom: Making Teaching & Learning Fun (1) This course explores ways to “hook” students into learning through stories, anecdotes, and humor that is culturally sensitive and appropriate. Research shows retention occurs through the use of emotion-based learning experiences. It is important for ideas, concepts, and strategies to “stick” in one’s mind. Competing with the influences of media exposure and working with students who tune out conventional learning is a significant challenge. EDUC 517 Building Positive Communication (1) This course teaches strategies to use in difficult conversations with student, co-workers, parents, or anywhere communication occurs and understand why we behave as we do. Students will learn effective ways to interact and create effective communication. EDUC 518 Second Language Learning (1) This course examines diverse aspects of language acquisition and development with emphasis on educational implications. Educational topics in second language learning are addressed, including concerns for linguistic and cultural diversity, bilingualism, and second language acquisition.

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EDUC 519 Language Acquisition: Theory into Practice (1) This course examines diverse aspects of language acquisition and how that impacts classroom instructional delivery. The major theories and current research in language acquisition are reviewed. EDUC 520 Creating Wonderful Readers and Nothing Less (1) This course is an overview of the why (theory), the what (method), and the how (application) of helping struggling readers through a constructivist approach. This class will teach how to instruct small groups and individuals in eliminating reading problems. Methodologies and material will be presented for one-to-one tutoring and for a small group application. Reading Theory and Process Learning Theory will be the focus. Hands on experience provides an understanding of specific content, current issues and trends, and applies integrative methods to helping struggling readers. EDUC 521 Classroom Relations & Management (2) Classroom management approaches and techniques for elementary, middle and high school students are taught with an emphasis on relational factors that contribute to behavior changes. The logistics of managing transitions and learning spaces, preventative strategies supported by classroom routines and protocols, and problem solving methods are presented. Students review social skills curriculum and approaches to character education. Advisory programs, classroom meetings, and peer mediations are some of the constructs taught as additional supports at the secondary level. Students learn to communicate classroom rules and behavioral expectations that provide a safe and orderly environment for learning, are appropriate to the level of development of students, and are consistent with laws governing student rights and responsibilities. Students develop a “Classroom Management Plan” as a precursor to this work sample component. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 522 Grant Writing for Teachers (1) This course will teach how to locate grants, select appropriate grants, and write grants to acquire funding and/or materials for classroom projects, school programs, and/or professional development. This interactive course will address the types of grants, the vocabulary associated with grants, the 5 W’s and an H of grant writing while allowing participants the opportunity to create and draft a basic grant proposal. EDUC 525 Exceptional Learners (2) This survey course provides an overview of the major educational practices, theories, and research regarding diverse learners with disabilities. Emergent issues and best practices including Response to Intervention (RTi), differentiated instruction, curricular adaptations and modifications, compliance with laws, ethical concerns, and characteristics and needs of learners with disabilities will be examined. Principles of effective collaborative and interdisciplinary teaming, positive behavior supports, and inclusive educational programming are addressed. EDUC 530 Child Development & Learning Theory (3) This course is designed to introduce students to developmental perspectives of elementary age and early adolescent children and the learning theories as they apply to different ages. Personal, social, moral, and cognitive aspects of development are explored. The study of learning theories includes behavioral, social, and cognitive approaches. The implications of developmental theories are explored including impacts on interests, motivation, and achievement with emphasis given to the role of the family, socialization, and the supportive influence of teachers and schools, including the needs of at-risk and exceptional learners. As students apply concepts from the class, they are encouraged to consider cultural and individual differences in development and learning styles.

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EDUC 531 Interdisciplinary Methods (2) This methodology course emphasizes a cross-curricular approach to content-based instruction through critical thinking skills, basic analysis skills, study skills and specific teaching strategies and methodology for active forms of learning. The process of interrelation of ideas and information within and across science, social studies, health and physical education utilizing the academic content standards is emphasized. Included in this course is the integration of reading, writing, listening and speaking across content areas. Instruction is aligned to the state adopted content standards (K-8) and the language needs of all learners. This course includes intentional practice of classroom management, active and equitable participation for culturally, ethnically, linguistically and academically diverse learners, lesson planning, and formative assessment to differentiate instruction for all learners. Modifications for diverse learners and learners with exceptionalities are researched and applied. Technology for teaching and learning is integrated in the course. EDUC 535 Special Populations (3) Provides an overview of the needs and issues that impact students who are at-risk. Participants will gain differentiated skills necessary in teaching students with disabilities, student of poverty, students learning beyond grade level, and English Language Learners. EDUC 540 Web Enhanced Learning (3) This course provides application of relevant theory to developing and implementing web-based resources for supporting classroom instruction. This course provides students with the opportunity to further develop their skills in technology. Students will work within a group to design and develop effective assignments to use in classrooms. EDUC 541 Elementary Literacy Methods & Children’s Literature (2) This course provides methods and materials for language arts teaching in the areas of reading and writing, with an emphasis of decoding using phonics, syntax, and morphology, fluency, and comprehension. Special attention is paid to the assessment of student performance and learning needs. Pre-service teachers will determine developmentally appropriate content, skills, and processes that will assist students in accomplishing desired unit outcomes, and design learning activities that lead to their mastery. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 545 Educational Law (3) Basic legal concepts in education, including statutory and case law dealing with rights, obligations, and responsibilities of administrators, teachers, and students. EDUC 551 Elementary Mathematics Methods (2) This course examines and utilizes national standards and Common Core state standards for mathematics at the elementary authorization level. A large portion of the course will focus on developmentally appropriate practices to enhance conceptual knowledge, process skills, and application of concepts. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 560 Contemporary Education Issues (3) During this course candidates will review historical education concepts, definitions and topics from the perspective of understanding the evolution of educational issues. The historical development of educational issues is explored and the philosophical and sociological influences relevant to current educational concerns will be researched and evaluated. This course is an application opportunity for experienced teachers requiring knowledge of current, research-validated concepts and strategies for managing classroom life and learning while building a community. Foundational key concepts will be researched, discussed and evaluated. Candidates may work with each other to design or implement school-wide programs. EDUC 561 Secondary Literacy Methods (2) Students learn strategies for teaching the language arts with emphasis on reading and writing in the content areas. Students learn methods for integrating 196

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instruction in support of inferential and evaluative comprehension. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 562 Secondary Language Arts Methods (4) Apprises middle and high school teacher candidates with a wide range of skills and concepts specifically supportive in teaching language arts. Expands teacher candidates’ knowledge of methods, materials, assessment strategies, remediation techniques, and motivational tools that will enhance their ability to teach language arts. Emphasizes research-based teaching and evaluation methods, such as the Smarter Balanced exam, and studies Common Core Standards. EDUC 566 Secondary Science Methods (4) This course introduces beginning educators to the standards, strategies, resources and technology appropriate to science curriculum and instruction at the secondary level. Particular emphasis is placed on state standards, research-based teaching and evaluation methods, and issues regarding the safe management of a laboratory classroom. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 567 Secondary Math Methods (4) This course examines and utilizes national standards and Oregon state standards for mathematics instruction at the basic and advanced levels. Mathematical reasoning and problem-solving are emphasized. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 568 Secondary Social Studies Methods (4) This course incorporates multiple perspectives for teaching the social sciences: historic, geographical, economic, political, and cultural through the use of essential questions (e.g. what has humankind done and thought?). Teaching strategies are presented that help learners work through the interplay of facts, concepts, and main understandings that enable them to understand and use the social sciences. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 570 Adolescent Learners & Learning Theory (3) This course is designed to introduce students to developmental perspectives of middle and high school age children and the learning theories as they apply to different ages. Personal, social, moral, cultural, and cognitive aspects of development are explored. The implications of developmental theories are explored including impacts on interests, motivation, and achievement with emphasis given to the role of the family, socialization, and the supportive influence of teachers and schools, including the needs of at-risk and exceptional learners. EDUC 575 Ethical Leadership in Education (3) This course will systematically explore the role of the teacher as an ethical leader. Teachers are members of a learning community that stretches each individual to prepare for the daily lessons as part of the “vision” of student learning and school culture and the law. During this course educators will have the opportunity to examine how their teaching “extends beyond developing the cognitive capacity of their students.” Theories of value and evaluation, ethical discourse and arguments including Application of ethics in educational case studies are the basis of this course. Topics that cause ethical dilemmas that may often arise in schools are covered and include race relations, abuse of power, and religious tolerance. EDUC 580 Curriculum Design and Instruction (3) This course explores the systematic application of instructional design models within a broad range of learning environments. Includes practical experience in selecting appropriate modes of instruction based on clearly defined objectives. Students learn and apply principles of analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation to deliver pedagogically-sound, technologically-rich instructional content.

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EDUC 610 Educational Assessments (3) Assessment is an essential part of the instructional systems design process. This course explores how to effectively design and use assessment to measure student, instructor and program performance. The course examines contemporary issues related to student testing, and examines theoretical frameworks and important considerations for designing and implementing effective learning assessments. EDUC 615 Faith Integration in Teaching Seminar (2) Students network each week to share and support each other in the development and implementation of their second (major) work sample. This course also provides the support and encouragement and involves the search of a personal definition of the integration of faith and teaching in a public setting as an integral part of curriculum. Students replicate professional work by designing typical communicative materials expected of first year teachers. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 620 Graphic Instructional Design and Production (3) This course offers practical experience in applying communication theory and learning principles to the design of graphic instructional materials to improve individual and group learning. Includes experience in the design, production, evaluation, and preparation of a variety of instructional materials. Prerequisite: Basic computer skills and consent of instructor. EDUC 630 Instructional Multi-Media Development (3) This course offers practical experience in designing and developing instructional resources for various learning environments. The course provides students with opportunities to apply learning theory in achieving instructional objectives through the use of multi-media enriched instructional materials. EDUC 635 Second Authorization Practicum (3) This school-based practicum takes place in the student’s second age-authorization level and extends classroom instruction through the development of a minor work sample with supervised support. Students will use a variety of research-based educational practices that reflect how students learn and are sensitive to individual differences and diverse cultures. Course may be taken multiple times for credit. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 637 EdTPA Support Seminar (3) This course is designed to assist future teachers to apply the curricular, instructional and assessment strategies learned in previous courses as the student develops and implements classroom instruction. Students learn about the diverse needs of special populations in today’s schools (e.g. LD, talented and gifted, and ELL). Work sample development will reflect adaptations for students with varying cultural, social and linguistic backgrounds to forward the equitable application of a variety of instructional strategies, assessment methods, and classroom management systems with regard to the demographics of classroom and school communities. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. EDUC 660 Advanced Educational Psychology (3) This is an advanced study of the cognitive process and the psychological foundations of educational practice and research. Emphasis is given to the principles for the development of cognitive skills and conditions of learning. EDUC 685 ESOL Practicum (2) In this school-based practicum, the student will work closely win an ESOL certified teacher and create a minor work sample with supervised support. Students will use a variety of research-based educational practices that reflect how students learn and that are sensitive to individual differences and diverse cultures. This practicum may be waived if the student is able to fit ESOL

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placement into their practicum or student teaching experience. Prerequisite: Teacher Education major. Pass/no pass grading option only. EDUC 695 Field Experience (1-3) Starting the school year and continuing in a single classroom, preservice teachers provide small group and whole class instruction and participate in building-level activities, staff development experiences, and parent-teacher conferences. Through a 3-5 week teaching unit, pre-service teachers work to emphasize instructional techniques that promote critical thinking and problem solving and that encourage divergent, as well as convergent, thinking. Course may be taken multiple times for credit. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. Pass/no pass grading option only. EDUC 696 Student Teaching (8-12) This field experience requires at least nine weeks of full-time teaching, including 3 weeks of full-time teaching for multiple subjects and/or classes. This culminating teaching experience provides a demonstration of students’ knowledge and skill in the preparation, implementation, and assessment of instruction that includes a positive classroom environment that employs developmentally appropriate practices and the use of technology. Pre-service teachers will monitor the engagement of students in learning activities, and the progress they are making, to determine if the pace or content of instruction needs to be modified to assure that all students accomplish lesson and unit objectives. Course may be taken multiple times for credit. Prerequisite: graduate teacher education major. Pass/no pass grading option only.

English ENG 201 Introduction to Literature (3) This course is a survey of literature, including poetry, drama, and prose, and a study of literary devices. Students will analyze texts for both form and content. ENG 202 Introduction to Literature (3) This course will consider the art of narrative storytelling in film and focus on symbols, themes, and other literary devices used in movies. ENG 211 Survey of American Literature (3) Studies in American literature from Native American folk tales to contemporary times. Focuses for the course may include topics such as banned/censored literature, the definition of freedom, religious beliefs, etc. ENG 212 Survey of British Literature (3) This course offers a broad view of literature produced in Great Britain—from Beowulf to current writings. Emphasis will be placed on major literary movements and those works that make British literature unique. ENG 320 The Bible as/in Literature (3) Students will analyze the art of narrative and poetry in English translations of the Old and New Testament as well as the use of the Bible in literature. ENG 325 Christianity and Literature (3) This course considers Christianity as it is presented by some of the Christian faith’s best storytellers. We will explore the intersection of Christianity and literature and analyze Christian themes and theology in writers such as Dante, John Bunyan, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Flannery O’Connor. ENG 340 World Literature (3) This course covers a range of texts from diverse time periods and cultures. Context—intellectual, historical, and social—will especially be emphasized. 199

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ENG 345 Multiethnic American Literature (3) This course will emphasize the diverse voices who have shaped American Literature. We will study writers from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds, such as Toni Morrison, Sandra Cisneros, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Louise Erdrich. ENG 395 Service Practicum (1) Students create and complete an English-related volunteer project in the community. ENG 417 Studies in American Literature (3) This course will focus on a particular time period (colonial, 19th century, modern, and contemporary literature) or topic (rags to riches, war, women’s literature, etc.) in American Literature. Course may be repeated for credit with a different time period or theme. ENG 427 Studies in British Literature (3) This course will focus on a particular topic (Arthurian legends, quests, etc.) or time period (English Renaissance, Victorian, modern, etc.) in British Literature. Course may be repeated for credit if time period or theme changes. ENG 450 Mythology (3) This course analyzes ancient mythologies and literature. Study of the GrecoRoman gods will be the primary emphasis, though we will also study Egyptian, Mesopotamian, and Native American myths. ENG 495 Internship (3) The English Internship is designed to give students practical experience using the skills they have gained through the English Program. Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. ENG 499 Senior Capstone (2) This guided research project culminates in a presentation to the graduating class and faculty near the end of the student’s final semester. Offered annually. Prerequisite: Open only to majors in their final year.

English to Speakers of Other Languages ESOL 310 Introduction to Comparative Linguistics (3) An introduction to the fields of phonetics, phonology, morphology, sociolinguistics, language acquisition, and foreign cultures. This course is foundational to all other courses in linguistics. ESOL 315 English Grammar and Syntax (3) Students in this course will study the syntax of English, focusing on the structure of the language, linguistic analysis, stylistics and usage. A basic knowledge of critical language functions are explored with a view to improvement in grammar and style in writing and applying this knowledge to the teaching of English, either for second-language learners or K-12 students. Prerequisite: WR 121. ESOL 410 ESOL Theory and Methods (3) A foundation course of the ESOL program, it focuses on theory and methods of teaching English to speakers of other languages. A study is made of major language acquisition approaches and techniques in teaching listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Off-campus fieldwork is a strong component of this course. ESOL 425 ESOL Teaching Oral and Literate Skills (3) This course helps students develop ESL materials and prepare lesson plans, providing practice teaching opportunities. A second component examines and 200

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puts into practice reading and writing teaching methods for non-native speakers, and assessment processes for language skills. A third focuses on teaching of oral/aural English. Current techniques and resources are used to formulate materials and lessons in teaching oral and listening skills. Focus is on speech patterns, pronunciation analysis, and corrective measures toward oral English improvement. Prerequisites: ANTH 210 or SOC 200 and ENG 310. ESOL 510 Introduction to Comparative Linguistics (3) An introduction to the fields of phonetics, phonology, morphology, sociolinguistics, language acquisition, and foreign cultures. This course is foundational to all other courses in linguistics. ESOL 515 English Grammar and Syntax (3) Students in this course will study the syntax of English, focusing on the structure of the language, linguistic analysis, stylistics and usage. A basic knowledge of critical language functions are explored with a view to improvement in grammar and style in writing and applying this knowledge to the teaching of English, either for second-language learners or K-12 students. Prerequisite: WR 121. ESOL 610 ESOL Theory and Methods (3) A foundation course of the ESOL program, it focuses on theory and methods of teaching English to speakers of other languages. A study is made of major language acquisition approaches and techniques in teaching listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Off-campus fieldwork is a strong component of this course. ENG 625 ESOL Teaching Oral and Literate Skills (3) This course helps students develop ESL materials and prepare lesson plans, providing practice teaching opportunities. A second component examines and puts into practice reading and writing teaching methods for non-native speakers, and assessment processes for language skills. A third focuses on teaching of oral/aural English. Current techniques and resources are used to formulate materials and lessons in teaching oral and listening skills. Focus is on speech patterns, pronunciation analysis, and corrective measures toward oral English improvement. Prerequisites: ANTH 210 or SOC 200 and ENG 290.

Exercise Science EXSC 310 Kinesiology (3) Introductory class for students with a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Human movement will be related to anatomical structure and mechanical principles; kinesiological analysis by means of a motor skills classification system and an outline for a systematic analysis that includes description, evaluation, and prescription will be explored. Emphasis will be on the respiratory, cardiovascular and neuromuscular systems in terms of their involvement during exercise and their adaptation to different types of training. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 or BIOL 311, BIOL 200, CHEM 121, 122. EXSC 320 Exercise Physiology and Neuromuscular Conditioning (4) Basic principles and foundations of physiology as related to fitness and performance. Biochemical pathways of metabolism as related to exercise, fuel selection, body temperature regulation and acid base balance, exercise programs for special populations, training for performance, neuromuscular conditioning, in-depth analysis of muscle structure and function, and adaption of muscle to weight training, endurance training. Additional concepts such as flexibility, muscle regeneration, and muscle reaction to injury will be explored. Prerequisites: BIOL 200, 312, CHEM 122.

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EXSC 407 Special Topics (1-4) Prerequisites: Determined on a course-by-course basis. EXSC 410 Biomechanics (3) Mechanical laws and principles will be applied to motion of the human body: forms of motion, linear and angular kinematics and kinetics. Topics include analyses of projectilerelated activities, aerodynamics in sport, balance related activities, throw and push patterns, and qualitative and quantitative analysis of sport activities. Prerequisites: BIOL 200, 311, 312, CHEM 121, 122, PHYS 201. EXSC 420 Exercise Testing and Prescription (3) Fitness principles and techniques for fitness assessments including cardiovascular endurance, blood pressure, joint flexibility, body composition, muscular strength, and endurance. Topics include health screening, informed consent, field test protocols, data interpretation, and exercise prescription. Practical experience in assessing fitness levels and developing appropriate exercise prescription for healthy individuals as well as special populations. Prerequisites: EXSC 310, 320. EXSC 425 Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Injury (2) After a review of the scientific foundations of biological structure and basic biomechanics this course aims to explore injury mechanisms. Topics explored are tissue adaption, injury and healing processes, specific injuries to lower and upper extremities, as well as the head, trunk, and neck. Much of this course is based on discussion of current topics in literature. Prerequisites: BIOL 311, BIOL 312, EXSC 310 recommended. EXSC 435 Sport Nutrition (2) Training and nutrition are key elements of athletic performance. This class blends nutrition and exercise physiology. It examines the energy expenditure required by exercise as well as the nutrient intake that is vital to support athletic activities. Scientifically sound and evidence based principles will be presented and literature will be discussed critically. Prerequisites: CHEM 122, NUTR 220. EXSC 495 Internship (1-3). Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only.

First-Year Seminar FYS 101 First-Year Seminar (1) This course is designed to help students adjust to their new educational environment and to lay the foundation for a productive and successful educational program at NCU. This course addresses academic preparedness and transitional issues for first-year university students. Pass/no pass grading option only.

Geography GEOG 310 World Cultural and Political Geography (3) Study of interrelationships between cultures, political units, and geographical boundaries. A comprehensive worldwide coverage with particular attention given to problem areas in world politics.

Geology GEOL 110 Introduction to Geology (3) This course explores how rocks and minerals are made, how the earth is structured, and how plates interact to cause earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountain building. 202

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Lab work typically includes describing minerals and rocks, using earthquake data, and interpreting simple geologic structures and geologic maps. Co-requisite: GEOL 110L. Student must enroll in a concurrent laboratory section. GEOL 110L Introduction to Geology Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Introduction to Geology. Corequisite: GEOL 110. GEOL 210 Historical Geology (2) A survey of the history of the earth throughout geologic time. Topics covered include sedimentation, fossils and fossilization (along with the geologic history of North America), recognizing fossils, interpreting age relationships, using geologic maps and cross-sections as tools to interpret earth history. GEOL 310 Meteorology/Oceanography (3) The first part of the course will analyze fundamental physical processes of the atmosphere; their relationships to the daily weather pattern and weather forecasting in the U.S weather systems; atmospheric temperature, pressure, and humidity; and provide tools for interpretation of weather maps and elements of forecasting. The second part of this semester-long course will take an interdisciplinary approach to studying the ocean by examining physical, biological, and chemical processes. Also, the history of oceanography and its technology; crustal movements, the ocean as a source of mineral resources, and animals living in the ocean will be discussed.

Global Studies GLST 295 Study Abroad (1) This course is designed to guide and assist students who are planning a study abroad experience as part of their undergraduate education. May be repeated for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only.

Greek GRK 301/302 Elementary Greek (4, 4) An introductory study of the forms, grammar, and syntax of New Testament (Koiné) Greek. Exercises and readings will be taken primarily from Mark and John. Students will begin to build vocabulary and to translate simple texts from the New Testament. GRK 401 Greek Exegesis (3) Readings from the Septuagint, the New Testament, and assorted other writings, designed to develop intermediate-level competence in Koiné Greek. Prerequisites: GRK 301, 302. (May be repeated for credit.)

Hebrew HEB 301/302 Classical Hebrew for Beginners (4, 4) A study of classical Hebrew grammar, vocabulary in context, and biblical use of words with readings in the Masoretic text. HEB 401 Hebrew Exegesis (3) Readings from the Hebrew Bible and ancient inscriptions, designed to develop intermediate-level competence in classical Hebrew. Prerequisites: HEB 301, 302. (May be repeated for credit.)

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History HIST 151/152 History of Western Civilizations, I and II (3, 3) Historical development of the Western world; major changes in value systems, ideas, social structures, economic institutions, and forms of political life and religious traditions. HIST 151: Ancient Middle East and Mediterranean to Early Modern; HIST 152 Early Modern to the Present. HIST 161/162 World History, I, II (3, 3) Historical survey of world cultures and civilizations with respect to value systems, ideas, social structures, economic institutions, forms of political life and religious traditions. Includes a study of intercultural relations between different cultures and various forms of imperialism. HIST 161: Prehistoric to 1500; HIST 162 from 1500 to the present. HIST 240 History of the Pacific Northwest (3) A study of the history of the Pacific Northwest including Native American peoples, problems and patterns of white movement to the area, acquisition by the U.S., the road to statehood and the ongoing impact of the region on the life of the nation. HIST 250 Art as History (3) This course builds upon the foundation of the IDS core curriculum. The course introduces students to the traditional discipline of art historical studies, as it developed within the evolutionary model of the 19th and 20th centuries. This approach emphasizes art analysis and interpretation within the dominant cultural paradigms, giving attention to developments in the style and content of art. Art as History also explores postmodern approaches to the study of art. Postmodern historical studies value the visual arts as offering potentially unique historical information. Art may complement written historical materials, contradict written historical materials, or provide alternate and unique information about history. Especially valuable are potential insights into areas which traditional history may ignore or marginalize. HIST 311History of Islamic Civilization (3) An historical study of the articulation and development of Islamic Civilization from its first appearance in the Arabian Peninsula in the seventh century CE to the present. HIST 331 History of Christianity I (3) An historical survey of Christianity from early beginnings through the Medieval Church period. This course may be used to fulfill an elective in the Bible & Theology major. HIST 332 History of Christianity II (3) An historical survey of Christianity from the Reformation to modern developments. This course may be used to fulfill an elective in the Bible & Theology major. HIST 334 Colonial and Revolutionary America (3) A study of early American politics, society, and culture from the era of first contacts through the gaining of independence and the writing of the constitution. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 151S. HIST 341 19th Century America (3) This course examines Jacksonian politics, the continuing themes of manifest destiny and expansion, the institution of slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 151S. HIST 342 America Since 1900 (3) This course examines America’s 20th century military conflicts, progressivism, the Depression, the rise of modernity and the U.S. in a geo-political context. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 151S. 204

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HIST 350 American Public Discourse (3) An examination of contemporary public discourse in America. The course provides opportunity to study various religious, social, and political settings for rhetorical implications; historical personalities prominent in American public address receive attention. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 151S. HIST 370 Ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean Civilizations (3) The primary purpose of this course is to explore the political, social, economic, cultural and religious contours of ancient civilizations that arose in the Near East (Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Syria-Palestine) and those that arose around the Mediterranean Sea (Greek, Hellenistic and Roman). We will investigate how these civilizations emerged individually in response to their unique geographical, political and economic circumstances and also what were the modes and consequences of their interaction with one another. Some attention will be paid to the question of the cultural legacy of these ancient civilizations on modern society (religion, art, law, government and administration, philosophy, medicine, literature, science, diet and language) and also how these ancient civilizations compared with those in other parts of the world such as ancient India, China and Asia. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 152. HIST 375 Medieval European Culture (3) This course explores the political, social, economic, cultural, and religious contours of European civilization during the Middle Ages. Students will investigate how these civilizations emerged individually in response to their unique geographical, political, and economic circumstances and also what were the modes and consequences of their interaction with one another. Some attention will be paid to the question of the cultural legacy of medieval European civilization on modern society (religion, art, law, government and administration, philosophy, medicine, literature, science, diet and language) and also how medieval civilization compared with those in other parts of the world such as Africa, the Americas, and Asia. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 152. HIST 380 Modern European Culture and the World (3) The purpose of this course is to examine the development of modern Europe from the Renaissance to the present with special emphasis given to its interaction with the rest of the world (particularly the Americas, Asia and Africa). We will explore the stages by which Europe became dominant in the world through exploration, conquest, colonialism and economic imperialism, how key developments in early modern Europe (e.g., demographic, religious, economic, technological, political, social, philosophical/ideological) impacted other parts of the world, and how Europe both affected and was affected by world events in the twentieth century (e.g., World Wars I and II, rise of international Communism, the Great Depression, de-colonization, the Cold War, privatization, globalization). Prerequisites: IDS 151, 152. HIST 390 Philosophy of History (3) This course investigates by speculative means a critical philosophy of history. It evaluates attempts to discern a pattern of meaning in history and studies problems of historical understanding and objectivity. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 152. HIST 410 History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict (3) This course is an intensive study of the historical roots and contemporary realities of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 152. HIST 420 Modern South Asia (3) An exploration of Mughal, East India Company, and British rule in South Asia, and the evolution of Islamic, Hindu and secular nationalism. The course features the career and philosophy of Mohandas K. Gandhi as a reconciler of difference and a voice of anti-colonial resistance. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 152.

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HIST 421 History of Modern East Asia (3) Historical examination of prominent East Asian countries (e.g., Japan, Korea, China and Vietnam) from the late 18th century to the present. Each is studied with reference to its own unique identity and with respect to the overlapping histories within the region. HIST 430 History of American International Relations (3) The purpose of this course is to examine the history of America’s international relations in the period from the Revolution to the present with attention to the important events, persons, and ideologies that have shaped American foreign policy and practice. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 152. HIST 440 Latin American Civilization (3) Beginning with the European encounter with indigenous civilizations in the Americas and continuing through the colonial, independence, early national, modern and contemporary periods, the course traces the political, economic, social, religious, intellectual and aesthetic developments which produced in Latin America a unique contribution to world civilizations. Prerequisites: IDS 151, 152. HIST 490 Historical Methods and Research (3) Guided research on a problem of historical interest. Culminates in a major paper. Open to juniors and seniors who are declared majors in history or minors in Written Communication. HIST 495 Internship (3) his course is designed to give history majors practical work in a professional setting. Required of all history majors. Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. HIST 499 Senior Capstone (3)

Interdisciplinary Studies IDS 151/152 Ideas Matter: Engaging World Thought and Culture (3, 3) This series of first year courses explores foundational themes in the diverse religious, literary, cultural, artistic, historic, and political expressions that have shaped the world. Major movements in religion, science, government, philosophy, economics, etc. are treated as part and parcel to the concerns of these courses. IDS 240 Foundations of Lifelong Learning (3) is designed to prepare students to engage in a dynamic learning environment that encompasses academic discourse, research, and professional development. It incorporates academic and career planning from a biblical perspective. By identifying individual strengths, students will be equipped to develop goals and strategies for maximizing their educational and professional pathways and becoming purposeful graduates. The foundation of lifelong learning is dependent upon effective research, writing, communication, and critical thinking skills. IDS 251 Ideas Matter: Engaging American Thought and Culture (3) This second-year “Ideas Matter” course explores the ideas that are key to the development of the American experiment with democracy. An examination of Christianity’s stake in this development is held up as a central concern around the themes on which the “Ideas Matter” courses focus. An emphasis is placed on the diverse religious, literary, cultural, artistic, historic, and political expressions of those individuals excluded from, as well as included in, the initial compact of citizenship in the emerging American republic. With attention to the American context, major movements in religion, science, government, philosophy, economics, etc. are treated as part and parcel to the concerns of this course. IDS 251S is a co-requisite with IDS 251.

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Course Descriptions

IDS 251S Appreciation of American Thought & Culture: Seminar on … (2) IDS courses with this designation are special seminar courses which offer students enrolled in IDS 251 an opportunity to explore in more depth some specific aspect of American thought and culture. In addition to studying a special topic, students will research and write a semester paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Available subject areas for seminar topics will be announced on a semester by semester basis. IDS 251 is a co-requisite with IDS 251S. IDS 275 Student Leadership (2) The purpose of this course is to provide leadership training for those that are currently in or aspiring to be in formal leadership roles. The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to address the issues from holding a formal leadership role. Leadership Theory, core understanding of strengths, time management, delegation, goalsetting, resume development, communication, conflict resolution, self-care, emotional intelligence, relationship building, team dynamics, and mentorship will be discussed. Students are given opportunities for selfdiscovery and reflection. IDS 495 Internship (1-4) This course is designed to give students practical work in a professional setting. Required of IDS and humanities majors. Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. IDS 499 Senior Capstone (2) Students work with a designated professor to develop a research project and written paper that reflects one or more areas of academic concentration in the IDS major and integrates a significant amount of their previous coursework, service learning, and internship experience.

Marketing MKTG 330 Marketing (3) This course introduces the study of price, product/service, promotion, and place. Also studied are the basic principles and practices involved in the distribution of goods and services, market surveys, salesmanship, advertising, as well as ethical considerations in all areas of marketing Prerequisite: BUS 110 or BUS 120. MKTG 431 Marketing Research (3) Provides insight into the nature and assumptions of marketing research conducted by corporations and commercial research companies. Provides practical experience in planning and implementing marketing research. Covers the sale of marketing research in business management; survey research and questionnaire design; scientific marketing research design and planning; data collection; basic statistical tools for analysis; and report writing and communication of research results. Prerequisite: MKTG 330. MKTG 432 Branding, Advertising and Promotion (3) Students examine the major areas of marketing promotion in this course, including such topics as advertising, media selection, packaging forms of sales promotion, and business ethics. Prerequisite: MKTG 330. MKTG 433 Sales Strategy and Management (3) Behavioral aspects of personal selling, retail sales and sales management are studied in this course with a focus on recruiting, selection, training, motivation, compensation, control, ethics, and the strategy of matching the sales effort to the sales task. Prerequisite: MKTG 330.

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MKTG 434 Consumer Behavior (3) Provides an in-depth look at consumer behavior and its role in marketing in for profit and non-profit organizations. Examines consumer behavior in terms of internal influences, external influences, the consumer decision-making process and consumers and culture. Students also learn qualitative and quantitative research methods utilized in attempts to understand consumer behavior. Prerequisite: MKTG 330. MKTG 435 Digital Marketing (3) Provides an introduction to Digital Marketing, a rapidly growing and evolving area of new media. This course examines the role of digital marketing and many of the areas this terminology has grown to encompass. A practical approach is adopted in this course. In addition to learning fundamental constructs and principles of the digital experience, students will focus on learning tools and skills necessary for solving business problems and exploiting business opportunities. Subjects include: eCommerce, Lead Generation, Retargeting; Web Sites, Media Planning, Branding; On-Line Advertising, Advertising Tools, Display Advertising; Digital Campaigns; Search Engine Marketing; Social Media Marketing; Mobile Media. Prerequisite: MKTG 330. MKTG 490 Marketing ePortfolio (0) As a summative assessment, students register for this course either during their last term of enrollment at NCU or after completing all required Marketing Concentration courses.

Mathematics MATH 70 Beginning Algebra Review (3) Reviews beginning algebra. Topics include operations with signed numbers, polynomials, and rational expressions; solving and graphing linear equations; exponents, square roots, and the Pythagorean Theorem. Emphasis on problem solving with numerous applications. This course does not satisfy the math requirement or any other graduation requirement. Pass/no pass grading option only. MATH 96 Intermediate Algebra (4) Solving, graphing, and modeling with linear equations, linear systems, quadratic equations, and exponential equations with numerous applications. This course does not satisfy the math requirement or any other graduation requirement. Prerequisite: MATH 70 or equivalent. Pass/no pass grading option only. MATH 105 Introduction to College Mathematics (3) Survey of applications of mathematics, including set theory, probability, statistics, study of growth with applications to finance, exponential and logarithmic functions, and mathematical modeling. Prerequisite: MATH 96 or equivalent. MATH 110 College Mathematics (4) Survey of applications of mathematics, including logic, set theory, probability, statistics, finance, geometry, and exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to finance, exponential growth and decay using mathematical modeling. Prerequisite: MATH 96 or equivalent. MATH 130 Precalculus (4) Equations and graphs; polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; elementary topics from modeling; basic analytical geometry and trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 96 or equivalent. MATH 211/212 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers (3, 3) The mathematics elementary teachers need to understand. Topics include: problem-solving, sets, numeration systems, whole numbers, algorithms 208

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for operations, rational and real numbers, axioms, plane and solid shapes and surfaces, and probability. A two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: MATH 96 or equivalent. MATH 230 Discrete Mathematics (3) Topics include sets, set operations, scientific notation, number bases, elementary symbolic logic, induction, recurrence relations, functions, algorithms, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 130 or equivalent. MATH 251/252 Calculus I, II (4, 4) A two-semester sequence that focuses on the study of differential and integral calculus. Topics include differentiation, the fundamental theorem of calculus, techniques of definite integration, sequences and series, including Taylor’s theorem. Applications to the sciences throughout. Prerequisite: MATH 130 or equivalent. MATH 310 Statistical Applications (3) This course presents an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics used in collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting data as it relates to business or health care applications. Pre-requisite: MATH 105 or higher and CIS 124. MATH 315 Applied Statistics (3) A study of basic descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on applications in business and the social sciences. Topics include the role and use of statistics; tables and graphs; numerical descriptive methods; probability; discrete, continuous, and sampling distributions; confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; analysis of variance; contingency tables, and simple linear regression. Prerequisites: MATH 105 or higher (minimum grade of C-) and CIS 123. MATH 320 Linear Algebra (3) Topics include systems of linear equations and matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. MATH 325 Differential Equations (3) Introduction to ordinary differential equations with emphasis on first and second order equations. Also included are systems of linear differential equations, Laplace transforms, and numerical methods. Some partial differential equations may be introduced. Prerequisite: MATH 252. Recommended: MATH 320. MATH 340 Advanced Geometry (3) Topics in Euclidean and post-Euclidean geometry, including compass and straightedge constructions, coordinatization, transformations, and projective and hyperbolic geometry. Proofs throughout. Prerequisite: MATH 252 or consent of instructor. MATH 355 Multivariable Calculus (3) A study of calculus in more than one variable, including functions in three-dimensional space. Topics include analytical geometry, vectors, dot product, cross product, partial differentiation, maxima-minima problems, gradients, optimization, multiple integrals, curl and divergence, line and surface integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 252. MATH 365 History of Mathematics (3) A study of mathematics as it has developed over time, from ancient to modern. Emphasis on key concepts and people in the development of mathematics throughout the world. Prerequisite: MATH 251. MATH 420 Topology (3) An introduction to fundamental concepts in point-set topology. Topics include open and closed sets, continuity, connectedness, compactness, separability, and metric spaces. Prerequisite: MATH 445.

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MATH 430 Advanced Data Analysis (3) This course is an extended study of probability distributions and inferential statistics. Topics include research design, advanced sampling methods, multiple linear regression as well as nonlinear regression analysis, analysis of variance and design of experiments, methods for categorical data, and non-parametric methods. Extensive computer use involved. Prerequisite: MATH 315. MATH 445 Modern Algebra (3) An introduction to some algebraic structures that are like the integers, polynomials, and rational numbers, and to some important abstract concepts, including homomorphism, isomorphism, substructure, and quotient structure. Prerequisite: MATH 252. Recommended: MATH 330. MATH 450 Complex Variables (3) Complex numbers and functions of a complex variable. Topics include limits, differentiability; Cauchy’s theorem; power series, Laurent series, residue theorem with applications, maximum modulus theorem, conformal mapping and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 355. MATH 495 Internship (3) Students will work in business, industry, government, or other agencies applying mathematics tools to problems. Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. MATH 499 Senior Capstone (3) Students work with designated mathematics professor to write a paper that reflects an area of interest and may integrate material from their previous courses.

Music - Class Guitar MCG 100 Class Bass Guitar (1) Learn to play bass guitar, without note-reading, to praise songs in a variety of styles. Emphasis on scales, keys, and style patterns. Size limit: 4-6 students. MCG 101 Class Guitar I (1) Emphasis on learning chords and playing praise songs with simple chords and picks. An introduction to the four easy guitar keys. Size limit: 4-10 students. MCG 102 Class Guitar II (1) A continuation of beginning guitar. An introduction to bar chords, bass notes, transposing, and more intricate strums and picks. Emphasis on performance and good practice habits. Size limit: 4-10 students. Prerequisite: MCG 101, or instructor’s consent.

Music - Class Piano MCP 101 Class Piano I (2) An introduction to piano designed to train students to read and play piano music with hands together. Provides training in reading musical notation, ear training, performance and keyboard technique. Size limit: 4-6 students. Prerequisite: MUS 100. MCP 102 Class Piano II (2) A continuation of beginning piano. Emphasis on performance, effective practice, learning scales, and chords. Size limit: 4-6 students. Prerequisite: MCP 101, or instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: MUS 100.

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Music - Class Voice MCV 100 Class Voice (1) A voice class for beginners that covers the basics of good singing: posture, breathing, support, resonance, vowels, and musicianship. Size limit: 4-10 students.

Music - Private Guitar MG 181/281/381/481 Private Guitar (1-2) Private guitar instruction in a sequence for music majors. The 300 level culminates in a 1/2 recital, 400 level in a full recital. Prerequisite: MCG 102 or consent of instructor. MG 182/282/382/482 Private Guitar (1-2) Private guitar instruction in a sequence for music majors. The 300 level culminates in a 1/2 recital, 400 level in a full recital. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Music - Private Lessons ML 181/281/381/481 Private Lessons (1-2) Private instruction in a sequence for music majors. Students are placed at a jury level by audition with their instructor, and advance only by passing a jury at the end of the semester. Students who choose not to jury will remain at the same level. This private lesson category is for instruments not specifically listed in the catalog. ML 182/282/382/482 Private Lessons (1-2) Private instruction in a sequence for music majors. Students are placed at a jury level by audition with their instructor, and advance only by passing a jury at the end of the semester. Students who choose not to jury will remain at the same level. This private lesson category is for instruments not specifically listed in the catalog.

Music - Private Piano MP 181/281/381/481 Private Piano (1-2) Private piano instruction in a sequence for music majors. The 300 level culminates in a 1/2 recital, 400 level in a full recital. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. MP 182/282/382/482 Private Piano (1-2) Private piano instruction in a sequence for music majors. The 300 level culminates in a 1/2 recital, 400 level in a full recital. Prerequisite: MCP 102 or consent of instructor.

Music MUS 100 Music Fundamentals (2) A study of the basic elements of music including notation, major and minor scales, time classifications, key signatures, intervals, primary triads and basic music terminology. No previous music training is necessary. The course prepares students for MUS 101 Music Theory. MUS 101 Music Theory I (3) This course is a theoretical study of the basic elements of diatonic harmonic materials. It includes a review of the fundamentals of music, diatonic triads in all positions, harmonic

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progression, analysis, harmonization of melodies and original composition. Prerequisite: MUS 100 or equivalent. MUS 111 Ear Training and Sightreading I (1) This course is a lab experience in correlated sight singing and aural perception. Sight singing, interval study, melodic and rhythmic dictation work is given as well as supporting work in the music computer lab. Material covered includes singing with solfege in major key with syncopated 8th notes and some 16th note rhythms. Introduction to solfege in minor keys. Writing dictation of rhythms up to syncopated 16th notes, dictation of diatonic single line melodies to syncopated 8th notes. Introduction to chord dictation.This course is taken concurrently with MUS 101 Music Theory I. Prerequisite: MUS 100. MUS 118 Music Technology (2) This course provides a student with an opportunity, through group instruction and hands-on experience, to study current applications of music technology in a comprehensive MIDI/audio studio. Students will be introduced to music software including Garage Band, Logic, Digital Performer, Sibelius and Finale. Students will learn basic MIDI concepts, sequencing, digital audio recording, plug-ins, and digital mixing systems. Students will work in the studios a minimum of 2 hours per week outside of class. MUS 120/220/320/420 University Choir and Orchestra (1) Preparation and performance of music from a variety of styles and historical periods. Students will be taught proper choral/vocal technique as well as sight reading and interpretive skills. Non-music majors will be allowed up to four hours toward graduation. Prerequisites: audition and consent of instructor. MUS 140/340 Vocal Ensemble (1) An opportunity for students enrolled in Concert Choir to form other vocal ensembles: trios, quartets, or jazz choirs. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in Concert Choir and consent of the instructor. MUS 150/350 Instrumental Ensemble (1) An opportunity for students enrolled in Praise Band to form other instrumental ensembles: pep bands, quartets, or jazz bands. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in Praise Band and consent of the instructor. MUS 175 Piano Proficiency (0) All music majors must pass a piano proficiency exam before graduation. MUS 201 Music Theory II (3) A continuation of MUS 101. The study includes a thorough investigation of harmonic practices in jazz and contemporary music, including chord construction and analysis, melodic and motivic development and principles of voice leading. Prerequisite: MUS 101. MUS 211 Ear Training and Sightreading II (1) A continued course in correlated sight singing and aural perception. Sight singing, interval study, melodic and rhythmic dictation work is given as well as supporting work in the music computer lab. Material covered includes chromaticism, minor keys and dictation with multiple lines of music in preparation to be able to “chart” melodies, drums and bass parts of a band by listening. Sight singing of contemporary melodies. This course is taken concurrently with MUS 102 Music Theory II. Prerequisite: MUS 111. MUS 225 The Worshipping Community (2) This course will explore the meaning of worship in relation to God and to one’s calling in the world, focusing upon different traditions of worship, liturgical renewal in the 20th century, worship and the arts (music, drama, dance), worship and the occasional services, and worship in the context of evangelism. 212

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MUS 240 The Christian Artist (2) Examining the role of the artisti in light of scripture will provide the student with a Christian lens from which to view their role as an artist. An examination of biblical text and a survey of Christian artists throughout history will provide the student with insight on how to thrive as a Christian Artist. MUS 241/341/441 The Grove Collective (1) A vocal ensemble hired by the University and trained by the music department for the purpose of constituent relations in the Northwest. Participation is open to full-time unmarried NCU students. Prerequisites: audition and successful review of other requirements for employment by the University. MUS 242/342/442 The Grove Collective (1) A vocal ensemble hired by the University and trained by the music department for the purpose of constituent relations in the Northwest. Participation is open to full-time unmarried NCU students. Prerequisites: audition and successful review of other requirements for employment by the University. MUS 310 Arranging & Orchestrating (2) A study of the principles of arranging and orchestration, including voice range, timbral qualities and instrumental setting. Attention will be placed on contemporary ensemble arranging and orchestration. Prerequisite: MUS 201. MUS 319 Audio Engineering (3) This course highlights professional audio industry theories, ideas and best practices. Relevant and hands-on instruction will focus on sound reinforcement for musical venues as well as recording studio techniques. Information learned in this course will be put into practice in Advanced Studio Recording and Concert Production Practicum I, II, and III. Prerequisite: MUS 118 or consent of the instructor. Course Fee: Lab fee may apply MUS 321 Music History I/322 Music History II (3, 3) A survey of music from the earliest times to the present, with an emphasis on music of the church. Students will research and present topics as well as perform and listen to musical masterworks. Semester one is a survey until the classic era (1750), and semester two continues to the present. MUS 335 Worship Theology and Planning (2) This course is an integration of theology, liturgy, critical thinking, and practical leadership skills related to worship, church, and culture. The student will focus on church service and concert planning in a variety of seasonal and worship settings. MUS 351 Conducting and Rehearsing I (2) A hands-on workshop class covering all the basic skills needed to rehearse vocalists, a choir and a band. Includes conducting techniques, rehearsal skills, introductory worship planning, and motivational techniques. Prerequisite: MUS 100 or instructor approval. MUS 352 Conducting and Rehearsing II (2) A continuation of MUS 351, involving more advanced rehearsal skills, administration of a music program, and instrumental conducting. Prerequisite: MUS 351 or instructor approval. MUS 375 History of Worship in the Church (2) A survey of the history of worship in the church from inception to present day. Through an examination of biblical, historical, and social contexts the student will gain an understanding of how practices developed and changed throughout history. Students will also be exposed to the ecumenical diversity that exists in the worship of the church.

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MUS 385 Music Business Practicum (1) This course is intended to give the student within the Music Business concentration hands-on application through work with The Grove Collective and University Choir and Orchestra concert booking, management, touring, road management, production, marketing and promotion. Common music business practices will be addressed, such as copyright and legal issues, as well as publishing and licensing. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. MUS 386 Concert Practicum (1) This course is intended to give the student within the Music Industry concentration an understanding of what happens behind the scenes in a variety of musical, worship, and production venues. Students will gain practical experience fulfilling roles as front of house, monitor, video, and light board operator, as well as production manager. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. MUS 387 Worship Leading Practicum (1) This course is intended to give the student within the Worship Arts Concentration an understanding of the essentials of worship leading. The student will learn practical leadership principles applicable to music and worship in a variety of ministry contexts. Relevant experience will be gained in worship leadership, music directing, composing chord charts, lead sheets and vocal arrangements, while integrating a variety of musical styles to minister to a diverse culture. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. MUS 419 Advanced Studio Recording (3) The intent of this course is for students to put into practice audio recording and production best practices. Each student will engineer and mix a song in conjunction with a production team to produce an NCU musical recording project. Topics in this course include session and arrangement planning, budgeting, contracting, engineering, editing, mixing, mastering, and final duplication. Prerequisite: MUS 118 and MUS 319. Course Fee: Lab fee may apply. Prerequisite: MUS 118 or consent of the instructor. MUS 495 Internship (1-4). Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. MUS 499 Senior Capstone (1-2). Repeatable for credit.

Music - Private Voice MV 181/281/381/481 Private Voice (1-2) Private voice instruction in a sequence for music majors. The 300 level culminates in a 1/2 recital, 400 level in a full recital. Audition required for placement to be done during orientation week or the first week of classes. Prerequisite: MCV 100 or consent of instructor. MV 182/282/382/482 Private Voice (1-2) Private voice instruction in a sequence for music majors. The 300 level culminates in a 1/2 recital, 400 level in a full recital. Audition required for placement to be done during orientation week or the first week of classes.

Nursing NURS 310 Foundations for Lifelong Learning in Nursing (3) This course serves as an introductory course to assist new students in navigating the learning management and support systems available and 214

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necessary for college success at NCU. Significant time will be spent exploring nursing as a ministry, Jesus as a healer, communication skills and the value of service to others. NURS 320 Systems Theory in Nursing (3) An introduction to nursing theory, evidence-based nursing care and the relationship between nursing theory and practice and application to Systems of Care. Emphasis on nursing judgements in practice substantiated with evidence. NURS 330 Leadership in Nursing Practice (3) Examination of the concepts of servant leadership, the concepts of Nursing as a ministry and professional commitment to human flourishing. Study of leadership models and the competencies that are critical to nursing professional and organizational success in change management. NURS 340 Role of the Professional Nurse (3) Introduction to the role of the professional nurse and differentiation of the technical and professional nursing roles, identity, behaviors, core values, and competencies. NURS 350 Ethics in Nursing (3) Understanding the commitment to the ministry and identity of nursing in the context of ethical obligations in nursing practice, including patient rights versus the duty to deliver care. Includes a focus on end of life care and genetic engineering. NURS 410 Community Health Nursing (3) A study of factors that influence the health of communities and populations locally, nationally and globally with a focus on management of vulnerable populations and chronic illnesses. Includes impact of health promotion, cultural beliefs and health policy on delivery of care across the continuum of health care and population-based management. NURS 420 Organizational Management in Nursing (3) An in depth study of leadership and management theories and skills in a changing healthcare environment including styles, roles and responsibilities as a leader and manager. Includes a focus on financial, staffing and human resource management NURS 430 Research in Health Care and Evidence-based Practice (3) An in depth review of qualitative and quantitative research methodologies including application of quality research standards in nursing practice, use of electronic resources/databases and critical evaluation of healthcare literature. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or higher. NURS 440 The Aging Population (3) A study of care and management of the aging population focusing on geriatric care including approaches to chronic illness, rehabilitative care and palliative care. A focus will be on communication and collaboration with patients, families, healthcare team members and care options, including home health care. NURS 499 Nursing Capstone (3) Project-based independent study or project within the setting of their organization or other as assigned. The theories, concepts, and practices that have been an integral part of the BSN coursework will culminate in this senior project development and presentation.

Nutrition NUTR 220 Nutrition (3) A study of how the body takes in and uses the nutrients from food. Food sources, functions, and requirements of the following are discussed: carbohydrates, proteins, fats, 215

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vitamins, minerals and water. In addition, digestion, absorption and metabolism of all nutrients are covered. Skills are developed for improving personal eating habits and for evaluating nutrition information in the mass media.

Philosophy PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy (2) An introduction to the perennial issues in Western philosophy, such as knowledge and skepticism, the existence of God, the problem of evil, freedom of the will, and the foundations of morality. Emphasis will be placed on critical thinking and the development of understanding through reasoned argument. PHL 210 Ethics (3) This introductory course in ethics surveys the history of ethical thought in Western culture. Attention is given to such important movements as utilitarianism, deontology, egoism, and virtue ethics. Some attention is given to contemporary moral problems. PHL 301 History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3) A study of major philosophical works in the Western tradition from the beginnings of philosophy in ancient Greece to the end of the medieval period, culminating in Aquinas. Offered annually. Prerequisite: PHL 110 or permission of instructor. PHL 302 History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy (3) A study of major philosophical works in the Western tradition from Descartes through Hegel in the modern period, and Heidegger, Sartre, Russell, Wittgenstein, et.al. in the contemporary period. Offered annually. Prerequisite: PHL 110 or permission of instructor. PHL 301 is strongly recommended. PHL 315 Bioethics (3) An in-depth examination of contemporary bioethical issues, such as the definition if a person, determination of life and death, euthanasia, doctor-assisted suicide, abortion and maternalfetal conflict, prenatal diagnosis and intervention, problems in the physician-patient relationship, new reproductive technologies, research on animals, genetic engineering, and human cloning. Prerequisite: PHL 210. PHL 320 Philosophy of Religion (3) A conceptual and analytical survey of the important questions linking philosophy and religion. Students will consider the chief contemporary approaches to justifying religious belief, as well as various non-theistic challenges to that belief. The following questions will be discussed: Are religious claims subject to rational evaluation? What can reason tell us about the nature of God? Can we prove that God exists? Why would a maximally perfect being permit evil and suffering? Is belief in miracles well founded? Is the idea of human survival after death a coherent one? This course may be used to fulfill an elective in the Bible & Theology major. Prerequisites: 6 hours of Philosophy or instructor’s permission. PHL 420 Christian Ethics and Social Responsibility (3) This course examines Christian ethics and Christian responsibility in their socio-political and economic arenas. In addition to general theories of ethics, students are expected to become familiar with the ethical teachings of the Hebrew prophets, Jesus, and Paul as well as modern thinkers such as Bonhoeffer, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Stanley Hauerwas. This course may be used to fulfill an elective in the Bible & Theology major. Prerequisite: PHL 210 or instructor’s consent.

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PHL 651/652/653/654 Supervised Research (3 credits each/12 credits total) Working under the supervision and mentorship of an assigned faculty supervisor, students will engage in an individualized program of research related to their preapproved research topic. Students are expected to initiate contact with their respective supervisors on a weekly basis to report progress and to seek critical feedback on their research activities. Assessment of each consecutive module will be based in part upon a formal presentation to faculty in the School of Christian Ministry. Pass/no pass grading option only. PHL 690 M.Phil. Thesis (3 credits) Upon completion of the Supervised Research modules, students will enroll for Thesis. The M.Phil. Thesis is the culmination of the research degree. The thesis committee will be comprised of three members, including NCU faculty supervisor (chair), one other NCU faculty member, and one external committee member. Upon completion of the Thesis, students will defend the thesis before the thesis committee in a public forum to include NCU faculty and student peers. The thesis grade will be assigned by the Thesis Committee, based upon the originality and integrity of the project, the quality of research and writing, and upon the defense.

Physical Education PE 101/102//201/202/301/302/401/402 Varsity Basketball (men’s and women’s) (1) PE 111/112/211/212/311/312/411/412 Varsity Volleyball (1) PE 121/222/221/222/321/322/421/422 Varsity Softball (1) PE 125 Yoga (1) This course gives basic instruction in Yoga techniques and is designed to promote overall physical health. Repeatable for credit. PE 126 Aerobics (1) A low impact aerobics class using movement to upbeat music. This course is designed to strengthen the body through overall conditioning techniques. Repeatable for credit. PE 131/132/231/232/331/332/431/432 Varsity Soccer (men’s and women’s) (1) PE 141/142/241/242/341/342/441/442 Varsity Cross Country (men’s and women’s) (1) PE 161 Fitness Conditioning (1) This class is designed to provide a start into a fit lifestyle. Students will learn how to lift weights safely and to incorporate cardiovascular exercises into their workout. The combination of lifting weights with aerobic workouts will keep the heart and lungs in shape, improve energy, and increase the overall quality of life. Individual classes may focus more on specific areas of fitness and conditioning (e.g. running). Repeatable for credit. PE 162 Ice Skating (1) This course provides instruction in general physical fitness (mind, body, health) including an ice skating fitness emphasis. Cardiovascular conditioning through ice skating exercise activities and other exercise activities will be required. Repeatable for credit.

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PE 163 Water Fitness (1) This class provides a high intensity workout using the resistance of water. Instruction will be in the deep water using flotation belts so there will be no impact or strain on any joints. The workout will improve muscle tone, aerobic capacity, flexibility, strength, and endurance. This class is for all levels from the beginner to the elite athlete and can be used to generally improve level of fitness, as part of a weight loss program, for injury rehabilitation or prevention, or as a method of cross training. Repeatable for credit. PE 164 Weightlifting (1) Weight training will provide the student a general knowledge of resistance activities for a healthy lifestyle. The course will provide direction and safe progression with a focus on proper technique enabling the student to continue with these activities throughout life. Repeatable for credit. PE 165 Bootcamp (1-2) This class introduces the student to a safe and highly effective workout program that provides the motivation to start and continue a lifestyle of fitness. This class is physically demanding; the student will improve cardiovascular endurance and build muscle mass. Repeatable for credit. PE 171/172/271/272/371/372/471/472 Varsity Golf (men’s and women’s) (1) PE 181/182/281/282/381/382/481/482 Varsity Outdoor Track and Field (men’s and women’s) (1) PE 175 CPR/First Aid (1) This course is an opportunity for students to become CPR/AED and First Aid certified through the American Red Cross. It will comply with the American Red Cross program standards and procedures. At the end of the course students will be able to recognize an emergency situation, know what actions to take based on a variety of emergency situations, know how to activate emergency medical services, be able to perform the skills needed to give care to a suddenly injured or ill person, and know how to physically and legally protect themselves when providing care. PE 215 Introduction to Coaching (2) This course is designed to introduce the foundations of coaching and team management at any level. The course aims to explore issues related to medical, social, physical, and physiological elements of coaching. Through the course students will examine coaching methodology and develop skills for practical application. Topics covered will include but are not limited to: coaching techniques, leadership, team and athlete development, team management, ethics in athletics, athletic administration, injury care and prevention, and first aid.

Physics PHYS 110 Fundamentals of Physics (4) This class combines elements of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, as well as the principles of waves and sound. Emphasis is on everyday phenomena and conceptual understanding more than calculations. PHYS 122 Meteorology and Astronomy (3) This course will analyze fundamental physical processes of the atmosphere; their relationships to the daily weather pattern and weather forecasting in the U.S. weather systems; and atmospheric temperature, pressure, and humidity. In the second part of the course, astronomy as a science will be introduced. The fundamental physics concepts underlying stellar astronomy will be investigated. Topics include the sun and its place in our galaxy, exploration of the nature of stars, super novae and stellar black holes. 218

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Course Descriptions

PHYS 201 Introduction to Mechanics (3) A study of the basic concepts of physics. Topics include vector algebra, kinematics of motion, Newton’s laws, dynamics of single and many-particle systems, work, energy, momentum, conservation laws, rotational and translational motion, fluid mechanics, thermal equilibrium, temperature, and the laws of thermodynamics. Pre-requisite: MATH 130 or MATH 251. PHYS 201L Introduction to Mechanics Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Introduction to Mechanics. Corequisite: PHYS 201. PHYS 202 Introduction to Electromagnetism (algebra-based) (3) This course introduces the basic laws of electricity and magnetism, basic circuits, and optics. Topics include electrical force, electric potential, circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, magnetic fields, inductance, reflection, refraction and diffraction. Pre-requisite: MATH 130 or MATH 251. PHYS 202L Introduction to Electromagnetism Lab (1) Laboratory to accompany Introduction to Electromagnetism. Co-requisite: PHYS 202.

Prior Learning Assessment PLA 105 (0/1 credit): Prior Learning Assessment Workshop. This course orients students to the prior learning assessment process. Students will conduct an individual learning analysis and develop an educational plan. Non-admitted students may take the workshop for no credit. Admitted students who have successfully met the requirements for completion of the class may gain one college credit upon acceptance to Northwest Christian University. PLA 205 (3 credits): Prior Learning Analysis and Portfolio Development. This course provides an in-depth study of the Kolb method for assessing adult learning at the college level. Students will gain an understanding of the options available to them for gaining credit through the experiential essay and through technical training based on the use of the ACE National Guide for College Credit for Workforce Training. This is a writing intensive course resulting in the creation of a Portfolio which may be submitted to the PLA Coordinator for additional PLA credits. Pre-requisites: WR 121 and WR 123/WR 315 PLA 206 (0 credits earned): Prior Learning Related to Specific Courses. Students who successfully complete PLA 205 may continue to seek college-level credits from experiential learning. Each student receives individualized guidance by the professor of PLA 206. Together, they will identify specific NCU courses that relate to the student’s prior learning. Students may write up to six experiential essays for each semester of enrollment in PLA 206. Credit is granted upon successful completion of each experiential essay as determined by the parameters of the PLA essay requirements. Pre-requisites: WR 315 and PLA 205. Pass/no pass grading option only.

Psychology PSY 200 General Psychology (3) An introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Specific areas studied are history and systems, research methods, perception, human development, personality, learning, memory, emotion,, cognition, psychological disorders, and social behavior. (Satisfies a social science requirement in the General Education Core.) 219

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PSY 320 Human Development (3) This course investigates human development from conception through death. Topics include physical, cognitive, perceptual language, social, and moral development across the lifespan. Prerequisite: PSY 200. PSY 330 Psychology of Learning (3) This course is a survey of learning theories and applications to everyday experiences. Topics include classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and social learning. Prerequisite: PSY 200. PSY 340 Social Psychology (3) This course is a study of the social behavior of individuals and groups. Topics include conformity, social influence, conflict, justice, altruism, aggression, prejudice, and attitudes. Prerequisite: PSY 200. PSY 350 Research Methods (3) This course is an introduction to basic research design. Topics include ethical guidelines, experimental design, correlational design, sample selection, questionnaire construction, reliability and validity of measurements, and internal and external validity. Students design a research study, write an IRB proposal, and present findings in an APA style research paper. Prerequisites: PSY 200, MATH 310 or MATH 315. PSY 370 Cognition (3) A course about mental processes including perception, attention, memory, reasoning, problem solving, decision making, and language. Prerequisite: PSY 200. PSY 380 Theories of Personality (3) A survey of historical and contemporary theories on personality. Major theoretical approaches include psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive, dispositional, social, and humanistic-existential. Prerequisite: PSY 200. PSY 390 Biological Psychology (3) This course is designed to introduce students to neuroanatomy, brain mechanisms, and the physiological bases of behavior related to sensory systems, movement, sleep, learning, memory, and psychological disorders. Prerequisites: BIOL 111, 130 or 200, and PSY 200. PSY 418 Psychology of Motivation (3) This course is designed to broadly survey psychological theory and research on motivation. We will review a number of major theories that explain what factors initiate, energize, direct, and sustain behavior from a biological, behavioral-learning, and cognitive perspective. The role of emotions in motivation will also be considered. In reviewing these topics we will also discuss the strengths and limitations of each theoretical perspective. PSY 420 Abnormal Psychology (3) Psychopathology is examined from a biopsychosocial perspective. Students are introduced to the DSM-IV-TR. Topics include etiology, symptoms, and treatment of depressive, anxiety, somatoform, and dissociative disorders, as well as schizophrenia, substance-related and age-related disorders, and personality disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 200. PSY 430 Psychology of Addictive Behaviors (3) This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the nature of addiction, including progressive stages and the accompanying “system of denial,” the impact of chemical dependency/behavioral addiction on individual users, families and communities, and to explore prevention and intervention strategies and treatment resources. Prerequisite: PSY 200. PSY 440 Psychology of Religion (3) An introduction to empirical approaches in the study of religion from the psychological perspective which includes studying the developmental, psychobiological, and cultural 220

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Course Descriptions

influences that affect beliefs and behaviors. Further, the roles of religion in psychopathology and wellbeing will be discussed. The course will be taught using a scientific foundation to understand religion. Prerequisite: PSY 200. PSY 450 Psychometrics (3) Students are introduced to educational and psychological assessment, such as measures of aptitude, achievement, intelligence, personality, and vocational interest. An emphasis is placed on principles of psychometrics, including test items, standard scores, reliability and validity, and interpretations. While students have some hands-on experiences with particular measures, this course does not train students to administer these tests. Prerequisites: PSY 200, MATH 310 or MATH 315. PSY 451 Advanced Research Methods (3) Advanced study of research design, statistical analysis, and SPSS. Students will design a study (survey or questionnaire-based for online course), collect and analyze data, write an APA style research paper, and prepare a poster presentation to faculty, staff, and students. Prerequisite: PSY350, MATH 310 or MATH 315. PSY 465 Introduction to Counseling Skills (3) This course is designed to introduce basic interviewing skills to students who anticipate future work in Christian ministry, teaching, counseling, or other related fields. While this course involves students’ practice of basic listening, empathy, and rapport-building skills, it is not intended to prepare students for clinical practice. Pre-requisites: PSY 200, PSY 420, and at least junior standing. PSY 475 Psychology of Trauma (3) This course covers the meaning and scope of trauma, the role of betrayal in trauma, trauma in the lives of individuals and families, and the trauma which individuals experience at the hands of several societal institutions: academic, religious, and military. Students will also learn how trauma affects the brain, body, and emotions, during the traumatizing event and over time. Common trauma-related diagnoses and current theories in understanding and effecting healing in individuals who have experienced trauma will be covered. Students in the course will reflect upon faith and biblical scriptures as we ask challenging questions about the intersection of God, Christian belief, and trauma. Prerequisite: PSY 200. PSY 490 Research Practicum (1-3) Student involvement in active research with faculty. By faculty approval. Pass/no pass grading option only. PSY 495 Internship (3-6) Internships provide students an opportunity to apply their classroom learning and gain practical experience in a counseling or social service agency in the community. Students are supervised by professionals in the field and average nine hours per week at their chosen site. Students should consult with their advisor during the semester prior to registration of internship credits. Prerequisites: Majority of psychology requirements and at least second-semester junior standing. Repeatable for credit. Pass/no pass grading option only. PSY 499 Senior Capstone (3) Students develop a written paper and oral presentation that reflects an area of interest and integrates a significant amount of their previous coursework. . Limited to senior psychology majors. Prerequisite: PSY 350, PSY 451, MATH 310 or MATH 315.

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Religious Studies RELS 210 The Abrahamic Faiths of Judaism and Islam (2) This course explores the monotheistic traditions of Judaism and Islam, giving attention to historical and phenomenological perspectives. These traditions will be examined from their inception to their modern expressions. At the end of the course, students should have a level of religious literacy for understanding the traditions in question. This course may be used to fulfill an elective in the Bible & Theology major. RELS 220 Living Religious Traditions of the Far East (2) This course explores the religious traditions of the Far East including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto, giving attention to historical and phenomenological perspectives. These traditions will be examined from their inception to their modern expressions. At the end of the course, students should have a level of religious literacy for understanding the traditions in question. This course satisfies diversity study requirements. This course may be used to fulfill an elective in the Bible & Theology major.

School Counseling SCOUN 510 Child/Adolescent Development and Mental Health (3) This course examines physical, social, and cognitive development of infants, elementary school-age children, middle school-age children and adolescents, with special consideration of spiritual and moral development. Development from early childhood through adolescence as it relates to adjustment in an educational setting is emphasized, as is an emphasis on children with physiological, intellectual, and social risk factors. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills and techniques for counseling children in schools. Students will also look in-depth at mental health disorders that are common in schools and will explore how best to serve these students. SCOUN 515 Instructional Strategies and Classroom Management (2) The focus of this course will be an examination of curriculum development, instructional strategies and classroom management strategies for those students in Track II of the School Counseling Program. Students will learn and practice a variety of strategies for curriculum development for large and small groups that will culminate in the production of the state required work sample or unit of study. Frequently, school counselors will organize school-wide programs, present individual classroom lessons, or other presentations as needed in the school setting. This course is designed to provide an opportunity for school counseling students to study techniques in classroom management, classroom or large group transitions, learning environments, cooperative learning and assessment. In addition, school counselors work closely with administration and teachers, which requires application of collaboration skills, mediation, and cooperation. SCOUN 516 Curriculum Development and Technology (1 ) The focus of this course is to provide technical and instructional assistance to school counselors at the K-12 level as they develop individual work samples based upon Student Teaching Practicum placements. Each student will use the information from SCOUN 515 to design and prepare the required series of lessons in preparation for student teaching. The students select topics aligned with the Guidance and Counseling Framework and state standards. SCOUN 517 Student Teaching Practicum (3) The classroom practicum is an abbreviated student teaching experience offered during the second semester of the program. This supervised practicum consists of a 222

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minimum of 200 clock hours in a regular classroom in an accredited school. The experience consists of 75 clock hours of full responsibility for directing learning with a work sample illustrating the ability to foster student learning. Pass/no pass grading option only. SCOUN 518 Introduction to the Counseling Profession (3) This required forum allows students the opportunity to explore the many questions that surface in their training. It is also intended to be an opportunity to build cohesion within the student cohort by offering an informal forum to discuss common issues, receive feedback from others, meet professionals in the community, and relate to faculty outside a structured setting. Issues such as professional identity, continued education, supervision, portfolios, licensure procedures, and career opportunities are topics of discussion. Students learn the process for compiling their professional portfolio. SCOUN 520 Counseling Theories and Skills I (3) This course introduces students to theories of counseling from a historical-chronological perspective. Specific orientations include psychoanalytic, Adlerian, person-centered, humanistic-existential, and a variety of cognitive-behavioral approaches to counseling. As students are exposed to these models, they are encouraged to incorporate their own values about the human change process and their faith with these theories in order to begin to define their own theoretical orientation to counseling. SCOUN 530 Counseling Theories and Skills II (3) Students’ preparation for practica experience begins with this course. Students learn the basic microskills of counseling, including attending behavior, listening and structuring skills, and reflecting skills, and practice those skills in simulated counseling sessions built around role-plays. Students integrate knowledge from the Theories of Counseling course and develop a personal theory of counseling and a conception of how the skills fit into that model. SCOUN 540 Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling (3) This course is designed to expose students to the myriad of ethical issues that surface in counseling settings as well as legal requirements of counselors. Topics include privacy and confidentiality, duty to warn, abuse reporting procedures, licensure and certification, marketing, boundaries in therapeutic relationships, and counselor health and welfare. SCOUN 560 Crisis Management (3) This course is intended to enable students to identify and diffuse crisis situations to minimize the possibility of clients doing harm to themselves or others. Students learn to identify suicidal ideation and intent and assess levels of potential violence in both face-to-face approaches and via telephone contact. Students learn about professional and community resources available to deal with various levels of crisis and gain an understanding about when and how to refer individuals to those resources. An introduction to critical incidence debriefing is also included in this course. SCOUN 570 Group Counseling (3) This course is intended to introduce students to the ethics of group counseling, the dynamics of group process, and a variety of techniques for working with specific groups. Students practice facilitating groups in simulated sessions and gain an awareness of their own personal process in a group setting as they take part as members in those simulated group sessions. In and of itself, it is not intended to equip students to conduct counseling groups independently. SCOUN 580 Counseling Diverse Populations (3) In this course, students investigate attitudes and perspectives regarding gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and other cultural differences. Particular emphasis will be placed upon biblical, historical, and cultural perspectives and the impact current views have on the counseling relationship. Students will be encouraged to expand their points of 223

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Course Descriptions

view of diverse populations leading toward successful therapeutic relationships and an acceptance of all persons. SCOUN 620 Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention (3) This course is designed to introduce students to issues associated with the use and abuse of drugs and alcohol. Students learn to recognize the abuse or potential abuse of substances, how to screen for the level of abuse, and where and how to refer for treatment. While it is not the intended purpose of the course to equip students for substance abuse counseling, information is presented to expose students to the impact of substance abuse on physiology, the therapeutic relationship, interpersonal relationships, functioning in work and school settings, and counseling outcome. SCOUN 622 Early Childhood/Elementary Counseling (3) This course is designed to express issues and practice specific to students in this educational level. Theories and skills will be expanded to enhance delivery models in the schools. Particular focus will be placed on the Oregon Framework. SCOUN 624 Middle/High School Counseling (3) This course is designed to explore issues and practices specific to students in this educational level. Theories and skills will be expanded to enhance delivery models in the schools. Particular focus will be placed on the Oregon Framework. SCOUN 630 Introduction to Family Systems (3) This course is designed to serve as an introduction to family systems theories and enable students to investigate family issues that surface in counseling. Topics include changing American families, alternative families, family boundaries, domestic violence, physical and sexual abuse, and marital discord. SCOUN 660 Career Development and Counseling (3) This course is designed to investigate the concept of career by providing an overview of the career development field and the practice of career guidance in elementary and secondary school settings. Students learn theories of career development relevant to children and adolescents, as well as strategies, information, and resources to assist with career decisions (assessment tools, technology, and labor market information). Students will investigate the concept of career as a process that continues throughout the lifespan. SCOUN 670 Academic/Behavioral Appraisal and Intervention (3) This course is an introduction to the principles of assessment, including reliability and validity of instruments, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of selected tests, and the ethics of the use of those instruments, especially with special populations. Types of tests explored include intelligence and general ability tests, achievement and aptitude tests, career and interest inventories, and personality measurements. This course is also designed to assist school counselors with the skills, information and research necessary to advocate on behalf of adolescents with special academic needs. The focus of the course is how counselors participate in developing elementary, middle school or high school educational programs that enhance all students’ learning. SCOUN 680 Research and APA Writing (3) This course presents basic methods of quantitative and qualitative research and program evaluation. It prepares students to be critical consumers of educational research. They learn to conduct research in an educational setting and how to assist school staff in evaluating educational programs. SCOUN 695 Internship/Group Supervision (6) Students apply knowledge and skills gained from previous coursework in an educational setting. Students work under supervision of a school counselor, with 224

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assistance from a faculty supervisor. They also prepare a professional portfolio that reflects their graduate experiences. Students begin their internship during fall semester of their second year of study and continue into the spring semester. Students in Track I and Track II must document a minimum of 600 clock hours, averaging about 20 hours per week, during their internship. Faculty supervisors visit students at their assigned school regularly during each semester. Pass/no pass grading option only.

Sociology SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology (3) An introduction to basic concepts and terminology; human behavior in groups, family, education, religion, government; ecology; social deviancy. This course meets diversity study requirements. SOC 250 Career and Life Planning (3) This course is designed with the philosophy that you will make better career (and life) decisions, the better you know yourself and the world of work. Thus, this class focuses on self-assessment, and self-awareness; career exploration and researching career options; decision-making and goal setting. It is the focused and flexible approach to career planning—as you focus to plan and pursue your goals, you are flexible as new opportunities and opinions arise. This class is intended both for those exploring their first career, as well as those in career transition. SOC 410 Global Issues (3) A survey of selected global issues and problems. This course includes conceptual and analytical tools, exploration of various issues, and various Christian responses to issues. Prerequisites: ANTH 210, SOC 200.

Spanish SPAN 111/112 First-year Refresher Spanish I & II (3, 3) A two-semester sequence designed for students with 1-3 years of high school Spanish or the equivalent. The courses are conducted in the target language and emphasize oral communication and listening comprehension in a culturally authentic context. In addition, students will read short texts and compile a series of written essays to be turned-in at the end of the semester. SPAN 111 is a prerequisite for SPAN 112. SPAN 199 Intensive First-Year Refresher Spanish (4) An intensive refresher course for students who have had between one and three years of high school Spanish. This course focuses on the development of oral skills through the use of communicative activities. Students will be expected to prepare for oral communication by completing one to two hours of homework daily. Homework assignments include listening exercises, grammar worksheets and the reading of short texts. Also, students will be expected to complete a series of written essays associated with in-class oral production. At the end of the course, students will be ready for entrance into Spanish 201. SPAN 201/202 Second-year Spanish (3, 3) Designed to emphasize oral communication and listening comprehension in a culturally authentic context. Special attention to the integration of advanced grammar in the development of more complex and authentic native expressions by students. Prerequisites: SPAN 101, 102. SPAN 300 Spanish Phonetics (2) Designed to improve pronunciation and intonation through aural/oral practice, written transcription and contrastive analysis with English. Prerequisites: SPAN 201, 202. 225

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SPAN 310 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition (3) This course focuses on the development of both interactive communication and written skills through the practice of advanced functions, including stating and defending opinions, debating issues, soliciting and giving advice and making persuading and convincing arguments. Students will be exposed to a wide register of both written and spoken Spanish, including idiomatic expressions, colloquialisms, and slang. By the end of this course, students will be able to show proficiency at the Advanced-Low to the Advanced-Mid range (based on the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines in all four skills). Prerequisites: SPAN 101, 102. SPAN 321/322 Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3, 3) An overview of the major influences in Hispanic culture and civilization, covering pre-Columbian cultures, the conquest and colonization by Spain, the independence of the Americas and 20th century history. Prerequisites: SPAN 201, 202. SPAN 330 Religion and History of the Americas (3) An overview of the influence religion has played in the development of the Americas, including the role of the Roman Catholic Church and the importance of indigenous languages and cultures. Prerequisites: SPAN 201, 202. SPAN 340 Latino Society and Culture in the U.S. (3) An historic and social survey of the Hispanic influences in the United States from both the American and Latin perspective. Attention will be given to Hispanic culture in politics, religion, and education and the arts. Prerequisites: SPAN 201, 202. SPAN 399 Service Within the Hispanic Community (3) Students provide services to local agencies and organizations that assist the Hispanic community. Areas of assistance include business organizations, schools, government agencies, hospitals and churches. Three hours of weekly service is required, in addition to a weekly one-hour tutorial with a faculty member. Prerequisites: SPAN 101, 102. SPAN 470 Teaching Foreign Language Methods (2) This course is designed to instruct teachers on how to implement the latest methodology used to teach foreign language. Prerequisites: SPAN 201/202. SPAN 499 Senior Capstone (3) Individualized projects reflecting specific interests by the student. Project involves both on-campus meetings under the supervision of a faculty member and off-campus involvement in the Hispanic community.

Study Abroad SA 207/307/407 Study Abroad

Writing WR 90 Basic Writing (2) An introductory course that stresses the connection between reading, writing, and study skills. Reading skills, vocabulary building, and ease with the writing process are emphasized. The student will move from personal writing to academic writing. The style goal is clarity; the mechanics goal understanding basic sentence patterns. This course does not satisfy the writing requirement or any other graduation requirements. Pass/no pass grading option only.

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WR 121 English Composition (3) This course prepares the student for academic writing by emphasizing the analytic skills that underlie formal essay writing: making claims, using evidence, and drawing logical conclusions. The course will also focus on correct mechanics and the construction of unified, cohesive paragraphs. Passing grade for graduation requirements is “C-“ or better. WR 123 English Composition (3) The second in the series of composition courses. The skills and practices of research writing are practiced, emphasizing correct and effective use of quotations, paraphrases, and summaries and the ability to find and evaluate sources. Students demonstrate these skills by writing a researched position paper of substantive length. Passing grade for graduation requirements is “C-“ or better. Prerequisite: WR 121 or equivalent. WR 151 Honors Grammar and Composition (3) An alternate to WR 121, this course in composition and rhetoric is designed for the student who has already mastered basic writing skills. Its goals are to develop the ability to read and think critically, to employ discussion and writing as a means of exploring and refining ideas, and to express those ideas in effective prose. By invitation only. WR 152 Honors Research Skills (3) An alternate to WR 123, this course in composition, rhetoric, and research is the second in the honors series of Freshman composition. Students continue the work of WR 151 by applying the skills of argumentation and critical thinking to advanced work in research essay writing. This course seeks to develop the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources, to synthesize the ideas and conclusions of others, and to support and sustain a thesis in an extended research project. By invitation only. WR 311 Writing for the Workplace (3) This course focuses on developing research and writing skills required for most professionals. Assignments include emails, memos, reports, proposals, descriptions, web writing, resumes, and cover letters. Pre-requisite: WR 123 or WR 315. WR 315 Writing for the Social Sciences (3) Students in the fields of psychology, sociology, business, and education learn the skills and practices of research writing, such as effectively using quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, finding and evaluating sources, and properly documenting and formatting their paper according to APA style . Students demonstrate these skills by writing a research paper of substantive length. Pre-requisite: WR 121. WR 332 Creative Writing (3) Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of writing fiction and poetry. Students will study published masters of the craft and practice their own writing in a workshop style. WR 351 Creative Non-Fiction Writing (3) In this course, students will practice writing in a variety of nonfiction creative genres, such as memoir, nature writing, travel writing, and spiritual autobiography. They will study strong examples of the genre and will workshop their writing, building toward a final portfolio. WR 410 Advanced Writing (3) Students will complete a major creative project of their choice. They will have the option to write a screenplay, work on a novel, create a full-length non-fiction piece, such as a memoir, write lyrics for a music portfolio, complete a collection of short stories or poems, create and maintain a regular blog or creative website, complete a major research paper, or other projects deemed appropriate by the instructor. Pre-requisite: WR 332, WR 351, or instructor permission.

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WR 500 Graduate Writing Seminar (1) The writing instruction focuses on APA manuscript style and methods for strengthening academic writing. Because good writing reflects clear, logical, and critical thinking, this course is aimed at developing students’ ability to frame an idea in a clear, succinct fashion and integrate support for that idea with current research literature. WR 501 Graduate Research and Writing (3) The writing instruction focuses on APA manuscript style and methods for strengthening academic writing. Because good writing reflects clear, logical, and critical thinking, this course is aimed at developing students’ ability to frame an idea in a clear, succinct fashion and integrate support for that idea with current research literature. The course also provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative research designs and methodology.

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Index

Continuing Thesis Policy .................................. 50 Core Themes ...................................................... 1 Course Descriptions ................................ 163-228 Course Withdrawal Policy................................ 46 Criminal Justice Major ................................... 135 Curriculum & Instructional Technology, M.Ed ............................................................... 156 Delayed Enrollment ......................................... 18 Deposits ........................................................... 29 Disability Services ............................................ 52 Disclosure of Student Records Policy .............. 64 Dishonesty and Plagiarism ............................... 52 Disqualification ................................................ 51 Drop Course Policy........................................... 46 Endorsements (Adult Degree Program) .......................... 146 (Daytime Undergraduate) ....................... 120 Educational Philosophy ..................................... 5 Edward P. Kellenberger Library ....................... 52 English Major ................................................... 98 Exam Policies ................................................... 57 Exercise Science Major .................................. 101 Faculty Emeriti ................................................... 8 Faculty................................................................ 7 Federal Tax Benefits ........................................ 44 Final Examination Policy .................................. 57 Final Grades ..................................................... 56 Finance Charges ............................................... 28 Finances ...................................................... 27-44 Financial Aid ............................................... 30-44 Application Procedure............................... 30 Award ........................................................ 36 Disbursing .................................................. 37 Eligibility .................................................... 31 Loan Funds ................................................ 41 Programs ................................................... 38 Work Opportunities .................................. 40 Fitness Center .................................................. 68 Grants .............................................................. 38 General Education Requirements (Adult Degree Program) .......................... 128 (Daytime Undergraduate) ......................... 77 Grade Systems & Grade Point Averages.......... 58 Graduation ....................................................... 64 Grievance Policy .............................................. 62 Health Insurance .............................................. 69 History Major ................................................. 103 History of Northwest Christian University ......... 2

Index Academic Calendars ........................................ i-iii Academic Grievance ........................................ 62 Academic Honesty Policy ................................. 52 Academic Honors ............................................. 63 Academic Policies............................................. 45 Academic Disqualification ................................ 51 Account Collections.......................................... 30 Accounting Certificate.................................... 149 Accounting Major (Adult Degree Program) ............................ 131 (Daytime Undergraduate) ........................... 80 Accreditation Standards .................................... 5 Active Service Duty .......................................... 65 Add/Drop Course Policy ................................... 46 Administrative Drop ......................................... 46 Administrative Withdrawal .............................. 46 Administrative Officers and Staff ..................9-11 Admission ...................................................13-25 Application Procedure (Adult Degree Program) .............................. 19 (Graduate) ................................................... 21 (Daytime Undergraduate) ........................... 14 Articulation Agreements .................................. 47 Bible & Theology Major ................................... 83 Associates Degree .......................................... 125 Biology Major ................................................... 86 Board of Trustees ........................................11-12 Business Administration Major (Adult Degree Program) ............................ 133 (Daytime Undergraduate) ........................... 89 Business Administration, Master of ............... 152 Calendars ........................................................ i-iii Catalog Changes and Authority Policy ............. 65 Chapel .............................................................. 61 Characteristics of our Churches ......................... 3 Christian Ministry Major .................................. 92 Church Matching Grant.................................... 39 Church Relationships & Theological Context .... 2 Class Attendance Policies................................. 51 Classification of Students ................................. 60 Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Master of 154 Code of Conduct .............................................. 67 Commitment to Evangelism and Mission .......... 3 Commencement/Graduation........................... 64 Communication Major ..................................... 95 229

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Honor Societies .................................................. 5 Honored Professors ........................................... 9 Honors .............................................................. 63 Honors Program ............................................... 73 International Student ....................................... 16 Interdisciplinary Studies Major (Adult Degree Program) ............................ 137 (Daytime Undergraduate) ......................... 106 Introduction ....................................................1-6 Judicial Affairs and Grievance Procedures ....... 70 Late Arrival for Class ........................................ 51 Late Papers and Assignments .......................... 56 Library, Edward P. Kellenberger....................... 52 Library Fines ..................................................... 28 Loans ................................................................ 41 Mathematics Major ....................................... 107 Military Credit .................................................. 48 Memberships ..................................................... 5 Mission of Northwest Christian University ........ 1 Music Major ................................................... 109 Nondiscrimination Policy ................................. 65 Nursing – RN to BSN Major ............................ 140 Officers/Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees............................................................ 11 Parking Pass ..................................................... 27 Payment ........................................................... 29 Pell Grant ......................................................... 38 Philosophy Minor ........................................... 113 Philosophy in Theology, Master of ................ 157 Plagiarism (Academic Honesty Policy) ............. 52 Psychology (Adult Degree Program) ............................ 142 (Daytime Undergraduate) ......................... 114 Reenrollment ................................................... 49 Registration ...................................................... 45 Repeat Classes ................................................. 61 RN to BSN Major ............................................ 140 Room Replacement Key Fees........................... 28 Satisfactory Academic Progress ....................... 32 School Counseling, Master of ........................ 158 Staff .................................................................... 9 Student Activities ............................................. 69 Student Classification....................................... 60 Student Development .................................67-70 Student Finances .........................................27-44 Study Abroad ................................................... 72 Teacher Education (Adult Degree Program) ............................ 144

(Daytime Undergraduate)......................... 116 Teaching, Master of ....................................... 160 Technology on Campus.................................... 55 Transfer Credit (Adult Degree Program) ............................ 20 (Daytime Undergraduate) ......................... 15 Transfer Credit Limit (Graduate) ..................... 62 Transfer Evaluation .......................................... 46 Transfer Student .............................................. 14 Trustees ...................................................... 11-12 Tuition and Fees .............................................. 27 Tutoring ........................................................... 52 Verification (Financial Aid)............................... 31 Veterans........................................................... 17 Veteran Educational Benefits .......................... 43 Vision of Northwest Christian University .......... 1 Withdrawal (from the University) ............. 20, 49 Withdrawal (administrative)............................ 46 Withdrawal (course) ........................................ 46

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