teacher resource lesson plan - Detroit Historical Society

teacher resource lesson plan - Detroit Historical Society

TEACHER RESOURCE LESSON PLAN DETROIT DURING WWII: WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE LEARNING OBJECTIVES Students will: • Gain perspective about industrial workin...

303KB Sizes 0 Downloads 3 Views

Recommend Documents

teacher resource lesson plan - Detroit Historical Society
essay on the French and New France, as well as a list of .... French seigneurs, or nobleman, owned the lands; they also

teacher resource lesson plan - Detroit - Detroit Historical Society
be the hub of a wheel. The Ambassador. Bridge and the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel provide transportation to and from Windsor

Teacher Resource Guide and Lesson Plan Activities - Walden Theatre
with the tall tale genre, but the story of Annie Christmas might be new to many. She is not a tall tale commonly told in

Teacher Lesson Plan - Internal Revenue Service
Materials. Online. Student Lesson—Taxes in a Market Economy. Activity 1: The Circular Flow of Economy. Activity 2: Tax

Teacher Lesson Plan - Internal Revenue Service
describe the impact of the two tax-related events on the history of the nation. Materials. Online. Student Lesson—Earl

Annual Report 2011 - 2012 - Detroit Historical Society
Chris Brown. Gary Brown. Gregory Cheesewright ...... Chris W. Murdie and Family. Ms. Lisbeth Murphy. Russ Murphy .... Ms

world war ii bibliography - Detroit Historical Society
American Home Front in World War II: Primary Sources. Detroit: ... 2. Honey, Maureen. Creating Rosie the Riveter: Class,

Historic Resource Survey - Canterbury Historical Society
Apr 1, 1992 - and Mark McDonough of Historic Resource Consultants, Inc. of. Hartford ...... known as the Henry P. Larkha

Lesson Plan Title - Wesselman Nature Society
have their own), Diary of a Spider and the topic books that the students will use to research .... Butterfly Life Cycle:

Teacher Resource - Cricket Australia
trophy to be presented to the winning team of the Women's Big Bash League. • Create an ... considerations, that impact

TEACHER RESOURCE LESSON PLAN DETROIT DURING WWII: WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE LEARNING OBJECTIVES Students will: • Gain perspective about industrial working women during WWII • Recognize difficulties male workers faced working with women for the first time • Formulate a position on work place discrimination during WWII • Evaluate and analyze a primary source

ERA Women working at the Willow Run plant, c. 1943. Courtesy of the Library of Congress

CREATED BY Michelle Anderson, John Glenn High School, Westland

INTRODUCTION World War II offered many American women the opportunity of a lifetime. Good paying jobs were suddenly available to females in industries who had previously denied them entry. Instead of being frowned upon, working outside of the home was seen as patriotic. But with opportunity also came discrimination. Bring your 9th - 12th grade students to the movie screen to judge for themselves if the United States government was looking out for the best interest of women or was guilty of perpetuating the second class status of females.

USHG Era 7- The Great Depression and World War II (1920-1945)

MI GLCES HSCE 7.2.3 Impact of WWII on American Life – Analyze the changes in American life brought about by U.S. participation in World War II including • mobilization of economic, military, and social resources • role of the home front in supporting the war effort (e.g., rationing, work hours, taxes)

ELA COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS ANCHOR LITERACY STANDARDS • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information. • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

LESSON PLAN: WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.11-12.2 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes.

4. Have students fill out Primary Source Analysis Tool while they watch the video.

TIME REQUIRED

5. Allow the students to discuss with a partner their answers from the Primary Source Analysis Tool.

One class period, depending on the discussion and if the extension activity is completed.

6. As a class, ask students to share their reaction to the movie.

MATERIALS USED

7. Discuss with the class why female workers were treated this way. What roles in society encouraged this kind of treatment?

• Computer/Smartboard/projector to display a video linked to the internet • Follow link to the “Problems in Supervision: Supervising Women Workers” video http://www.signalalpha.com/ SupervisingWomenWorkers_1944_320x240.wmv

created by the U.S. Government under the U.S. Office of Education as a training film for new male supervisors in war production plants.

8. Discuss with students their answers to the Further Investigation section. Allow students to expand on other student’s ideas. Activity Two

• Primary Source Analysis Sheet or Student Comparison Organizer

1. Ask students, “What challenges do you think women faced working in war production plants during WWII?”

LESSON PREPARATION

2. Pass out the Comparison Organizer and allow students to brainstorm this question with a partner. Have them record their ideas on the Comparison Organizer.

• Prior to the lesson, the teacher should decide which activity they will use to analyze the training video. • The teacher should also become familiar with the need for industrial workers during WWII. • The following link to the National Park Service study of Rosie the Riveter offers a nice overview to help teachers understand the issues women faced while working during World War II. http:// www.nps.gov/pwro/collection/website/rosie.htm

LESSON SEQUENCE Activity One 1. Ask students, “What challenges do you think women faced working in war production plants during WWII?” Discuss with students their answers.

3. Introduce the “Problem in Supervision: Supervising Women Workers” video. Make sure the students understand that the video was created by the U.S. Government under the U.S. Office of Education as a training film for new male supervisors in war production plants. 4. Have students fill out the What You Saw column of the Comparison Organizer while they watch the video. 5. Allow the students to discuss with their partner how their answers were the same or different from what they predicted women would be treated like during World War II.

2. Pass out the Primary Source Analysis Tool from the Library of Congress.

6. As a class, ask students to share their reaction to the movie. Allow students to volunteer the answers they predicted during the brainstorming session.

3. Introduce the “Problem in Supervision: Supervising Women Workers” video. Make sure the students understand that the video was

7. Discuss with the class why female workers were treated this way. What roles in society encouraged this kind of treatment?

LESSON PLAN: WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE 8. Discuss with students and allow them to record on their Comparison Organizer how the workplace has changed or stayed the same today. Reflect with students about their answers.

EXTENSION ACTIVITY Allow students to watch the video again. This time, have students document every attribute female workers brought to the workplace. Have students create a skit of a new training video from the WWII era which highlights the attributes female workers brought to the workplace.

Accounts of World War II. 1996. Nelson, Donald M. Arsenal of Democracy: The Story of American War Production. New York: Harcourt, 1946. Peterson, Sarah Jo. Planning the Home Front: Building Bombers and a Communities at Willow Run. University of Chicago Press, First Edition: 2013. Rosie the Riveter, http://www.history.com/topics/ rosie-the-riveter Staff of the Detroit News. War in Headlines from The Detroit News 1939-1945. 1946.

EVALUATION

Weatherford, Doris. American Women in World War II. 2009.

• Primary Source Analysis Tool or the Comparison Organizer

Wise, Nancy Baker and Christy Wise. A Mouthful of Rivets: Women at Work in World War II. 1994.

• Feedback shared by students to the class during the activity.

Wrynn, V. Dennis. Detroit Goes To War. Osceola, WI: Motorbooks International Publishing, 1993.

• Extension Activity skit

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Babson, Steve. Working Detroit. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1986. Bauer, Lt. Col. Eddy. History of World War II. New York: Galahad Press, 1966. Brown, Arthur Joseph. The Arsenal of Democracy. Oxford University Press, 1941. Davis, Michael W.R. Detroit’s Wartime Industry: Arsenal of Democracy. Chicago: Arcadia Publishing, 2007. Gervasi, Tom. Arsenal of Democracy: American Weapons Available for Export. New York: Grove Press, 1978. Herman, Arthur. Freedom’s Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II. 2012. Honey, Maureen. Creating Rosie the Riveter: Class, Gender and Propaganda during World War II. 1984. Kallen, Stuart A. The War at Home. San Diego: Lucent Books, 2000. Litoff, Julie Barrett and David C. Smith. American Women in a World at War: Contemporary

Yellin, Emily. Our Mother’s War: American Women at Home and at the Front During World War II. Free Press, 2004.

For more information about the Detroit Historical Society, or to schedule a field trip to the Detroit Historical Museum or Dossin Great Lakes Museum, visit

detroithistorical.org

LOC.gov/teachers

F UR TH ER INVESTIGA TIO N

OBSERVE

REFLECT

Primary Source Analysis Tool

QUESTION

QU

BSERVE

T

O

C

ION ST

E

REFL E













YOUR PREDICTION

WHAT YOU SAW

• Unchanged

• Changed

TODAY’S WORKPLACE

Directions: Before watching the video, “Problems in Supervision: Supervising Women Workers”, write down three predictions of how you believe new male supervisors will be trained to deal with female workers during World War II. As you watch the training video, write down at least five forms of biased treatment toward female workers. After watching the video, reflect with your classmates and provide examples of how female workers are treated today.

Name: _________________________________________________ Date: _____________________ Hour: _______________________

COMPARISON ORGANIZER