The American Revolution - Playhouse Square

The American Revolution - Playhouse Square

Teacher Resource Guide: The American Revolution Before the Show About the Show Theater techniques used in Theater Unspeakable Meet the Director Co...

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Teacher Resource Guide:

The American Revolution Before the Show About the Show Theater techniques used in Theater Unspeakable Meet the Director Coming the Theater

Pre-Show Activities Connect with the Cast Timeline of the American Revolution Key Terms and Events Learning About Research and Writing Using the American Revolution

Post-Show Activities We Hold These Truths Spies Like Us Critical Thinking Questions

Resources The lessons and activities in this guide are driven by the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects (2010) which help ensure that all students are college and career ready in literacy no later than the end of high school. The College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards in Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language define general, cross-disciplinary literacy expectations that must be met for students to be prepared to enter college and workforce training programs ready to succeed.

21st century skills of creativity, critical thinking and collaboration are embedded in process of bringing the page to the stage. Seeing live theatre encourages students to read, develop critical and creative thinking and to be curious about the world around them. This Teacher Resource Guide includes background information, questions, and activities that can stand alone or work as building blocks toward the creation of a complete unit of classroom work.

The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this organization with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, educational excellence and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. Playhouse Square is supported in part by the residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

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ABOUT THE SHOW Theater is a magical medium where any story of any size can be told in any space, provided that the actors are up to the task of course. Want proof? Take the groundbreaking company Theater UnSpeakable for example. This is one group of performers who knows how to work a space. In The American Revolution, Theater Unspeakable brings seven actors to a tiny 21 square foot platform to tell the entire story of the fight for America’s independence: in just 50 minutes. From battles at Lexington to Yorktown, the actors cover it all using only their bodies, minds and voices. This show provides audiences with a delicate mix of tongue-in-cheek humor, physical theatre and authentic American history. 

Techniques used in Theater Unspeakable: D  evised theater (also called collaborative creation, particularly in the United States) is a form

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of theater where the script originates not from a writer or writers, but from collaborative, usually improvisatory, work by a group of people (usually, but not necessarily, the performers). The actors work with the director to develop the show, improvising dialogue and creating choreography. There is a mantra regarding Devised theater that “Two heads are better than one.” In Theater Unspeakable’s case, it’s eight heads are better than one! The American Revolution took over a year to create, and the piece continues to evolve with every performance. Physical theater means to tell the story primarily through physical and visual means. Theater Unspeakable likes to tell big stories in small spaces. To do this they use their bodies in many non-traditional ways: as set pieces, as props, and even as sound effects. They ask our audience – that’s you – to use your imaginations to bring our epic stories to life.

MEET THE DIRECTOR An interview with Marc Frost and ASC intern Cristabel Donker Why did Theater Unspeakable choose to make this play? The American Revolution is definitely a big story – with all its important political and historical moments not to mention eight years of battles – but it’s also a story that we don’t hear very much today. Maybe this is because Civil War-era films are popular right now (e.g. Free State of Jones, starring Matthew McConaughy), or maybe it’s because our nation’s founding story seems too academic, too stale, too far removed from the way we live today. That’s where movement-based narrative, or what may also be called Physical Theater, can help us make a story fresh and alive for a contemporary audience. It is important to tell both sides of any story, but when you are trying to condense a big story into a small space (and time!) you have to paint the action with a thicker brush while also maintaining some of the finer details. In this case, I think most US audience members can sympathize with the American side and that is where we have tried to show the most complexity. That George Washington was not born a hero, that John Adams had major ego problems and that the Founding Fathers and Mothers were real people trying to deal with real situations long before they became mythologized into marble portraits. How do you pick a project? Since we spend so much time on each project, I make sure to pick a story that really speaks to me. While it happened many, many years ago in a time when people lived very differently than we do today, the events of this era changed our lives forever. The Revolution gave birth to our country and when George Washington defeated King George’s army, the world was truly spun on its axis. We have been spinning in that direction of freedom and equality ever since.

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How did you approach the obvious presence of slavery in this time period without making it central to the story? We did not want to shy away from the fact that slavery was an everyday fact of life during the American Revolution. Washington, Jefferson, and many other famous revolutionaries spoke about “unshackling themselves from the chains of England’s tyranny” while at the same time keeping thousands of slaves in their own households. What message or feeling are you hoping audiences walk away with? Billy Lee, who was a personal servant of George Washington (and the only one of Washington’s slaves freed in his will) once said of him: “When I think about George, I think of our country. Not a perfect one, but a good one.” This is the same message I would like people to take with them when they leave the theater. The country’s founding had an imperfect beginning, built upon the sacrifice, slaughter, and subjugation of many individuals and peoples, but I want them to leave feeling proud of their country’s founding, because it truly was the dawning of a new era for personal freedom. Even in its most beatified heroes, we see the flaws, the human shortcomings, which to me, make the achievements all the more inspiring. We also hope they laugh. For all those of you sitting in the audience who have big stories you would like to tell, I would like to encourage you to start bringing them to life – today. Don’t wait until you have a big theater; you can create a show anywhere (just look at our little stage!). Who knows, maybe one day I’ll be coming to the theater to sit and watch your big story come to life!

Coming to the Theater Playhouse Square is an exciting field trip destination! As the country’s largest performing arts center outside of New York, the not-for-profit Playhouse Square attracts more than one million guests to 1,000+ performances and events each year. Playhouse Square thus acts as a catalyst for economic growth and vitality within the region. When you visit, be sure to note the GE Chandelier, the world’s largest outdoor chandelier, and the retro Playhouse Square sign with its 9-foot-tall letters! As audience members, you and your students play a vital role in the success of the performances. You are part of a community that creates the theater experience. For many students, this may be their first time viewing a live theater production. We encourage teachers to discuss some of the differences between coming to the theater and watching a television show, attending a sporting event or viewing a movie at the cinema. Here are a few points to start the discussion: Students are led into the theater and seated by an usher.  heaters are built to magnify sound. Even the slightest T whisper can be heard throughout the theater. Remember that not only can those around you hear you; the performers can too.  ppropriate responses such as laughing or applauding A are appreciated. Pay attention to the artists on stage; they will let you know what is appropriate. There is no food, drink or gum permitted in the theater.  hotography and videotaping of performances is not P permitted.  hen the houselights dim, the performance is about to W begin. Please turn your attention toward the stage.  fter the performance, you will be dismissed by bus A number. Check around your seat to make sure you have all of your personal belongings.

An exciting destination for field trips and more!

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Pre-Show Activities

CONNECT WITH THE CAST W  hat is a piece of advice you would give to your elementary/middle school self? W  ho/what inspires you? (A friend, a celebrity, a piece of art, etc.) I f you could split a sandwich with any famous person – real or fictional – from the past, who would it be? Trey Hobbs Advice: If I had any advice to give my middle school self it would be to not try to hide a part of you. Enjoy not fitting in a little more. Inspiration: I’ve always been inspired by campfires. The conversations around them are always better. Something about the fire ignites a really amazing part of the imagination. Sandwich: It would be my Granddad. I never knew him very well and would like to catch up. Kathleen Hoil Advice: It’s okay to be a weirdo! Inspiration: Nature, music, strangers

on the street, folklore. Sandwich: J.R.R. Tolkien!

Brittany Anderson Advice: I would tell my middle school

self to pursue any interest I had without caring if my peers thought it was “nerdy.” At 24 years old, I can honestly say that the “nerdy” ones are the most passionate. Inspiration: I always feel inspired when I watch music videos by the band Ok Go. They’re super fun and colorful and quirky and most of all – simple. Watching them reminds me that you don’t need a lot of money to create something really cool. Sandwich: If i could split a sandwich with anyone it would be a dainty cucumber sandwich with Elizabeth Bennett in Pride and Prejudice. It would be fun to know if Mr. Darcy actually has any not-so-dreamy habits like picking his nose.

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Jeffery Freelon Advice: Don’t be afraid to fail just as

long as you plan to learn from those failures swiftly and effectively. Inspiration: Simply the fun of theater. I can be anybody I want to be, I can be Spider Man without all the life threatening responsibilities! Sandwich:It would be Huey P. Newton, just to know how he would handle all these unfortunately grave instances of young unarmed black men being unjustly murdered. Quenna Barrett Advice: Hey middle school self,

make sure your parents put you in guitar lessons now! It’s much harder to start in college. Inspiration: My grandmothers! Sandwich: Ernest Hemmingway Aaron Rustebakke Advice: Don’t worry about getting it

right the first time. People who have mastered any talent, skill, or sport never started that way. They just didn’t care if they messed it up a lot, and eventually they figured it out. Inspiration: Steve Prefontaine. He makes me want to be a better person. Sandwich: Terry Crews. Because he is just cool. Vanessa Valliere Advice: I tried really hard to get my

older sister to like me more. (She loved me all along, I just didn’t know it yet.) I would just say, “Vanessa, don’t worry, your sister loves you so, so much. One day the two of you will be impossibly close.” Inspiration: My friends Lindsey and Katy inpsire me. They are beautiful people who do amazing things and they love me without judgment. Sandwich: I would love to have lunch with Theo Decker from Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch. I am a big reader and I don’t think I’ve ever loved a character more than I love him.

CONNECT WITH THE CAST OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. W.4-12.1 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. W.4-12.3 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriates to task, purpose, and audience. W.4-12.4 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. W.4-12.6 Adventure Stage creates work for young people, and we deeply value their insights and reactions. We look forward to the student letters, artwork, photos, and video we receive each year. We welcome and encourage your students to dialogue and engage with us by writing letters or sharing artwork, photos, or videos with the cast of the show! We’d like to share several ways for you and your students to get involved. Students are always welcome to reach out individually via social media outlets. Students can also hand-write or type letters to the cast and send them back to us. We will respond to all student correspondence that arrives before the show closes!
We may post letters, artwork, videos, and photos to our Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook pages. Instagram: @adventurestagechicago Twitter: @adventure_stage Facebook: www.facebook.com/adventurestage

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Students can also hand-write or type letters to the cast and send them back to us: Email: [email protected] Mail: Dani Bryant c/o Adventure State Chicago 1012 N. Noble Chicago, IL 60642 We will respond to all student correspondence that arrives before the show closes!
We may post letters, artwork, videos, and photos to our Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook pages.

« TIPS FOR STUDENTS! Make sure your first name and school is on your

artwork, video or letter! Ask the cast at least one question: they love to talk about the show! Share your experience of watching the show. You and your friends can pick different actors so that every cast member gets letters, artwork or media. Send your letters, artwork or media as soon as you can so we have time to respond!

TIMELINE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION EVOLUTION College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization and analysis of content. W.K-5.2 Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations. SL.K-5.5

1767 – When the Stamp Act fails, the King enacts the Townshend Acts, further taxing the colonists. Like the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts meets many protests and boycotts.

1760

1753 – Washington delivers message from the British Royal Army to the French troops in Fort Le Boeuf, Pennsylvania, telling the French to remove themselves at once.

Action: Have students create a timeline of the major events that occurred during the American Revolution. (Seven Year War, Stamp Act, Townshend Act, Declaration of Independence, etc.) and draw or find pictures to represent each event. Materials: Paper, crayons/markers/colored pencils. Alternate for older students: Create on Power Point.

1773 – British Parliament further taxes the Colonists with the enactment of the Tea Act. In protest, the Boston Tea Party destroys a shipment of tea from the East India Trading Company.

1754-63 – An attack led by George Washington leads to the French and Indian War, or the Seven Years War. This war ends in British victory and land acquisition in America, but the British government also finds itself in massive debt.

1750

Objective: To sequence the major events of the American Revolution.

1765 – King George III enacts the Stamp Act, taxing the colonists in order to pay off the debt from the Seven Years War. The Act is met with much resistance by the Colonists, and is eventually repealed in 1766.

1770

“We’re not fighting for South Carolina or Virginia or Massachusetts now. We’re fighting for America!” 1775 – The Continental Army is established and George Washington is named its Commander in Chief

1770 – The Boston Massacre raises tensions amidst the Red Coats and the Colonists when a protest against the British soldiers ends in 5 deaths and 6 injuries.

“Until an independence is declared, the continent will feel itself like a man who continues putting off some unpleasant business yet knows it must be done. “ 1776 – Thomas Paine publishes Common Sense, arguing that the Colonies needed to break away from Great Britain.

1775 – The first major battles between the Continental and British armies begin at the Battles of Lexington and Concord. The first British soldiers fall in battle in what is famously called “the shot heard round the world.”

1774 – Paul Revere embarks on his famous Midnight Ride, warning the colonists in Lexington that the British troops are approaching and to move their weaponry and other goods elsewhere.

1777-78 – After many losses on the battlefield, George Washington takes his troops to find shelter and train at Valley Forge for a brutal winter. With the help of General von Steuben of Prussia, the Continental Army receives proper training that changes the tide of the war once winter turns to spring.

1780

1783 – The War of Independence ends with the signing of the Treaty of Paris.

1790

1781 – British General Cornwallis surrenders at the Battle of Yorktown, ending the last major battle of the American Revolution.

1776 – The Continental Congress signs the Declaration of Independence, officially breaking away from Great Britain.

1789 – George Washington is elected the first American President, the only president to be elected unanimously…twice! “When I think of George, I think of our country. Not a perfect one, but a good one.”

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KEY TERMS AND EVENTS Continental Army – George Washington’s troops. Daughters of Liberty – This organization supported the boycott of British goods. They urged Americans to wear homemade fabrics and produce other goods that were previously available only from Britain. They believed that way, the American colonies would become economically independent. Democracy – This is a government where the people get to vote for their leaders, representatives, and laws. East India Trading Company - A British stock company indirectly controlled by the government. The company traded goods from all over the world, though predominantly in the Indian Ocean. First Continental Congress – A meeting of delegates from 12 out of the 13 colonies on September 5, 1774. The delegates convened in response to the Intolerable Acts, which the British Parliament had imposed on the Colonies in response to the Boston Tea Party. The Second Continental Congress was held May 10, 1775. House of Burgesses – The colonial Virginia legislative assembly. House of Commons – The lower house of the British Parliament. It is the Parliament that approved the Stamp and Townshend Acts, and it was also the Parliament that repealed those acts. Loyalist – American colonists who remained loyal to Britain and opposed the war for independence. Minutemen – Early responders to times of crisis in the American Revolution. They made up about a quarter of the Continental Army and were typically the best trained of the troops. Monarchy – A government where there is only one King or Queen to rule the country. Natural Rights – Rights that are given to humans by God, such as life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. Plan of Union – A plan to keep the Colonies part of the British Empire. It was overturned at the First Continental Congress.

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Proclamation of 1763 – A proclamation from the British government which forbade British colonists from settling west of the Appalacian Mountains, and which required any settlers already living west of the mountains to move back east. The Regulars – Members of the British Army. Also referred to as the Redcoats. Suffolk Resolves – A declaration endorsed at the First Continental Congress that called for boycotts of British goods until the Intolerable Acts were re-pealed. Sugar Act - British Tax on foreign molasses entering the American Colonies. 6 Nations Confederacy – Six tribes of Indians in upstate New York who were aligned with the British during the War of Independence. Also referred to as the Iroquois Confederacy. Sons of Liberty – A radical political organization for colonial independence which formed in 1765 after the passage of the Stamp Act. They incited riots and burned the customs houses where the stamped British paper was kept. After the repeal of the Stamp Act, many of the local chapters formed the Committees of Correspondence which continued to promote opposition to British policies towards the colonies. The Sons leaders included Samuel Adams and Paul Revere. Stamp Act – an act passed by the British parliament in 1756 that raised revenue from the American colonies by a duty in the form of a stamp required on all newspapers and legal or commercial documents. Virginia Resolves – Patrick Henry- formal statements of the House of Burgesses protesting the stamp act in 1765.

LEARNING ABOUT RESEARCH AND WRITING USING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. W.4-12.7 College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. W.4-12.8 College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. SL.4-12.4 Grades: 4 and up Estimated Time: Seven 60-minute sessions Lesson Author: Renee L. Glover Beaufort, South Carolina

If You Lived at the Time of the American Revolution

by Kay Moore (Scholastic, 1998)  Chart paper or transparencies  Computer with Internet access  LCD projector  Overhead projector

STUDENT OBJECTIVES Students will:  Gain knowledge about the American Revolution by researching a specific figure from that time period  Learn research skills by observing the teacher model how to find information from a variety of sources  Apply the research skills they have learned by accessing historical information from a variety of sources, scanning those sources for the type of information they need, and verifying the information they find using multiple sources  Practice analysis by interpreting a historical figure’s importance to the American Revolution and writing a poem about him or her that demonstrates this importance  Develop presentation skills by reading their acrostic poem to the class

Publisher:

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Materials and Technology

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Session One 1. W  rite the words American Revolution on the board and give students two minutes to list any associations they have with these words on a piece of paper. Solicit one response from each student and include it in a web around the key words American Revolution. When everyone has offered a response, allow students to respond with any further associations.

tell them that they will expand their knowledge of the American Revolution. Explain that each student will have a historical figure from the American Revolution to research and then write a poem about, with the aim of sharing the information he or she discovers with the class. Their research will be guided by this question: Who was this person and how did he or she impact the American Revolution? Assign a historical figure to each student (see Preparation, Step 5).

2. N  ext, put students in small groups and give them five minutes to ask questions about the things listed in the web. These inquiries are directed toward other students in their groups, not you. Students may ask about definitions, clarifications, or elaborations on any of the items.

2. D  istribute the Using the American Revolution to Teach Research and Writing Rubric to students and review it, explaining that it is what you will use to assess the research project.

3. B  ring students back together and give them a few minutes to write about information they learned in their groups.

3. D  istribute the American Revolution Research Project Organizer to students, and explain that they will use this sheet to record information about their historical figures.

4. F  inally, read all or part of the book If You Lived at the Time of the American Revolution by Kay Moore aloud to students, taking care to point out the sections that deal with the loyalists and the patriots (See Preparation, Step 1).

4. S how students the blank American Revolution Research Project Organizer on chart paper or a transparency. Tell them that you will show them how they can use the organizer to take notes for their poems.

5. A  fter reading, have students write about what they now know about the American Revolution. Questions for them to answer in this writing include:  What were the differences between the loyalists and the patriots?  Who were some famous loyalists and patriots?  What did the two sides believe in?  How were the lives of the loyalists and patriots different after the war?

5. S  how the Biography of George Washington website: www.whitehouse.gov/1600/presidents/george washington on the SMART Board or by distributing copies to students. Ask them to follow along as you read it aloud, pausing to ask yourself every few sentences whether a piece of information is important or not. Record key information on the transparency or chart paper, modeling how to abbreviate it and talking about why it relates to the guiding question. You can use the phrases listed on the American Revolution Research Project Sample Organizer, have students volunteer ideas, or do both.

6. D  iscuss the new knowledge students have gained after they have finished writing.

Session Two 1. D  iscuss the research project with students. Draw their attention to the web you created in Session 1 and

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6. W  hen you have finished sharing the website, repeat this process, modeling note-taking using a different resource, such as a book (see Preparation, Step 5).

Sessions Three and Four Note: If you do not have access to classroom computers, these sessions should take place in the computer lab. 1. R  eview the resources you have selected for students to use. Students should then research their historical figures and fill out their American Revolution Research Project Organizers. 2. G  ive students the rest of this session and one additional one-hour session to complete their research. You may choose to have students work in pairs or small groups. While students are working, circulate among them, helping them identify key pieces of information and answering questions as necessary. Homework (due at the beginning of Session 5): Students who do not complete their organizers by the end of Session 4 should do so for homework.

Session Five 1. E xplain to students what an acrostic poem is. An acrostic poem uses the letters in a topic word to begin each line. Tell them that they are going to write an acrostic poem using the last name of the person they have researched. In these acrostic poems, each line should relate back to the guiding question: Who was this person and how did he or she impact the American Revolution? 2. U sing the organizer you created together on a transparency or chart paper during Session 2, write an acrostic poem about George Washington. Questions to ask include:  there a synonym for this word or idea that would Is work in our poem?  Can I rearrange a phrase or abbreviate it so that it will work in the poem?  Does the information about Washington refer back to the central question?

If you choose, you may use the American Revolution Research Project Sample Poem as an example for students, or you may prefer to have students help you write a poem using the notes from Session 2. If you are unable to find something immediately for a specified letter, let students know that it is okay to skip it and come back; you may need to do more research. 3.  Students should use their American Revolution

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Research Project Organizers to write an acrostic poem. (As with the research, you may choose to have students do this in pairs or groups.) Circulate while they are working to help them find synonyms and identify when they might need to do additional research. Homework (due at the beginning of Session 6): Students who do not complete their acrostic poems by the end of Session 5 should do so for homework.

Session Six 1. D  istribute the Peer Editing Checklist to students and review each of the sections with them. 2. H  ave students work in pairs to comment on each other’s poems. If students have written their poems collaboratively, have pairs or groups of students fill out the checklist for other pairs or groups. 3. S  tudents should use the peer comments to revise their poems Homework (due at the beginning of Session 7): Students should finish revising their poems, write out a clean copy, and practice reading them aloud.

EXTENSIONS

 Publish students’ poems in a class book or website titled The Who’s Who of the American Revolution.  Have students research and write acrostic poems about important battles, places, or events in the Revolutionary War.

STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

 Compare what students are able to share about the American Revolution during the discussion in Session 1 with what they share during Session 7.

Session Seven

 Informally assess students’ research skills as you observe them during Sessions 3 and 4.

1. A  sk students to present their poems by reading them during a poetry cafe in the classroom. After each student reads, give the rest of the class a chance to respond to the poem and ask questions.

 Informally assess students’ abilities to work collaboratively and to offer feedback on each other’s work during Session 6.

2. A  fter everyone has shared their poems, talk about the process of researching and writing them. Questions for discussion include:  What did they learn about the American Revolution by researching their historical figure? What did they learn by hearing the other poems?

3. H  ave students try to answer the guiding question about each famous person: Who was this person and how did he or she impact the American Revolution? If a student has done a thorough job of researching their historical figure, the other students should be able to answer this question in a sentence or two. 4. A  t the end of this session, have students turn in their organizers, poems, and peer review forms.

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 Use the Using the American Revolution to Teach Research and Writing Rubric to assess students’ research, writing, peer editing, and presentation skills.

Student’s name:

Historical figure:

USING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION TO TEACH RESEARCH AND WRITING RUBRIC 4

3

2

1

Advanced

Proficient

Basic

Needs Improvement

Graphic organizer

Organizer completely and correctly documents sources. Information pertains directly to the guiding question.

Organizer cites documents correctly. Most of the information pertains to the guiding question.

Some of the organizer documents are cited correctly. Some of the information pertains to the guiding question.

Organizer documents are not cited or are missing information. Very little information gathered about the historical figure.

Acrostic poem

Poem helps to answer the guiding question and provides additional information about the figure.

Poem answers the guiding question and provides basic information about the figure.

Poem answers part of the guiding question and provides little information about the figure.

Poem does not adequately answer the guiding question. Important facts are missing.

Student’s name:

Historical figure:

Presentation USING

Student clearly Student read the Student stumbled Student had difficulty AMERICAN EVOLUTION TO TEACH ANDthe Wpoem RITING THEarticulated the R poem poem with little RESEARCH through reading the poem, with plenty of eye difficulty and made little eye and made little or no RUBRIC and some contact and eye contact. contact. eye contact. demonstrated 4 3 2 1 knowledge Advanced of the Proficient Basic Needs Improvement figure. Organizer completely and Organizer cites documents Some of the organizer Organizer documents are

Graphic organizer

Class discussion/ Participation Acrostic poem

correctly documents sources. Information Student fully pertains directly to the guiding participated question. in

correctly. Most of the documents are cited not cited or are missing information pertains to the correctly. Some of the information. Very little Student participated Student participated Student guiding question. information pertains to the information gathered about participated guiding question. the historical figure. all in class discussions, insome class in few of the class

class discussions, asking questions discussions, discussions and Poem helps to answer the Poem answers the guiding Poemand answers part of the Poem does not adequately guiding providing question and relevantquestion and provides basic guiding question and answer the guidingdid question. providing answers. asked few questions, not ask many provides additional information about the provides little information Important facts are missing. information and and provided little questions or give information about the figure. about the figure. information. many answers. figure. pertinent questions.

Presentation

Student clearly articulated Student read the poem with Student stumbled through the poem with plenty of eye little difficulty and some the poem and made little contact and demonstrated eye contact. eye contact. knowledge of the figure.

Student had difficulty reading the poem, and made little or no eye contact.

Class discussion/ Participation

Student fully participated in Student participated in all class discussions, class discussions, asking providing relevant questions and providing information and pertinent answers. questions.

Student participated in few of the class discussions and did not ask many questions or give many answers.

Comments:

Comments:

Copyright 2005 IRA/NCTE. All rights reserved. ReadWriteThink materials may be reproduced for educational purposes.

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Student participated in some class discussions, asked few questions, and provided little information.

Student’s name:

Historical figure:

AMERICAN REVOLUTION RESEARCH PROJECT ORGANIZER Find two to three sources of information about your historical figure. Write your sources below and list any information that will help you answer the guiding question:

Who was this person and how did he or she impact the American Revolution?

Source 1

Source 2

Source 3

Name of book or website (URL):

Name of book or website (URL):

Name of book or website (URL):

Student’s Author: name:

Author:

Author:

Name of historical figure:

AMERICAN REVOLUTION RESEARCH PROJECT ORGANIZER Copyright date:

Copyright date:

Copyright date:

Find two to three sources of information about your historical figure. Write your sources below and list any information that will help you answer the guiding question:

Interesting informationWho to was help you answer the guiding question: Source 1

to the American Interesting this person Interesting and how did information he or she impact Revolution? help you answer the guiding question: Source 2

Name of book or website (URL):

Name of book or website (URL):

Name of book or website (URL):

Author:

Author:

Author:

Copyright date:

Copyright date:

Copyright date:

Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

Copyright 2005 IRA/NCTE. All rights reserved. ReadWriteThink materials may be reproduced for educational purposes.

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information to help you answer the guiding question: Source 3

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Student’s name:

Historical figure:

George Washington

AMERICAN REVOLUTION RESEARCH PROJECT SAMPLE ORGANIZER Find two to three sources of information about your historical figure. Write your sources below and list any information that will help you answer the guiding question:

Who was this person and how did he or she impact the American Revolution?

Source 1

Source 2

Source 3

Name of book or website (URL):

Name of book or website (URL):

Name of book or website (URL):

Author:

Author:

Biography of George Washington http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/gw1.html Student’s Author: name:

The White House

Name of historical figure:

AMERICAN REVOLUTION RESEARCH PROJECT ORGANIZER

Copyright date:

Copyright date:

Copyright date:

Find two to three sources of information about your historical figure. Write your sources below and list any information that will help you answer the guiding question:

Interesting informationWho to was help you answer the guiding question: Source 1

to the American Interesting this person Interesting and how did information he or she impact Revolution?

Born in Virginia

help you answer the guiding question: Source 2

information to help you answer the guiding question: Source 3

Name of book or website (URL):

Name of book or website (URL):

Author:

Author:

Copyright Army date: Continental

Copyright date:

Copyright date:

Forced the British to surrender at Yorktown Interesting information to help you

Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

Name of book or website (URL):

Interested in the military

Moderate, but didn’t like the British Author:

Was Commander-in-Chief of the

answer the guiding question:

Copyright 2005 IRA/NCTE. All rights reserved. ReadWriteThink materials may be reproduced for educational purposes.

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AMERICAN REVOLUTION RESEARCH PROJECT A R R P SAMPLE POEM S P MERICAN

EVOLUTION AMPLE

ESEARCH

ROJECT

OEM

George Washington

Student’s name:

Wealthy Virginian who became the A rmy commander-in-chief. He S aw the best way to win and Held out against the British, Inspiring his soldiers to fight. N ever one to give up he was a G entleman and a leader who Triumphed at Yorktown. O ur first president, he became a N ational icon – the first! Name of historical figure:

AMERICAN REVOLUTION RESEARCH PROJECT ORGANIZER

Find two to three sources of information about your historical figure. Write your sources below and list any information that will help you answer the guiding question:

Who was this person and how did he or she impact the American Revolution? Source 1

Source 2

Source 3

Name of book or website (URL):

Name of book or website (URL):

Name of book or website (URL):

Author:

Author:

Author:

Copyright date:

Copyright date:

Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

Copyright date:

Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

IRA/NCTE. All rights reserved. Copyright 2005 IRA/NCTE.Copyright All rights 2005 reserved. ReadWriteThink materials may be reproducedmaterials for educational ReadWriteThink may bepurposes. reproduced for educational purposes. Image ©2005 JUPITERIMAGES, and its licensors. All rights reserved.

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Name of author: Name of peer reviewer:

PEER EDITING CHECKLIST Use this checklist as a guide to help edit and revise your partner’s Revolutionary War Figure Acrostic Poem. Follow the directions in the Checklist column and write your feedback in the Comments/Suggestions column.

Checklist

Comments/Suggestions

Read through the poem and offer praise first. Was there a phrase or a line that you really liked? Tell your partner something wonderful about his or her work. Student’s name:

Name of historical figure:

Did your partner follow the guiding AMERICAN REVOLUTION RESEARCH PROJECT ORGANIZER question: Who was this person and how did he or she impact the American Find two to three sources of information about your historical figure. Write your sources below and list any information that will help you Revolution? answer the guiding question: Make sure all of the information relates Who Cross was this to that central question. off person any and how did he or she impact the American Revolution? information that you think does not relate. Source 1 Name of book or website (URL):

Source 2 Name of book or website (URL):

Check spelling. Circle any works that you think your Author: partner Author: needs to look up in a dictionary. Give suggestions for spelling if you can Copyright Copyright date: help. Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

date:

Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

Copyright 2005 IRA/NCTE. All rights reserved. ReadWriteThink materials may be reproduced for educational purposes.

playhousesquare.org/eduresources

Name of book or website (URL):

Author:

Check punctuation. Did your partner use commas, periods, and capital letters where necessary?

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Source 3

Copyright date: Interesting information to help you answer the guiding question:

Post-Show Activities

WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. W.4-12.2 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriates to task, purpose, and audience. W.4-12.4 Objective: Students will consider basic human rights and employ writing skills as they write their own Declaration of Independence. Materials: Blank paper, pens/markers, poster board for additional activity. Procedure: 1. G  ive each student a piece of paper and a marker or pen.


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2. A  sk each student to write at the top: “I hold these truths to be self-evident.”
 3. Define self-evident for students.  Self-evident: clearly true and requiring no proof or explanation 4. T  he students, like Thomas Jefferson, will write their own Declaration of Independence. Have students consider what rights they think every person should have; what rights are necessary for groups of people to live together peacefully.
 5. Continuing Conversations:  Should different communities have different rights? Families, classrooms, schools, cities, countries? Why or why not?  Make a classroom declaration. At the top of the poster write: “We Hold These Truths to be Self-Evident.”  Have each student write one of their rights on the poster and then sign their name.

SPIES LIKE US College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriates to task, purpose, and audience. W.4-12.4 Objective: Students will place themselves in the shoes of Revolutionary soldiers and spies as they write a letter home encoded with invisible ink. Materials: Paper, pens/pencils, baking soda, water, small cups, cotton swabs, grape juice concentrate Procedure: 
 1. In this activity students are spies for Continental Army. Each student will write a secret message “home” (though it is actually going to the Continental Congress). On the top layer of the letter students are to write their very own top secret message with invisible ink.


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2. G  ive each student a piece of paper, a pen/pencil, a cotton swab, and a cup of equal parts baking soda and water mixed together.
 3. U  sing the baking soda/water mixture and cotton swab, students can write a letter revealing top secret information about the war. 4. O nce the paper has dried completely, students will write their “letters home.”
The letter must be believable, or the British will know it is encoded if they get their hands on it. Suggested questions to consider: Why are you fighting? Is it scary? What do you miss about home? When do you think the war will be over? 5. H  ave each student give their letter to a classmate to decode. To decode the letter, paint grape juice on the paper with a cotton swab.

Critical Thinking Questions Students develop their comprehension when they reflect upon what they wondered about, noticed and felt. Ignite a classroom discussion with the following critical response questions: 1. W  hat does freedom mean to you? 2. W  hat does it mean to be free? 3. Is everyone in America free? 4. W  hat are freedoms we can still fight for today? 5. W  hen do you follow the rules and when do you break them? 6. W  hat events led to the Revolutionary War?

7. W  hy did some people support independence while others favored remaining loyal to Great Britain? 8. W  hat event triggered the start of the American Revolution? How? 9. W  hen was the turning point of the war? What event caused the turning point? 10. How did the Revolutionary War end?

Critical Thinking

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RESOURCES Movies 1776 – Rated PG
In this adaptation of the famous Broadway musical, John Adams, Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson work on the Declaration of Independence as the newly formed Continental Congress tries to come to agreement on how to proceed in the heat of battle. (1972) Felicity: An American Girl Adventure. Upon turning 10, Felicity Merriman learns about loyalty, patriotism and family in 1775 Williamsburg. When her new best friend, Elizabeth, supports the British troops, Felicity must hold fast to her own conviction as war brews in the new colonies. (2005) The Crossing. In the darkest hour of the American Revolution, George Washington risks everything in his famous crossing of the Delaware River. This TV film offers a humanized portrayal of Washington and his tactics that led the colonies to victory. (2000). No Rating.

Books The American Revolution for Kids: A History with 21 Activities by Janis Herbert. Heroes, traitors, and great thinkers come to life in this activity book, and the concepts of freedom and democracy are celebrated in true accounts of the distinguished officers, wise delegates, rugged riflemen, and hardworking farm wives and children who created the new nation. This collection tells the story of the Revolution, from the hated Stamp Act and the Boston Tea Party to the British surrender at Yorktown and the creation of the United States Constitution. All American students are required to study the Revolution and the Constitution, and these 21 activities make it fun and memorable. Kids create a fringed hunting shirt and a tricorn hat and reenact the Battle of Cowpens. They will learn how to make their voices heard in “I Protest” and how Congress works in “There Ought to Be a Law.” A final selection including the Declaration of Independence, a glossary, biographies, and pertinent Web sites makes this book a valuable resource for both students and teachers. Chicago Review Press – 2002. The Fifth of March: A Story of the Boston Massacre by Ann Rinaldi. Ages: 12-14 years.
Rinaldi’s novel gives a historical portrayal of the Boston Massacre told through the eyes of an indentured child of John and Abigail Adams. HMH Books for Young Readers, 2004.

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Founding Mothers, by Cokie Roberts. Ages: 7-12 years.
Learn about the important women of the Revolution and their roles in America’s road to independence. Harper Perennial; 2005. George vs. George: The American Revolution As Seen from Both Sides by Rosalyn Schanzer. Ages: 8-12 years. There are two sides to every story. The narrative introduces anew the two enemies, both named George: George Washington, the man who freed the American colonies from the British, and George III, the British king who lost them. Two leaders on different sides of the Atlantic, yet with more in common than we sometimes acknowledge. We are lead through their story, and the story of their times, and see both sides of the arguments that divided the colonies from the Kingdom. Was King George a “Royal Brute” as American patriots claimed? Or was he, as others believed, “the father of the people?” Was George Washington a scurrilous traitor, as all the king’s supporters claimed? Or should we remember and celebrate him as “the father of his country?” Who was right? History teaches us that there are two sides to every story. National Geographic Children’s Books; 2007. Johnny Tremain, by Esther Forbe. Ages: 9-12 years.
When Tremain is injured, he must leave his post as an apprentice, and his travels have him cross paths with Washington, Revere and many other key players of the Revolution. HMH Books for Young Readers; 2011. My Brother Sam Is Dead, by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier. Ages: 12+
This novel follows Tim Meeker and his family in the months leading up to the war. When Tim’s brother Sam declares his intent to fight against the British, the Meekers are torn apart by their religious and ideological beliefs. Phoebe the Spy by Judith Griffin  (Author) and Margot Tomes (Illustrator). Ages: 8-12 Years. Someone is planning to kill George Washington, and young Phoebe Fraunces is trying to save his life. Phoebe gets a job as George Washington’s housekeeper, but her real job is to work as a spy. She listens and watches very carefully, and she meets her father every day to tell him what she has learned. One day Phoebe’s father tells her that Washington is planning to leave town in a few days, and the person plotting against him will act before then. Phoebe is very frightened, but she is determined to figure out who is after Washington before it’s too late.  Puffin Books; Reissue edition, 2002.

RESOURCES Internet

Apps

American Revolution Webquest https://sites.google.com/a/tctchome.com/americanrevolution-web-quest/home

Featured by Apple as a Best App in Education, March 2014 Kids will learn all about the strain between the colonies and Britain, investigate the famous Boston Tea Party, and discover the main battles and key leaders of the American Revolution in this interactive reading app. Reading Level: Upper Elementary and Middle School. APPLE/$2.99

The American Revolution Webquest http://questgarden.com/63/99/1/080415075239/tindex.htm Ducksters-Background information on the Revolutionary War http://www.ducksters.com/history/american_revolution/ daily_life_during_the_revolutionary_war.php Revolutionary War Webquest http://revolutionarywarwebquestcampbell.weebly.com/ research.html Hamilton Documentary – PBS http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/hamiltons-americadocumentary/5048 The Road to Revolution Game http://www.pbs.org/ktca/liberty/road.html

Other The Pritzker Military Museum and Library – http://www. pritzkermilitary.org/ Liberty! – A PBS series on the American Revolution – http://www.pbs.org/ktca/liberty Liberty’s Kids (PBS) – http://www.libertyskids.com/ School House Rock videos on the American Revolution:  The Shot Heard Round World” https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=rZMmPWTwTHc  “No More Kings” https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=PBBTF0Wg7dY  Fireworks: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=ZTY0V8GaeFI Roles of Women in the Revolutionary War:  www.allthingsliberty.com/2013/10/10-amazingwomen-revolutionary-war

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The American Revolution comes to life with a fully interactive textbook and study guide designed exclusively for the iPad by a high school senior with a passion for U.S. History. Journey through the formation of our country with interactive flashcards, explorable war maps, audio narrations, review quizzes, and interactive biographies. iPad/FREE.