The CHS English Department - Cheltenham School District

The CHS English Department - Cheltenham School District

The CHS English Department 2017 Summer Reading Program English 9 and English 9H In ninth grade English, students should select one novel to read from...

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The CHS English Department 2017 Summer Reading Program

English 9 and English 9H In ninth grade English, students should select one novel to read from the choices listed below. Ruta Sepety’s Between the Shades of Gray Edwidge Danticat’s Untwine Len Vlahos’s The Scar Boys Matthew Quick’s Boy 21

Seeking a reading challenge? Ben Yancey’s 5th Wave

In English 10, students must select one of the memoirs listed below to read. For English 10H, students must choose from one of the choices listed below to read.

English 10

English 10H

Art Spiegelman’s Maus: A Survivor's Tale or Mariatu Kamara and Susan McClelland’s The Bite of the Mango

Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus or Stephen King’s 11/22/63 or Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere

In English 11, students should select one text to read from the listed choices below. For English 11H, students must choose two books. In English 11H, all students will read The Grass Dancer, plus a secondary mandatory text from the books listed below.

English 11 Lorene Cary’s Black Ice Alice Hoffman’s The River King Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian Jon Krakauer’s Into the Wild LeAlan Jones’s Our America: Life and Death on the South Side of Chicago Christopher McDougall’s Born to Run

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The CHS English Department 2017 Summer Reading Program

English 11 AP Language and Composition English 11 AP students must compose an essay based on their summer readings. See AP Teacher for prompts.

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In English 12, students should select one text to read from the choices listed below. For English 12H, students will choose one of the fiction options to read.

English 12

English 12H

Wes Moore’s The Other Wes Moore Ja Quavis Coleman’s The Day the Streets Stood Still Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones

Anthony Doerr’s All the Light We Cannot See David Guterson’s Snow Falling on Cedars

English 12 AP Literature and Composition Mandatory Reading Euripides’s Bacchae NOTE: 12 AP Lit & Comp students must complete a reading journal for Euripides’s Bacchae in place of the assignment outlined on the back of this announcement. Find journal guidelines at https://cheltenham.instructure.com/courses/2022/pages/reading-journal-guidelines.

All assignments should be submitted to turnitin.com by Friday, September 8th.

The CHS English Department 2017 Summer Reading Program

ESL Summer Reading Offerings Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Dope Sick: 720L

Between Shades of Gray: 490L

Neverwhere: 760L

Part-time Indian: 600L

5th Wave: 690L

11/22/63: 810L

Our America: 750L

L: A Lexile measure serves to evaluate the difficulty of a text or a student’s reading ability level. To All Students Enrolled in CHS English and ESL Courses: Your teacher will evaluate you through a test, essay, project, or journal to be collected during the first week of school (Friday, September 8th). See reverse for further information. Please note the following: Þ Students may either check with local libraries for copies of summer reading selections or purchase paperback copies on-line or from local bookstores. Þ In September students will work with the required books in their English classes. Þ Summer reading responses will be part of the students’ first marking period grades. Þ This information also appears on the CHS English department web site. Þ The analytical writing rubric is available at http://www.cheltenham.org/CheltenhamHigh.cfm?subpage=35317. Thank you, and enjoy your summer. The Cheltenham High School English Department

The CHS English Department 2017 Summer Reading Program

Summer Reading: Purpose for Reading Guidelines Please be prepared to discuss the following elements listed below. Your teacher will evaluate you through a test, essay, project, or journal to be collected during the first week of school (Friday, September 8, 2017). To better prepare yourself for an evaluation, take notes directly in your book (if you own it) or use post-it notes. Use the following ideas to help you as you read:

1.

Character • • •

2.

Plot • •

3.

Language • • • • •

5.

7.

8.

Identify themes and be able to follow how each develops throughout the text. Observe use of literary terms. Be able to comment on their function in the text. Take note of any striking images. Be able to comment on their purpose. Take note of the tone of the text. How does it support the content? What specific words contribute to the tone? What impact does the tone have on the mood? Take note of the text’s sentence structure and be able to explain its relationship to tone or content. Note strange or unusual word choices.

Symbols •

6.

How has the plot advanced in each chapter and how have these advancements affected the characters? How have the character’s internal motivations advanced the plot?

Theme •

4.

Be able to identify each new character. Describe how and why each character has changed throughout the text. Be able to trace each character’s change throughout the entire text. Analyze what motivates a character’s action or inaction.

Identify symbols and be able to follow how each develops throughout the text.

Author’s Purpose • Determine the author’s intent. Remember, an author may focus on asking a question rather than giving an answer. Be able to support your claims with textual examples. Setting • Explain why the author chooses the setting he or she does. • Explain how the setting develops the plot, theme, or characterization. Genre • •

Identify the genre and literary mode (utopian/dystopian literature, magical realism, historical fiction, etc.) of your text. Find textual support to prove the literature’s specific literary mode.