The ScholASTic ArT & WriTing AWArdS 2012 - Artandwriting.org

The ScholASTic ArT & WriTing AWArdS 2012 - Artandwriting.org

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers & The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers www.artandwriting.org The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Alli...

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The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

&

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers www.artandwriting.org

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Alliance for Young Artists Writers

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers presents the nation’s most creative teens

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

2012 National Catalog

National Catalog 2012

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

In 1923, Maurice R. Robinson introduced the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards “. . . to insure to a wide group of future citizens, regardless of vocation, a sense of the power of independent thought and an appreciation of the beauty and wonder of existence.”

Notable Alums

Tom Otterness Frances Farmer

Red Grooms

1941, Photographer

Bernard Malamud 1932, Author

Robert McCloskey 1932, Author, Illustrator

1951, Experimental Filmmaker

1934, 1935, Printmaker, Painter

Joe DiPietro

1955, Fantasy Novelist

Cy Twombly

Edward Sorel

1948, Artist

Joyce Carol Oates

Erik Madigan Heck 2001, Photographer

Thane Rosenbaum

1956, Author

1976, Professor, Novelist, Activist

Truman Capote

Donald Lipskipresented

Luis Jiménez

1936, Author

1937, 1938, Author

1996, Author

1963, Actor

1947, Illustrator, Political Cartoonist

Maureen Daly McGivern

1965, Sculptor

1957, 1958, Sculptor

John Currin 1979, Painter

1948, Conceptual Artist

1923 John Sloan 1928, Painter

Mel Bochner

Carolyn Forché

1958, Conceptual Artist

www.artandwriting.org

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers Billy Collins

1994, 2001, 2010, 2011, Artist

2007, Former Poet Laureate of the US

John Leland [email protected] David Sedaris

Byron Kim 2009, Artist

Alice Aycock

Alliance for Young Artists Edwidge Danticat Writers

&

2012, Writer

Phong Bui

Paula Poundstone Malachy McCourt

1999, Gallery Owner

Tony Hawk

2012, Cartoonist

2004, 2009, 2011, Poet

Matthew Marks

1938, Novelist

Roz Chast

Alice Quinn

2001, Sculptor

E.B. White

2011, Pro Skateboarder, Video Game Franchiser

2010, Artist, Writer, Curator

2010, Writer, Comedian

Mary Ellen Mark

2007, Actor, Writer, Politician

2012, Photographer

Langston Hughes

Chuck Palahniuk

1947, Poet

Faith Ringgold 2007, 2011, Artist

Gary Soto

1998, 2011, Novelist, Poet

Notable Jurors

2013

2012, Humorist, Author

1928, Painter

1959, Novelist

2005, Sculptor

2010, 2012, Journalist

1998, Artist

Eudora Welty

1989, Novelist

1968, Illustrator, Designer

To learn more and apply online, visit us at

Kiki Smith

Robert Henri

1966–1971, Author

Gary Panter

1967, Poet

1948, Artist

Rodney Alan Greenblat

Abdi Farrah

by the Alliance forAudrey YoungNiffenegger Artists & Writers 1981, Author, Illustrator

Joyce Maynard Registration for 2013 Awards opens on September 17, 2012 Myla Goldberg

John Baldessari

Kay WalkingStick

2004, Fantasy Writer

Ned Vizzini

ca. 1973, Tony Award Winning Playwright

John Lithgow

1947, Novelist

Jacob Landau

Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Peter S. Beagle

Sylvia Plath

Jaida Jones

1974, Designer

1954, Actor, Activist, Producer, Director

1946, Pop Artist

1934, 1936, Sculptor, Designer

Michael Bierut

Robert Redford

Robert Indiana

Harry Bertoia

1998, Fashion Designer

1970, Painter

1941, 1942, Realist Painter

1945, Pop Artist

Zac Posen

David Salle

Stan Brakhage

Philip Pearlstein

Andy Warhol

1971, Documentary Film Director, Producer

1952, Multimedia Artist

1931, Actress

&

Ken Burns

1970, Sculptor

Richard Avedon

Alliance for Young Artists Writers

Fred Tomaselli 2001, Painter

2008, Novelist

Brian Jungen 2012, Artist

Rachel Goslins

Andy Rooney

2012, Documentary Director, Producer

2004, Essayist

Don Gummer 2008, Sculptor

Dread Scott 2008, Artist

John Hockenberry 2011, Journalist

= Alum and Juror

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Tom Otterness

&

Ken Burns

1970, Sculptor

Red Grooms

Alliance for Young Artists Writers

1971, Documentary Film Director, Producer

1952, Multimedia Artist

Zac Posen

David Salle

1998, Fashion Designer

1970, Painter

Michael Bierut

Robert Redford

Jaida Jones

1974, Designer

1954, Actor, Activist, Producer, Director

2004, Fantasy Writer

Joe DiPietro

Ned Vizzini

ca. 1973, Tony Award-Winning Playwright

John Lithgow

1996, Author

Erik Madigan Heck

1963, Actor

2001, Photographer

Thane Rosenbaum 1976, Professor, Novelist, Activist

1965, Sculptor

1979, Painter

1967, Poet

2005, Sculptor

1981, Author, Illustrator

John Currin

Carolyn Forché

Abdi Farrah

Audrey Niffenegger

Donald Lipski

Joyce Maynard 1966–1971, Author

Myla Goldberg

Gary Panter

1989, Novelist

1968, Illustrator, Designer

Byron Kim

John Leland

2009, Artist

2013 Edwidge Danticat

David Sedaris

2010, 2012, Journalist

2012, Writer

2012, Humorist, Author

Roz Chast

Tony Hawk

2012, Cartoonist

Phong Bui

Paula Poundstone

2011, Pro Skateboarder, Video Game Franchiser

2010, Artist, Writer, Curator

2010, Writer, Comedian

Mary Ellen Mark 2012, Photographer

Chuck Palahniuk 2008, Novelist

Brian Jungen 2012, Artist

Rachel Goslins

2012, Documentary Director, Producer

Don Gummer 2008, Sculptor

Dread Scott

2008, Artist

John Hockenberry 2011, Journalist

= Alum and Juror

Table of Contents 4 About the Alliance 6 2012 National Jurors 9 2012 Teacher Awards 11 Gold Portfolio Awards 35 Creative Concept Awards 36 Best in Grade 44 New York Life Award 46 Creativity & Citizenship 48 AMD Game Changer

National Staff

Board of Directors

Virginia McEnerney Executive Director

Dwight E. Lee, Chairman Gagnon Securities

Programs Department Katherine Hendrix, Director National Programs and Partnerships

Dr. William Walker Robinson, Vice Chairman Fogg Art Museum

Rebecca Rutherfurd, Senior Manager National Programs Mariana Sheppard, Manager Affiliate Services

49 National Awards

John Sigmund, Manager National Programs

116 National Winners List

Keren Davis, Project Coordinator

121 Scholarship Partners 122 Regional Affliliates 126 Donors 128 Special Thanks

Lisa Feder-Feitel, Editorial and Program Assistant External Relations Department Jonathan Ettinger, Director Development and External Relations Katie Babick, Manager External Relations Monica Johnson, Manager Art and Exhibitions Dominic Matar, Web Producer Danniel Swatosh, Manager Design and Production Carol Tan, Associate Manager External Relations

On May 31, 2012, as a special recognition of this year’s gold and silver medalists, the Empire State Building, an emblem of our nation’s achievement, was lit in gold in honor of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Congratulations to all of our National winners. No part of this book may be stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying, microfilming, recording, or otherwise, without written permission from the publisher. Copyright © 2012 Alliance for Young Artists & Writers. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America.

Many writing selections have been excerpted, go to www.artandwriting.org/galleries to read all the work as it was submitted.

Michael Vinereanu, Assistant Design and Production Jessica Schein, Bookkeeper 2012 Catalog Graphic Design / Production Meg Callery Photography (Artwork) Kristine Larsen Copy Editing Adrienne Onofri Production Coordination Courtney Buckland

Gregory R. Miller, Treasurer Greenhill & Co. Howard J. Rothman, Secretary Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Charles C. Bergman Pollock-Krasner Foundation Thomas K. Carley The New York Times Co. Dr. Ernest B. Fleishman Scholastic Inc Hugh J. Freund Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP Craig Hatkoff Tribeca Film Festival James D. Kaplan KB Financial Partners Dr. David C. Levy Cambridge Information Group Andrew I. Merson Command Web Offset Co. Steven Merson Command Web Offset Co. Jennifer Mooney Northlich Anne Morrill The Maurice R. Robinson Fund Laurie L. Nash Russell Reynolds Associates Jeffery Nesin School of Visual Arts Suzanne Randolph Suzanne Randolph Fine Arts Dr. Hugh Roome Scholastic Inc Thane Rosenbaum Fordham University of Law Scott D. Schulman Dow Jones & Co. Gaynor Strachan-Chun Ovation Aaron Stratten Fairfax County Public Schools Kit White Artist

The Scholastic

Art & Writing Awards

90 Years of Excellence

Dwight E. Lee and Virginia McEnerney

As the Scholastic Awards reach the end of the 2012 season, we begin our 90th year. This milestone carries on its wings the experiences of the millions of students who have participated in the Awards over the years, and the indelible mark they have made on our culture. The Alliance received more than 200,000 original works this year­— paintings and poems, sculptures and photographs, video games, drawings, essays, and more­— our largest number of submissions yet. Of those, 60,000 received regional honors, and more than 1,600 received our highest national honors. Many of these incredible works are featured here in our 2012 National Catalog, and in our national student exhibition.* At the heart of the Awards is our commitment to provide a showcase for creative teens—to publicly recognize their achievements, to share their visionary talents with national audiences through exhibitions and publications, and to offer educational opportunities through scholarships. Our commitment extends to students who’ve not yet found the Awards, and we are dedicated to ensuring that all creative students in grades 7 through 12 have the opportunity to participate. In the past five years alone, the Alliance received almost 700,000 works of student art and writing from nearly every state, and more than $25 million in scholarships was made available to top winners by our network of partnering colleges, art schools, and universities, many of which vie for our students. We hope you’re as struck as we are by the unparalleled talent in these pages, and we hope you’ll join us in thanking the dedicated students, teachers, parents, donors, and friends who have made the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards so impactful over the past nine decades. We look forward to celebrating our 90th anniversary with you during the coming year, and in not too long, our 100th. We can’t wait to see what innovative and exciting work our students create.

Virginia M c Enerney Dwight E. Lee Executive Director

Chairman of the Board

* The exhibition and public programs are co-sponsored by the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at Parsons The New School for Design.

About The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

ABOUT US

National Student Poets Program

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers identifies teen­

Founded by the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, the

agers with exceptional artistic and literary talent and

President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities,

brings their remarkable work to regional and national

and the Institute for Museum and Library Services, the

audiences through the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards.

National Student Poets Program (NSPP) is the country’s

The Awards, begun in 1923 by Scholastic founder

highest honor for youth poets presenting original work.

Maurice R. Robinson, are the largest and longest-running

Five outstanding high school poets whose work

recognition program of its kind, and invite students from

demonstrates exceptional creativity, dedication to craft,

across the country in grades 7 through 12 to submit their

and promise are selected annually for a year of service

best, most creative works for review. This year alone, we

as national poetry ambassadors.

received over 200,000 submissions covering the Awards’ 25 categories.

National Student Poets are chosen from the national medalists in the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards by a

We congratulate the 2012 winners at all levels, some

jury of literary luminaries and leaders in education and

of whom will undoubtedly deploy their vision and talent

the arts. Student Poets receive college scholarships

to follow in the footsteps of past winners such as Andy

and opportunities to present their work at writing and

Warhol, Richard Avedon, Truman Capote, Sylvia Plath,

poetry events, and are featured at the National Book

Zac Posen, John Baldessari, and Edward Sorel, who

Festival in Washington, DC, in cooperation with the

will accept this year’s Alumni Achievement Award. Each

Library of Congress.

of these renowned artists and writers won Scholastic Awards as teenagers, and for many participants the Awards are the first recognition they receive for their creativity.

Alliance Summer Arts Program The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers presents the Alliance Summer Arts Program (ASAP) Awards, spon­ sored by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, for students

The Alliance, a nonprofit organization, is funded through

in grades 7–11. Selected high-potential, low-income

the generosity of Scholastic Inc. and numerous individu­

students earn ASAP Awards and receive partial- to full-

als, foundations, corporations, and program partners, all

tuition scholarships to attend summer art and writing

of whom value the encouragement of our nation’s most

programs offered by colleges, camps, and nonprofit

creative and visionary young people. Their extraordinary

organizations. Gold Key award-winning teens partici­

support has expanded our reach and touched the lives of

pate in art and writing intensives to learn new artistic

innumerable students across our country.

and literary forms, improve their skills, and expand their portfolios.

RECOGNITION

PUBLICATIONS

Students tell the Alliance year after year that the most

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers annually features

important aspect of its programs is the recognition. To

National Award-winning works of both art and writing

be identified as uniquely talented by a national organiza-

in our National Catalog and in SPARK, which provides

tion, to be provided the opportunity to stand before peers

special encouragement and opportunity to students in

and be honored for being creative and original­— we

seventh and eighth grades. Additionally, we publish a

know this changes students’ lives and their ideas about

collection of the most exemplary written works in The

their futures and gives them a sense of confidence and

Best Teen Writing. All these publications are distributed

accomplishment. In 2011–12, more than 60,000 teens

free of charge to schools, students, teachers, museums,

were recognized in their communities for their artistic

libraries, and arts and community organizations.

and literary achievements, with Gold Key, Silver Key, and Honorable Mention awards. Of these top regional winners, 13,000 went on to compete at the national level. Over 1,600 students received national medals and were offered the opportunity to be celebrated on stage during our annual ceremony at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

SCHOLARSHIPS The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers gives out nearly a quarter of a million dollars in scholarships annually to National Award-winning students. Seniors also leverage their success for funds from a network of nearly 60 universities, colleges, and art schools, which collectively

EXHIBITIONS

earmark more than $5 million in financial aid and ad-

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers honors students

ditional scholarships for our top award recipients. The

by presenting their work to the public, giving audiences

Alliance Summer Arts Program (ASAP) provides scholar-

a chance to enjoy the remarkable creative output. More

ships to high-need Scholastic Award winners interested

than 400 works by national medalists are displayed in

in attending summer arts and writing camps and pre-

the ART.WRITE.NOW national exhibition at Parsons The

college programs.

New School for Design in New York City, held June 1­–16. Throughout the year, a selection of work is exhibited at the U.S. Department of Education and the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities in Washington. An additional exhibition opportunity is provided through

ART CATEGORIES: Architecture, Ceramics & Glass, Comic Art, Design, Digital Art, Drawing, Fashion, Film & Animation, Jewelry, Mixed Media, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture, Video Games

the ART.WRITE.NOW traveling exhibition, which will visit

WRITING CATEGORIES: Dramatic Script, Flash Fiction,

Detroit, Virginia Beach, and Kansas City, MO, in the

Humor, Journalism, Personal Essay / Memoir, Persuasive

coming year.

Writing, Poetry, Science Fiction / Fantasy, Short Story, Novel Writing.

2012 National Jurors arts selected over 1,600 National Award-winning works,

“What a fantastic, quirky, talented, disciplined group of artists!”

from a field of 13,000 regional Gold Key winners. Every

Rachel Goslins

More than 200 professionals in the visual and literary

work is blindly adjudicated, without any knowledge of the student’s name, background, or geographic location. This year’s jurors included best-selling writers David Sedaris and Edwidge Danticat, photographer Mary Ellen Mark, and cartoonist Roz Chast. Judging is John Leland is a reporter for The New York Times and since 2000 has worked on its style and national desks and in the Baghdad bureau. Formerly at Newsweek, Details, and Spin magazines, Leland also authored Hip: The History and Why Kerouac Matters.

guided by three core principles—originality, technical skill, and emergence of a personal vision or voice.

“The best essays flowed. Their movement was directed not by a rigid topic sentence but by the author’s ease and obvious delight with language.” Charles Eckert

David Sedaris

Filmmaker Rachel Goslins was appointed by President Obama as the executive director of the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities in 2009. Her films include the awardwinning documentary ‘Bama Girl; Besa: The Promise, about Albanian Muslims who saved Jews during WW II; and productions for PBS, National Geographic, Discovery, and History channel.

Donald Lipski’s sculptures are in major museum collections around the world, at New York City’s Grand Central Terminal, and in many other public sites. as three National Endowment for the Arts awards, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Rome Prize, and an award from the American

Anne Fishbein

He is the winner of such honors

Academy of Arts and Letters.

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www.artandwriting.org

Satirist David Sedaris has penned nearly a dozen bestsellers, of which seven million copies are in print, in 25 languages. His radio pieces can be heard on This American Life, he writes frequently for The New Yorker, and he’s earned three Grammy nominations for spoken-word and comedy albums.

Mary Ellen Mark, worldrenowned photographer, has earned dozens of awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, published 17 books, is a contributing photographer to The New Yorker, and collaborated on three films, Streetwise, American Heart, and Extraordinary Child (commissioned by the National Museum of Iceland), with her husband, Martin Bell.

“Truly original!” Mary Ellen Mark

Brian Jungen is a Canadian artist whose work draws on “found art” similar to that of Andy Warhol, and Marcel Duchamp. This summer his art will be featured at three different venues in Germany, the Documenta Festival and solo shows in Hannover and Bonn. He lives and works in Vancouver, British Columbia.

“The work was original, well-written, and well-thought-out. I was wowed by the craft, but it also moved me.” Edwidge Danticat

Leo Sorel

Nancy Crampton

Edward Sorel received his Scholastic Award for this lithograph in 1947. He is a celebrated illustrator who has created many covers for The New Yorker.

Edwidge Danticat, a native of Haiti, moved to the U.S. at 12. She has been nominated for National Book Awards and won an American Book Award and a National Book Critics Circle Award. She is editor of The Best American Essays 2011 and recently published Create Dangerously, a collection of her own essays.

Edward Sorel

2012 Alumni Achievement Honoree Edward Sorel’s cartoons and illustrations have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, Vanity Fair, GQ, The Nation, and The New Yorker, for which he has produced 45 covers. His work has been exhibited at the Library of Congress and the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC. He is recognized as one of America’s leading satirical artists.

“Prizes are especially meaningful to artists who have a sneaking suspicion that they’re not as good as they should be. Prizes offer the insecure artist the delightful possibility that he or she really isn’t as hopeless as was thought.” Edward Sorel Born in the Bronx in 1929, Mr. Sorel studied at the Cooper Union and later formed the award-winning Push Pin Studios with three Cooper Union classmates. He is the author and illustrator of numerous books, including the children’s book The Saturday Kid (2000). A collection of his caricatures, Unauthorized Portraits, was published in 1997, and Literary Lives, in which he used his distinctive style to illustrate the lives of iconic literary figures, was published in 2006. Mr. Sorel is the recipient of the George Polk Award as well as Der Karikaturpreis der Deutschen Anwaltschaft award for satire, presented by the German legal

Roz Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978. Since then, she has produced more than 1,000 cartoons and several covers to the magazine. She has a number of cartoon collections in print, the most recent of which is Theories of Everything.

profession. In 2011, the School of Visual Arts honored Mr. Sorel with a Masters Series award and a retrospective exhibition. As a teenage student at the High School of Music & Art (now LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts), Mr. Sorel won a Scholastic Art & Writing Award for a lithograph in 1947. Throughout our 2012 national events, the Alliance celebrates Edward Sorel’s art and career with our Alumni Achievement Award in recognition of his illustrious accomplishments—and for making us laugh and think through his art and illustrations over the years.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

7

2012 2 National Jurors 2012 National Jurors

Jurors give their time, expertise, and enthusiasm, helping to ensure the long-held values and excellence of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. We thank them for their extraordinary commitment. * Scholastic Awards alum Topaz Adizes Esther Allen Kamrooz Aram Joanne Arbuckle Kenseth Armstead Moira Bailey Tanya Baker Joan Bankemper Andrea Barnet Laura Baudo Ekiwah Adler Belendez Aimee Bender Michael Bierut * Elisabeth Biondi Rebecca Bondor Power Boothe Susan Bristol Krista Brooke Jesse Browner Phong Bui Asi Burak Teresia Bush Regie Cabico Jonathan Calm Elinor Carucci Robin Cembalest Veronique Chagnon-Burke Roz Chast Winston Chmielinski * Naomi Clark Wayne Coe * Eireann Corrigan Valerie Crosswhite * Sam Cullum Edwidge Danticat Shawn Delaney

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www.artandwriting.org

Philip-Lorca diCorcia Thom Duffy Andrew Eccles Courtney Eldridge Thomas Sayers Ellis Kathryn Erskine Clayton Evans Scott Alan Evans Tom Feigelson Cathy Fischer Enrique Flores-Galbis Marian Fontana Edith Freni Neil Gagliardi Anne Gaines Beth Ann Gerstein * Alfred Gingold Rachel Goslins Michelle Hagewood Althea Harper David Hernandez Elena Herzog Heidi Hinish Grace Hopkins-Lisle Carla Jablonski Brian Jungen Phyllis Kaufman Lauren Keane * Braden King Karen Kitchen Gersh Kuntzman Frank Lantz Joseph Legaspi John Leland David Leung Melissa Levin

Jacob Lewis Donald Lipski * Marc Littlejohn Sarah Darer Littman Lisa Lucas Christopher Luna Stephen Mallon Mary Ellen Mark Lissa McClure Sarah McNear Christopher Meyers Lee Mingwei Mark Mitchell Katie Morris * Gregory Mosher Carson Moss Tomas Mournian Manuel Muñoz Hans Nelman Mark Newgarden Alex Niki Lorie Novak Kevin Olivas Janice Oresman Carol Padberg Eung Ho Park Nazli Parvizi * DC Pierson Jeff Ramos Suzanne Randolph Trent Reedy Julie Reiss Stephanie Reyer Gerald Richards Margy Rochlin

Daniel Rios Rodriguez Davy Rothbart Rene Saldana Luc Sante Zach Savich Aurel Schmidt David Sedaris Suzanne Seggerman David Shenk Rudy Sheppard Stephen Sherrill Rachel Shim * Victor Sira Jon Skovron Jonathan Smith Patricia Smith Edward Sorel * Mara Sprafkin * Catharine Stimpson Alec Strum Radhika Subramaniam Caridad Svich Samantha Thornhill David Treuer Eugenie Tsai Lora Urbanelli Paul Vinet Ned Vizzini * Lauren Weinstein * Michael Welles Tara Welty Chuck Wentzel Julia Whicker Grant White Eric Zimmerman

2012 Teacher Awards 2012 Teacher Awards

Behind many of our young artists and writers are great teachers. Teachers are often the gateway to the Awards, inspiring creativity and exploration, guiding their students’ talents, and helping with the submission process. This year’s Teacher Awards shine the spotlight on some of the most accomplished educators in the country. To these winners, and to all those teachers whose students participate, thank you for helping to make the Awards more rewarding and more spectacular every year. PORTFOLIO TEACHER AWARD S cott Armetta Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts West Palm Beach, FL Lisa Baker Milton Academy Milton, MA Kimberly Basinger Westfield High School Chantilly, VA Dawn Bloink Homeschool Northbrook, IL John Bradford Jersey City Arts High School Jersey City, NJ Katie Brink Lake Oswego High School Lake Oswego, OR Maureen Burgess Hewitt School New York, NY Cathy Burnett Pius XI High School Milwaukee, WI



David Cavagnino Ursuline Academy Wilmington, DE

Sheri Ellis Conard High School West Hartford, CT

Kimberly Glasgow Seven Lakes High School Katy, TX

Marsha Christo Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts West Palm Beach, FL

Jacquelyn Fowler Center Grove High School Greenwood, IN

Scott Gould South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Greenville, SC

Yoon Chung Kennesaw Mountain High School Kennesaw, GA Rachel Cohen Marble Hill High School of International Studies Bronx, NY Elaine Conroy Onteora High School Boiceville, NY Anne Davey Hutchison School Memphis, TN Steven Deeb North Farmington High School Farmington Hills, MI Courtney Egan New Orleans Center for Creative Arts New Orleans, LA

Carolyn Frazier Jersey City Arts High School Program Jersey City, NJ Pat Frederick Pius XI High School Milwaukee, WI Robert Friedman Miami Palmetto Senior High School Miami, FL Randy Gachet Alabama School of Fine Arts Birmingham, AL Carlos Gallostra New World School of the Arts Miami, FL Jenny Gifford Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts West Palm Beach, FL

John Griffin Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts West Palm Beach, FL Sharon Hanson Boise High School Boise, ID Allison Heisel Taylor High School North Bend, OH Tammy Hewitson Livonia Career Technical Center Livonia, MI Darius Hill Alabama School of Fine Arts Birmingham, A oni Johnson L New World School of the Arts Miami, FL

Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

9

2012 Teacher Awards continued

Taehyun Kang WOW Art Studio New York, NY

Dorsey Sammataro Chattahoochee High School Alpharetta, GA

Joan Bickelhaupt Washington Lee High School Arlington, VA

Jarred Jackman Mountain View High School Vancouver, WA

Steven Karl Urban Academy Laboratory High School New York, NY

Claire Schomp Weston High School Weston, MA

Brian Blanchfield Walnut Hill School Natick, MA

Peter Metzler Horace Greeley High School Chappaqua, NY

George Singleton South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Greenville, SC

Linda Bricking Notre Dame Academy Park Hills, KY

Rene Miles Charleston County School of the Arts North Charleston, SC

Brigid Kennedy Conrad High School West Hartford, CT

Daniel Kitrosser LaGuardia High School of Kristin St. Martin Music & Art and Performing Arts Mallard Creek High School New York, NY Charlotte, NC Patricia Leeson Nicolet High School Glendale, WI

Judith Tanzman Marlborough School Los Angeles, CA

Jayne Matricardi-Burke Woodson High School Fairfax, VA

Cumbee Tyndal Alabama School of Fine Arts Birmingham, AL

Jennifer McClain Boise High School Boise, ID

Rebecca Wallace-Segall Writopia Lab New York, NY

Mamie Morgan South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Greenville, SC

Nicole Walter Marshall High School Falls Church, VA

Nanci Nigro Oceanside High School Oceanside, NY Anne-Marie Oomen Interlochen Arts Academy Interlochen, MI Julie Parker Fayetteville-Manlius High School Manlius, NY Mika Perrine Interlochen Arts Academy Interlochen, MI Lauren Powell Chattahoochee High School Alpharetta, GA Steve Reynolds New Orleans Center for Creative Arts New Orleans, LA Jeremy Rheault Livonia Career Technical Center Livonia, MI Fred Robertson Millard West High School Omaha, NE

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Karen Ward Homeschool Brandon, MS Paul Werner New Orleans Center for Creative Arts New Orleans, LA Tom Wyroba New World School of the Arts Miami, FL Denise Yagel Maggie L. Walker Governor’s School for Government and International Studies Richmond, VA BEST IN GRADE TEACHER AWARDS Mary Amador Concord Junior High School Elkhart, IN Scott Armetta Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts West Palm Beach, FL

Debra Cox Maize High School Maize, KS Kathy Crutcher Deal Middle School Washington, DC Karin Durup The Mirman School Los Angeles, CA Anthony Dyke Classen High School of Advanced Studies Oklahoma City, OK Kent Ewing Hong Kong International School Hong Kong Josh Friedman St. Margaret’s Episcopal School San Juan Capistrano, CA Jenny Gifford Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts West Palm Beach, FL Scott Gould South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Greenville, SC John Griffin Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts West Palm Beach, FL Francis Hammes Charleston County School of the Arts North Charleston, SC Jennifer Hockhalter Vancouver School of Arts and Academics Vancouver, WA Nancy Hoover Girls’ School of Austin Austin, TX

Erin Murtagh Freeman High School Richmond, VA Kate Nallar The Mirman School Los Angeles, CA Lara Naughton New Orleans Center for Creative Arts New Orleans, LA Lisa Nicolaou The Elisabeth Morrow School Englewood, NJ Kasumi Parker Hunter College High School New York, NY Matthew Rosen Little Red Schoolhouse / Elizabeth Irwin High School New York, NY Sean Scapellato Charleston County School of the Arts North Charleston, SC Jill Van Berkom Meadowdale High School Lynnwood, WA Laura Yorke The Pingry School Martinsville, NJ Andy Young New Orleans Center for Creative Arts New Orleans, LA Ovation Inspired Teacher Awards Rebecca Wallace-Segall Writopia Lab New York, NY Keith Sasada Leilehua High School Wahiawa, HI

Graduating seniors are invited to compete for top honors as Portfolio gold and silver medalists in the broad categories of art, photography, and writing. Fifteen students receive $10,000 scholarships, and thirty receive $1,000 scholarships. Students may submit up to eight pieces as part of their best or most cohesive body of work. Top portfolio students can leverage their success through the Awards to access additional scholarships at nearly 60 colleges, universities, and art institutes around the country. Our scholarship partners offered more than $5 million to National Award students this year. Visit www.artandwriting.org/scholarships for a list of scholarship partners,

Gold Portfolio

old

wards Portfolio

Gold Portfolio Awards



Awards Lashanda Anakwah Chelsea Borsack Haeyeon Cho

Sarah Devlin Felipe Di Poi Emma Goldberg

Leah Lierz Leo Purman Brianna Robinson Drew Shields Diane Ward Rosa Wolf Elise Wunderlich

Batrek Yassa Yan Zhang

Many writing selections have been excerpted, go to www.artandwriting.org/galleries to read all the work as it was submitted.

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Portfolio Gold Medal CHELSEA BORSACK, Oceanside, NY Grade 12, Age 17, Oceanside High School, Oceanside, NY. Nanci Nigro, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Command Web Offset Co. Art Portfolio Gold Medal. (This page, three diptychs) top: Connected, bottom left: Haven, bottom right: Unfazed; (Facing page, two diptychs) top: Bare, bottom: Alluring, Photography.

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Portfolio Gold Medal



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Portfolio Gold Medal DIANE WARD, Brandon, MS Grade 12, Age 17, Homeschool, Brandon, MS. Karen Ward, Teacher; The Eudora Welty Foundation, Affiliate; The Maurice R. Robinson Fund Writing Portfolio Gold Medal.

Zhaojun Short Story

?? (Zhaojun) 1 ???? (Her beauty causes birds to fall)

through her village. The stream had

The silence as the room looked toward

given her the moon-pale skin of some-

her was more oppressive than she had

one who had not known labor, and

expected, as if someone’s hands had

she had a naturally slender build with

been cupped over her ears smothering

thin arms and wrists. Though her left

the sound.

shoulder sloped slightly lower than her



“You bring nothing?” Yanshou asked.

right, it did little to diminish her beauty.



Zhaojun only inclined her head in a

She had powdered her face white and

small bow and Yanshou scowled, turn-

darkened her eyebrows. But not to the

ing his eyes back to the fresh paper.

extent that many in the company of



the emperor did whose faces were so

The room filled with sound again.

The ladies in the background mur-

pale that they may have been carved

mured, and the servants hurried about,

from bone.

cleaning and supplying fresh brushes



and water.

quickly over the page, and unease filled



her when he didn’t even glance at her to

Zhaojun folded her hands on her

lap, even though they would not be in

take in her features. When he finished

the portrait, and smoothed her tradi-

the portrait, he did not even take the

tional robes, red trimmed with white.

time to survey the piece to check its cor-

Her hair had been bound up with simple

rectness, nor did he acknowledge her as

and reasonably expensive jade pins,

she rose and bowed. Yanshou had been

though hardly extravagant.

insulted, and she did not need to see



the picture to know that what had been

It had been said that her beauty

sprang from the Xiangxi River that ran

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Yanshou moved the brush too

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painted was not her true face.

Portfolio Gold Medal EMMA GOLDBERG, New York, NY Grade 12, Age 17, Abraham Joshua Heschel High School, New York, NY. Rebecca Wallace-Segall, Teacher, Writopia Lab; Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate; Amazon.com Writing Portfolio Gold Medal.

Moral of the Story Personal Essay / Memoir

Cosmic Blips My dad lost his job when I was in ninth grade. It



was the middle of a recession and apparently about

of a lone space heater and the whir of the kitchen

30 million Americans had lost their jobs that year

dishwasher and the piercing tang of my brother’s

anyhow, but to my brother and I it seemed some-

silence.

how unfair, like some cosmic blip in the steady



pulse of the journalistic world, some mistake that

“He quit.”

needed to be bundled up in excuses and mistruths.





reative satisfaction—a bit disappointed, perhaps,

And it was a Wednesday afternoon in Novem-

And the house was silent except for the clank

“He wasn’t fired,” my brother muttered. And Sam nodded, accepting the answer with

ber, and my brother and his friend Sam were sitting

that the answer offered no stories of scandal and

in the kitchen of my dad’s new apartment, spraying

office drama.

the oak table surface with crumbs and particles of



peanut butter, jelly, and banana.

ing at a level tone. “Who do you think is the best



player in the league?” And they turned back to

And Sam asked the question, and I don’t think

“Coby?” he said thoughtfully, his voice remain-

he meant any harm, because these are the types of

their baseball cards and the only remnant of their

things sixth-grade boys ask without really thinking

conversation was a tightening squeeze in

about anything much beside the NBA, math class,

my stomach.

baseball cards, and peanut butter sandwiches.





he overheard, and later that evening when my

“Coby?” Sam turned to my brother, his words

My dad and I never spoke about it, but I know

interlaced with the squelching noise of banana

brother watched the game, my dad turned on the

tumbling over taste buds. “Why did your dad

Beatles and read the paper. And when his brother

get fired?”

called to ask how things were, he forced a smile and they talked about Obama, Palin, the economy, and anything but everything.



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Portfolio Gold Medal DREW SHIELDS, Milwaukee, WI Grade 12, Age 17, Pius XI High School, Milwaukee, WI. Pat Frederick and Cathy Burnett, Teachers; Milwaukee Art Museum, Affiliate; Scholastic Inc Art Portfolio Gold Medal. (This page, clockwise from top left) Blind Man and Monster, Camp Amongst the Ruins, The Museum; (Facing page) top: The Tunnel, bottom: Enlistment, Sculpture.

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Portfolio Gold Medal



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Portfolio Gold Medal LEO PURMAN, Milwaukee, WI Grade 12, Age 18, Nicolet High School, Glendale, WI. Patricia Leeson, Teacher; Milwaukee Art Museum, Affiliate; The Lucy Evankow Photography Portfolio Gold Medal, Sponsored by the Maurice R. Robinson Fund. (This page) Urban Landscape; (Facing page) top: Cut & Tagged, bottom: Contained, Photography.

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Portfolio Gold Medal



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Portfolio Gold Medal FELIPE DI POI, West Hartford, CT Grade 12, Age 18, Conrad High School, West Hartford, CT. Sheri Elis and Brigid Kennedy, Teachers; Connecticut Art Education Association, Affiliate; The Jacques & Natasha Gelman Trust Art Portfolio Gold Medal. (This page) Beeper Gonzales and the Mutant Ghoulies; (Facing page, from left) Bavaria!, Design, Acerbic Commeuppance, Design.

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Portfolio Gold Medal



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Portfolio Gold Medal BRIANNA ROBINSON, Charlotte, NC Grade 12, Age 17, Mallard Creek High School, Charlotte, NC. Kristin St. Martin, Teacher; Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Affiliate; Alliance for Young Artists & Writers Board of Directors Art Portfolio Gold Medal. (This page) Averse; (Facing page) Loss, Digital Art.

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Portfolio Gold Medal



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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Portfolio Gold Medal LEAH LIERZ, Greenville, SC Grade 12, Age 17, South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, Greenville, SC. George Singleton, Mamie Morgan, and Scott Gould, Teachers; Region at Large, Affiliate; Scholastic Awards Alumni Writing Portfolio Gold Medal.

Protection Personal Essay / Memoir

By some stroke of luck, the day I

the bad words. Oh, and help me pass

had to shadow my parents coincided

out these Tasers,” she said, handing

with Pepper Spray and Taser Day. To

me one of the heavy boxes at her feet.

complete training, every Federal Law

“Just make sure they know you’re

Enforcement Training Center student

there. They can’t see really well, so they

had to spray and be sprayed, Tase and

might smack you by accident if you

be Tased, at least once. In the early af-

aren’t loud enough.” I walked around

ternoon, my 110-pound, 5 foot-1-inch

handing the crying men their Tasers. I

mother took her students and me out

stomped my feet so they would hear me

to a giant field surrounded by trees on

coming and not punch me in the face.

all sides. I watched as, scattered across



the field, pairs of grown men pepper-

my mother never seemed to be afraid of

sprayed each other. Some sprayed with

setting me in front of about 50 panicky

hesitation and some without mercy.

adult men. Especially when she was

I heard the cries and curses of men

scared of almost everything else in the

crackling in my ears. It was a battle.

world that I could’ve possibly come

A few fell to their knees in the field.

into contact with. A few years ago,

Others kept going, the preconceived

though, she came to my school to tell

and unspoken agreement to attack one

the kids about her work. That’s when

another still intact. My mother told me

she said something that I had never

to pass out the water bottles for the

heard before. Something that made me

men, desperate to wash the pepper out

understand why she’s so protective.

of their eyes. “Don’t pay attention to

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It seems strange to me now that

Portfolio Gold Medal LASHANDA Anakwah, Bronx, NY The Conversation, Grade 12, Age 17, Girls Write Now, New York, NY. Rachel Cohen, Teacher; Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate; The New York Times Writing Portfolio Gold Medal.

The Conversation Personal Essay / Memoir

Girl, I’m really thinking about the lift, though. Ha-ha, seriously, don’t laugh. I’m serious! No, but seriously, I can’t keep walking around like this. It’s embarrassing. I mean, I’ve been thinking about it; I’m not being irrational. Everyone in my family has a butt. It’s just me; I must have a genetic disorder or something along those lines. I just know it.

I’ve done my research­—it’s nothing too unnatural like I was worried about.

Basically the surgeon sucks fat out of somewhere in the body and injects it back into the buttocks. It’s my own fat, placed where it’s supposed to be.

I mean, I’m African, it’s my birthright. And if I was born without my butt like

some people are born without fingers, it’s my duty to fix it. You don’t understand. I feel like shit when I try on jeans and they just don’t fit the way I want them to. I have the worst butt envy. I can never befriend a girl with a perfect bottom. I just can’t. And it’s like I never feel pretty because of it. I could wear the best outfit and do my hair real nice. I could feel like a million-bucks, but if I catch just the tiniest glimpse of my butt, my whole day is ruined. Oh, I can’t tell you how many good days have been ruined because of my inferior backside. . .

I don’t know. I’m kind of disappointed that it’s come to this. You know all

that self-love crap they preach on TV? I was hoping to eventually love my body for what it is. I wish I could be the “oh, well, whattayagonna do” type of girl. I wish I could take my butt problem casually: “I’ve got a flat butt, oh, well, whattayagonna do. I just gotta live it with.” Wouldn’t that be great? Instead of cringing every time I catch my reflection in a store window. I just feel so inadequate at those moments. You know what I mean?



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Portfolio Gold Medal ELISE WUNDERLICH, Lake Oswego, OR Grade 12, Age 18, Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego, OR. Katie Brink, Teacher; Oregon Art Education Association, Affiliate; Ovation Art Portfolio Gold Medal. (This page) top left: Cracked, Sculpture, others: Puzzle Piece Face (Human Nest), Sculpture; (Facing page) top: Reach, Film & Animation, bottom: Womb Ceremony, Film & Animation

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Portfolio Gold Medal



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Portfolio Gold Medal SARAH DEVLIN, New Orleans, LA Grade 12, Age 17, New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, New Orleans, LA. Courtney Egan, Paul Werner, and Steve Reynolds, Teachers; Region at Large, Affiliate; Blick Art Supplies Art Portfolio Gold Medal. (From top to bottom) Long Now, Untitled, Traverse, Writer’s Block, FIlm & Animation.

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Portfolio Gold Medal



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Portfolio Gold Medal BATREK YASSA, Jersey City, NJ Grade 12, Age 17, Jersey City Arts High School Program, Jersey City, NJ. Carolyn Frazier and John Bradford, Teachers; Montclair Art Museum, Affiliate; The Maurice R. Robinson Fund Art Portfolio Gold Medal. (This page) Sewing Directions; (Facing page, clockwise from left) The Unwavering Daughter, The Unwavering Son, The Reawakening, Mixed Media.

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Portfolio Gold Medal



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Portfolio Gold Medal ROSA WOLF, Boise, ID Grade 12, Age 17, Boise High School, Boise, ID. Sharon Hanson, Teacher; Boise State Writing Project, Affiliate; Scholastic Inc Writing Portfolio Gold Medal.

Girl Flash Fiction

After the bodega down the street



got robbed last spring, Mr. Alvaro is

and some man holds a gun to my

really nervous. When he’s working,

head, I know what I will do. I will

he keeps some of the money from

pause with my hands cupped up-

the cash register in his left sock.

ward like petals and smile at him



instead of reaching for the money.

Little girls with big tits some-

times try to buy cigarettes and

I will say something about life to

boxed wine from me. They say

show I’m not afraid, maybe some-

they’re 21 or 19 or whatever but

thing Milan Kundera has written.

left their ID at home. “I can’t sell it



to you,” I say. I pretend to be real

appears to possess a special area

sorry, like I give a s--t, like I don’t

which we might call poetic mem-

recognize them from school. They

ory, and which records everything

don’t know me because I like to read

that charms or touches us, that

poetry and write stories in my note-

makes our life beautiful.”

book. These girls purse their lips



Maybe I will laugh.

and shake their chests at me when



I don’t know if the man will

they get mad.

then kill me or just push me out



of the way. But whatever happens,

Mr. Alvaro has two boys;

Maybe I will say, “The brain

he keeps their pictures taped to

I imagine there will be someone

the glass in front of the rows of

kneeling in the bread aisle with

cigarettes. Sometimes I talk to the

their hands in the air, and they

pictures when no one’s in the store

will say, “Look at that girl. What

and I’ve finished all my books. I tell

a smart girl.”

them I’m lonely and tired and my feet hurt; they always stare at me with the same blurry, silent smiles.

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If the bodega ever gets robbed

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Portfolio Gold Medal Haeyeon Cho, Milton, MA Grade 12, Age 18, Milton Academy, Milton, MA. Lisa Baker, Teacher; New England Art Education Conference, Inc. and Boston Globe, Affiliate; The New York Times Writing Portfolio Gold Medal.

Delivery Failure Short Story

She stuck both arms into the box. A moment later her hands

The Soup Kitchen

found at the bottom an edge of a plastic bag. “I think I’ve

Poetry

With her thumb and forefinger, she held an airtight,

Winter drinks her alive. Cheeks peeling, lips crusted with wind and dead flesh, a chicken-eyed crane nesting in her craw.

got it,” she said. She called out his name and he burst open the door.

The light from the bedroom showed them what it was.

packaged baby.

“Thank God, there it is!” he shouted.



The thing had the color and the size of a peach. It had a

little nose.

“So they didn’t lie.”



The plastic wrinkled tight around the baby like wet bed-

She is ashamed to eat alone.

sheets. He took it from her fingers and ripped open the top.

Hollow bones, wire hangers

Immediately, the bag sucked up the air and the baby expanded

pushed into crooked wings

to twice its size. It turned pinker.

droop as the warmth of the fish



“Oh, my God.” She collapsed. “What the hell is that?”

seeps through, feeding the bird



“It’s my baby.” He took out the baby by its wrist and

that grows wilder, softer.

cradled it in the fold of his elbow. “Isn’t it perfect?”





“Is it real?”



“Maybe. Unless it has a button somewhere.”



Its face softened.



“Holy shit.” Numb, she felt the black floors for the couch.

“Why?”

“You didn’t want one, you couldn’t have one.” He

shrugged. “I mean, I think I deserve this. That day when we found out that we could never have a family, you didn’t say a word. And in case you didn’t know, this is what a family looks like: a husband, a wife, a child. Wait, hold on.” He flipped the baby over and smacked its bottom. He flipped it back and saw its face wrinkle toward its center. It started wailing without sound. “Shit,” he said. “Malfunction.”



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Portfolio Gold Medal YAN ZHANG, Omaha, NE Grade 12, Age 17, Millard West High School, Omaha, NE. Fred Robertson, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Scholastic Inc Writing Portfolio Gold Medal.

The Art of Layers Personal Essay / Memoir

People in China live in layers. Photos are displayed in their frames in layers. Western-style wedding pictures, complete with wide white dresses and gentlemen’s tuxedos, share a frame with one’s pigtailed children. (Or is it one’s self? It becomes difficult to remember which layer is which.) If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the Chinese make their frames hold several thousand words. We are very thrifty.

People also live stacked like suitcases. My mother’s old home perches

on the thin ramparts of many accumulated ceilings, and we can hear their inhabitants’ activities late into night. Stories of marital strife, of clattery mahjongg games, and of heavy iron pans and plucked chickens are brought to us by the water pipes that run from dwelling to dwelling. And since we have no respect for privacy, the contents of our layers flow into each other’s easily. Laundry left to dry drips onto the balcony of the next floor. Dirt is tracked inside. Doors are left open. 



Of course this is necessary, because how else would one house one

billion people but in layers? And how else would one hold memories but in safe, cocooned layers so that if some are stripped off by another revolution, or another perilous flight, the others are left intact? Layers are like the cotton jackets and underwear the Chinese make their children and parents wear in winter. They keep one warm but can be quickly adjusted.

So it must be necessary that my grandfather dies in layers. It must be

necessary that cancer slowly strips his life.

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Creative oncept

Creative Concept Awards Creative Concept Awards provide additional opportunities for students to compete by creating works within a specific theme or category. These awards are often presented through the generosity of a donor or partnering organization.

Best in Grade In addition to competing for awards within their respective categories, two writers and two artists per grade 7 through 12 are chosen each year as the Best in Grade. Grouping students’ work by grade provides extra incentive for students to compete among their peers. Each Best in Grade winner receives a $500 prize.

Grade 7

Grade 10

Sarah Abrahamsen

Jonathan Carroll

Dayln Gillentine

Szofia Komaromy-Hiller

David Liu

Monica Sun

Aurelyn Van Kirk

Alina Wang

Grade 8

Grade 11

Estella Donis

Ben Caldwell

E. Jeremijenko-Conley

Shelly Pires

Megan Oppenheim

Paige Shelton

Rachel Page

Chris Tran

Grade 9

Grade 12

Hannah Balducci

Gaetano Icangelo

Anna Laughter

Manon Loustaunau

Samantha Li

Shauna Moore

David Weaver

Sarah Rhu

Many writing selections have been excerpted, go to www.artandwriting.org/galleries to read all the work as it was submitted.

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Best in Grade

Chris Tran, Self-Enamored, Photography. Grade 11, Age 16, Classen High School of Advanced Studies, Oklahoma City, OK. Anthony Dyke, Teacher; Tulsa Community College Liberal Arts Department, Affiliate.

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CREATIVE CONCEPT AWARDS

Sarah Rhu, Grade 12, Age 17, South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, Greenville, SC. Scott Gould, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate.

David Liu, Grade 7, Age 12, Hunter College High School, New York, NY. Kasumi Parker, Teacher; Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate.

My Brother in Pieces

The Hands

Personal Essay / Memoir

Personal Essay / Memoir

My greatest fear: I will have a son, and he will be exactly like my little brother Danny. A list of medications Danny has taken over the past few years: Ritalin, Adderall, Concerta, Prozac, Zoloft, Tenex. Danny’s age when he had his first panic attack: 10. What happened one Thanksgiving: Danny asked me if I had ever cut myself. He looked up at me, his wide green eyes framed by the dark lashes I envy. I told him I never had, which was somewhat true. I tried once at summer camp but couldn’t bring myself to run a razor across my wrist. I was too afraid of the pain. I set my controller down on my lap and asked Danny the same question. He fiddled with the seam of his jeans for a moment. Then he said that he had. I sat up straight. “Just once, though,” Danny said, “and I’m not going to do it again.” He explained that a lot of his friends cut themselves, but they were all working through the problem together. “It’s going to be all right,” he told me. And for some reason, I almost believed him. It was dark when we came downstairs for dinner. My brother led the way. The old wooden steps creaked beneath our weight. I caught sight of the inside of Danny’s left arm when he reached for the kitchen doorknob. His skin was lined with thin red cuts from his wrist to the crease of his elbow. I gasped and grabbed him. I pushed up his sleeve and stared at all of the marks. Danny pulled his arm away and begged me not to tell our parents. I thought about it for hours before I told my mom. Number of days Danny went without speaking to me: 12. What he said then: “Pass the orange juice.”

What I never understood in elementary school was why my dad would always tell me to go on the bus last. At first I believed he merely wanted me to be respectful to others by letting them go on first. Now I realize he just wanted to spend as much time as possible with me. As others were boarding the bus, my father whispered, “Behave, son. I love you.” I responded, “Dad, I love you too.” I would then give my father a hug. At that moment, my turn came and I walked up the stairs. I quickly hurried into my usual seat (second seat on the right side) and strapped on my seat belt. I looked at the window and, as sure as day, my father’s hand was already there. I followed our time-practiced ritual, and I put my hand in front of his. Even though there was a glass window between us, it was almost as if we were actually touching each other, my small hand in his bigger one. For a moment we were connected as one, and it seemed that all outside noises were filtered out and the whole world was revolving around the two of us. My mind was calm and full of love, and it seemed to me that we were out of sync with the surroundings. Everybody was moving around with the hectic morning, but we were there as calm as ever. As the bus roared to life, I watched my dad wave goodbye to me. I leaned back in my seat and felt the warmth of my father’s hand soak into me.

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Best in Grade

Anna Laughter, Untitled, Drawing. Grade 9, Age 14, Freeman High School, Richmond, VA. Erin Murtagh, Teacher; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Affiliate.

Paige Shelton, Thousand Miles, Sculpture. Grade 11, Age 16, Maize High School, Maize, KS. Debra Cox, Teacher; Wichita Center for the Arts, Affiliate.

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CREATIVE CONCEPT AWARDS

Ben Caldwell, Grade 11, Age 17, Vancouver School of Arts and Academics, Vancouver, WA. Jennifer Hockhalter, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate.

A Love Poem Poetry

4. that’s not quite what i’m feeling i’m more just hurt i regret writing it now i’m sorry to say it’s stupid, poetry, foolish, to leave your emotions lying around where others can find them just i don’t want to say “burn it” but keep it safe, if you have to keep it i know it might seem silly but it would make me feel better i won’t ask for it back i gave it to you, and now it’s yours to keep, i can’t take it back, that’d be wrong i just need you to know it’s not yours to give to anyone else, just to keep thank you i wish i had just memorized it and told it to you, looking into your eyes but i’m sure i’ll make the same mistake again sooner rather than later



i mean, people do stupid things when they’re falling for someone i’m sure i’ll convince myself to write another one and give it to someone before long god bless us, humans are goldfish when they’re in love or even when they just think they are 5. crafting this, I consulted the experts, mapping out every glottal stop and sibilant aspirate, the arch of every h and the twist at the bottom of every t. I beat those words with hammer and fist, set them gingerly with tongs on the fires of other minds but kept the whole cantankerous contraption, clandestine. tucked away in the dusty, churning recesses between the delicate black keys. Shut my eyes against the light, plunged the molten paper into the ink, and sent steam spiraling out into september and now look, it’s all about as secret as scripture.

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Best in Grade

Rachel Page, Grade 8, Age 13, Writopia Lab, Washington, DC. Kathy Crutcher, Teacher; Writopia Lab, Affiliate.

Lost Short Story

She made her way through the brush that separated the patch of trees and her shed from the rest of the world. When she closed her eyes, something tightened in her stomach. A familiar feeling, one she could never get rid of. Not just a feeling, a command. Something lost. Find now. She had never learned how to disobey. Her feet took her down a narrow alley and through a back gate into someone’s backyard. A plastic ball lay in a puddle of rainwater next to the grill. And: a naked baby doll, missing a foot, hidden under hard green tomatoes. She bent and picked it up hesitantly, fingers curling around the small plastic neck. It fell with a quiet thud into an empty jar. The nakedness of the doll seemed odd, almost disrespectful, as if it had been stripped of all pride before being forgotten. Its eyes were half-closed, as if ashamed. She stood. “Hey.” A man’s voice. Her head whipped up. He stood on the steps leading up to the house, a cigarette dying slowly in his hands. She had not heard the door open. “Hey!” His voice was harsh and deep. “What are you doing in my garden?” The girl took a step back, hands tightening around the cord of her jars. They clanged with the step, and she jumped like a dog frightened by his own tail. She could not think. The girl could have done many things. Like: apologize. Or: tell him the truth and hope that maybe, just maybe, he would believe it. Or: cry. But she didn’t do any of these things. Instead, she turned and ran.

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CREATIVE CONCEPT AWARDS

Megan Oppenheim, See None, Speak None, Digital Art. Grade 8, Age 13, The Mirman School, Los Angeles, CA. Karin Durup, Teacher; Armory Center for the Arts, Affiliate. Estella Donis, (Facing page, left) She Watched, Photography. Grade 8, Age 13, Concord Junior High School, Elkhart, IN. Mary Amador, Teacher; Friends of Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, Affiliate. Jonathan Carroll, (Facing page, right) Who Let the Dogs Out?, Photography. Grade 10, Age 15, Meadowdale High School, Lynnwood, WA. Jill Van Berkom, Teacher; Schack Art Center, Affiliate.

Hannah Balducci, Grade 9, Age 14, Mountain View High School, Vancouver, WA. Jarred Jackman, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate.

The Sound of Silence Personal Essay / Memoir

At 4 a.m. Violet is insatiable. She is a raging insomniac, a girl with a sharp nose and a tendency to chew her nails. Violet stays up all night ingesting words, poetry, Internet binary. She goes to Wikipedia and hits random. Violet reads of Icarus, of the Velvet Underground, of Davy Rothbart and red-breasted pygmy parrots. She cries sometimes at night. She doesn’t know why. Maybe it’s the beauty of the world, the thrill of her pulsing computer screen and yellowing book pages. Maybe it’s the snaking knowledge, the messages slithering into her system and resonating in a series of brain synapses (which she has read all about). Violet tells herself she’s hormonal, but even this is a lie. She eats free-trade chocolate and listens to Neutral Milk Hotel, sometimes taking breaks to groom her budding novel. She has resolved to only write at 4 a.m., designating that a sacred hour each morning. Her novel is strange. It’s hallucinogenic, phantasmagoric, and

labyrinthine (her three favorite words, which she often uses out of context). Violet is afraid of light. Google has told her she’s “photophobic.” Violet has many other incapacitating social phobias, but chooses not to dwell on them. She does, however, mull over her aversion to the bright quite a bit. She considers childhood traumas that could have caused this event (as she is taking an online psychology course) but cannot think of anything. Her parents were flawless. Her mother baked pies bloated with cherries, her father milled about cubicles. She went to charity balls with mother, to office bashes with father. People said she was charismatic. Violet considers the fact that her small talk could have been used up—her fabricated laughter evaporated into storm clouds. She confides with her laptop. Violet’s a hypochondriac, a bibliophile, a nyctomaniac. These definitions are comforting. It’s so lovely that she can catalog herself like that, putting her mind into tidy little file folders.

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Best in Grade

DAYLn Gillentine, The Baguette Murderers, Painting. Grade 7, Age 13, Girls’ School of Austin, Austin, TX. Nancy Hoover, Teacher; St. Stephen's School, Affiliate.

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CREATIVE CONCEPT AWARDS David Weaver, The Bureaucracy Is Expanding to Meet the Expanding Needs of the Bureaucracy, Photography. Grade 9, Age 15, St. Margaret’s Episcopal School, San Juan Capistrano, CA. Josh Friedman, Teacher; California Arts Project, Affiliate.

Monica Sun, Grade 10, Age 15, The Pingry School, Martinsville, NJ. Laura Yorke, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate.

How I Was Born Poetry

When I couldn’t stand the passing of days anymore than the screaming from the kitchen and the sun that always seemed like rain to me, my godmother told me how I was born. She told me I came from the wind. She said, “He wanted you to never be alone, so he gave you his skin.” She said, “He took the desert sand and piled it on your head until it flowed, so that the man



you fell in love with would only thirst for you.” She said, “He plugged your ears with sugar from Belgium street markets, so you would only hear sweet things.” She said, “He ripped the static from lightning clouds, so he could shape them into pearls and fit them in your eyes.” She said, “He plucked cherry blossoms from Aomori and folded them on your breasts, so even kings would drown in the scent of them.” She said, “The wind made you, my dear child,” and took the knife from my wrist.

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New york Life Award

New York Life Award Teenagers deal with a great number of complex issues, so it’s not surprising that this comes through in their creative choices and expressions. The Alliance Johanna Bear Emma Chalk Paris Ebersviller Claudia Fang Samantha Siomko Dillan Smith

partners with the New York Life Foundation to present this very special award, giving students the chance to apply their unique personal vision to the difficult themes of loss and bereavement. Students participating in any of the National Awards, 25 categories may enter their work for consideration for a New York Life Award, and must submit a statement of their motivation and how the individual piece reflects these subjects. Six works are chosen by our partners at New York Life to represent this award. Each winning student receives a $1,000 prize.

Samantha Siomko, Grade 11, Age 16, Warwick High School, Lititz, PA. Brenda Homberger, Teacher; Lancaster Public Library, Affiliate.

Watch Me short story

When we were both very young, my sister would stand on a bucket in the middle of the yard. “Watch me!” she would yell in her broken, infantlaced speech. But I would not look up from the book I had pressed my nose into. She broke her arm a couple of times that way. Mother would always ask when it happened, and I would tell her I didn’t know. I wasn’t watching. When we got older, her activities became less childish. In elementary school she received a rather large part in the school play. She came home that night with a less-than-opulent playbill, her name scrolled in small, common font across the front. “Watch me,” she said, but I shook my head and told her I had too much homework. I sat in the cold for hours at her soccer tournament. Right before her team went onto the field, she came up to me, a soccer ball under her arm, and smiled brightly, cockily. “Watch me,” she cooed. As she ran up the field darting in and out

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between the defenders, Mother cheered loudly and nudged my arm. But my phone vibrated in my pocket, and I retrieved it, the latest school gossip more important at the moment. She asked me after the game if I had seen her winning score. And her face fell when I told her I had missed it. She graduated three years after I did. Mother told me of the beautifully written speech she had given. She had thanked her friends and family for her success and happiness in life. But she had especially extolled me. She spoke about how I was her greatest role model and friend. She spoke about how she always tried to emulate me. Her eyes scanned the audience as she spoke, hoping to catch my eyes, but I had not come to see her that night. The last line of her speech, so I heard, told how she had watched me throughout the years, and she had only one thing to ask of me now: “Watch me,” she had said.

CREATIVE CONCEPT AWARDS

Johanna Bear, Grade 8, Age 13, Lamberton Middle School, Carlisle, PA. Jason Griffith, Teacher; Commonwealth Connections Academy, Affiliate.

Blueberry Whispers Personal essay / memoir

During the car ride home, my mind floats to the house—my house, my sanctuary, and my life away from home—Yellow Shutters, the reason my anger at Granny exploded. Her daughters, my great aunts, decided that Granny needed money to support her in her decline, for health care, and to pay the nursing home. They sold my place, my friend, the house where I have gone every summer I could remember, the cottage of dreams, hopes, crystal clear water, and blueberry bushes intertwined with the beautiful mossy trees that led down to the wooden dock, bouncing along the gentle waves.  Now, every night I spend with the sweet, salttinged smell in my nose, cuddling against the cold in the warm blue blankets around me, feels like an absurd luxury. My mind wanders, wondering how many more nights I will have here before it gets taken away, just as Great-Granny will inevitably be another friend abandoning me. I feel the gentle quaking of the old cottage, almost as if it were turning in its sleep alongside me, mimicking my movements, as though trying to reassure me that everything would work out. The truth, though, is in my mind. The cold, hard, unforgiving facts that

can never tell a lie, the facts that say the end is coming. The “for sale” sign is being manufactured, and a realtor will come, treating this magical place as just another job when it deserves so much more. It deserves owners who know how to preserve its forest of trees and the fairy houses I created all those years ago. I almost wished I could join the fairies in those miniature houses, to escape from the conversations everyone thinks I cannot hear: the talk of moving, selling, tearing down, and renting. Stripping the cottage of its owners and all the beauty and memories it once represented. They talk in low whispers, believing I have drifted into sleep. But I lay awake, trying to shut out the words from my ears, trying to believe it isn’t happening. Trying to keep the gullibility and innocence of childhood, when I know I must grow up to deal with this problem. A problem I have no control over, because who listens to the child? Nobody. Not even when they know best. The day is coming, the salty air whispers as it caresses my ears gently, more gently then the truth.

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Creativity & Citizenship

Creativity & Citizenship For the past three years, the Alliance has collaborated with the National Constitution Center to award three $1,000 prizes to students creating work with a specific and timely social theme. Previous themes have been freedom of expression and social change, and this year’s theme was bullying. Students were encouraged to take a stand against bullying in their work, whether from a personal or social perspective. This award is supported by the Maurice R. Robinson Fund.

Michelle Fontillas, Words Hurt, Photography. Grade 12, Age 17, Leilehua High School, Wahiawa, HI. Keith Sasada, Teacher; Hawai’i State Department of Education, Affiliate.

Kodi Hays, Accept It!, Painting. Grade 11, Age 17, Thompson Valley High School, Loveland, CO. Cordelia Devine, Teacher, Colorado Art Education Association and Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design, Affiliate.

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CREATIVE CONCEPT AWARDS

zoe cheng, Grade 9, Age 14, Walnut Hills High School, Cincinnati, OH. Kyle Scudder, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate.

Caught Like Smoke Poetry

By some stroke of luck, the Hijab: A head cover

Far away from my dry tongue

worn by Muslim women.

And my chattering teeth.

My hijab was beautiful.

And the perfect pictures of perfection would walk down

My first one was pink, the color of Mama’s fingernails, a gorgeous silky perfection laced with bits of stringy crimson… I donned my hijab at the time most girls my age started getting boyfriends, silky shiny hair slinking down the hallway, lips curled around other lips like rose petals. Sometimes it was hard to remember I was wearing my hijab, until I washed my hands in the girl’s bathroom or changed into my gym clothes. I tried ignoring the spikey chitterchatter words

the hallway, Whispers and gossip and my name floating back over their skinny shoulders, Surrounding my ears like buzzing flies. I used to cover my ears when they taunted me with stereotypes, Used to block the sound of their ruthless giggles, Turning my heart to stone. My mother used to cradle me in her arms When I cried, arms as strong as tree branches Carrying the weight of the wind in their nooks and crannies.

streaming around my head like silver smoke

I let loose my troubles, let them roll off my tongue

the stares that painted flushing red roses onto my

Like marbles, tears collecting in the corners of my eyes

cheekbones.

Until it became too hard to cage in what was already

The other girls wore shirts that bore their bellies,

Too wild, too free.

soft fat clinging to gaunt hip bones,

My hijab was the most beautiful thing I had ever laid

sometimes with a piercing at the navel.

eyes upon,

They would mock me with their perfect pale skin, blue eyes wide and innocent, makeup just so,

The most gorgeous piece of fabric that billowed in the lackluster wind. I wanted the girls at school to see my hijab like I did,

“Eye – dill – AH,” they would say my name,

Wanted to tear their robin’s egg-eyes from their sockets

Tongue curling around the soured consonants,

So they would stop laughing, giggles following me

The overcooked syllables,

down the hallways,

“How do you say that? It’s Indian, right?”

Burning in my ears like fire, tears caught in my throat

…I would feel the words I wanted to say

like a haze of smoke.

Drop like heavy balls of lead into my stomach,



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AMD Game Changer

AMD Game Changer The Alliance added video games to the Awards’ categories in 2009 and soon afterward partnered with the AMD Foundation to help foster its growth. Through AMD’s generous support, we promote this category to teachers and students across the country, and encourage video game design as a creative method to teach art and writing. This year we received over 750 submissions made on a variety of game design platforms. The top five winners each receive a $1,000 prize from AMD. Go to www.artandwriting.org / galleries to view videos of this year’s winning games.

MARCUS PASELL, Fuse, Grade 11, Age 17, Cretin Derham Hall, St. Paul, MN. Chris Babcock, Teacher; Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Affiliate.

MATTHEW DAVIS, Forgotten Memories, Grade 11, Age 18, North High School, Sioux City, IA. Tiffany Stevens, Teacher; Connie Belin & Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development, Affiliate. TOBIN HUITT, Vox, Grade 11, Age 16, Le Jardin Academy, Kailua, HI. Amy Manso, Teacher; Hawai’i State Department of Education, Affiliate.

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National

Art Portfolio Silver Medal with Distinction Adam Amram

National Awards Exemplary students receive Gold, Silver, and American Visions and Voices medals in 25 individual categories

Dominique Bloink

of art and writing, and gold and silver portfolio awards.

Jamie Earnest

Art Categories: Architecture, Ceramics & Glass,

Mary Harvey

Comic Art, Design, Digital Art, Drawing, Fashion,

Gaetano Icangelo

Film & Animation, Jewelry, Mixed Media, Painting,

Angelina Namkung

Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture, Video Games

Amir Noorbakhsh Sarasota Proffitt Daniel Santa Megan Schmunk

Writing Categories: Dramatic Script, Flash Fiction, Humor, Journalism, Personal Essay / Memoir, Persuasive Writing, Poetry, Science Fiction / Fantasy,

Seohi Song

Short Story, Novel Writing

AB Stone

Portfolio Gold winners are featured on pages 11–34.

Wonpyong Yu

Portfolio Silver with distinction are listed to the left.

Renee Zhan

For a full listing of National Award winners, see pages 116–120 or visit www.artandwriting.org

Writing Portfolio Silver Medal

with Distinction Nicole Acton Elizabeth Ballou Rachel Berger

Photography Portfolio

Rachel Brown

Silver Medal

Lillian Fishman

with Distinction

Aubrey Knight

Masie Chong

Karintha Lowe

Emily Mesner

Nora Miller

Samantha Newby

Sophie Strand

Rachel Stuart

Alexandra Warrick

Mackenzie Thompson

Maggie Zhang







Many writing selections have been excerpted, go to www.artandwriting.org/galleries to read all the work as it was submitted.

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National Awards

Abigail Hartley, Grade 12, Age 18, Gaston Day School, Gastonia, NC. Greg Rainey, Teacher; Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

How to Be a Seductive Goddess Flash Fiction

If you’re ever going to entice a man into your web

off desks and upsetting potted plants, you’re do-

of seduction, looking the part is essential. Beauty

ing it right. Wiggle your shoulders ever so slightly

may be only skin deep, but when Mr. Right

for maximum irresistibility. Strut, strut, wiggle,

bumps into you in the checkout line at Harris

wiggle, spin turn, and dismount. Your friends

Teeter, the first thing he’ll notice will not be your

will do impressions of you, shuffling their feet

ability to quote extensively from David Sedaris.

across the floor: part salsa dance, part drunken

Cut your hair into sexy inch-long hanks using

swagger. Walk away, chest out and hips swaying,

nail scissors and your dad’s electric razor, with

with your dignity intact. Ignore them when they

liberal application of the beard trimmer attach-

trail behind you, a single-file line of Mick Jagger

ment for texture. Draw attention to your power-

impersonators.

ful Scots-Irish shoulders and outsize ribcage by



refusing to grow breasts. Some say androgyny,

small, eccentric private school in search of fresh

you say mystique.

prey, preferably boys who didn’t know you in



seventh grade, the Year of Orthodontia. Begin

Now, head shorn and 34A bra strapped

Leave the nest of friends you’ve built at your

firmly in place, you are ready to take the male

tutoring your peers for the SATs. When one of

world by storm. You have the feminine wiles of a

your “students,” a tall, blond swimmer from the

wicked vixen now and, by God, you’re going to

public high school, asks you to go see the musical

charm and tempt someone with them. When you

Young Frankenstein with him, prepare as though

walk, let your hips swing wilder than the pirate

he had asked you to be his date to the Cannes

ship ride at Carowinds. If you’re knocking things

Film Festival.

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National Awards

Wonpyong Yu, (Clockwise from top) The Sniffer, Breath, Confused Reality, The Listener, Mixed Media. Grade 12, Age 17, WOW Art Studio, New York, NY. Taehyun Kang, Teacher; Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.



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National Awards

Adam Amram, Self Portrait Study 2, Painting. Grade 12, Age 17, Chattahoochee High School, Alpharetta, GA. Dorsey Sammataro, Teacher; Georgia State University Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.

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National Awards

Nathan Cummings, Grade 10, Age 16, Mercer Island High School, Mercer Island, WA. Susan McKay, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

Conjoined flash fiction



When I was three days old, doctors cut my brother off of my right side.

As expected, he didn’t survive the experience. They put him in a small box and gave him to my parents, who—not being much for pomp and circumstance—laid him to rest in our backyard. For all I know, he’s still there. It doesn’t matter. This is not his story. This is my story.

Funny how people have trouble telling the difference.



The word is conjoined twin, for the record; let’s just get that out of the

way. It doesn’t help that my mom is from Thailand, of course. There are certain people who will never understand that that does not make me an actual, factual Siamese twin. Trust me, if you can make the connection, allow me to tell you it’s been done before. Like on my first day of kindergarten: all the parents in the back, listening to their kids mumble their names and favorite colors. Then I got up to speak. The teacher—a gray-haired matronly type who’d apparently been briefed in advance—took one look at me and said to the whole room, “Will is a very special boy. He was born a Siamese twin.” Instantly, the room went quiet; my mom got this furious gleam in her eye. Like, I cannot believe you just said that. The teacher seemed to sense she’d made some sort of faux pas but stubbornly decided to forge ahead. “Will,” she said to me, her voice dripping with as much syrup as she could slather, “what is your favorite color?”

I said red, and people automatically started trying to assign some sort of

connection to my psychological profile, because there’s no way a former conjoined twin could be interested in something as mundane as fire engines. One parent took a peek at my right arm, which has always been slightly shorter than my left, and he looked as if he wanted to pickle me in a jar.



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National Awards

Kiara Kobayashi, Grade 11, Age 16, Henry Perrine Baldwin High School, Wailuku, HI. Grace S. Taguchi, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Flush flash fiction

“My period stopped coming.” She didn’t even try to avoid my eyes because she’s not afraid of confrontation like I am. She didn’t say it in a whisper, like those girls who bring pregnancy tests to school and cry in the bathroom stalls during lunch. I shook my head, hesitantly. Mine never came.

“One protein shake, two-thirds cup of celery, four

8-ounces of water…” She savored the words in her mouth as if she were eating her own prized medals, because she doesn’t eat much else. I made my own list in my head but swallowed it down instead.

We sat too close in a small corner of the cafeteria

for no reason, really. She had a funny smell, almost like sharp metal. I could taste it in my mouth when she gossiped, a putrid scent, almost as though she were rotting and crumbling from the inside. I imagined the scent traveling up from her small intestine and radiating out of her head. Each dead strand of hair from her mottled scalp fell to the ground, drifting like drowsy snowflakes. When she collapsed in a pile of ashes, there wasn’t enough of her left to muster up a Adam Amram, Helen, Painting. Grade 12, Age 17, Chattahoochee High School, Alpharetta, GA. Dorsey Sammataro, Teacher; Georgia State University Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.

cloud of dust.

She was disintegrating right in front of me, and I

was awfully envious. She seemed to notice my barely restrained jealousy, and her eyes were sympathetic as she said, “Yours is harder to do than mine.” A gentle pat on my hand to make me feel better. “Use milk to wash it down. I heard it helps.”

I left her before I could get caught in the post-

lunch traffic in the hallway. When I took the third stall to the right, the girl in the stall over was sobbing. I drained the entire carton of milk and, sure enough, everything came out quick and neatly.

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National Awards

Jamie Earnest, Stacked Special Series, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 17, Alabama School of Fine Arts, Birmingham, AL. Darius Hill, Teacher; Region at Large; Affiliate, Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.

Rachel Page, Grade 8, Age 13, Writopia Lab, Washington, DC. Kathy Crutcher, Teacher; Writopia Lab, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

The Things She Wanted flash fiction

A doll in a toy shop window. Pretty, with real hair and eyes that blinked when you lay it down. A mom who was nice enough to buy her. A $20 doll. A chocolate bar. A new friend. After that, an old friend. A neighbor with a doll that had real hair and eyes that blinked when you put it down for a nap. A dog. For Christmas, a new dress and a cell phone that worked. A purse with real lipstick like Mommy’s. Rings when rings were cool. Anklets when anklets were cool. Earrings before they were cool, because being cool was so overrated. A better cell phone that worked. More friends. Less friends. Makeup. A mom who let her daughter wear makeup. Boyfriends. A mom who let her daughter have boyfriends. Love. The end of high school. A new dress. A mom who let her daughter buy new dresses. Real love this time. A chocolate bar. Another new friend. And some old ones. Perfect scores on the SATs. A mom who didn’t worry about perfect scores on the SATs. A nice college roommate. No college roommate. A mom who didn’t come to college every holiday. More friends. The end of college. A job. A better job. Real love, because 23 is old enough to know when it’s real. Money. A house. An apartment without a boyfriend and his stinky roommates. Old friends. A quiet place. A loud place. A place to be alone. A place where everyone can find you. A wedding dress. A baby. A mom who didn’t cry at weddings. A husband who didn’t drink. A baby who didn’t scream. One perfect night of sleep. A first word that wasn’t Daddy. A child who stayed forever 3. A day without rain. A day of sunshine. A phone that didn’t ring. A happiness that never ended. A photo album. A rewind button. A mother who lived forever. A daughter who was grateful. A mother who felt wanted. A daughter who had enough time to say what she needed to. A mother who was.



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National Awards

Gaetano Icangelo, (Clockwise from top) From Florida to Oregon, Painting, Typewriter, Printmaking, Desk Writer, Drawing, Kitchen Table, Painting. Grade 12, Age 17, Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts, West Palm Beach, FL. Jenny Gifford, Teacher; Educational Gallery Group (Eg2), Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.

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National Awards

Sophie Strand, Grade 12, Age 17, Onteora High School, Boiceville, NY. Elaine Conroy, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Writing Portfolio Award

Bruce Springsteen Poetry

I’ve decided we need a hero and I’ve decided it’s Bruce Springsteen. We’ve never listened to any of his music together but we could. He could be our Beatles or our Bard. He could be our summer spent in the sand with long tans under the shirt sleeves. Or Dewing with his brush like dew, his beach scenes like breath on glass. We could pray to a new American impressionism and listen to “Blinded by the Light” while the blurred Madonna steps through the prairie dawn. I’ve decided we should go to church more often or attend the synagogue in the sand dunes. We could bring Florette cheese and offer it to the witch weeds. We could have our lunch and pray with the stereo on.

Megan Schmunk, top: Green Still Life, Painting, bottom: Suspension, Painting. Grade 12, Age 17, Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts, West Palm Beach, FL. Scott Armetta, Teacher; Educational Gallery Group (Eg2), Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.



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National Awards

Angelina Namkung, New Identity, Painting. Grade 12, Age 17, Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA. Jayne Matricardi-Burke, Teacher; Fairfax County Public Schools, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.

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National Awards

Hannah Schumacher, Grade 8, Age 13, Lusher Charter School, New Orleans, LA. Eric Flynt, Teacher; Greater New Orleans Writing Project, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Felonious flash fiction

One thing I’ve learned is that funerals can be the source of truth, passion, love... pure emotion. Death brings these people (most of whom have never met) together. Death tugs at the feeble human soul strings, directing the outer shell into raw, reverent “mourning.” I say “mourning” because it’s hardly a depressing occurrence. In fact, these mourners have never felt so alive.

The beloved and betrothed of dear John came to witness the last rites

of our center-stage performer, and passion overwhelms them. Happiness, in remembrance of good times past. Grief, over the acknowledgment of the fact that Mrs. Jane will never again grace her audience with a wellexecuted pun. Despair, in the realization of the nature of their fragile and meaningless existence. Emotion realized in the form of sobs and wails, emotion suppressed in the mind of a psychopath committed. It is here that, if John’s or Jane’s shell reawakened a particular sense, they’d know that their voyage was well-spent.

I’d kill for that kind of devotion and love. If my victim understood my

logic, he’d gladly die for the cause.

Here is such a beautiful house of death. Death, in the sense of love, de-

votion, renewal, and satisfaction. When death is clearly such a wonderful thing, it’s a shame that the dead can’t stick around long enough to reap the full benefits. This of course opens the door to another marvelous paradox. In death, John sees the true beauty of life, the purpose of life. If there is an afterlife, he knows. If there isn’t, he knows. The only snag of obtaining these great truths is that they can’t be shared with the only creatures in existence that haven’t learned: the living. Possessing the most profound of all knowledge in the universe is an exclusive privilege of the dead. There is actually a statistic for those who are literally dying to know.



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National Awards

Mary Harvey, top: Dog Days, bottom: Are You Kitten Me?, Digital Art. Grade 12, Age 17, Livonia Career Technical Center, Livonia, MI. Jeremy Rheault, Teacher; College for Creative Studies, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.

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National Awards

Karintha Lowe, Grade 12, Age 17, Milton Academy, Milton, MA. Lisa Baker, Teacher; New England Art Education Conference and The Boston Globe, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Writing Portfolio Award.

The Lucky Hours Short Story



On Saturday nights, with caps safely stowed in

pants, her face glittering with powder and confi-

dorm rooms, Ming Li and his friends saunter off

dence. Ming Li began to tap his feet to her song,

the campus to karaoke with the girls in their fac-

mesmerized by the way she shimmied to the left

tory department. This is where the toy-factory men

and simultaneously wiggled her right eyebrow.

get the final laugh: Electric-company women have



rough hands and mouths, sore from all the sparks

it came, to a somber man recounting the day’s

flying out from under light bulbs. Ming Li loves to

news. Ming Li paid no attention, instead imagin-

karaoke, and is popular among his group for his

ing himself on a stage. He’d wear blue jeans and a

clear voice.

black leather jacket, unzipped to reveal an orange



polo shirt, the collar popped. He’d sing a song

Ming can point to the exact moment when his

The channel flipped back, just as quickly as

life changed. He was sitting in a local restaurant,

with words like “beautiful” and “everlasting,” and

licking up the last drops of spicy tofu and making

all the girls on the second-floor painting station

eyes at the pretty waitress. Just as Ming Li was

would fall in love with him. He could see it now,

about to drop his napkin on the ground near the

the entire floor silent, all the girls in pink aprons

waitress’ feet, the television set in the corner of the

and caps staring at the TV screen, watching him as

room flashed pink. Ming Li forgot his attempt at

he swayed to the right and winked at the camera.

courtship and stared, riveted, at the small electric

He could leave the factory, with its damp walls and

square. On its screen was a girl, probably only a

mechanical hums, for an apartment in a high-rise

year younger than Ming Li. She wore bright red

building with plush carpet and a young wife.

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National Awards

Renee Zhan, Nostalgia, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 18, Seven Lakes High School, Katy, TX. Kimberly Glasgow, Teacher; Harris County Department of Education, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.

Petra van Kan, La Pierre du Phillosphe, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 18, Mayfield High School, Cleveland, OH. Laura Capello, Teacher; Martha Holden Jennings Foundation and Cleveland Institute of Art, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

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National Awards

Flora Collins, Grade 12, Age 18, The Chapin School, New York, NY. Maria Smilios, Teacher; Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

Debbie flash fiction

Debbie Bell liked capturing frogs and putting them

got her depressed and itchy. Debbie was 7 years

in a cake pan, racing to snatch them if they tried

old and she was bored.

to leap away. Frogs were slimy in a different way



than her armpits were, and she found this a sort

though there were birds swooping in the sky,

of delightful phenomenon. One day she wanted to

she couldn’t play. She wasn’t wearing anything

bathe with them in the sink, and maybe their slip-

but sagging underwear, so she put on one of her

pery feet or tongues would touch her in places her

mother’s shirts and took a cigarette from the

mother had stopped caring about.

pack on the counter.





Debbie would also draw what she’d seen in

One day the Pop-Tarts ran out, and even

Debbie stepped outside and thought about

Malcolm Shorter’s brother’s magazines in chalk

letting the sun light her cigarette. Her face

on the sidewalk outside the trailer park. She’d wait

would explode into a thousand million pieces

gleefully for a spanking or some precious, sexy

that would get lodged into the asphalt, and

swear word to be flung at her, but no one ever

somehow little flowers would grow with her

noticed anything around there, especially what the

nose and eyes and mouth on them. She let

kids were up to.

the cigarette dangle from her lips instead and



She made Pop-Tarts and fed them to the birds.

thought about her mother in the bathtub some-

She went on the roof of the trailer naked and tried

times in the evening, with her legs stretched out

to sunbathe. She fried eggs on the concrete, but the

and the lighter in one hand and the soap in

spatula was too weak. She hid in her room all day

the other.

and stared at the cracked ceiling but that always



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National Awards

Seohi Song, (Clockwise from top) Taste of Freedom, Perfection, Supression, Loneliness, Painting. Grade 12, Age 18, Aineo Cultural Art Center, Duluth, GA. Yoon Chung, Teacher; Georgia State University Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.

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National Awards

Sophia Dillon, Grade 11, Age 16, Wilbur Cross High School, New Haven, CT. Robert Fee, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

Garland Flash Fiction

The first time I saw The Wizard of Oz, it was raining. A hurricane, actually. It was built up to be a monster of a storm. My mother filled a whole drawer with batteries, a whole shelf with cans of the cheapest tomato soup she could find. Even my father was worried about the river overflowing. I caught him wringing his fisherman hands by the flickering forecast the night before it was going to hit. School was canceled a day early, and I dreamt that night that I was Noah. But instead of animals, I had to save each member of the Partridge Family. I woke up with David Cassidy’s breath still on my neck and a slow drizzle on my window keeping time to “Doesn’t Somebody Want to Be Wanted.”

My mother wouldn’t let me outside. While she and my father spat at each other in

the kitchen over whether or not they should board up the windows, I went through every comic in my stash and got sick of each punch falling flat—a fist in a starburst of broken jaw and everything is fine again. I turned on the snowy television to the only station that wasn’t blaring weather alerts and there she was: skin like clean sheets, eyes like harvest moons, naive as anything newly plucked, Judy Garland.

The static made her voice quiver, but it still managed to rise above my parents’ shouts

and all that rain and hang itself up in the eaves with the nesting passerine.

The storm never came. It trickled over our houses, knocked a few trees sideways, and

fell vertical somewhere south. The weather alerts faded and my father put the wooden boards back in the basement. My mother even let me outside. I spent the whole afternoon humming, searching for any rainbows the hurricane had left behind.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Hannah Broderick, Grade 10, Age 15, Punahou School, Honolulu, HI. Alison Lazzara, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Hannah Linsky, Grade 10, Age 16, Lake Washington High School, Kirkland, WA. Liz Christiansen, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

we (k)no(w) more poetry

we old, old souls. we pucker-too-soons.

Truth Teller poetry

She was a cardboard box oracle spitting out bourbon-tainted proclamations from the bench in the freckled shade on 3rd Street. Tasseled shoes would stop starched white corneas, agape at her tan exposed skin hanging like elephant hide from her cage in the zoo. They threw peanuts, watching her, fascination mingled with disgust, categorizing her, knowing she lived in the back corners of everyone, shouting out her asphalt prophecies, waiting for them to come true.

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we early birds.

we know not of these quick-paced,

pink-laced,



blank-faced encounters.

we see no wrongs. we 2 a.m.’s.

we green eyes.

we have these hearts to know desire,

hard wire,



feed fire.

we moon hangers. we forget-me-nots.

we guilt dancers.

we end up against walls, only to twist-and-shake

undertake,



avoid heartbreak.

National Awards

Kelsey Lee, Lux Nova, Photography. Grade 12, Age 17, The Bishop’s School, La Jolla, CA. Elizabeth Wepsic, Teacher; California Arts Project, Affiliate; Gold Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Rachel Berger, Grade 12, Age 17, Writopia Lab, New York, NY. Rebecca Wallace-Segall, Teacher; Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Writing Portfolio Award.

Leaving the Nest: A Monologue Dramatic Script

RACHEL stands center stage. Behind her are a

conceivable social situation. And she didn’t feel

chair and a projector. As she speaks, old photo-

anything but normal, back then.

graphs of her mother fade in and out.





remember anything being wrong, I was told it was



RACHEL

I told someone once that my mom and I have

My mom is not a strong woman. Even before I

the worst thing to be anything like her. That’s ac-

a perfectly normal mother-daughter relationship

cording to my dad, who listed her faults loudly and

—I’m the mother, she’s the daughter. What I never

frequently. He said she was lazy, which could have

said was I’m just as bad a parent as I ever blamed

been true, since she has always been unemployed.

her for being.

But he also said she was stupid, which I knew



wasn’t true. My mom was a bookworm. She gradu-

(Turns to watch the changing pictures on the

projector. Beat. Turns to audience.)

ated high school when she was 16 and went to live



above the Shakespeare and Company bookstore in

I’ve been looking through pictures of her lately,

trying to find one from when I was 6 years old. My

Paris. She impressed the storekeeper because she

first-grade class went on a field trip to the Brooklyn

was so well read. She came back quoting Oscar

Bridge, and my mom was one of the parent chaper-

Wilde and Anaïs Nin and dressing like a hipster.

ones. I don’t actually remember the trip, but there’s

(Smiles.)

a picture of the whole class kneeling in front of one

It’s kind of a family legend—at least in my mind.

of the big stone pillars. Standing behind us, my

(Smile fades.)

mom looks...totally normal. She doesn’t look like a woman with the power to ruin her daughter’s every

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National Awards

Mackenzie Thompson, (Clockwise from top) Spanish Web Poses 1946, Lindblom Xmas 1954, Jim Worland 1952, Swimming Pool 1957, Photography. Grade 12, Age 18, Center Grove High School, Greenwood, IN. Jacquelyn Fowler, Teacher; Clowes Memorial Hall of Butler University, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Photography Portfolio Award.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Logan Hollinger, Grade 12, Age 17, St. Vincent High School, Perryville, MO. Courtney La Chance-Denton, Teacher; Prairie Lands Writing Project at Missouri Western State University, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

How to Start a World Religion in 10 Easy Steps humor

5. Be Exclusive

Everybody has a tight-knit group of followers to spread their message. First and fore-

most, you should determine who is not allowed to follow you. For example, Jesus distinguished between disciples and apostles. There was no discernible difference between the two, but the apostles were special simply because they were.

Similarly, Christ said that he’d take anybody, even lepers and (ugh) tax collectors,

if they gave all of their worldly possessions to the poor in order to follow him. This is a trickier proposition than it sounds. I mean, it’s my stuff. If the poor want my stuff, they can pry it from my cold, dead, covetous hands.

Dense, esoteric ritual can also help keep your religion exclusive. Mohammed demand-

ed Muslims pray three times a day on special mats, facing toward Mecca. Who the hell even knows where that is, anyway? 6. Stick It to the Man

All religions challenged the status quo in their day. Governments don’t like change as

a rule. This is very good for you. People by their nature are contrarians. They like to go against the grain. Once it’s established that your religion is banned by the powers that be, converts will flock to you like moths to a flame!

It’s fairly easy to get your religion banned. Simply find something everybody likes and

go in the opposite direction. Examples abound. The Romans banned Christianity because it weakened loyalty to the state. Europeans disliked Islam because it wasn’t Christianity. The Chinese initially prohibited Buddhism because it’s really boring.

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National Awards

Kassidy mccann, Sunset in the City, Painting. Grade 12, Age 17, South Strokes High School, Walnut Cove, NC. Phil Jones, Teacher; Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Affiliate; Gold Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

71

National Awards

Alec Nguyen, Joint Spatial Study, Architecture. Grade 10, Age 15, Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts, West Palm Beach, FL. Melissa Glosmanova, Teacher; Educational Gallery Group (Eg2), Affiliate; Gold Medal.

Connor Gravelle, Mexican Border Memorial, Architecture. Grade 12, Age 17, Newburyport High School, Newburyport, MA. Sarah Leadbeater, Teacher; New England Art Education Conference and The Boston Globe, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

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National Awards

Alexandra Warrick, Grade 12, Age 17, Hewitt School, New York, NY. Maureen Burgess, Teacher; Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Writing Portfolio Award.

Review: Misterman Journalism



“What hope has a kitten in a town full of dogs?”

warped Mr. Rogers. Pitching queasily from black

pleads a wounded Cillian Murphy in Enda Walsh’s

humor to blacker horror, Murphy seamlessly ma-

knockout one-man show Misterman, and the

nipulates the audience into hysterics one moment

audience’s hearts bleed for him. Of course, this is

and shell shocked silence the next; one is spell-

before we find out that the kitten in question has

bound by the grace with which he unites the godly

wicked claws. Murphy, a Cork-born Irish actor, is

and the ghastly in seductive unholy matrimony.

no stranger to the intersection between the angelic



and the sinister, whether playing a sweetly optimis-

a religious fanatic who, exiled from his village to

tic transgender young man swept up in the horrors

an isolated warehouse, compulsively forces himself

of the Troubles in Breakfast on Pluto or allowing

to relive the worst day of his life. With the help of a

Christopher Nolan to gleefully distort his matinee-

system of reel-to-reel recorders stocked with voices,

idol looks into eldritch horror in Batman Begins.

Thomas carries on imaginary conversations with



his neighbors as he pantomimes his daily routine of

Murphy has long been a favorite actor of mine,

In Misterman, Murphy plays Thomas Magill,

due to his riveting ability to shift on a dime from

fetching Jammie Dodgers for his Mammy and visit-

charismatic to chilling and back again. Fallen

ing his father’s grave. The kicker is that Murphy

angels are his wheelhouse, and never has this

also plays all of his neighbors, young and old, male

served a production so well as in Misterman, a

and female, and watching him shift fluidly from

hellish 90-minute tour of a beautiful day in the

wizened old woman to foul mouthed delinquent to

neighborhood of Innisfree, as given by a gravely

flirtatious waitress is nothing short of thrilling.

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National Awards

Jake Schapiro, Caesar's Cup, Ceramics & Glass. Grade 12, Age 17, Harvard-Westlake School, North Hollywood, CA. Dylan Palmer, Teacher; Armory Center for the Arts, Affiliate; Gold Medal

Emily Mosher, Decayed Thoughts, Ceramics & Glass. Grade 12, Age 17, Yorktown High School, Arlington, VA. Jeffery Pabotoy, Teacher; Arlington Public Schools, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

Emily Kopas, Vessel Family, Ceramics & Glass. Grade 10, Age 15, University School of Nova South, Fort Lauderdale, FL. Melanie Cohen, Teacher; American Learning Systems, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

Zoe Freedman Coleman, Untitled, Ceramics & Glass. Grade 11, Age 16, Amherst Regional High School, Amherst, MA. Hannah Hartl, Teacher; New England Art Education Conference and The Boston Globe, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

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National Awards

Amir Noorbakhsh, Silent Forest, Painting. Grade 12, Age 18, Marshall High School, Falls Church, VA. Nicole Walter, Teacher; Fairfax County Public Schools, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Claire Benarroch, left: Movie Poster, Design. Grade 12, Age 18, Windward School, Los Angeles, CA. Hannah Freed, Teacher; Armory Center for the Arts, Affiliate; Silver Medal. Kassia Gordon, top: Seven Devils, Design. Grade 12, Age 17, Pine Creek High School, Colorado Springs, CO. Tiffanie Davis, Teacher; Colorado Art Education Association and Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design, Affiliate; Silver Medal. Christine Catlin, bottom: Kitty, Grade 10, Age 15, Mounds View High School, Arden Hills, MN. Gretchen Nesset, Teacher; Minneapolis College of Art and Design, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

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National Awards

Vincent Kings, The Orphans Issue 1: Butt-Headed Beginnings, Comic Art. Grade 12, Age 17, Orange County High School of the Arts, Santa Ana, CA. Patrick Williams, Teacher; California Arts Project, Affiliate; Silver Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

77

National Awards

George Rayson, Study for Messy Drawing, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 17, University School of Nashville, Nashville, TN. Elizabeth Mask, Teahcer; Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

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National Awards

Shauna Moore, Grade 12, Age 18, New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, New Orleans, LA. Lara Naughton, Teacher; Greater New Orleans Writing Project, Affiliate; Best in Grade Award.

The History of Winter Poetry

My grandpa foretold the bulge of my ginger cat, weary but pregnant in the blankets. We sold the cats and kept the blankets. Snow palmed us that winter. We shaped the bowl-cut that my grandpa foretold would swallow my older brother, who cracked the mirror. His ears jutted, pregnant with warmth, under blankets cold Jesse Arnholz, Peter, Photography. Grade 11, Age 17, Maret School, Washington, DC. Bill Crandall, Teacher, Region at Large, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

and crisp with memory as old as rolling snow. Snow whites out my windows. I am unloved— which my grandpa foretold. Dad plays poker, his shoulders swell. Mom weeps at ambulances, her buttons bust. Blankets hush pregnant bellies. I fold those blankets. I’m small, gutless for cats I sold: an armful of downy gingers. To grandpa, I’m a mutt that he regrets he foretold to my mother, pregnant in blankets, the day that it snowed.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Kayleigh Waters, R-18, Comic Art. Grade 12, Age 17, James I. O’Neill High School, Highland Falls, NY. Patricia Hassler, Teacher; Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

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National Awards

Randy Huan, top: Toy World, Digital Art. Grade 10, Age 15, Taipei American School, Taipei, Taiwan. David Badgley, Teacher; International Region at Large, Affiliate; Gold Medal. Madi Muller, Pinky Promise, Design. Grade 10, Age 16, Sunset High School, Portland, OR. Mary Cherveny, Teacher; Oregon Art Education Association, Affiliate; Gold Medal. Ha Min (Paul) Chung, left: Open Up My Thoughts, Digital Art. Grade 12, Age 18, Centreville High School, Clinton, VA. Kris Killinger, Teacher; Fairfax County Public Schools, Affiliate; Gold Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Breanne Pereira, Under the Sea Driveway, Photography. Grade 12, Age 17, Leilehua High School, Wahiawa, HI. Keith Sasada, Teacher; Hawai’i State Department of Education, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

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National Awards

Jane Herz, Grade 8, Age 13, Writopia Lab, New York, NY. Rebecca Wallace-Segall, Teacher, Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Speaking Freely, Again Poetry

I remember when I wore neon yellows,

I wish I could still wear neon yellows,

And bright, eye-burning oranges.

I wish I could walk into school wearing glasses and

Long, colorful beaded necklaces fell all the way to

Velcro sneakers.

my hips,

I would if I could.

And Lip Smackers greased my lips. I remember when twenty books would come in thick brown paper packages, And I would sit like a dog in my lobby waiting for their arrival. Glasses sat on my face, Velcro sneakers on my feet. I remember when we dipped my Polly Pockets into Jell-O chocolate pudding, And tore apart Ty Girlz. I remember when I didn’t care what anyone else thought, And I could say freely what I wanted to.

Now I wear grays and blues and blacks, No more eye-burning oranges. Henri Bendel necklaces fall right above my collarbone, And now Philosophy sits atop my lips. Now all the Baby Sitters Club books sit abandoned on a bookshelf. Glasses are long forgotten, And contacts have taken their place. Now we tear apart fashion magazines, Sephora catalogs galore. Now I care what people think, And my perfectly painted lips are sealed.

Rachel Stuart, left: Still Holding On, right: Blend In, Photography. Grade 12, Age 17, Miami Palmetto Senior High School, Miami, FL. Robert Friedman, Teacher, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Affiliate, Silver Medal with Distinction Photography Portfolio Award



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Emma Munson, The Room, Painting. Grade 11, Age 17, North Allegheny Senior High School, Wexford, PA. Frances Hawbaker, Teacher, La Roche College and North Allegheny School District, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

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National Awards

Jake Moody, Grade 7, Age 12, Deer Park Junior High School, Deer Park, TX. Diane Gordon, Teacher, Harris County Department of Education, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Puber-me Humor

According to my parents, I have a new attitude and

we all returned to the locker room. The smell was

a new smell. The change is happening as we speak.

unreal. It smelled like a mixture of feet, moldy

A year ago it started. My mom took me to the doc-

cheese, and wet dog. It made me want to puke.

tor and she confirmed it. It is medically diagnosed

Was that me? It couldn’t be, so naturally I blamed

so it must be official. I am going through puberty.

it on my best friend. “Cameron! You rank, dude.

It is not newsworthy, and the paparazzi will not

You need to put some Axe deodorant on, man.

be beating my door down for a picture, but it is

That is nasty.” Of course, he blamed the smell

important to me.

on me as any immature sixth-grade boy would



do, but I know the truth. It was him. After that,

A year ago I started sixth grade and entered

the planet called Junior High School. Aside from

I was sure I didn’t want to smell like Cameron,

the normal worries about school, like getting

so I started putting deodorant on every day, not

stuffed in a locker by an eighth grader and be-

just when I thought about it, as I had done before.

ing tripped in the cafeteria, I was pretty excited.

Eventually I think all the boys discovered they

I made it through the first week alive. However,

smelled as bad as Cameron had that day, so most

by the end of the week I noticed the first sign of

of them started lathering up too. I made sure I

change. In PE class, something was definitely dif-

smelled like a mixture of Febreze and whatever

ferent. After we took a few laps around the school,

cheap cologne I could buy at Walgreens when I left the locker room after that.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Lillian Fishman, Grade 12, Age 17, Weston High School, Weston, MA. Claire Schomp, Teacher; New England Art Education Conference and The Boston Globe, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Writing Portfolio Award.

How to Keep Your Sister’s Secret Flash Fiction

When you loll downstairs in the morning, don’t

you shower to feel the complete aloneness. Relish,

meet your mother’s eyes. Pour yourself cereal

when you are bored, the quick pulse of harboring

and the last of the milk. Survey yourself in the

a secret. Handle doorknobs only with the tips of

window’s shallow reflection and wish, again,

your fingers. Buy more milk. Take out the trash

that your face were longer, your lips fuller. Think

so your mother doesn’t see the bright carcasses

about yourself. Think of nothing to say when

of your sister’s pregnancy tests. Straighten your

your mother says “Emma,” and fathom that there

hair and cut off the parts that burn with kitchen

is such a thing as silence, that you don’t have to

scissors. Steal your sister’s mascara. Put it back

answer. Don’t tell your mother what you’re think-

because you feel sorry for her and you aren’t scared

ing. Don’t tell her what you dreamt. Don’t tell her

of her anymore but she doesn’t know that she’s

of your love affair with doorknobs.

powerless and you don’t want to break her heart.



Borrow her shiny shoes on Saturday morning and

Wait for your sister to whisper to you because

you’re 12, almost 13, and you already hear her

walk at the edges of the carpet in the hallways.

when she comes in at night while the radio’s on.

Put them back in the closet. Notice the way your

Wait for her to tell you why she’s retching in the

breath in silence is blue in the dark and wine-

dark, why she’s crying, why her eyes are black.

stained in the kitchen, unfurling like oil in water.

Don’t say to her “I love you.” When she smiles at

Leave the radio on at night. Wait for the doorknob

you, pretend you don’t know. Lock the door when

to wheel, unhurriedly, for your sister to spill in.

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National Awards

Kelsey McDonnell, Baby Birds, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 17, Phillipsburg High School. Phillipsburg, NJ. Jennifer Schilling-Horvath, Teacher; Montclair Art Museum, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Grace Chmielinski, Pears, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 17, Dighton-Rehoboth Regional High School, North Dighton, MA. Wendy Rutkowski, Teacher; New England Art Education Conference and The Boston Globe, Affiliate; Silver Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Rodrigo Castillo, Cardboard’s Edge, Fashion. Grade 12, Age 17, Everett High School, Everett, MA. Annette LeRay, Teacher; New England Art Education Conference, and The Boston Globe, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Dylan Weitzman, Growing Coral, Ceramics & Glass. Grade 12, Age 18, University School of Nova South, Fort Lauderdale, FL. Melanie Cohen, Teacher; American Learning Systems, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

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National Awards

Alejandrina Sanchez, Salustia, Fashion. Grade 11, Age 17, East Central High School, San Antonio, TX. Rebecca Kunz, Teacher; SAY Si (San Antonio Youth Yes), Affiliate; Gold Medal; Prismacolor Scholarship Award.



Jennifer Strickland, Woven, Fashion. Grade 12, Age 17, University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Winston-Salem, NC. Pam Griffin, Teacher; Barton College, Affiliate; Gold Medal. Alyssa Schwarz, Revolving Ring, Jewelry. Grade 12, Age 18, Ralston Valley High School, Arvada, CO. Bonny Colagrosso, Teacher; Colorado Art Education Association and Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

89

National Awards

AB Stone, top left: Caffeinated, bottom left: Propeller, top right: Multi-View Madness, Fashion. Grade 12, Age 17, Hutchison School, Memphis, TN. Anne Davey, Teacher; Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award

Josh Priddy, Blame Petroleum, Sculpture. Grade 12, Age 17, Bolton High School, Arlington, TN. Autumn Thron, Teacher, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

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National Awards

Gabi Lauzier, top left: Fertility Mantle, Jewelry. Grade 11, Age 16, University School of Nova South, Fort Lauderdale, FL. Melanie Cohen, Teacher; American Learning Systems, Affiliate; Gold Medal. Zora Martin, top right: Cacophony, Jewelry. Grade 12, Age 17, East High School, Wauwatosa, WI. Barbara Murray, Teacher; Milwaukee Art Museum, Affiliate; Gold Medal. Gabriel Behan, Target Practice, Jewelry. Grade 10, Age 15, Lakota East High School, Liberty Township, OH. Jesse Doman, Teacher; Art Machine Inc., Affiliate; Gold Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Jessicca Thompson, Grandpa George, Painting. Grade 12, Age 18, Lincoln-Way West High School, New Lenox, IL. Paul Faris, Teacher; Downers Grove North and South High Schools, Affiliate; Silver Medal. YooJung Lee, Waiting, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 18, WOW Art Studio, Old Tappan, NJ. Taehyun Kang, Teacher; Montclair Art Museum, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

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National Awards

Lily Cooper, Irish Ancestor, Painting. Grade 12, Age 17, Earl Wooster High School, Reno, NV. Rebecca Rosenberg, Teacher; Nevada Museum of Art, Affiliate; Gold Medal. Sarah Fischer, Felis Domesticus, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 18, Dupont Manual High School, Louisville, KY. Julie Tallent, Teacher; Jefferson County Public Schools, Affiliate; Gold Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

93

National Awards

Hannah Berger, 4th Birthday, Painting. Grade 12, Age 18, Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts, West Palm Beach, FL. Scott Armetta, Teacher; Educational Gallery Group (Eg2), Affiliate; Gold Medal.

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National Awards

Asher Feldman, Grade 8, Age 14, P.S. duPont Middle School, Wilmington, DE. Tracy Selekman, Teacher; National League of American Pen Women, Diamond State Branch, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

The Bird, the House, and the Man Science Fiction

Bird left the room, and he found himself alone in the place with Death. The crushed bones of his brothers, left so unceremoniously out in such a casual way… The man shivered, but he did not leave. He could not leave, be he bound by his own mind or a spell he did not know. Not that it mattered.

The man looked up from his reverie to find it dark. The door had shut of its own accord.

There was no light. The world was dark as was the world before darkness. Black as black before black. And then a light, piercing as an arrow through an arm. As the sun through water as viewed from below. But red. Blood red.

Two pin-pricks shone from where the man knew the window to be. By the meager light

of these two points, the man saw Bird slide into the room. She was even more emaciated than before, bone showing through her skin. Her flesh had melted away in places, leaving arteries and capillaries visible just inside open wounds. Behind her, a cloaked figure was framed in the doorway, the light coming from under his deep hood.

“Rise! Dance my servants! Dance a ballet to Death!” He cried, swinging an unseen hand

over the floor of bone. With a moan, bone met bone and dozens upon dozens of skeletons rose from the floor, pearly arms waving in an obscene mockery of dance.

He could not scream. He could not run. He simply stood, waiting for Death.



As Bird’s teeth dragged him by his throat to join the bones in their dance until the end of

time, the man found himself back in…what was it?

In that in-between place. The gray land between dream and consciousness, where any-

thing and everything was and wasn’t at the same time.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Camden Coxson, The Outcome, Painting. Grade 11, Age 16, Las Vegas Academy, Las Vegas, NV. Carol Treat, Teacher; Springs Preserve, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

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National Awards

Emily Frech, Grade 11, Age 16, Norman High School, Norman, OK. Elizabeth Ballard, Teacher; Tulsa Community College, Affiliate; American Voices Medal.

Green short story

It’s strange, the secrets parents keep from chil-



dren. Often they’re personal ones, things they’re

you are 9, nor is there one for when you are 11,

ashamed about, metaphorical skeletons in their

as my sister was. But stop we did as our world

metaphorical closets. This way, parents stay super-

continued to spin out of control. My father fell

heroes and dream people until their children are

into his work, growing distant and angry. My sis-

old enough to have secrets of their own.

ter disappeared, consumed by a group of friends



Alcoholism. Al-ko-hawl-iz-um. Five syllables

that replaced her family. My mother folded into

and a word I got right in my fifth-grade spelling bee.

herself, the metaphorical skeletons in her meta-



phorical closet becoming actual ones shaped like

When I was little, there was never alcohol in

There is no easy way to stop being 9 when

the house—no beer, no spirits. After parties, any

wine, vodka, and rum hidden deep behind jackets,

gifted bottles of wine would be thrown away.

shirts, and shoes. Years passed. She entered dif-

When I slept over at friends’ houses, it was strange

ferent rehab centers five more times. Sometime in

for me to see their parents having any at dinner.

those turning years, she exited her marriage to my

But soon enough, after the Hong Kong trip, bottles

father and her relationship with my sister. And I,

began to appear in sizes much larger than the one

perpetually frozen at 9 years old, rocked the two

in the hotel. And as more bottles appeared, more

of us in an embrace tight with equal measures of

things fell apart. Then, a month before we were

love and necessity.

supposed to move to Hong Kong, my mama went to rehab and I grew up.



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National Awards

Maggie Zhang, Grade 12, Age 18, Fayetteville-Manlius High School, Manlius, NY. Julie Parker, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Writing Portfolio Award.

The Stakes Poetry

Winning the lottery can kill a man,

how they aren’t meant to be touched,

my father likes to tell me.

how the carrot should always be left

He says this while walking

dangling in front of the palomino’s eyes,

in a frost-bitten garden, crushing

only for temptation.

the flowers, his footsteps staining

Once you have something, it’s no longer yours,

the lawn with dark ink

and he reaches into the leather lining

Life is naked without ambition,

of a breast pocket, slides a crumpled bill

he says, and I think of dreams,

across the counter, asks for the winning numbers, please.

Daniel Santa, (This page) Clarity, (Facing page) Father, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 17, New World School of the Arts, Miami, FL. Tom Wyroba, Teacher; Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Art Portfolio Award.

98

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National Awards

Lisa Muloma, Grade 11, Age 17, Park Tudor School, Indianapolis, IN. Jan Guffin, Teacher; Clowes Memorial Hall of Butler University and Hoosier Writing Project at IUPUI, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Nora Miller, Grade 12, Age 17, Urban Academy Laboratory High School, New York, NY. Rebecca WallaceSegall, Teacher, Writopia Lab; Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Writing Portfolio Award.

Bleacher Bum

All I Want

Poetry

Poetry

And it’s like everyone I see is soul

come out to coney island

music wrapped in skin and school spirit;

1.

yellowed pages of some long-winded

I hope I don’t choke you with my poems,

beautiful cliché,

And I hope there isn’t too much anchovy in

inhaling wind and smiling too much and talking

your salad dressing because

too loudly;

I know how much you hate that it’s in there

but I like rooms full of windows framing forests­— rooms where the air conditioning whispers dirty jokes, and it’s all hurricanes.

at all, All raw and subtle and alluding. 2. last summer we went to coney island beach and I traced you with my finger in the sand. I wish we could do it all again, The sand and the sun and all of it, but you’re straight and I’m ugly under all this skin. 3. I think I heard you coming in last night, but Maybe it was just the wind banging against the door. This is what it’s like not knowing, Or maybe this is what it’s like knowing. Your skin under the sand was smooth and unyielding. Maybe this is what it’s like to know.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

Cormac Cummiskey, Grade 11, Age 16, Joel Barlow High School, Redding, CT. Janice Garvey, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

Multiple Choice Persuasive Writing

Education is integral to the survival of America.



Predicated upon democratic principles, the

can education is declining. Lemann bemoans “the

nation requires an intelligent, informed, and ethical

heartbreakingly low quality of the education that

electorate. America’s current educational system is

many poor, urban, and minority children” receive,

faltering in the production of citizens a democratic

which has contributed to widening achievement

society needs.

gaps between privileged and less-privileged stu-



dents. In his Harper’s essay “Leveling the Field,”

The foundation of democratic education must

Evidence confirms that the quality of Ameri-

be accessibility, and America’s current educational

Christopher R. Beha asserts that “less than a

system largely succeeds in extending educational

quarter of New York’s public high school gradu-

opportunity to the public. Nicholas Lemann, in his

ates are deemed college-ready” and only “about

New Yorker essay “Schoolwork,” lauds the institu-

half of America’s high school graduates are ready

tion of “the world’s first system of universal public

for college-level reading.” Mark Slouka, in his

education” as “one of the great achievements of

Harper’s essay “Dehumanized,” claims that “two-

American democracy.” The fact that “about a sixth

thirds of our college graduates” are “unable to read

of the population” can be found under the roof

a text and draw rational inferences.” Citizens who

of a public school on any given weekday is indeed

are incapable of thinking at a higher, college level,

a democratic triumph. What students are taught

and who do not possess advanced reading skills,

under these roofs, however, is the true litmus test

undermine democratic society insofar as they have

of democracy.

a limited ability to render informed judgment on the actions of public officials.

100

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National Awards

Naomi Hironaka, Birthplace of Fools, Painting. Grade 12, Age 17, Westview High School, San Diego, CA. Keith Opstad, Teacher; California Arts Project, Affiliate; Gold Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

101

National Awards

Jessi Glueck, Grade 11, Age 16, Blue Valley North High School, Overland Park, KS. Michele Radio-Buche, Teacher; Prairie Lands Writing Project at Missouri Western State University, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

Learning to Read Personal Essay / Memoir

In time, I grew to understand Tolkien and then Dickens, Austen, Wilde, Thackeray, Dostoevsky, and Frost. By the time I was a junior in high school, I figured there wasn’t much important literature I couldn’t read.

I was wrong. I realized this the summer before my junior year when I picked up John

Milton’s Paradise Lost. It had been gathering dust on a shelf in a friend’s basement, and I thought it looked old and British—just my type. But as I read the first stanza of the epic poem, my mind reeled. Where was the subject? Where was the verb? What on earth were all of these biblical allusions? I struggled on until my temples throbbed and I realized I wasn’t getting anywhere. Then I put the book down, heartily dissatisfied with myself.

A few months later, I was presented with the opportunity to take a graduate-level

class on Milton at a local university. I’d finished all the English classes my high school offered, and the Milton course promised close readings and intense class discussions, which sounded fun. My parents hesitated. “Won’t it be too hard?” they asked. “You have all the time in the world to study Milton. Why not start off with something a little easier?” The 5-year-old in me who was undaunted by Tolkien’s long descriptions responded, “No, this is the course I want to take.”

I walked into class the first day and discovered I was the only one under the age of

20 in the room. I sat silent in a corner as the senior English majors and graduate students chatted about the comparative advantages of various courses and books. At last the professor brought the class to order.

“You’re all here for Milton, right?” she asked with a grin. There was a collective

murmur of assent.

102

“Brave souls,” she said.

www.artandwriting.org

National Awards

Khalil Green, Toy Monster, Sculpture. Grade 8, Age 12, Highland Middle School, Louisville, KY. Tammy Podbelsek, Teacher; Jefferson County Public Schools, Affiliate; Gold Medal.



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National Awards Aliza Schaffer, top left: The Followers, Photography. Grade 10, Age 15, Fairfield Ludlowe High School, Fairfield, CT. Michele Hermsen, Teacher; Connecticut Art Education Association, Affiliate; Silver Medal. Joshua Halper, bottom right: The Ghost of Robert Johnson, Printmaking. Grade 12, Age 17, University School of Nashville, Nashville, TN. Lesley Patterson-Marx, Teacher; Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art, Affiliate; Gold Medal. Powers Hommel, Calendar, Design. Grade 12, Age 17, Bishop Fenwick High School, Peabody, MA. Erin Grocki, Teacher; New England Art Education Conference and The Boston Globe, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

104

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National Awards Mary Elizabeth Phillips, My Snack Collided With My Art, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 17, Wando High School, Mount Pleasant, SC. Mary Catherine Middleton, Teacher; Lander University, Affiliate; Gold Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

105

National Awards

Aubrey Knight, Grade 12, Age 17, South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, Greenville, SC. Scott Gould, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Writing Portfolio Award.

Pistols, Needles, and Armchairs: A Genetic Road Map Personal Essay / Memoir

It turns out that many of my family members—distant and close—are out of their minds. I could collect them—thumbtack their pictures to a family tree and map out the bad genes. I could trace their lineage from father to sister to daughter to me. Three of my grandfather’s sisters killed themselves. My great-great-aunt had her children seized by the state, then scattered among family members and church homes. Closeted housewife alcoholics, sneaking glasses of wine between dinner and dishes, people laced with bipolar disorder and depression, people who see ghostly visions patched together by their mind. The sickness in my family will never leave us. It’s in us and part of us and bred into us.

Even those who cut ties to the family, those who left the poor low country

where their parents trapped themselves, can’t fight the genes that interlace them with their crazy cousins and uncles and parents. My mom’s cousin Bill fled the swirling chemical vats of pulp that filled Georgetown, South Carolina, with a musky sweet taste in the air. He moved away, went to college, and found a new life out of the influence of his unstable mother.

He became a psychologist, and really loved his work and his patients—young

abused women. But constantly hearing stories of domestic brawls—mad moments of glass cuts and heavy-handed punches and locked bathroom doors—wore him down until he couldn’t keep his own life separate from his clients’. A voice entered Bill’s head. It pressured him to pursue the women’s violent boyfriends, to punish them for their abuse. I don’t know if he actually listened to them or not. I don’t know how his family and wife found out what was happening to him. All I know is, once he’d been put on enough medicine to stop his delusions, he had to get out of the counseling business.

106

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National Awards

Grant Stoner, Grade 12, Age 18, Homeschool Academic Teaching Support, Salunga, PA. Elizabeth Jones, Teacher; Lancaster Public Library, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Mr. Ten Fifty flash fiction



The money was not the goal. He was motivated

out of the store. He slipped behind the wheel of a

by the physical rush and mental challenge that

“borrowed” car and was gone.

he could get from robbery. He decided he would



pilfer ten dollars and fifty cents from each place. It

days later, he robbed a department store without

was enough to make him feel like he accomplished

even the slightest hint of a sniffle. Then he went

something without damaging the targeted

on to rob a small jewelry store, taking his usual

businesses.

ten dollars and fifty cents without even looking at



the gold. After that he went on to rob a high-class

Saturday mid-afternoon, he reached a small

So began the mystery of Mr. Ten Fifty. A few

grocery store that was about an hour from his

watch and necklace store. He held the security

hometown. He simply slipped his handkerchief up

guard under gunpoint while robbing the store,

over his face, pulled his hat low over his eyes, and

then left with squealing tires in another newly

stepped into the store. He then pulled a small gun

“borrowed” car.

from his coat pocket. Pointing it at the man behind



the counter, he demanded ten dollars and fifty

papers were having a heyday with the mysterious

cents in a gruff voice. It was quickly brought forth

identity of Mr. Ten Fifty. Many people wished the

by the panic-stricken man. He received the money,

gentleman robber well, but others considered his

slipped the gun back into his pocket, and backed

unlawful actions to be in bad taste.

Mr. Ten Fifty became a household name. The

Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National Awards

DJ Cleavinger, Multiple Personalities, Mixed Media. Grade 7, Age 12, Schain Studios, Cincinnati, OH. Merlene Schain, Teacher; Art Machine Inc., Affiliate; Gold Medal.

108

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National Awards

Rachel Brown, Grade 12, Age 16, Ursuline Academy, Wilmington, DE. David Cavagnino, Teacher; National League of American Pen Women, Diamond State Branch, Affiliate; Silver Medal with Distinction Writing Portfolio Award.

How to Be a Clown Short Story

Your knees feel like picked locks, twisting inside

ask any questions until you’ve nearly left. Then,

the cartilage frames; you walk around to the house

all you say is Where do you get so many of them?

in the sunlight and everything looks like an art-

He looks sad for a moment, which you wouldn’t

house movie, and when you get to the door you

have realized if you hadn’t been learning to think

knock the agreed-upon code, shave and a haircut,

of everyone you meet as an audience to be read. He

your hands intentionally loose so they don’t shake.

tells you they are the costumes of clowns who have

When the door opens, you can only walk through

died, or were too afraid to continue as they had

it when you realize it’s either do that or fall. In

been, and then he shuts the door behind you. You

this stranger’s basement, the costumes are lined up

walk back to the car, trying not to look like you’re

along the old, splintering walls in a way that looks

ashamed or frightened (you will not be like those

careless and haphazard. But when you pick one up,

cowards who used to wear the costumes that are

you realize it’s soft and clean, that the stooped, ner-

yours now).

vous man who is selling you costumes for less than



half-price loves them nearly as much as you do.

ing you as you close the car door, but you don’t



hunch your shoulders and you keep your eyes level.

You find the ones you think will fit and a case

You feel like there are a hundred people watch-

of six shades of paint; you give him the money he

The second key to a good performance is not giv-

asks for with no hesitation at all and you don’t

ing away any of your sadness, ever. Your job is to make people happy.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

109

National Awards

Othon Tejeda, Grandpa’s House, Drawing. Grade 12, Age 17, Austin High School, Austin, TX. Jeff Seckar-Martinez, Teacher; St. Stephen’s School, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

110

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National Awards

Jacob Fritz, Grade 9, Age 15, Canterbury School, Fort Wayne, IN. Alice Hancock, Teacher; Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Affiliate; Silver Medal

Fahrenheit 451: Is Yesterday’s Fiction Today’s Reality? journalism

In the novel Fahrenheit 451, Mildred Montag, wife of protagonist Guy Montag, ponders: “How long you figure before we save up and get the fourth wall torn out and a fourth wall-TV put in? It’s only two thousand dollars.” Not only is the price in the right ballpark for today’s market, but the idea of having multiple televisions per household has certainly come to fruition. In fact, 66 percent of U.S. homes own three or more televisions. Sixty percent of our children, our next generation, have a television right in their bedroom. Yes, it’s true that the homes in Bradbury’s world had entire walls devoted to television, but have you noticed all the commercials for the new 80-inch LCD TVs?

Steve Armstrong, a 46-year-old father of two young girls, states, “I am too tired to

come home and read a book. Reading makes me think too much when I’d rather just zone out in front of the TV and watch Survivor.” He goes on to say he “used to read to the girls, but now that they are older, it’s much easier to put in a video and let them drift off to sleep.”

Eighteen-year-old Ryan Hire, a freshman at Purdue University, claims reading is

“old-fashioned. Why read when I can Google something or look it up on Wikipedia?” Hire brings up a good point: High-speed Internet is readily available in this country and in seconds allows us access to charts, pictures, and text on any subject we want. The days of heading to the nearest library to conduct one’s research in a vast collection of encyclopedias are now extinct. You don’t even need to leave your house to buy food, clothes, or even your next car. How did we ever manage without the Internet, right?



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

111

National Awards

Max Seiler, Traverse, Sculpture. Grade 12, Age 17, AP Studio Independent Study, Delmar, NY. Deborah Zlotsky, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

112

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National Awards Kanya Wilder, top right: Razor Wave, Sculpture. Grade 12, Age 17, St. Petersburg High School, St. Petersburg, FL. Marty Loftus, Teacher; Pinellas County Art Region, Affiliate; American Visions Medal. Robert Brooks, bottom right: Bottle 3, Ceramics & Glass. Grade 11, Age 17, Pace Academy, Atlanta, GA. Rick Berman, Teacher; Georgia State University Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Christopher Lauer, top left: The Light at the End of the Table, Design. Grade 8, Age 14, St. Andrews United Methodist Day School, Edgewater, MD. Hayley Meyer, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Silver Medal. Emilio Martinez, bottom left: Inside Out House, Sculpture. Grade 12, Age 17, Friends School of Baltimore, Baltimore, MD. Erin Hall, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Gold Medal.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

113

National Awards

Victoria Wirkijowski, Nowhere Man, Digital Art. Grade 8, Age 13, Holicong Middle School, Doylestown, PA. Kristin Ritter, Teacher; Philadelphia Arts in Education, Affiliate; Gold Medal.

114

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National Awards

Elizabeth Gobbo, Grade 11, Age 16, Hood River Valley High School, Hood River, OR. Gabe Judah, Teacher; Region at Large, Affiliate; Silver Medal.

Puna Flash Fiction

She works for herself, and no one else. Not for her mother, her dead father, her refusing-dead grandmother, or her loser brothers and sisters back home, crowding all together under one sagging roof. Not for the old ways or her people or old Laos. Now she works for herself, and for America.

Still, after 15 years, America does not work for her. She lives and

works in dark grease and cinderblock, and bathes her daughter each night in spindled shadows and cracked cold water. She tells her daughter that when she grows up she will know how to care for herself, because she will be an American. She left the girl’s father years ago; he did not work at all. You already are working, he would say, I do not have to work. You provide for me, you are the wife. But he is gone now, she has let him fade back into the same part of her mind that contains the rest of them, the dead and the refusing-dead and the wishing-they-weredead, all crowded, one sagging roof.

For five years she has made her living as a waitress in a bowling

alley. The cook is from her country, from Laos, and he makes drunken noodles and basil rice next to the burgers and French fries. The drunken noodle is very good, very spicy and soft, like home. No one ever orders it, they all want pizza and Coca-Cola and M&M’s to swallow between rounds, shooting terrorists with purple machine guns in the arcade. She watches the American children who play on the games and scream and drop food on the floor and sweep it into the corners with the hard heels of their bowling shoes. Her daughter could almost be their age; she will enter the first grade in September, after the summer is over. She wonders if she is like them. She does not get to see her much; she is never home, always working.



Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

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National

Winners

Alabama Mary Ball Braxton Barker Annabelle DeCamillis Jamie Earnest Buddy Gardner Virginia Hayley Summer Johnson Jasmine Jones Cami Lee Kueckelhan Arjun Lakhanpal Gibbs Lee Leo Styslinger Addison Tambling Kaya Turan Katie Volkman Danielle Williamson Rachel Williamson Zoe Zahariadis Alaska Megan Edic Emma Funk Arizona Priscilla Beck Elise Boyle Andres Flemons Emma Klajbor Bogdan Korishev Haley Lee Arkansas Alyssa Blakeney Katie Neilson California Rachel Arena Christina Bartzokis Nachiketa Baru Audrey Bell Claire Benarroch Bray Caverly Max Chernov Mynor Chinchilla Stephanie Delazeri Renée Dembo Tucker Elkins Emily Fockler Jessica Gardner Annakai Geshlider Ava Gordon Stephanie Guo Chae Won Han Naomi Hironaka Catherine Huang Sun Young Im Anna Kelly Vincent Kings Joanne Koong Alexis Ladge Kelsey Lee Sol Ah Lee Rennie Lembo Jessica May Lin

116

Chloe Lister Hannah Lokos Asusena Lopez Laura Luo Sella Malin Matthew Mantel Carolina Navarro Samantha Newby Benjamin Nikssarian Justin Noel Tomi Okuno Megan Oppenheim Simone Paci Tony Pan Sydney Pardo Lily Patterson David Rathmann-Bloch Maria Reyes-Garza Jake Schapiro Isabelle Sennett Jack Taylor Vivian Tong Emma Townley-Smith Tammy Tseng Brian Wang David Weaver Siying Wu Brenna Xiang Xinyi Xie Yvonne Ye Kelly Yeo

Colorado Anakata Aschenbrenner Niré Aschenbrenner Jenna Batch Morgan Bierbaum Caroline Brewer Anna Charney Aspen Clark Edgar Garcia-Jimenez Karissa Gonzalez-Othon Kassia Gordon Kodi Hays Anisa Heins Emily Hill Katherine Hortik Charlie Humpal Amanda Lewis Jaime Midgyett Honor Miles Claire Ricks Tori Schaus Maddy Schneider David Schurman Alyssa Schwarz Amber Smith Arianne Thomas Annie Worford Connecticut Gita Abhiraman Michela Bentel Russell Bogue Cormac Cummiskey

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Felipe Di Poi Sophia Dillon Riley Doherty Joseph Gentile Juliette Granger Summer Gray Marissa Iamartino Rachel Jones Peter LaBerge Alexa Lecko Carles Lopez Nicole Lorinsky Sarah Munger Nicole Narea Pauline Nyren Mairi Poisson Alex Rainone Aliza Schaffer

Delaware Stephanie Bailey Courtney Bannon Rachel Brown Asher Feldman Alexa Hazel Chris Newton Nathan Robison Miranda Rosaio Brianne Sands Kyna Smith Emma Stovicek Kenneth Testa George Thompson Richard Werbe Kevin Zong District of Columbia Jesse Arnholz Sarah Cooke Emily Crehan Pablo Das Julia Dohner Emily Fox-Penner Olivia Mendelson Gillian Page Rachel Page Adam Reid Florida David Acosta Bobby Adderley Jorge Aguilar Alexandra Akimov Tisha Antique Dylan Aponte Nicole Arias Dillon Arthur Josh Ascherman Amanda Barrios Abby Bartholomew Chloe Baur Kathlyn Belizaire Alexandria Bennett Andy Bennett Hannah Berger

Madeline Bertelson Jessica Bethel Catherine Bethmann Irina Bit-Babik Bracha Brauser Valentina Cabezas Blake Caccavale Hannah Cai Yrina Castells Diego Castro Savanah Catalina Coleen Chan Ashley Chase Brianna Chavez-Chase Hannah Chelgren Britney Clark Thomas Cody Megan Corley Madeline Cowen Kelly Creef Elizabeth Curley Ariana Cutler Malarie Delgado Jacob Derbabian Liberty Deskin Kyle Dunn Michelle Farina Ashley Ferro Katelyn Fitzgerald Jalyn Fortosis Daniel Gallo Ivan Garcia Jessica Garcia Katya Garcia Allison Golden Taylor Goldenberg Tyler Goss Heather Grace Sabrina Granados Bonnie Green Rory Harper Seanna Harris Maeve Hedstrom Yann Herry Reilly Hogue Sidney Howard Gaetano Icangelo Emily Jackson Reinaldo Jaffet Emily Kopas Rori Kotch Taylor Krauser Daria Krylova Alexa Langen Gabi Lauzier Vanessa Leiva Debra Marcus Jacqueline Medina Alexa Mekita Stephanie Metz Emily Minsky Mariya Muravia Pratheek Nagaraj Alec Nguyen Ashley Obel

Kira Oglesby Joseph Parrella Megan Perritt Kirin Pino Chikanma Pondexter Sofia Pozsonyiova Christie Ramsaran Zachary Rapaport Tatiana Reina Maya Renaud Mika Rosenberg Santiago Sabogal Shelby Salomone Evy Sands Cate Sans Daniel Santa John Schmittau Anna Schmitz Megan Schmunk Max Shavrick Anna Silina Brittany Soder Nathan Solitaire Rachael Strauss Rachel Stuart Stefanie Suarez Erika Suhr Jessica Suhr Katelyn Surprenant Maria Tamayo Abigail Tami Sarah Thaler Alexander Valdes Nicole Valmana Natalie Van Brunt Rebekak Vargas Amanda Vasquez Brenda Vazquez Carolina Vogt Abby Walters Christopher Watkins Lauren Watters Stephanie Weil Dylan Weitzman Kanya Wilder Chandler Wilson Madeline Windsor Lindsay Wright Di Wu Felicia Yan Kimi Yonamine Angelica Yudasto Samantha Zackheim Aiste Zalepuga Leah Zeng Georgia Briana Achtman Natorian Allen Adam Amram Robert Brooks Katie Broyles Nahyun Chung Emily Cowart Nikolas Farrer

National Awards Grant Flinn Emily Hudson Alexandra Huey Ben Katz Emily Kearney-Williams Isaac Kerns Ali Kight Eileen Kim Elishah Lee Sarah Lee Victoria Lee Brooke Lingard Darcy Melton Russell Pershing Seohi Song Avery Tutt Christina Voss Trevor Weigle Hawaii Rae Alexie Bali Hannah Broderick Caesar Caberto Suszett Emwalu Kevin Fajardo Nicholas Farrant Carina Fasi Michelle Fontillas Joshua Gonzaga Garrett Griffith Rachael Heller Kamden Hilliard Christine Hirata Pascha Hokama Tobin Huitt Kiara Kobayashi Lindsay Milhorn Shannon Paaaina Breanne Pereira Kyanna Spain Kristen Tanabe Amy Uehara Xiaotong Xu Idaho Madison Inouye Molly McGinnis Olivia Thomas Porter Wilkes Rosa Wolf Illinois Minha Aamer Sammie Anselmo Katie Berendt Ransom Bergen Bridget Bicek Brendan Blaber Dominique Bloink Alyssa Brdlik Camara Brown Edeline Chen Hayun Cho Hannah Clemens Elizabeth Cogan Courtney Cook Leighanne Crawford Abby Dalsin Victoria DeLeon Rachel Fligor Ashley Fox Brenna Guiney



Matthew Jungert Emilie Karl Maisha Khan Robert Konzelmann Jana Kotysan Amelia Lozada Emily Mack Tiana Maldonado Thomas Mereness Dorothy Moore Sofia Moran Jordan Murphy Abby Nierman Sami Perillo Zoe Persico Nicolas Pucheta Lisa Qi Savannah Quintanar Hannah Resnick Maegan Richards Natalie Richardson Minia Rios Bethani Rothrock Dylan Shomidie Katherine Sivits Hannah Srajer Jessicca Thompson Ian Todd Julia Wallace Kylie Walsh Dominique Whitney Malik Wingard Francisco Zafra Indiana Jake Adam Elizabeth Alexander Mark Anella Brandon Baird Claire Baker Ally Berry Esther Boller Kirsten Brown Joseph Cahoe Theresa Carpenter Megan Crimmins Eli Crow Preston Dean Estella Donis Greg Dugdale Teresa Dunn Erin Feldmeyer Jacob Fritz Savannah Furniss Ivan Gutierrez Molly Henderson Hannah Hesterman Wei-Wei Huang Apsara Iyer Annika Johnston Bridget Kelly Nora Kelly Zachery Kittaka Kurt Kobrehel Sarah Lehman Karly Lounds Bethany Lumsdaine Jessica Mann Nilson Mendez Jacob Metzger Riley Miller John Milstone Lisa Muloma

Dannielle Murphy Emily Mylrea Braxton Newman Thong Nguyen Neha Patel Sean Peters Logan Pollock Josh Query Mariah Rippy Alexander Rodgers Amanda Rodriguez Meredith Rogers Hannah Siegel Paige Sordelet Tayler Sordelet Margie Stutzman Mackenzie Thompson Ava Tomasula y Garcia Ashley Vandervelde Nick Vare Denise Veldman Brandon Wilder Emily Young Iowa Spenser Bower Madison Clark Matthew Davis Taylor Geu Abby Hamilton Anna Prozorov Stefan Schmidt Natalie Shoultz Kansas Corson Androski Kayla Deines Nic Dikin Zach Duff Aaron Gable Jessi Glueck Crystal Gutierrez Jim Kittel Christopher Lericos Matthew Oliver Matthew Rogers Lynn Rojas Paige Shelton Megan Stessman Kentucky Megan Beischel Molly Bramble Mara Cobb Lutricia Crowder Sarah Fischer Kathleen Gatti Khalil Green William Harper Joseph Hodapp Karlin Kimmel Jacqueline Knight Madison Koczo Szofia Komaromy-Hiller Lauren Leonard Delaney Lewis Olivia Morris Zehui Ni Ally Parel Sydney Radcliff Lauren Rassenfoss Maura Reilly-Ulmanek

Shelby Rogers Kelly Rosen Harriet Sudduth Meredith Sweasy Christa Thomas Ian Timothy Lydia Voss Madison Wade Wyatt Wasz-Piper Felicia Whitehouse Elizabeth Wilder Louisiana Bixby Boss Darby Cressy Monika Daniels Sarah Devlin Lila Dunlap Tori Lambert Cecilia McAlear Shauna Moore Sara Pendleton Margot Rieth Hannah Schumacher Annalise Torcson Lucy Tucker Abraham Younes Lylla Younes Maine Morgan Elkins Patrick Menard Allison Pierpont Maryland Michael Anderson Andrea Bajcsy John Baker Gracelyn Biamonte Kamal Browne Margo Csipo Sarah Gingerich Caleb Harrison Cecilia Hsu Alizay Jalisi Hye Youn Kim Marley Kinkead Lucas Kircher Christopher Lauer Emilio Martinez Gina Maskell Sarah Miller Jorden Myers Evan Numbers Bailey Parater Nicole Parker Taylor Parks Ruthie Prillaman David Ruppert Cassie Tucker Ariana Vaeth Masha Yazlovsky Massachusetts Lindsey Ades Clare Aubuchon Cendana Auger Noah Baker Mark Blackwell Audrey Bransfield Phung Bui Zach Bunick

Anne Burke Wyatt Burns Cameron Cabo Olivia Canestrari Rodrigo Castillo Alli Caulfield Branndon Chen Grace Chmielinski Haeyeon Cho Michelle Chung Sam Cusson Emily Davis Aimee Dearias Willy DeConto Katie Denenberg Meredith Disessa Sadie Dix Malcolm Donaldson Lillian Fishman Casey Flach Rosalia Fodera Leah Fortes Olivia Foster Alexander Frankiewicz Zoe Freedman Coleman Sorrel Galantowicz Milan Gary Marina Goba Phoebe Goldenberg Alex Goodisman Hannah Grace Mark Grande Connor Gravelle Julia Himmel Powers Hommel Alexa Horwitz Hyun Cheol Jung John Kasarda Caroline Kelly Abby Kennelly Olivia Kennis Nicole Kestenberg Jennie Kim Janine Ko Bobby Kwon Elena Lacourt Rebecca Leanos Mateo Lincoln Madeline Lindfors Matthew Loreti Karintha Lowe Jessica Lu Adam Macalister Courtney McCain Grace Moore Georga Morgan-Fleming Aaron Orbey Toula Papadopoulos Mirian Pineda Shelly Pires Matthew Preston Katelyn Reichheld Shannon Reilly Kathrine Reynolds Alison Saparoff Natalie Schoen Leandra Sethares Julia Shenefield Carolyn Shin Rachel Silverman Madeline Smith Sarah Spencer

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National Awards Tayler Stander Quentin Stipp Jonathan Stricker Emma Sunog Margery Tong Ann Tran Dan Tuttle Catherine Wang James Whalen Victoria White Cary Williams Joel Wilner Dasom Yoon Carol Zhang Michigan Nicole Acton Philippa Adam Sojourner Ahebee Karley Bauroth Kaitlyn Becker Todd Boudos Madeleine Bradford Matthew Buday Min Jeong Cho Nicole Cischke Kelly Clare Chelsea Dahline Carly Daiek Jonathan D’Ambrosio Michael Demeter Miranda Dick Erica DiClemente Kathryn Elms Michelle Farias Ana Lucia Fernandez Abby Fetke Matt Fields Leah Fifer Margaret Flowers Margaux Forster Aleksa Fortuna Charlotte Fox Micaela Frakes-Zieger Ioana Grosu Mollie Hansen Mary Harvey Emily Hittner Cunningham Kylie Johnston Tatiana Kerwin Cagney Krzywosinski Abigail Kuohn Jessica Lalonde Marin Larsen Chris Lee Sella Malin Ryan Manauis Devon McKinley Emily Mesner Elizabeth Milne Steven Miner Crista Mulder Kara Mullison Yeonsu Oh Shelby Packer Lauren Pankin Alexandra Pittel Ashley Presson Hailey Rozenberg Shelby Rummel-Knott Laura Rusch

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Liam Rush Mihyun Ryu Andrew Schultz Samantha Schuman Simon Schuster Alessa Serna Dillan Smith Alyssa Spytman Alison Suwalkowski Elliott Thomas Rachel Toeppe Amber Unema Leah van Allsburg Chelsea Vincent Claire Wang Jeremy Webster Lucienne Woods Matt Wyman Jiwon Yun Minnesota Elena Anderson Kyra Anderson Christine Catlin Janice Chung Paris Ebersviller Elena Kahn Regan Kerfeld Hee Soo Kim Jennifer Kim Sarah Mevissen Shiloh O’Rourke Marcus Pasell Erin Schwagerl Lauren Skager Nikita Skorykh Aliya Tourville Mississippi Nicolette Albert Samantha Alliston George Bennett Merrilee Bufkin Emily Carr Aaron Cooper Catherine Croney Avery Dennison Kayla Lee Sarah Santucci Mary-Hannah Smith Mary Taylor Arielle Wallace Charlotte Wang Diane Ward Missouri James Andrews Elena Bellamy Marlee Cox Madeline Gill Logan Hollinger Hannah Kelley Natalee Merola Hannah Pointer John Rosher Ben Shinogle Nebraska Ruby Bless Casey Callahan Katharen Hedges Caitlin Hochwender

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Danny Houdek Sarah Kort Tyler Manion Katie Samson Jenny Solheim Liz Thon Georgiana Tut Richard Warner Yan Zhang Nevada Amber Aramini Jessica Beck Lily Cooper Camden Coxson Bria Hansen Aimee Lowenstern Janelle McCarthy Alejandra Muneton-Carrera Jacquelyn Nader Amanda Newman Alexandra Springer Ryan Tingey Kevin Wegener Colton Witt New Hampshire Gillan Doty Jordan Firkey Allison Gardner Charles Gould Max Norton Joohee Ui Karen Yuan New Jersey Sarah Abrahamsen Erika Andal Janaki Chadha Yihan Chou Joyce Chu Yeon Jae Chung Shruthi Deivasigamani Alexa Derman Laura French Alexis Inguaggiato Yuchen Ji Yixin Jiao Hee Tak Jung Yena Kang Helen Laser Minha Lee Yoojung Lee Shannon Levin Florence Ma Kelsey McDonnell Deryn Mierlak Caroline Miller Stephanie Moon June Soo Park Jiyeon Rim HeeKyeong Seo Hannah Septoff Deirdre Sheridan Alicia Suarez Monica Sun Jaeyong Sung Sixiao Tang Adriana van Manen Andrew Velez Catherine Wong

Jihoon Woo Jessica Xu Batrek Yassa Amy Zhang Zoe Zylowski New Mexico Reed Bobroff Savoy Rath Rhiana Rivas Oakley Robertson Rachel Youn New York Ellie Abrams Sharon Adams Odreka Ahmed Nadine Aho Tabitha Akins Sydney Allard Jason Alweis Seonghun An Lashanda Anakwah Zora Arum Andrew Bannar Nikolas Bentel Rachel Berger Chelsea Borsack Jamie Briscoe Rebecca Anne Brudner Tyler Burr Amy Butcher Randi Butler Erin Cadora Tristan Cannan Amber Canorro Daniel Carlon Vincent Carlucci Pauline Ceraulo Lainey Chippero Youjin Cho Janice Choi Jung Min Choi Yirang Choi Jin Soo Chun Flora Collins Madeleine Cravens Angie Cui Terrance Daye Vance Dekker-Vargas Alexandra Denton Isabella Di Pietro Andrea Dobbie Anna Emy Stephanie Engelmann Claudia Fang Mia Farinelli Lauren Feiner Kalia Firester Aisling Flaherty Oscar Flores Mollie Forman Anna Franceschelli Kaitlynn Franey Karina Franke Joyce Freitag Ian Garrity Michael Gellman Jacob Ginsberg Emma Giordano Isabella Giovannini Amelia Goldberg

Emma Goldberg Gabriella Gonzales Chloe Gordon Samantha Greenky Marcela Grillo Mariel Grosshtern Erika Harper Caleb Harrington Jordan Harris Darcy Haylor Margaret Heftler Nathan Hellstern Emily Henderson Jane Herz Dante Hin-Gasco Matt Holmes Eui Jip Hwang Nicole Im Leda Jaquin E Jeremijenko-Conley Bin Jin Jessica Jones Nia Judelson Nicholas Judt Teddy Katz Cate Kenworthy Ian Kessler Alex Kim Cheryl Kim Eileen Kim Hyun Kim Jae Eun Kim Ji Hyun Kim Min Soo Kim Mirhee Kim Elizabeth Klammer Zachary Kligler Nadya Kronis Hiokit Lao Taylor Lashley Claire Lee HyeJoo Lee Jee Won Lee Miya Lee Soo Ji Lee Michal Leibowitz E-rim Lim David Liu Francesca Longo Eliana Lorch Annie Loucka Emily Maar Micaela Macagnone Hannah MacLagger Julia Marino Alice Markham-Cantor Cassandra Martensen Will Mayer Grace McLeod Diana Mellow Max Messie Rachel Mikofsky Rose Miles Anna Miller Nora Miller Angelica Modabber Thea Moerman Daniel Moon Shinji Moon Samantha Moran Gabriela Mota Jacqui Neber

National Awards Leanna O’Brien Erika O’Neill Troy O’Neill Chaya Sara Oppenheim Erin Palumbo Soyoung Park Paige Perez Seleena Phillip Justin Pietropaoli Joe Polsky Alexandra Puleo Anjali Raghunathan Allison Rainsby Micaela Raviv Jeremy Reynolds Meg Reynolds Michelle Ricklin Erika Riley Cassidy Robishaw Gussie Roc Sarah Rodeo Jennifer Sacks Alicia Schleifman Brian Schmitt Rachael Schwartz Harry Seabrook Jack Seibert Max Seiler HeeKyeong Seo Chris Shaw Ian Sherman Clara Siegmund Farhat Sikder Farhat Sikder Kristina Sinitsin Nick Smolenski Benjamin Sobel Carly Sorenson Miranda Spencer Elisabeth Sprague Olivia Stovicek Sophie Strand Noa Street-Sachs Ye-bin Suh Helen Sywalski Annalee Tai Claudia Tanney Madelaine Taylor Rebecca Teich Kristjan Tomasson Stephanie Tomasson Julia Tompkins Joshua van Biema Alina Wang Alexandra Warrick Jacob Wasserman Kayleigh Waters Makayla Webber Evan Weeks Zoe Wellner Annmarie Wiehenstroer Lacee Wiestner Erin Willey Kai Williams Molly Williams Tiki Wojcik Jake Wolf Lucinda Wong Christopher Wu Benjamin Xu Matthew Yafcak Wonseok Yang Phyllis Yao



Annabel Young Sylvia Yu Wonpyong Yu Megan Yuan Maggie Zhang Karen Zheng Amy Zimmerman North Carolina Emily Askew Rebecca Austin Sierra Bradshaw- Kreimer Elizabeth Brown Michaela Brown Ivana Chan Kate Condon Ellie Czejkowski Audrey Davis Caroline Drew Taylor Edwards Abigail Hartley Goliath Hunt Brendan Kerlin Stella Kimsey-White Kelli King Samantha Lewis Stuart Mason Andrew Maxwell Kassidy McCann Morgan McManus Erin McNaughton Meredith Miller Ana Montesdeoca Alexa Nix Ben Osborne Austin Palenick Zoe Pruitt Tara Robert Brianna Robinson Hunter Ross Timothy Rozansky Carly Seifert Madison Sims Alyssa Sprinkle Shelby Stocton Jennifer Strickland Allison Tate Harvey Thomason Koviet Tran Caswell Turner Rachel Uri Monina Varela Nicole Watson Jane Wester Huntleigh Williams Ohio Benita Alveranga Claire Ashmead Shaina Bahler Feiruz Bakthir Gabriel Behan Sierra Blumenthal Julia Bouzaher Samantha Brinkman Delaney Caton Emma Chalk Zoe Cheng Madeline Chernosky Kathryn Ciolkevich Michaella Cipriani

DJ Cleavinger James Clement Jesse Clevenger Brittney Combs Micaela Cottman Margaret Cregan Manuel Cuellar Sarah Cunningham Anna D’Amico Kylie Daniels Thomas Dannemiller Marisa DeSanto Ashley Dillon Ceci Donovan Amelia Drew Brittney Drum Rowen Durban Jordan Freeman Madeline Garrett Kendra Grubba Joyce Guo Malia Holubeck Anthonee Hunter Elise Huzjak Morgan Iser Erika Jobson Hannah Kane Ameera Khalid Abby Koch Vahni Kurra Lauren Lalli Robert Lauer Josh Lehmann Olivia Linn Austin Litfin Jenna Macy Abby McInturf Cari Meixner Connor Muething Julia Murphy Christopher Neal Cori Nelson Isabella Nilsson Annie Noelker Hannah Pettiford Melissa Phillips Sarasota Proffitt Cynthia Reinecke Jodi Rettig Gabe Rhoads Devin Rogala Kayla Salzl Severn Sanders Rachel Sebenoler Jordan Serpentini Sarah Sexton Olivia Smith Emily Sprinkle Elizabeth Taucher Tessa Trozzolillo Petra van Kan Katelyn Vlastaris Hope Wang Erin Ward Shawn Ward Benjamin Weiner Aaron Williams Drake Withers Rylie Wogenstahl Ryan Yates Alaina Yuresko

Oklahoma Mayzie Allswede William Baker Michael Brigance Mary Daniel Elle Denyer Laurel Driskill Emily Frech Eli Freeman Danial Gebreili Julie Grice Harlan Hubbard Nour Kayali Alexis LaBoube Claire Pickens Melia Pitts Chris Tran Michael Whitten Julie Yang Oregon Ry Allred Reema Al-Marzoog Alexis Baun Andrei Blebea Amy Chen David Choi Jacob Cooper Annelies Cowan Taylor Crowell Anisha Datta Bethany Drake Anna Engstrom Sofia Estrada Sami Fisher Elizabeth Gobbo Haley Hedren Katya Heisel Kyle Hiebel Bert Isle Celia Jacobs Christa Jeschke Connor Johnson Sawyer Johnson Ryan Jones Sophie Kidd-Myers Kaile Kristiansen Cardin Le Keith Lippincott Iris Long David Marmarinos Kathryn Marshall Elise McMahon Justin Mellott Mackenzi Merrill-Olsson Lillie Meyer Justine Moore Isabel Morgan Madi Muller Ritapa Neogi Sophie Obayashi Alexx O’Boyle Rachel Osmundsen Zach Prescod Quinn Richards Nate Rockey Una Rose Bergen Sather Elaina Schrader Gaby Segura Serena Smith Lisa Stitt

Nathan Stucki Becky Thomas Molly Walls Maisy Washatka Alexandria Wilkinson Troianne Wilkinson Annabel Willis Samantha Wrigglesworth Elise Wunderlich Tony Zeng Pennsylvania Tabitha Arnold Grace Asuncion Tobi Balmer Johanna Bear Victoria Beck Rachel Bodine Madison Brown Arturo Cabrera Julia Cao Vivian Cao Abigail Carmody Laura Cook Michaela Coplen Catherine Cowan Lucille Crelli Kai Davis Hannah Ehlers Mayah El-Dehaibi Ethan Emmert Lydia Estes Charlotte Forsythe Drevin Galentine Jillian Galle Madison Gardler Lauren Gillespie Jael Goldfine Annie Gordon Samuel Guenin Sarah Hartmann Joan He Lucas Jemison Olivia Jia Lauren Jones Ryan Jones Eric Kaczinski Tess Lalor Kristen Longsderff Karoline Loretan Marisha Lozada Christopher Lynch Sophia Martin Joel McCarthy Rishi Mirchandani Danielle Misiaszek Ian Morrison Emma Munson Ashleigh Nadzam Yoanna Parocua Kelly Pfab Elizabeth Porterfield Kalanna Robinson Gabriel Rosenberg Eliza Savage Sarah Schaeffer Samuel Sedory Samantha Siomko Caitlyn Smith Sophia Sterling-Angus

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National Awards Cristina Stockton Juarez Grant Stoner Brandon Tauber Savannah Thorpe Edgardo Torres Lauren Valley Hannah Volpe Paul Walker Patrick Walsh Lining Wang Katherine Weaver Alexandra Wirkijowski Victoria Wirkijowski Lauren Wolfe Dorschutz Wyatt Rhode Island Anthony Anderson Josephine Baldwin Beneich Max Brumberg-Kraus Isabella Fielding Jacob Hassel Miri Kim Natalie Paris Kathleen Radigan Jordan Walker South Carolina Maya Bradford Dylan Combs Cooper Donoho Sarah Gladden Kamry Goodwin Caroline Hamilton Sarah Hand Abaigeal Harris Julia Hogan Nandita Karambelkar Aubrey Knight Emily Knott Leah Lierz Katelin McCall Savannah Miller Emily Nason Mary Elizabeth Phillips Dorothy Pierce Anna Pittman Savannah Porter Sam Rames Jenna Realmuto Sarah Rhu Katherine Ridgway Nicole Sadek Dylan Scheer Madison Seabrook Robert Simoneau Jessica Smith Rachael Thoma Kelly Tsao Aurelyn Van Kirk Sophia Wiltrout Tennessee Ruby Blackman Kate Caldwell Zachary Cyganek Jane Anne Darken Shelley Doss Travis Fields Maggie Finaly

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Peter Garvin Pedro Garza Everett Gunther Joshua Halper Chasity Hurst Ji-Young Hwang Sophie Laurenzi Katie Lee Sophia Mason Daphne McKee Christine McKinney Gena Mosley Kai Mote Kyle Owens Josh Priddy Emily Proud George Rayson AB Stone Angie Wan Erin Wiseman Emma Yoder Texas James Alexander Michael Alvarez Michael Arroyo Tyler Bantz Ray Brown Albert Chavarria Gavin Chin Sydney Cho Audrey Cockrum Ryan Cowell Madison Daughn Michelle Deaver Justine Ditto Vee Duong Camiel Duytschaever Diana Enriquez Katherine Fang Miranda Fermin Rachel Garcia Molly Garrison Dayln Gillentine Deanna Govea Sabrina Grivich Kate Ham Xinyi He Gregory Hesse Haley Hewitt Abigail Hinojosa Ashley Huang I-Chia Huang Tingjie Huang Carter Jimenez Jenkins Michael Johnson Camille Jones Zara Khan Daphne Kokkinis Louis Lafair Keenan Lashier Lacey Leonard Grace Li Sophie Li Diana Lopez Joel Louviere Zach Low Madison Mackey Katherine Mansfield Nancy Marroquin Cesar Martinez Stuart McRobbie

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Jeanette Miller Kirari Misawa Jake Moody Carleigh Newland Aidan O’Brien Katie Parkerson Madilyn Pflueger Lane Preston Meagan Robson Laken Rodriguez Aundrea Rosado Alejandrina Sanchez Christina Sanchez Nikita Sankoorikkal Eun “Jinny” Seo Victoria Songyang Zac Spears Sierra Speegle Danielle Strasburger Emily Taylor Othon Tejeda Kendall Tiller Margaret Trautner Lauren Trexler Nicholas Vafiadis Sarah Waligura Kathryn Grace Wallace Liana Wang Natalie Westmoreland Miranda Whitus Emma Willingham Sharon Yang Andress Zepeda Renee Zhan Raeann Zuniga Utah Jamie Duke Vermont Robert Baskett Elizabeth Benton Virginia Johntay Abbey Gail Adams Nathan Ammons Youna An Abby August Summer Balcom Elizabeth Ballou Luisa Banchoff Miles Barnett Rimjhim Barua Olivia Bodor Ariana Chaivaranon Masie Chong Erika Chu Sophie Eichner Miranda Elliott Victoria Ferrante Jason Fields Jeremy Frenzel Ashley Frongello Zachary Frye Emily Green Benjamin Gross Chung Ha Min Min Kyong Han Emma Hastings Morgan Hayes Hope Hellwege-Bales

Kristina Hu Alec Jackson Leyla Kiran Selena Kitchens Lauren Kristin Caitline Kwon Anna Laughter Andrew Lee Hannah Lewis Mary Lincoln Hannah Littmann Juan Lopez Manon Loustaunau Coline Macorol Peter Manville Emma McCormack Angela McGlathery Ryan Mioduski Emily Mosher Jordan Myers Angelina Namkung Christina Navas Jessica Nguyen Amir Noorbakhsh Tyler O’Brien Sejin Park Sumin Park Sunhong Park Austyn Ries Elizabeth Rodriguez Lindsey Rosenthal Caroline Smith Sarah Sondheim Pattrick Suh Sidney Tilghman Mac Todd Caroline Toone Melissa Vasquez Erin Williams Catharine Wintory Jessica Zheng Washington Hannah Balducci Xochitl Briones Delaney Brown Ben Caldwell Ben Caldwell Walker Caplan Jonathan Carroll Nathan Cummings Kristin Devey Emma Every Katie Gerhardt Miles Hewitt Holly Hillman Ben Kadie Grace Lackey Hannah Linsky Emily Nelson Angelica Rabillas Rebecca Wexler West Virginia Hailey Harmon Michelle Ma Wisconsin Meron Aydiko Rebecca Basten Evan Bennett Rebecca Blau

Amanda Bohl Dustin Dahlman Alexis Daley Allison Ewald Nora Feldman Morgan Fields Michael Goldstein Abi Graham Bonnie Granroth Monica Hellmer Marcus Hoffman Kaitlin Jennrich Michaela Kane Bryant Kimball Biersach Lucy Kohlenberg Brianna Kromrey Theresa Le Zora Martin Colleen McLaren Savannah Mikle Taylor Milam Cecilia Palacios Tess Parks Leo Purman Drew Shields Alex Theisen Sarah Tyson Lauren Verhaagh Ashleigh Vertelka Joeylynn Zawacki Stepheni Zuehlke Wyoming Steven Stella Cabot Wilson ABROAD Canada Whitney Fox Biliana Gortchova Samarah Iddon Jacob Irish Rina Kang Matt Ledwidge Frances Platt Law Feodor Poukhovski Sheremetyev Thomas Schneider Eric Tweel Jasmine Zhang China Siying Wu Tiffany Ku Gabriel Melo Egypt Han Sol Lee Hong Kong Larry Chan Alison Cheung Samantha Li Yi-Ling Liu Korea Tritia Lee Euna Sun Taiwan Randy Huan Sidney Lu

SCHOLARSHIP

PARTNERS Scholarship Partners

More than 50 colleges, universities, and art institutes

These important Institutions see the special value in adding Scholastic Award winners to their ranks, and they allow the Alliance to help students leverage their awards to pay for educational opportunities

across the country reserve

that might otherwise not be accessible.

over $5 million in scholarships

Also, a growing number of summer art and writing programs and

specifically for Scholastic Art & Writing Award-winning seniors.

summer pre-college programs offer full or partial scholarships to highachieving, underserved students in grades 7-11 through the Alliance Summer Arts Program (ASAP). Funding for this program is provided through a generous grant from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation.

Scholarship Partners

Parsons The New School for Design

Cranbrook Academy Summer Program

Adelphi University

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Honors Art & Design Program at Herron

Art Academy of Cincinnati

Pennsylvania College of Art & Design

School of Art & Design

Art Center College of Design

Pratt Institute

International Center of Photography

Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University

Purchase College SUNY School of

Summer Teen Academy

The Art Institutes

Art + Design

Interlochen Summer Arts Camp

Bennington College

Rhode Island School of Design

Juniper Institute for Young Writers

California College of the Arts

Ringling College of Art and Design

The Kenyon Review Young Writers Workshop

California Institute of the Arts

Rochester Institute of Technology

Maine Media Workshops

Carnegie Mellon University

College of Imaging Arts and Sciences

Maryland Institute College of Art Precollege

Chatham University

Salem College

Massachusetts College of Art and

Cleveland Institute of Art

San Francisco Art Institute

Design Summer Studios

College for Creative Studies

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Montclair Art Museum Yard School of Art

College of Mount St. Joseph

School of the Museum of Fine Arts

Morean Arts Center Summer Program

Columbus College of Art & Design

School of Visual Arts

Otis College of Art and Design Summer

Cooper Union School of Art

Syracuse University College of Visual and

of Art

Corcoran College of Art + Design

Performing Arts, School of Art and Design Oxbow School

Cornish College of the Arts

University of Maine Farmington

Kansas City Art Institute

University of Michigan School of Art &

Design Precollege

Kendall College of Art and Design of

Design

Pacific Northwest College of Art Precollege

Ferris State University

University of the Arts

Pratt Institute Precollege Program

Kenyon College

Virginia Marti College of Art and Design

Laguna College of Art + Design Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts Maine College of Art Maryland Institute College of Art Massachusetts College of Art and Design Memphis College of Art Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design Minneapolis College of Art and Design Montserrat College of Art Moore College of Art & Design New Hampshire Institute of Art Oregon College of Art & Craft Otis College of Art and Design Pacific Northwest College of Art



ASAp Partners 92nd Street Y Recanati Scholars Belin-Blank Center National

Reynolds Young Writers Workshop at Denison University Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design Precollege San Francisco Art Institute Precollege

Scholars Institute

School of the Art Institute of

Buck’s Rock Performing + Creative Arts Camp California College of the Arts Camp Woodward Digital Media Program Chester College Turnstyle and ACE programs College for Creative Studies Precollege Columbus College of Art & Design Precollege Program

Parsons The New School for

Chicago Precollege School of the Museum of Fine Arts Precollege School of Visual Arts Precollege University of Iowa Young Writers’ Studio Wellesley College Explorations Writopia Lab

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Regional Affiliates The Alliance’s nationwide reach stems from our partnerships with 116 affiliates around the country. These schools and school districts, museums, writing and art programs, and community organizations bring the Awards to local communities and students. In addition to facilitating Awards offered at the national level, affiliates work closely with local funders and universities to provide regional scholarship opportunities for top winners. Our affiliates collectively celebrated over 60,000 students this year—with the Awards’ Gold Keys, Silver Keys, and Honorable Mentions­—advancing top winners for national judging.

NORTHEAST Connecticut Connecticut Art Region Connecticut Art Education Association Hartford Art School of the University of Hartford Delaware Delaware Art Region Delaware State University Delaware Writing Region National League of American Pen Women, Diamond State Branch Delaware Division of the Arts District of Columbia District of Columbia Metro Writing Region Writopia Lab Busboys and Poets; DC Area Writing Project Maine Maine Writing Region Southern Maine Writing Project at the University of Southern Maine The Betterment Fund Massachusetts Massachusetts Art Region New England Art Education Conference / The Boston Globe Massachusetts Writing Region New England Art Education Conference / The Boston Globe New Hampshire New Hampshire Art Region New Hampshire Art Educators’ Association New Hampshire Writing Region National Writing Project in New Hampshire

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New Jersey Northeast New Jersey Art Region Montclair Art Museum New York Central New York Art Region Central New York Art Council M&T Charitable Foundation Hudson Valley Art Region Hudson Valley Art Awards Sullivan County BOCES; Dutchess BOCES; Ulster BOCES; Middletown School District; Orange County Arts Council New York City Art Region Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education New York City Writing Region Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education Writopia Lab Pennsylvania East Central Pennsylvania Art Region East Central Pennsylvania Scholastic Art Awards Air Products and Chemicals Inc.; Allentown Art Museum; Dan’s Camera City; Ms. Linny Fowler; Northampton Community College; PPL; Dr. Christine Oaklander; Dr. Vincenzo Ranzino; The Banana Factory; Baum School of Art; The New Arts Program Lancaster County Art Region Lancaster Museum of Art Lancaster County Writing Region Lancaster Public Library Northeastern Pennsylvania Art Region The Times-Tribune Marywood University Philadelphia Art Region Philadelphia Arts in Education Partnership

Philadelphia Writing Region Philadelphia Writing Project University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education; University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology; Campus Copy Center Pittsburgh Art Region La Roche College and North Allegheny School District Pittsburgh Writing Region Western Pennsylvania Writing Project, University of Pittsburgh South Central Pennsylvania Art Region Commonwealth Connections Academy South Central Pennsylvania Writing Region Commonwealth Connections Academy Southwestern Pennsylvania Art Region California University of Pennsylvania CONSOL Energy; Observer-Reporter Southwestern Pennsylvania Writing Region California University of Pennsylvania CONSOL Energy; Observer-Reporter Rhode Island Rhode Island Art Region Rhode Island Art Education Association Salve Regina University Vermont Vermont Art Region Brattleboro Museum & Art Center Amy E. Tarrant Foundation; New Chapter Vermont Writing Region Brattleboro Museum & Art Center Amy E. Tarrant Foundation; New Chapter

8%

3% 25%

8%

Regional Affiliate Organization Types 2011–2012 The regional affiliate network of the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers presents the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in communities across the country.

12%

16%

13% 15%

MIDWEST Illinois Chicago Writing Region Chicago Area Writing Project Mid-Central Illinois Art Region Mid-Central Illinois Region Benedictine University Springfield; Springfield Art Association; Springfield Area Arts Council; Illinois Arts Council; The Community Foundation for the Land of Lincoln Southern Illinois Art Region Cedarhurst Center for the Arts (an activity of the John R. and Eleanor R. Mitchell Foundation) Suburban Chicago Art Region Downers Grove North and South High Schools Indiana Central / Southern Indiana Art Region Clowes Memorial Hall of Butler University Penrod Society Central / Southern Indiana Writing Region Clowes Memorial Hall of Butler University and Hoosier Writing Project at IUPUI Penrod Society Northeast Indiana and Northwest Ohio Writing Region Fort Wayne Museum of Art Fort Wayne Art League; News-Sentinel; Northeast Indiana Public Radio Kansas Eastern Kansas Art Region Wichita Center for the Arts Elizabeth B. Koch and the K.T. Wiedemann Foundation



Community-Based Organizations

National Writing Project State Sites

Colleges and Universities

National Art Education Association State Chapters

School Districts and Departments of Education

Regional Consortia

Museums

Newspapers and Libraries

Western Kansas Art Region Western Kansas Scholastic Art Awards Michigan Macomb, St. Clair, and Lapeer Art Region Macomb Community College and College for Creative Studies

Lorain County Art Region Lorain County Regional Scholastic Arts Committee Nordson Corporation Foundation; The Stocker Foundation; Lorain County Community College Foundation Northeast Central Ohio Art Region Kent State University at Stark

West Central Michigan Art Region Kendall College of Art and Design of Ferris State University

Northeastern Ohio Art Region Art Outreach Gallery at the Eastwood Mall and Akron Children’s Hospital

Southeastern Michigan Art Region College for Creative Studies

Northeast Ohio Writing Region Northeast Ohio Writing Project at Kent State University

Minnesota Minnesota Art Region Minneapolis College of Art and Design Missouri Missouri Writing Region Prairie Lands Writing Project at Missouri Western State University Missouri Writing Projects Network; Missouri Association of Teachers of English Nebraska Nebraska Art Region Omaha Public Schools Art Department Ohio Central Ohio Art Region Columbus College of Art & Design Cuyahoga County Art Region Cleveland Institute of Art Martha Holden Jennings Foundation

Wisconsin Milwaukee Writing Region Still Waters Collective M Magazine Southeast Wisconsin Writing Region Southeast Wisconsin Scholastic Writing Region Carthage College; Harborside Academy; Purple Peonies Antiques; Educators Credit Union; Robert and Shirley Viehweg Wisconsin Art Region Milwaukee Art Museum Milwaukee Art Museum Docents; Marc & Karen Flesch Memorial Fund; James Heller in memory of Avis Heller; Ray and Sue Kehm; James and Carol Wiensch

Cuyahoga County Writing Region Cleveland Institute of Art Martha Holden Jennings Foundation

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SOUTHEAST Florida Broward Art Region American Learning Systems Central Florida Writing Region The English Teacher’s Friend Miami-Dade Art Region Miami-Dade County Public Schools Miami Art Museum Miami-Dade Writing Region Miami Writes John S. and James L. Knight Foundation’s Knight Arts Challenge; Miami-Dade County Fair & Exposition; The Miami Foundation Northeast Florida Art Region Duval Art Teachers Association (DATA), Bird Emergency Aid and Kare Sanctuary (BEAKS), and Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville (MOCA) Jacksonville University; Savannah College of Art and Design; Lowes; Reddi Arts; The Florida Times-Union; Folio Palm Beach Art Region Educational Gallery Group (Eg2) CityPlace Palm Beach Writing Region Blue Planet Writers’ Room Pinellas Art Region Pinellas County Art Region Raymond James Financial Inc.; Suncoasters of St. Petersburg; Pinellas County Schools Sarasota Art Region Sarasota County Schools

Georgia Georgia Art Region Georgia State University, Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design Utrecht Kentucky Louisville Metropolitan Area Art Region Jefferson County Public Schools Fund for the Arts; Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft; Kentucky School of Art; Louisville Visual Art Association; Arts Council of Louisville; Louisville Area Fiber and Textile Artists Association Northern Kentucky Writing Region South Central Kentucky Art Region Capitol Arts Alliance Bowling Green Kiwanis Club Mississippi Mississippi Art Region Mississippi Museum of Art Mississippi Writing Region The Eudora Welty Foundation C Spire Foundation North Carolina Eastern/Central North Carolina Art Region Barton College Mid-Carolina Art Region Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Arts & Science Council Mid-Carolina Writing Region Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Arts & Science Council Western North Carolina Art Region Asheville Art Museum Asheville Area Section, American Institute of Architects

South Carolina South Carolina Art Region Lander University Tennessee East Tennessee Art Region Maryville College Middle Tennessee Art Region Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art Tennessee Credit Union Virginia Arlington County Art Region Arlington Public Schools Fairfax County Art Region Fairfax County Public Schools Richmond Art Region Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Southwest Virginia Art Region Fine Arts Center for the New River Valley Bosang Trust; Southwest Times; The Pulaski County Patriot SOUTHWEST Arizona Young Authors of Arizona Arizona Teachers of English Arizona English Teachers Association Louisiana North-Central Louisiana Writing Region Northwestern State University Writing Project Southeast Louisiana Writing Region Greater New Orleans Writing Project Mississippi Mississippi Art Region Mississippi Museum of Art

“ The Oregon Art Education Association has had the privilege of being the affiliate for Oregon for eight years now. Our state membership has grown in the last five years in part because of our involvement in the Scholastic Art Awards. The Oregon Scholastic program puts a face on what we do and shows the public that arts in the schools are alive and well. The regional Scholastic program gives our students the opportunity to compete at the national level and raises the bar for each of our individual programs.” Shannon McBride, Portland Metro Area Art Region

124

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Mississippi Writing Region The Eudora Welty Foundation C Spire Foundation Oklahoma Oklahoma Scholastic Writing Awards Tulsa Community College Liberal Arts Department Tulsa Community College Foundation; Ziegler Art & Frame; Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa Oklahoma Writing Region Tulsa Community College Tulsa Community College Foundation Texas Harris County Art Region Harris County Department of Education Harris County Writing Region Harris County Department of Education San Antonio Art Region SAY Sí (San Antonio Youth Yes) Travis County Art Region St. Stephen’s School West Texas Art Region Wayland Baptist University Department of Art Plainview Cultural Arts Council; Plainview Herald; Local Edge WEST Alaska Alaska Art Region MTS Gallery / Alaska Art Education Association Out North Contemporary Art House Alaska Writing Region F Magazine 49 Writers; Out North Contemporary Art House; Trailer Art Center California California Art Region California Arts Project California Writing Region California Writing Project California Writes!; California Association of Teachers of English Los Angeles Art Region Armory Center for the Arts

Colorado Colorado Art Region Colorado Art Education Association and Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design Denver Rotary Club; Denver Art Museum; Jerry and Marty Berglund; Colorado Data Mail; ExxonMobil Foundation

Benton County Historical Society Oregon Art Education Association

Hawaii Hawai’i Art Region Hawai’i State Department of Education Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

MULTI-STATE REGIONS Mid-South Art Region Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Brooks Museum League

Idaho Idaho Art Region Boise State Writing Project Idaho Writing Region Boise State Writing Project Nevada Northern Nevada Art Region Nevada Museum of Art Northern Nevada Writing Region Nevada Alliance for Arts Education Southern Nevada Art Region Springs Preserve Southern Nevada Writing Region Springs Preserve Oregon Oregon Art Region–Central Oregon Area Central Oregon Scholastic Art Awards and Oregon Art Education Association Oregon Art Region–Portland Metro Area Portland Metro Scholastic Art Awards Oregon Art Education Association; Pacific Northwest College of Art; Oregon College of Art & Craft Oregon Art Region–Willamette Valley Art Region

Washington Snohomish County Art Region Schack Art Center Everett Cultural Arts Commission; Everett School District; Melby, Cameron & Anderson

Iowa Multi-State Art & Writing Region Connie Belin & Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development Belin-Blank Center; Art Educators of Iowa; Iowa Alliance for Art Education Northwest Indiana and Lower Southwest Michigan Art Region Friends of Scholastic Art & Writing Awards South Bend Museum of Art; Macy’s Northeast Indiana and Northwest Ohio Art Region Fort Wayne Museum of Art Fort Wayne Art League; The News-Sentinel; Galliher Photography Southern Ohio, Northern Kentucky, and Southeastern Indiana Art Region Art Machine Inc. Summerfair Cincinnati; Dixie Heights High School; Corporex Family of Companies Twin Tiers Art Region Arnot Art Museum Chemung Canal Trust Co.; Community Foundation of ElmiraCorning and the Finger Lakes; County of Chemung, NY; Elmira Regional Art Society; Town of Horseheads, NY

“ Keeping the bond between colleges that foster dreams and possibilities and the community is important for student growth, teacher growth and the college’s growth.” Amy Armand, College for Creative Studies, Detroit, MI, Southeastern Michigan Art Region



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Donors Support from Alliance donors is particularly important to the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Through the special generosity of Scholastic Inc., which underwrites our operating costs, gifts can be applied directly toward increasing the availability of scholarships and expanding the national reach of the Awards. Your support, and that of our friends listed here, is vital to our future. To make your tax-deductible donation to support the creative futures of young artists and writers, visit www.artandwriting.org/support.

The Maurice R. Robinson Fund

JACK KENT COOKE F O U N D A T I O N

Jacques and Natasha Gelman Trust $1,000,000 and above Scholastic Inc. $500,000–$999,999 The Maurice R. Robinson Fund $100,000–$499,999 AMD Foundation Command Web Offset Co. Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP New York Life Foundation The New York Times Co. $50,000–$99,999 Blick Art Materials Institute of Museum and Library Services National Endowment for the Arts Ovation

126

$25,000–$49,999 Amazon Bernstein Family Foundation Bloomberg Jacques and Natasha Gelman Trust $10,000–$24,999 Charles Bergman Leslie H. and Barbara Buckland Central National Gottesman Foundation Esther B. Kahn Charitable Foundation Half Price Books HarperCollins Publishers Dwight Lee Gregory Miller William and Sue Morrill Prismacolor

www.artandwriting.org

$5,000–$9,999 Arvato Print Bloomberg Sisters Foundation BlueWater Communications Group Brown Printing Company Cohanzick Management Coral Graphic Services The Display Connection Dow Jones & Co. Dubose and Dorothy Heyward Memorial Fund Fleishman Charitable Fund Dr. Ernest B. Fleishman Hugh J. Freund Craig Hatkoff Jeffrey Kobernick Jill and Peter Kraus Lumenate Microsoft Corp. Laurie L. Nash Augustus and Lisbeth Oliver

Dr. Hugh Roome Leigh Seippel Andrea Stern Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP Three Bridge Trust Towers Watson Universal Printing Weissmann Wolff Bergman Coleman Grodin & Evall LLP $2,500–$4,999 Baker & McKenzie Anne Marie Buck Jim Cast Cleveland Institute of Art Jill Conner George DiStefano Eileen Fisher EMC Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz PC G3 Architecture Gilder Foundation

Kyle Good Julia Kim Kirkland & Ellis LLP KPMG Richard Lane Lehigh Phoenix Marty Levy Nirish Mathias Margery Mayer Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart PC Paula Seibel Associates Richard Robinson Rosetta Marketing Group Schulman Foundation Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Holly Singsen Sirius Computer Solutions Gaynor Strachan-Chun Unity Construction UPS $1,000–$2,499 291 Foundation Adecco Group Services North America Francie Alexander Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield Association of Educational Publishers Axe-Houghton Foundation Bank of America Phil Banks Hank and Phyllis Beinstein Business Relocation Services Inc. William Cohan Cushman & Wakefield Michael Doyle Frederick & Greta Smiley Charitable Foundation Gabelli Foundation GAMCO Investors David and Joan Grubin Agnes Gund Chad Gutstein Charles and Susan Harris Andrew Hedden Samuel Hoi International Integrated Solutions JM Wechter & Associates



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SPEcIAL

Thanks

Special Thanks Associated Visual Communications and Paul Anthony Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design Margo Baender Moira Bailey John Baldessari Clar Baldus Jennifer Baldwin Rebecca Bondor Boys & Girls Clubs of America Laura Bronsin Christine Bettes Cartell Chatsworth Consulting, Lisa Kohn and Robyn McLeod Clariza Chavez Wayne Coe College for Creative Studies Color Industries Lindsey Paul Connuck Cotter Steve Diamond Lindsey Cotter Billy DiMichele Steve Diamond Bryan Billy DiMichele Doerries EmpireDoerries Bryan State Building Lighting Partners Christine Empire State Erickson Building Lighting Partners Tessa Faye Christine Erickson Lisa Feder-Feitel Tessa Faye AnneFeder-Feitel Lisa Gaines David Gaines Anne Gazzo David Gazzo

Justin Gentry Myla Goldberg Kyle Good Rodney Alan Greenblat Deb Greh Andrea Haas Yanique Hart Institute of Museum and Library Services Jasmine Johnson Kimone Johnson Paul King MC Lars Cathy Lasiewicz Kevin Lawlor Leedy-Voulkos Art Center Melissa Levin David Levithan Donald Lipski Jeremy Madl Elysa Marden Lauren Mayer, Otterness Studios Margery Mayer Military Child Education Coalition Jessica Moon Claire Munoz Claire Munoz NAACP ACT-SO NAACP National ACT-SO Art Education Association National Art EducationCenter Association Constitution National Constitution Center of English Council of Teachers National Council of Teachers of English

National Writing Project New Orleans Center for Creative Arts Tom Otterness Pacific Northwest College of Art Parsons The New School for Design Nazli Parvizi Philadelphia Museum of Art, Rebecca Mitchell and Barbara Bassett Cassandra Pixey Anastasia Plakias Colin Poellot President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities Prints Charming Printers Alice Quinn Residency Unlimited Julie Russell Colleen Salcius Kerri Schlottman Donna Siclari Donna Siclari Anne Sparkman Anne Tema Sparkman Stauffer Tema Aaron Stauffer Stratten Aaron Stratten Meryl Streep Meryl Streep Universal Printing Company Universal PrintingofCompany U.S. Department Education U.S. Department Education Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art Diane Waff Diane Waff Lucianne Walkowicz Lucianne Tara WeltyWalkowicz Tara Welty Lia Zneimer Lia Zneimer

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www.artandwriting.org

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

In 1923, Maurice R. Robinson introduced the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards “. . . to insure to a wide group of future citizens, regardless of vocation, a sense of the power of independent thought and an appreciation of the beauty and wonder of existence.”

Notable Alums

Tom Otterness Frances Farmer

Red Grooms

1941, Photographer

Bernard Malamud 1932, Author

Robert McCloskey 1932, Author, Illustrator

1951, Experimental Filmmaker

1934, 1935, Printmaker, Painter

Joe DiPietro

1955, Fantasy Novelist

Cy Twombly

Edward Sorel

1948, Artist

Joyce Carol Oates

Erik Madigan Heck 2001, Photographer

Thane Rosenbaum

1956, Author

1976, Professor, Novelist, Activist

Truman Capote

Donald Lipskipresented

Luis Jiménez

1936, Author

1937, 1938, Author

1996, Author

1963, Actor

1947, Illustrator, Political Cartoonist

Maureen Daly McGivern

1965, Sculptor

1957, 1958, Sculptor

John Currin 1979, Painter

1948, Conceptual Artist

1923 John Sloan 1928, Painter

Mel Bochner

Carolyn Forché

1958, Conceptual Artist

www.artandwriting.org

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers Billy Collins

1994, 2001, 2010, 2011, Artist

2007, Former Poet Laureate of the US

John Leland [email protected] David Sedaris

Byron Kim 2009, Artist

Alice Aycock

Alliance for Young Artists Edwidge Danticat Writers

&

2012, Writer

Phong Bui

Paula Poundstone Malachy McCourt

1999, Gallery Owner

Tony Hawk

2012, Cartoonist

2004, 2009, 2011, Poet

Matthew Marks

1938, Novelist

Roz Chast

Alice Quinn

2001, Sculptor

E.B. White

2011, Pro Skateboarder, Video Game Franchiser

2010, Artist, Writer, Curator

2010, Writer, Comedian

Mary Ellen Mark

2007, Actor, Writer, Politician

2012, Photographer

Langston Hughes

Chuck Palahniuk

1947, Poet

Faith Ringgold 2007, 2011, Artist

Gary Soto

1998, 2011, Novelist, Poet

Notable Jurors

2013

2012, Humorist, Author

1928, Painter

1959, Novelist

2005, Sculptor

2010, 2012, Journalist

1998, Artist

Eudora Welty

1989, Novelist

1968, Illustrator, Designer

To learn more and apply online, visit us at

Kiki Smith

Robert Henri

1966–1971, Author

Gary Panter

1967, Poet

1948, Artist

Rodney Alan Greenblat

Abdi Farrah

by the Alliance forAudrey YoungNiffenegger Artists & Writers 1981, Author, Illustrator

Joyce Maynard Registration for 2013 Awards opens on September 17, 2012 Myla Goldberg

John Baldessari

Kay WalkingStick

2004, Fantasy Writer

Ned Vizzini

ca. 1973, Tony Award Winning Playwright

John Lithgow

1947, Novelist

Jacob Landau

Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Peter S. Beagle

Sylvia Plath

Jaida Jones

1974, Designer

1954, Actor, Activist, Producer, Director

1946, Pop Artist

1934, 1936, Sculptor, Designer

Michael Bierut

Robert Redford

Robert Indiana

Harry Bertoia

1998, Fashion Designer

1970, Painter

1941, 1942, Realist Painter

1945, Pop Artist

Zac Posen

David Salle

Stan Brakhage

Philip Pearlstein

Andy Warhol

1971, Documentary Film Director, Producer

1952, Multimedia Artist

1931, Actress

&

Ken Burns

1970, Sculptor

Richard Avedon

Alliance for Young Artists Writers

Fred Tomaselli 2001, Painter

2008, Novelist

Brian Jungen 2012, Artist

Rachel Goslins

Andy Rooney

2012, Documentary Director, Producer

2004, Essayist

Don Gummer 2008, Sculptor

Dread Scott 2008, Artist

John Hockenberry 2011, Journalist

= Alum and Juror

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

&

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers www.artandwriting.org

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Alliance for Young Artists Writers

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers presents the nation’s most creative teens

The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

2012 National Catalog

National Catalog 2012