This is not my house. This is not my house. 4 - USD 450

This is not my house. This is not my house. 4 - USD 450

Teacher Copy: Assessment for Independent Reading Levels Levels A-K (Fiction/Narrative) Reader’s Name___________________________________ Grade________...

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Teacher Copy: Assessment for Independent Reading Levels Levels A-K (Fiction/Narrative)

Reader’s Name___________________________________ Grade________

Date_________

Level A

Independent Level: Yes No

Is This My House? by Patty Haley Level A 34 words

Book Introduction: Show the cover of the book to the student and say this to the reader before he or she begins reading: “This book is called Is This My House? It is a story about a boy who is going to show us his house. But, first he shows you places that ARE NOT his house. Think about why some of the places he shows you could not be his house. I’ll read the first two pages, you read the rest.” Read pages 1 and 2 aloud to the child, pointing under each word.

E Check the reading behaviors you notice the child using. These notes may not determine the reader’s independent reading level, but will inform your teaching:

Running Record: Record the reader’s miscues (or errors) above the words as he or she reads. Although we are not assessing accuracy at this level, you can still gain valuable information from analyzing and coding the miscues with MSV.

□ Does the reader match

2: (Teacher reads and points under each word.)

spoken words to printed words? (For example, if the

text says, “I like lunch,” and the child reads, “I like food,” matching words correctly, she has met the criteria at this level. The mismatch of letter-sound will be addressed in C and D books).

□ Does the reader point

This

3:

from left to right when reading?

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not

is

not

my

my

M S

V M S

house.

This

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not

my

house.

5:

This

is

not

my

house.

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house.

4:

under the words?

□ Does the reader move

This

is

SC

E

1

V

Teacher Copy: Assessment for Independent Reading Levels Levels A-K (Fiction/Narrative) E

□ Does the reader use

6:

This

is

not

my

house.

7:

This

is

not

my

house.

8:

This

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my

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illustrations as a source of information?

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Level A E

SC

M S

V M S

2

V

Retell:

Teacher Copy: Assessment for Independent Reading Levels Levels A-K (Fiction/Narrative)

Level A

Say, “Please retell this story.” Be sure to retell the important parts, and to tell them in order.” Write notes regarding the student’s retelling on the back of this page. If the student has trouble getting started or says very little, you may use non-leading prompting. Examples of nonleading prompting include: What happened next? Can you say more? Did anything else happen? Make a note that you needed to prompt the student, as you will want to teach this student how to self-initiate more elaborated retells. The child may also refer back to the book as needed. Use the Sample Student Responses to determine if the child’s retelling and responses to the comprehension questions are acceptable. See scoring guidance for specifics regarding how to account for the retell and the responses to questions in determining a student’s independent reading level. Sample retell may sound like this:

“He found his house. He found a swimming pool. He found the house for ants.” or “He couldn’t find his house. Then he found his house. House starts with “h”.”

Comprehension Questions: If the student’s retell did not include answers to the following questions, please ask any/all of the questions that were not addressed. There are many acceptable responses to each question, some of which are listed below. The reader’s response is acceptable as long as it demonstrates an accurate understanding of the text. As the reader answers each question, be sure to record the response carefully. The child may also refer back to the book as needed. Question

Sample Acceptable Responses

1. Literal: The boy says some places ARE NOT his house. Look at the pictures. Tell me a place that is not his house. Can you name another place?

At least two of the following: “A dog house.” “A lily pad.” “A rabbit cage/bunny house.” “Underwater.” “A bird’s nest.” “An ant hill/ant house.” “The dog house. It wasn’t that big and the dog was watching him.” “The rabbit pen.” “The bird’s nest.” “The ant hill.”

2. Literal: Which house was too small for the boy?

3. Inferential: How do you think the dog felt about the little boy going inside his house? 4. Inferential: The boy might get hurt in some of the houses he visited in this story. Name one house where he might get hurt. November 2014

“He thought the boy was silly because his house was too small.” “Sad because he went in his house.” “Sad because the house was too small for him.” “The ant house.” “He can’t live under the water with the fish.” “The ants might bite him in the home of the ants.” “The dog will bite him.”

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Teacher Copy: Assessment for Independent Reading Levels Levels A-K (Fiction/Narrative)

Level A

Notes on retelling (this may be a transcription or comments on students’ ability to retell in order and prioritize the key story elements):

Student’s replies to comprehension questions (if necessary because not addressed in retell): 1)

2)

3)

4)

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Teacher Copy: Assessment for Independent Reading Levels Levels A-K (Fiction/Narrative)

Level A

Final Score Evaluate the reader’s use of Level A reading behaviors by referring to the side panels and the statements below. Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

The reader matches spoken words to printed words.

The reader moves from left to right when reading.

The reader uses the illustrations as a source of information.

Did the reader demonstrate literal and inferential comprehension through one of the following combinations of retell and responses: • •

A clear, accurate retell that incorporates answers to three out of four comprehension questions. (This may be with or without non-leading prompting. See directions for retell for more about non-leading prompting). A mostly accurate retell PLUS acceptable responses to three out of four of the comprehension questions (or addressed in the retell). The retell need not be well-crafted or completely comprehensive, but if it indicates mostly inaccurate comprehension, try the next level down.

Is this the student’s independent reading level? • •

If you did NOT answer “yes” to all questions in this Final Score box, try an easier text. Keep moving to easier texts until you find the level at which you are able to answer “yes” to all questions in the Final Score box. If you answered “yes” to all questions in this Final Score box, the student is reading independently at this level. However, it is possible that the student may also read independently at a higher level. Keep moving to higher passages until you can no longer answer “yes” to all questions. The highest level for which you can answer “yes” for all questions is the student’s independent reading level.

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