this is the non-confidential version of the answer of sabre inc., with

this is the non-confidential version of the answer of sabre inc., with

IMPORTANT NOTE: THIS IS THE NON-CONFIDENTIAL VERSION OF THE ANSWER OF SABRE INC., WITH REDACTIONS AS TO SABRE’S FUTURE TECHNOLOGY PLANS IN BOTH THIS A...

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IMPORTANT NOTE: THIS IS THE NON-CONFIDENTIAL VERSION OF THE ANSWER OF SABRE INC., WITH REDACTIONS AS TO SABRE’S FUTURE TECHNOLOGY PLANS IN BOTH THIS ANSWER AND THE ACCOMPANYING EXHIBIT 1. A CONFIDENTIAL VERSION HAS ALSO BEEN FILED UNDER SEAL SUBJECT TO A MOTION FOR CONFIDENTIAL TREATMENT UNDER §302.12 BECAUSE THE MATERIALS REDACTED HEREIN CONTAIN SABRE’S BUSINESS SECRETS AND PROPRIETARY INFORMATION BEFORE THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION WASHINGTON, D.C. ___________________________ ) In The Matter of ) ) Docket No. OST-2013-0048 ) Agreement Adopted by the ) Passenger Services Conference ) Of the International Air ) Transport Association as ) Resolution 787 ) __________________________ ) ANSWER OF SABRE INC. IN OPPOSITION TO APPLICATION FOR APPROVAL OF IATA RESOLUTION 787 Sabre Inc. (“Sabre”) hereby answers the application by the International Air Transport Association (“IATA”) for approval under 49 USC Section 41309 of the intercarrier agreement contained in Resolution 787 (“Application”). First, Sabre supports the Answer in Opposition filed today by Open Allies for Airfare Transparency (“Open Allies”) 1 to IATA’s Application. Second, Sabre submits this separate answer to address one specific claim by IATA and some of its supporters in this proceeding. That assertion is that new technical standards, to be jointly agreed and jointly controlled by airlines under the auspices of IATA, are needed because, it is claimed, GDSs, such as Sabre, will not otherwise be

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Sabre is a member of Open Allies.

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able to support efforts by airlines to highlight their amenities and services and to make “personalized” offers to consumers. This assertion is not true. As we show below, and in particular based on a review of the attached PowerPoint capturing screen shots of current Sabre GDS merchandizing capabilities, as well as those capabilities coming online this year and next, Sabre is committed to and fully capable of enabling airlines to effectively and efficiently merchandise their products, including personalized offers. 2 (Annexed and labeled as Exhibit 1.) Sabre enables airline personalized offers on an opt-in basis using frequent traveler numbers, in contrast to NDC’s mandatory provision -- at the request of any carrier -- of personal information and competitively sensitive information about status on and purchases from other airlines. At the very core of Sabre’s GDS business is a continually evolving travel marketplace that enables suppliers to efficiently merchandise their products to a broad base of travel buyers globally in order to maximize sales, revenue and customer loyalty—while simultaneously ensuring that buyers can efficiently comparison shop, purchase and manage travel in a transparent environment with full knowledge of all of their options.

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As the Department will recall from Sabre’s August 7, 2012 live Sabre demonstration before the Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection and from other live demonstrations Sabre has provided the Department, Sabre has had since 2010 the capability of displaying the full price of travel, including the costs of various ancillary services such as baggage, priority boarding and pre-reserved seat charges in its multi-carrier shopping results. This facility is fully operational and enables airlines to merchandize these ancillary services through all of Sabre’s tens of thousands of subscribers. Unfortunately, airlines have largely chosen not to avail themselves of this opportunity to merchandize their special services and features even though Sabre built this facility in accordance with the specifications dictated by airlineowned ATPCO and even though Sabre has said it will not charge airlines anything extra to utilize this merchandizing capability. In a nutshell, we have the merchandizing shelves; we just need the carriers to allow us to stock them. In any event, since the Department will be well aware of that capability, we have not replicated it in the attached slides.

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To be clear, Sabre fully supports the development and implementation of technology standards that drive value and make the process work even better to meet the needs of both travel suppliers and buyers as they change over time. But as shown by the Answer of Open Allies, Resolution 787 is a not about new technology standards. It instead sets forth in detail a proposed new, opaque and carrier-agreed business model for the pricing and sale of airline tickets. The fact that carriers might desire new, carrier-controlled technology standards to implement the new business model does not transform the business model itself into technology standards. 3 Sabre Has Long Utilized XML Messaging And There Is No Justification for IATA’s Request DOT Approve Its Control of An XML Standard-Setting Exercise At the outset, and before turning to Sabre’s current and near-term merchandizing capabilities for airlines, we want to underscore that IATA’s asserted need for IATAdictated and controlled “XML standards” to enable merchandizing and customization is factually wrong.

At the hearing held before the Advisory Committee for Aviation

Consumer Protection on August 7, 2012, Sabre explained in the presence of IATA and the other airline representatives in attendance that XML is simply a messaging protocol that Sabre has used for years, each day processing over 237 million XML messages. (That number has since increased to over 300 million per day and now includes the use of XML messages to support the US Airways ChoiceSeats product, as demonstrated in the attached PowerPoint.

As also covered in that PowerPoint, Sabre and United

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As the Open Allies’ Answer rightly points out, only a very few fragments of this seven-page Resolution can be read as referring in any way to the supposed modernization of messaging standards. Sabre supports the submission of Open Allies that if, as it claims, IATA in fact seeks DOT approval of just a few snippets of this much longer agreement, IATA should withdraw its present application and resubmit for consideration and comment only the specific text for which it seeks DOT’s approval.

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Airlines are in active development now to implement the sale of United’s Economy Plus seats using XML in 2013.) Since 2010, Sabre has connected to Easyjet using an XML solution for the fullrange of booking, pricing, payment and reservation change functions. Sabre processes over 1.4 billion incoming application programming interface (API) transactions daily, a volume which places Sabre among a small group of companies including Google, Facebook and Twitter.

(And as noted above, over 300 million of these daily

transactions are transmitted via XML.)

A co-developer of XML is on the Sabre

development team. In sum, the claim GDSs cannot handle XML messages is false and a literal red herring. In its XML-enabled implementations, Sabre has for roughly 10 years coded to the XML schema established by the Open Travel Alliance -- a collaborative association of airlines, hotel companies, car companies, rail companies, cruise lines, tour operators GDSs and other travel technology providers that has developed XML messaging standards that work universally for the services of all travel providers. The Open Axis XML standards that IATA has taken over (and will need to further develop before they would facilitate NDC) are by contrast air-centric, as one would expect from an organization run only by airlines. Ironically, and as the Answer of Open Allies in this docket today established, the airlines themselves actually gave far higher ratings to the XML schema of Open Travel Alliance, the schema Sabre (and most other travel industry participants including airlines) uses, than they gave the XML schema of Open Axis, the schema IATA has endorsed, with respect to meeting the functional requirements of NDC. Specifically, the

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airlines as a group found that the long-existing Open Travel Alliance XML schema met 97% of the needs of NDC, while Open Axis met only 51% of the needs of NDC. In short, in seeking to take over the process of XML standard setting, a mission for which it expressly seeks the “imprimatur” of DOT, IATA is trying to fill a need that has already been almost completely met via existing standards – and, we emphasize, satisfied without DOT ever having provided its seal of approval to that technical standard over all others. A Quick Overview Of Sabre’s Personalization Capabilities Next, we wish to provide a quick overview of Sabre’s current tools that enable airlines to make personal offers to travelers via the Sabre GDS. Critically, Sabre does so without in any way sacrificing the current regime of publicly available and transparent fares that has greatly benefited consumers. Sabre today offers airlines the ability to provide two levels of personalization facilitating more attractive offers than the standard offers: One is based on individual frequent flier number, and the other is based on frequent flier tier level. 4 The ability to tailor seat maps and paid seat pricing to individual travelers (based on frequent flyer number) utilizes an XML direct link for real time communication of frequent flyer numbers to the airline, and enables airlines to provide custom seat maps (with personalized seat availability) and custom seat pricing, also personalized for that traveler.

This technology is illustrated in the PowerPoint attached as Exhibit 1 in

Example 11 at slides 28-29.

Sabre completed development of this facility for US

4

We stress here that Sabre has long provided airlines the ability to sell targeted fare reductions off the published prices that should be viewed as forms of personalization. For example, Sabre has for many years supported (and continues to support) the sale by airlines of private negotiated fares, including corporate discounts, and also of discounted fares directed at specific categories of travelers, such as military fares, government fares, children’s fares and senior fares.

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Airways and built it to that airline’s specifications, based on the airline’s desire to be able to customize seat availability and pricing. While the technology has already been implemented by Sabre, US Airways is not yet providing custom seat availability or pricing based on the frequent flyer number. We believe US Airways will soon take advantage of this personalization capability and that it will be implemented soon with additional carriers. As noted above, and has recently been reported in the press, Sabre is currently engaged with United Airlines to implement its Economy Plus Seats product in late 2013. Sabre today also offers airlines the ability to make custom ancillary pricing available (for items like seats and bags) to consumers based on frequent flier tier level. That facility utilizes ATPCO OC standards (with filing via ATPCO or directly with Sabre through established fare filing processes). Currently Sabre offers airlines the ability to make thousands of custom pricing offers available across nine different ancillary categories.

Those ancillary categories are baggage, ground transportation, in-flight

entertainment, lounge, meals, medical, pets, seat assignment, and unaccompanied travelers. Sabre will soon offer the ability to make custom offers for a 10th category, priority boarding and/or priority security. However, despite the calls by IATA and some airlines in this proceeding for GDSs to enable personalized offers, and despite the fact that Sabre devoted much time and effort to successfully providing that facility - using the technical standards developed by the airline-owned ATPCO - no airline has yet opted to utilize any of them. Sabre will very soon enable an even broader array of personalized offers by airlines, including the ability to make unique offers available to targeted travelers

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utilizing Sabre’s Custom Offer campaign engine. That campaign engine has already been implemented successfully for hotels and permits travel suppliers to supplement their published prices with special deals in which consumers might be interested, like attractive multi-day rates or included amenities or extras. The Department should also know that late in 2012 with less than 48-hours notice, Sabre was able to implement the facility in the Sabre GDS for American Airlines to provide its Preferred Seat product free of charge to its best customers based on the customer’s frequent flyer number, which Sabre transmits to American as part of the booking process. Thus, the travel agency can advise the traveler before a purchase commitment is made that there will be no additional charge to him/her for the Preferred Seat on American’ service. Sabre Merchandizing Capabilities Shown in Screen Shots We now turn to the specific screen shots demonstrating the functionality that Sabre has already implemented enabling carriers to highlight amenities and services and to personalize offers and also to the new relevant functionality which will be implemented by the end of 2014. The discussion below will follow the sequence of the PowerPoint attached as Exhibit 1. For ease of reference, we have accompanied each slide in the PowerPoint containing a screen shot with an explanatory page or pages of text. Exhibit 1 is divided into three sections: 1) Sabre’s existing capabilities for air merchandizing (slides 4-26); 2) Sabre Future Capabilities for air merchandizing that Sabre plans to implement by the end of 2014 (slides 27-43); and 3) Appendix 1, with slides 44-60 showing, historical, real-world examples of campaigns airlines have run in

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the Sabre GDS highlighting such services or amenities they wish to feature to set themselves apart from other airlines. (Important Note: Slides 28-43 contain Sabre’s confidential and proprietary commercial information about its future technology plans. For that reason, those slides and the portion of this Answer discussing them have been redacted from this non-confidential version.) Sabre Existing Capabilities for Air Merchandizing As an overarching theme, Sabre wishes to stress a fundamental point illustrated by the entire attached slide presentation. It is that GDS technology has moved by leaps and bounds since the early 2000s when carriers still owned interests in GDSs and were therefore more conversant with the features and products offered by the GDSs. What we demonstrate in this section of the PowerPoint is not “SlideWare”; it is live, functioning Sabre GDS technology available to carriers today. As shown beginning at slide 5, Sabre has deployed a desktop, called Sabre Red Workspace, which allows any travel agency to use a fully graphical display of the sort that consumers would be familiar with and that offers ease of use with more intuitive commands and responses. Alternatively, if the travel agent prefers, he/she can use Sabre Red Workspace to access a display that offers graphical functionality but still employs the “Classic Sabre” display consisting of a series of shortcuts and codes. Sabre-equipped travel agencies are highly trained professionals who utilize Sabre many hours each day. Many of them prefer the efficiency of the Classic Sabre display as it enables them to complete transactions with blazing speed (comparable to using keyboard shortcuts while working in Microsoft Word).

While the codes and shortcuts of Classic Sabre have been

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criticized as “cryptic” from some quarters, they are only cryptic to those who do not know them. In the travel agency business, time literally is money. So the desire of some agents to utilize Classic Sabre as their preferred display in the Sabre Red Workspace is completely understandable and indeed often is the best choice for their business. Regardless, the flexibility and power of both interfaces is available to our subscribers. Whether the Sabre subscriber selects the Sabre fully graphical display or the Sabre Classic view, Sabre provides rich tools today for carriers to promote and sell their amenities and services, such as integrated media, advertising and video, so that they can distinguish their products and services by more than just price if they choose. 5 (And as we show at slides 27-43, Sabre will launch in the near term even better facilities for the sale of air that will enable airlines to promote even more fully and in a targeted way special services and products they think might sway the consumer as he or she makes the buying decision.) At numbered slides 4-26, we provide and explain screen shots of 10 examples of Sabre’s current merchandizing capability for airlines. Since the screen shots are in each case accompanied by a slide describing exactly what is being displayed to the Sabre subscriber, we refer the Department to the slides themselves for a more comprehensive explanation of the details of each screen shot. However, we wish to highlight the following: •

Example 1, at slide 5, demonstrates how US Airways ChoiceSeats are displayed and sold today in the Sabre Red graphical display. The screen

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We hasten to add however that for many consumers the lowest available price for the desired itinerary is their ultimate goal. It is certainly the right of consumers to demand shopping tools that empower them to search based strictly on price if that is their desire.

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shot found at slide 5 uses as the real-world example US Airways flight 267 from Dallas/Fort Worth Airport to Phoenix. Seat 7C has been reserved at a charge to the passenger of $26. As explained in numbered Slide 6, Sabre and US Airways use XML to book and pay for the desired seat.

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o As noted at slide 6, Sabre and United Airlines are working on a similar solution using XML for the sale of United’s Economy Plus seats, with implementation targeted for late 2013. (This facility will replace the facility for the sale of Economy Plus that United and Sabre used for several years but that was lost temporarily when United moved to a new reservations hosting system as part of its systems integration with Continental.) •

At slides 7-8, we provide an overview of Sabre’s present multi-channel merchandising and procurement solutions that enable travel suppliers to promote their brand, inventory and offers to Sabre travel agents to increase awareness and influence bookings. Carriers can promote new routes/markets or products and services, such as in-flight amenities, like Wi-Fi, high-end meals, or special seating). Many targeting capabilities are available by product - a message displayed upon sign-in to the system (called simply “Sign-In messages”) or ads associated with displays of particular service (called “PromoSpots”). As noted in these slides, several large North American (and other) carriers have used these capabilities in

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Sabre also offered to use XML to display the seat maps presented by US Airways for ChoiceSeats but because the carrier’s internal reservation system could not support XML for that purpose, we presently employ EDIFACT to display its seat maps. Sabre is building the ability to display seat maps using XML for United’s Preferred Seat implementation.

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the past to promote their products and services, and they continue to use both Sign-In messages and PromoSpots to promote services/offers, and thus to set their products apart from those of other airlines.

These

merchandizing tools can be targeted by route, by city, or by agency and can link to videos touting the features or products the airline thinks are most advantageous to it. •

At slides 9-10, in Example 2, we have presented a screen shot showing how US Airways has used Sabre’s PromoSpots point-of-sale advertising to market their Choice Seat product on the Dallas/Fort Worth-Phoenix route. The fares themselves are displayed in ascending order as this display of options is in response to a low-fare shopping entry and thus fare transparency is fully preserved. Even though, in this example, US Airways does not have the lowest fare in the market and therefore does not appear at the top of the list of itinerary options, its PromoSpot ad allows it to capture the Sabre subscriber’s attention at the point of sale by advertising its Choice Seat product as the Sabre user interacts with his/her customer. o As we discuss at slide 10, airlines can use PromoSpots to promote any special product or service they choose.

The historical

examples of PromoSpots found in Appendix 1 show that airlines have used this feature of Sabre displays to highlight new routes, WI-FI, special seating and the fact that they are the “number one” airline to various regions.

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Example 3 at slide 11 provides an exemplar of the large ad that appeared touting the benefits of US Airways’s ChoiceSeats when the travel agent clicked on the Promospot viewed in slide 9.

Slide 12 explains the

operation and contents of Slide 11 and emphasizes that airlines can feature using PromoSpot any of their products and services, such as WIFI, if they believe it is beneficial for them to do so. •

Example 4 at page 13 contains a screen shot of a PromoSpot in text format as it appears today for subscribers who have opted to use the Sabre Classic view, with slide 14 describing the four-key stroke entry (JM*1) made by users of the Sabre Classic display to see the full text of the PromoSpot advertising US Airways ChoiceSeats.



Example 5 at slides 15 and 16 shows and then explains that in addition to text Promospots, users of Classic Sabre view can access an HTML page by clicking on an icon. So, for Classic Sabre view users, carriers can deploy either the text messages found in Example 4 or the more graphical HTML page shown in Example 5 to draw attention to any feature or service they believe sets them apart from competitors.



Example 6 at slides 17-18 demonstrates the video capabilities Sabre offers carriers now to feature anything special they think will attract sales. In this case, we show how a carrier today can, via Sabre Classic view (and of course our graphical view as well), deploy a static HTML page in a PromoSpot that has an embedded link to a video. While this capability is fully operational today, the link to a carrier video touting its frequent flyer

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lounge is a mock-up as no carrier is currently using this video capability for that purpose. Of course, the video ad could be dedicated to any special service or product a carrier desires. •

Example 7 at slides 19-20 depicts how US Airways on the Dallas/Fort Worth-Phoenix routing could, if it chose, use a PromoSpot to advertise its Dine Fresh meal service as a feature to attract business, with slide 20 explaining the process and how this sort of PromoSpot would appear in both the graphical and Sabre Classic displays and that, like other PromoSpot ads, it can be targeted by route if the carrier desires.



Example 8 at slides 21-22 illustrates the static HTML ad page for Dine Fresh meals that the Sabre subscriber would see after clicking on a Dine Fresh PromoSpot if US Airways used this feature to promote Dine Fresh.



Example 9 at slides 23-24 is an illustration of how a carrier could use targeted PromoSpot ads on a route-by-route basis to advertise new flatbed seats on international routes in both the Sabre Classic view and Graphical view.



Example 10 at slides 25-26 demonstrates the visual image in the form of a static HTML page promoting flatbed seats on select international routes the travel agent would see if he/she clicks on the PromoSpot shown in Example 9.

Sabre Future (in 2013 and by end of 2014) Merchandizing Capabilities (This Section Is Redacted From This Non-Confidential Version)

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Beginning at slide 27 and continuing through slide 43, we graphically illustrate our next set of innovations for merchandizing carrier services. •

In Example 11, at slide 27, we show the next generation of the present day seat maps, one that enables carriers to charge varying fees for seats in the same cabin depending on their perceived desirability. (As stated earlier, this facility has been implemented in Sabre but is not yet utilized by any airline.) At slide 28, we explain that this feature is targeted for activation by carriers in late 2013 and that airlines will also be able to vary the fee by “customer value.” That is, they will be able to personalize the offer by waiving or reducing the fee for select travelers. (This ability to vary ancillary fees based on customer value exists today in the Sabre GDS and is tied to the frequent flyer number sent by Sabre to each carrier for its own frequent flyer members. The example we described earlier of American waving the Preferred Seat charge for its best customers is an illustration of the present use of this facility.)



In seven related examples, beginning at slide 30 and continuing through slide 43, we demonstrate how by the end of 2014 the Sabre GDS will highlight in the graphical display, using standardized icons, “air extras,” that is ancillary or special services that each carrier offers on specific flights. At Examples 12-18, we walk through the process from the initial display of flight options, with icons embedded in the response alerting the Sabre subscriber to the particular ancillary or special options offered on specific flights, to the end of the process where at Example 18 we will confirm for the subscriber the total price including the amount charged for the “air extras” before the ticket is purchased. At all

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times, the fares themselves and the costs of any desired ancillary services are transparent and easily determined and compared. •

Importantly, we direct the Department’s special attention to Example 12 at slides 30 and 31 where we demonstrate and then explain the use of these standard icons for baggage charges, special seating, special meals and lounge access.



In Example 13, at slides 32-33, we show that when a subscribe clicks on one of the icons for a particular carrier and flight, he/she will see the description of this ancillary or special service that has been prepared or approved by the carrier. As will be obvious, these tools will afford any airline the ability at the point of sale

in a comprehensive and transparent multi-carrier shopping environment to distinguish its in-flight and related services from those of other carriers. Appendix 1 (slides 44-60) In this Appendix, we have collected and described eight historical examples of campaigns airlines have run in the Sabre GDS using PromoSpots to highlight services or amenities they wish to advertise. As the Department will see, airlines have used PromoSpots to promote diverse sales points for their services, including new routes, WI-FI, that a carrier is the “#1 US carrier” to particular regions, new service offerings on routes (such as Business Elite Service from JFK to Los Angeles and San Francisco), and an economy seats product with more leg room. Conclusion Sabre reiterates its support for the request of Open Allies that DOT reject IATA’s Application for approval of Resolution 787.

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As demonstrated by the attached materials, the claim that carriers must band together to adopt a new model for the pricing and sale of airline tickets in order to attain the ability to merchandize or personalize their products in the shopping and booking systems travel agencies use is simply not true. And even if the inter-carrier agreement set out in Resolution 787 were purely, as IATA states, an agreement to work on XML messaging standards, the special “imprimatur” of DOT that IATA seeks of its proposed standard is neither necessary nor appropriate. DOT approval is not necessary because the marketplace has already produced an XML schema (that of the Open Travel Alliance) that the IATA member-airlines themselves found meets 97% of the requirements of the putative NDC business model. Further, IATA is proposing that carriers work together to enhance the Open Axis XML schema that a group of carriers already developed without any sort of approval by DOT. There is no need for DOT to approve the IATA-member airlines working together to improve them; they can do that already. Nor would acceding to IATA’s request for DOT’s “seal of approval” for its XML standard be appropriate as DOT should not be in the business of favoring one such XML standard over others.

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Finally, if IATA is in fact seeking DOT approval for only the very few parts of the seven page agreement that refer to the supposed “modernization” of messaging standards, the better course is for IATA to withdraw its present application and resubmit for consideration and comment only the specific text for which it seeks DOT’s approval.

Respectfully submitted, FILED ELECTRONICALLY AND THEREFORE NOT SIGNED David A. Schwarte Special Counsel for Sabre Inc.

May 1, 2013

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Confidential. © Sabre Travel Network, 2013.

Exhibit 1 to Sabre Answer Non-Confidential Version Air Merchandising Capabilities

Background Sabre currently supports: • Both EDIFACT & XML for airline products • Graphical seat map capabilities in the market using both EDIFACT & XML messages • Graphical seat maps with attribute / price details based on existing industry codes or other elements from XML feeds • Fully graphical point of sale environment with integrated media, advertising & video capabilities

2

We have built the shelves, we need suppliers to stock them In the following slides, we will provide • Examples of Sabre existing capabilities followed by an explanation of the highlighted capability • Examples of Sabre Future Capabilities followed by an explanation of the highlighted capability • An appendix of Sabre Media Solutions ads purchased by carriers to promote their products and services

3

Sabre Existing Capabilities 4

Example 1 - Seat map display capabilities using existing industry codes

5

Explanation Example 1 •

• •

Today can both view and sell US Airways ChoiceSeats via Sabre based on single cabin pricing and mirrors US Airways direct pricing Sabre and US Airways communicating via XML Sabre and United Airlines are in active discussions and development to support the sale of United’s Economy Plus seats in Sabre via XML with a targeted implementation date in late 2013

6

Sabre Media Solutions Overview •

Sabre’s multi-channel merchandising and procurement solutions enable travel suppliers to promote their brand, inventory and offers to Sabre travel agents to increase awareness and influence bookings • •







Promote new routes / markets Promote products and services (In-flight amenities, i.e. Wi-Fi, meals, seats)

Many targeting capabilities are available by product - a message displayed upon sign-in to the system (Sign-In) or ads associated with particular flight displays (PromoSpots) Travel supplier provides creative (messaging and graphics) or Sabre can provide creative assistance Several large North American (and other) carriers have used our products to promote their products and services and continue to purchase • • • •

American Airlines – to promote new service / markets, Wi-Fi service Delta Air Lines – to promote new service / markets, seat product and business product United Airlines – to promote their Economy Plus seat product US Airways – to promote their ChoiceSeats product 7

Sabre Media Solutions Capabilities Targeting Capabilities



Sign-In Messages (Text and Graphical) • Targeted at a Global, Regional (Country of State Level) or specific agency level



Sabre PromoSpots (Text or Graphical) – Air Availability and Air Sell Screen, available for both unless noted



• • • • • • •

• •

Route Agency level – Text PromoSpots only Agent Country Agent State – Text PromoSpots only Agency City Class of service booked Number in party – Air Sell Screen

Video Links are also supported See Appendix for details of past North American carrier campaigns

8

Example 2 – Sabre Media Solutions Graphical PromoSpots in Graphical View to highlight products and services – Actual US Airways ChoiceSeats campaign

Graphical PromoSpot

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Explanation Example 2 •





• •

Sabre offers agents a choice of two views – Graphical View (as shown on Examples 2 and 3) and Classic View (as shown on Examples 4 and 5) Low fare entry to search by best fare. If Air Extras or ancillaries are included, they will be added to the Fare with Total Fare reflecting selected Air Extras; in this case, no Air Extras were selected Graphical PromoSpot appears in bottom right hand corner in Sabre Graphical View Actual campaign used to promote US Airways ChoiceSeats Airlines determine what they want to promote or create awareness of. For example, Delta Air Lines could promote Wi-Fi here; US Airways is promoting ChoiceSeats 10

Example 3 - Static HTML page provides full details from PromoSpots in Graphical View – Actual US Airways ChoiceSeats campaign

Static HTML page with details as provided by US Airways

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Explanation Example 3 •



• •

Graphical PromoSpot appears in bottom right hand corner in Sabre Graphical View on Example 2 Agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot on Example 2 and a static HTML page with details as provided by US Airways appears on screen on Example 3 Actual campaign used to promote US Airways ChoiceSeats If Delta Air Lines ran a Wi-Fi ad, they would provide details for static HTML page

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Example 4 - Sabre Media Solutions Text PromoSpots Classic View to highlight products and services – Actual US Airways ChoiceSeats campaign

Text PromoSpot

Full verbiage of Text PromoSpot as provided by US Airways is viewable with a secondary entry JM*1 (displayed in yellow to highlight for this deck) 13

Explanation Example 4 •





Sabre offers agents a choice of two views – Graphical View (as shown on Examples 3 and 4) and Classic View (as shown on Examples 4 and 5) Although formats may appear cryptic in Classic View, many agents prefer this view because of the extraordinary speed and efficiency Text PromoSpots appear in Classic view and a secondary entry (JM*1) is made to view full details of promotional message as provided by US Airways

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Example 5 - Sabre Media Solutions Graphical PromoSpots and HTML page in Classic View to highlight products and services – Actual US Airways ChoiceSeats campaign

Static HTML page with details as provided by US Airways

Graphical PromoSpot

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Explanation Example 5 •



• •

Graphical PromoSpot appears in bottom right hand corner in Sabre Classic View on Example 5 Agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot on Example 5 and a static HTML page with details as provided by US Airways appears on screen on Example 5 Actual campaign used to promote US Airways ChoiceSeats Any other carrier can use these to promote any service, i.e., Wi-Fi, seats, meals

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Example 6 - Illustrative example promoting video capabilities within static HTML page in Classic View of how United could promote new United Club in Chicago O’Hare

Static HTML page with embedded link to view video as would be provided by United Airlines

Graphical PromoSpot 17

Explanation Example 6 • Illustrative ad to promote United’s Clubs in Chicago via existing video capabilities • Targeted by route (Chicago, ORD, to Houston’s George Bush Airport (IAH) a Graphical PromoSpot appears in bottom right hand corner in Sabre Classic View (as would also appear in Graphical View) • Agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot on Example 6 and a static HTML page appears with video link appears on Example 6 – agent clicks on “play” to view video • Can be used to promote any service, i.e., Wi-Fi, seats, meals • Opportunity available today should United choose to use it

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Example 7 - Illustrative example of how US Airways could promote their DineFresh meals on select international flights

Graphical PromoSpot 19

Explanation Example 7 • Illustrative ad to promote US Airways DineFresh meal option • Targeted by route • Graphical PromoSpot appears in bottom right hand corner in Sabre Graphical View on Example 7 (ad would also appear in Classic View) • Opportunity available today should US Airways choose to use it

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Example 8 - Illustrative static HTML page providing details of the DineFresh meals on select international flights

Static HTML page with details as would be provided by US Airways

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Explanation Example 8 • Agent “clicks” on Graphical PromoSpot as illustrated on Example 7 and a static HTML page appears with details as provided by US Airways on Example 8 • Sale of the DineFresh meal option could be supported in Sabre today should US Airways choose to make available • Capabilities exist to offer various types of meals using industry standard ATPCO codes and commercial names i.e. low fat meal, breakfast or vegetarian dinner • US Airways could also promote that use of the US Airways MasterCard® card entitles customer to double bonus miles for your DineFresh purchase as they do online and same offer could apply 22

Example 9 - Illustrative example of how American Airlines could promote their new seats and amenities on select international flights

Graphical PromoSpot 23

Explanation Example 9 • Illustrative ad to promote American Airlines new seats • Targeted by route • Graphical PromoSpot appears in bottom right hand corner in Sabre Graphical View on Example 9 (ad would also appear in Classic View) • Could be used as an upsell opportunity – if customer interested in coach class, agent could promote benefits of new seats to influence upsell • Opportunity available today should American Airlines choose to use it

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Example 10 - Illustrative static HTML page providing details of new seats and amenities on select international flights

Static HTML page with details as would be provided by American Airlines

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Explanation Example 10 • Agent “clicks” on Graphical PromoSpot as illustrated on Example 9 and a static HTML page appears on Example 10 with details as provided by American Airlines • Could be used as an upsell opportunity – if customer interested in coach class, agent could promote benefits of new seats to influence upsell

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Appendix I The following examples represent historical campaigns. Although some date back to 2008, the capabilities remain and carriers are still purchasing Sabre Media Solutions to promote their products and services

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Example 19 - American Airlines – New service to Moscow’s Domodedovo International Airport – 9Apr-30Apr,08 / 15Sep-8Sep,08 / 4Nov-30 Nov,08

Static HTML page with details as provided by American Airlines

Graphical PromoSpot 45

Explanation Example 19 •

• •



Represents a historical ad purchased by American Airlines to promote new service to Russia’s Domodedova International Airport. Graphics as provided by American Airlines appeared in the Sabre displays Targeted by route Graphical PromoSpot appears on agent screen as previously shown in Examples 2 and 5 As in Examples 2 and 5, agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot in bottom right hand corner of screen and static HTML page with details as provided by American Airlines appears on screen as previously shown in Examples 3 and 5

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Example 20 - American Airlines - Wi-Fi on select flights- 16Oct-31Dec,08 Static HTML page with details as provided by American Airlines

Graphical PromoSpot 47

Explanation Example 20 •

• •



Represents a historical ad purchased by American Airlines to promote Wi-Fi on select flights. Graphics as provided by American Airlines Targeted by route Graphical PromoSpot appears on agent screen. This representation is in MySabre, an earlier version of Sabre Red Workspace As in Examples 2 and 5, agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot in bottom right hand corner of screen and static HTML page with details as provided by American Airlines appears on screen

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Example 21 - Delta Air Lines – New service Sydney - 2Jun-1Jul,09

Static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines

Graphical PromoSpot 49

Explanation Example 21 •

Represents a historical ad purchased by Delta Air Lines to promote new service to Sydney. Graphics as provided by Delta Air Lines appeared in the Sabre displays



Targeted by route



Graphical PromoSpot appears on agent screen as previously shown in Examples 3 and 6.



As in Examples 3 and 6, agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot in bottom right hand corner of screen and static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines appears on screen as previously shown in Examples 4 and 6 50

Example 22 - Delta Air Lines – #1 U.S. Airline to Asia - 6Sep-31Dec,10

Static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines

Graphical PromoSpot 51

Explanation Example 22 •

• •



Represents a historical ad purchased by Delta Air Lines to promote service to selected market. Graphics as provided by Delta Air Lines Targeted by route Graphical PromoSpot appears on agent screen as previously shown in Examples 2 and 5 As in Examples 2 and 5, agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot in bottom right hand corner of screen and static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines appears on screen as previously shown in Examples 3 and 5

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Example 23 - Delta Air Lines - Flat Bed – 6Sep-31Dec,10

Static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines

Graphical PromoSpot 53

Explanation Example 23 •

• •



Represents a historical ad purchased by Delta Air Lines to promote their flat bed. Graphics as provided by Delta Air Lines appeared in the Sabre displays Targeted by route Graphical PromoSpot appears on agent screen as previously shown in Examples 2 and 5 As in Examples 2 and 5, agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot in bottom right hand corner of screen and static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines appears on screen as previously shown in Examples 3 and 5

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Example 24 - Delta Air Lines - # 1 Airline to Europe – 6Sep-31Dec,10

Static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines Static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines

Graphical PromoSpot 55

Explanation Example 24 •

• •



Represents a historical ad purchased by Delta Air Lines to promote #1 Airline to Europe. Graphics as provided by Delta Air Lines appeared in the Sabre displays Targeted by route Graphical PromoSpot appears on agent screen as previously shown in Examples 2 and 5 As in Examples 2 and 5, agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot in bottom right hand corner of screen and static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines appears on screen as previously shown in Examples 3 and 5

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Example 25 – Delta Air Lines - BusinessElite – 6Sep- 31Dec,10

Static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines

Graphical PromoSpot Graphical PromoSpot 57

Explanation Example 25 •

• •



Represents a historical ad purchased by Delta Air Lines to promote BusinessElite product. Graphics as provided by Delta Air Lines appeared in the Sabre displays Targeted by route Graphical PromoSpot appears on agent screen as previously shown in Examples 2 and 5 As in Examples 2 and 5, agent “clicks” on Graphical PromoSpot in bottom right hand corner of screen and static HTML page with details as provided by Delta Air Lines appears on screen as previously shown in Examples 3 and 5

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Example 26 - United- Economy Plus seating – 12Oct-19Nov,11

Static HTML page with details as provided by United Airlines

Graphical PromoSpot 59

Explanation Example 26 •

Represents a historical ad by United Airlines Lines to promote Economy Plus seating. Graphics as provided by United Air Lines



Targeted by route



Graphical PromoSpot appears on agent screen



Agent “clicks” on the Graphical PromoSpot in bottom right hand corner of screen and static HTML page with details as provided by United Airlines appears on screen

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