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Thursday, January 11, 2018

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Town celebrates grants to refurbish centre By Bill Rea A lot of work has gone into refurbishing Mayfield Recreation Centre, and the Town is celebrating it. The ribbon was cut Sunday to officially open the revamped facility. The ceremony took place as part of the Town’s annual Winterfest celebrations, as the Town recognized the contributions of the Ontario Trillium Foundation (OTF) through the Ontario 150 Community Capital Program. It was announced early last year that the Town had been successful in obtaining a grant from OTF for $500,000 for arena floor and board system replacement.

Quote of the week

“It’s not locking out the public. It’s helping the public get where they want to go.” Mayor Allan Thompson, explaining new procedures at Town Hall

Phil Lankhof, recreation su- prove sightlines. pervisor at the Centre, point“It just sort of modernizes ed to several of the improve- it,” he commented. ments, including the shifting He also said all six change of the players’ benches to the rooms in the arena have new other side of the rink. That rubber flooring or skate tiles. had helped expand the viewLankhof said the ing area. That has also consultant on freed the project u p was Barry space Bryan Assof o r ciates and t h e general s e v contractor e r a l was Schillearn thuis Conto skate struction. p r o He was grams also imoffered pressed at the at how facility. quickly Parents the job 511 -9 have more w a s 1 5 -9 5 90 re St., Bolton va room to c o m Pizza No 24 Shobe e th nd hi help their pleted. youngsters H e m o c t. s denti onfamily on with said it www.bolt their skates started close to the in April, and was done by ice. the middle of September, “which As well, he said old wooden was tight, tight, tight time lines.” railings have been taken out of “This was one of the the stands in an effort to im- real accomplishments last

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year,” Mayor Allan Thompson declared. “I think it looks beautiful.” He added that in addition to the grant from OTF, the federal government provided funding for the compressor unit. Dufferin-Caledon MPP Sylvia Jones observed the Trillium money also helped with the reboarding of the rink. She added she was happy this project came in for the money. “I would say, Mayor Thompson, it has been very well used,” she remarked. The federal contribution was part of the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure program. It came to $39,655 for the Mayfield project. Brampton North MP Ruby Sahota had been in Town in May to announce the allocation on behalf of the Ministry of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, and she was back Sunday for the ceremonies. She stressed the value of partnerships between various levels of government and how they work to make communities better.

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A2 CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

Town councillors are optimistic looking to 2018

By Bill Rea A new year has started, and Caledon’s Town councillors are all looking to it with plenty of optimism. Each one had some items they are looking forward to seeing progress on Mayor Allan Thompson said he wants to finish work on the Caledon Community Work Plan this year. He said there were 61 issues under nine categories that needed to be addressed. “I think we’ve accomplished what we set out to do,” he said.

He also pointed out a lot of work has been done on storm water management along roads in town, and he’s hoping these improvements will pay off. Thompson also said requests for proposals (RFP) are out for the job of bringing broadband internet to more areas of Caledon. The RFPs close March 1 and he’s hoping work can start in May. The Town seems to be working well financially, according to the Mayor. “I think we’ve come through with a pretty good budget,” he commented,

pointing to such projects as the new track approved for Humberview Secondary School. “I see a lot of positive things starting to happen across town,” Thompson remarked, adding there are still efforts to improve customer service. “The Irish in me always has hope,” Ward 12 Regional Councillor Barb Shaughnessy declared, adding she had checked her horoscope and is expecting a great year. She pointed to the fact that 2018 is going to be an election year, and that will provide new challenges to Caledon. The fact that the Chair of Peel Region will be elected at large will have a “tremendous effect” on Caledon, considering the town’s small population. “I am expecting Caledon won’t have a chair again,” she commented. More locally, Shaughnessy observed that new legislation is going to have to be reflected this year in the Town’s Official Plan. She added the Town is working on an Official Plan review, which she said will have to be done by 2022. “That’s challenging,” she said. Addressing Ward 1 issues, Shaughnessy pointed out the preparation of terms of reference for a master rehabilitation plans for aggregate operations was covered in this year’s budget.

“I think that’s extremely important,” she said, adding it represents a substantial economic opportunity. Ward 1 area Councillor Doug Beffort said there are two main areas where he is hoping to see progress. One of them is to help people who still dont have access to high-speed internet. He said they are a paying premium in their taxes, but are not seeing any benefits. He added there are some areas in the ward that are close to connections, but they haven’t got it yet. He’s hoping work can progress to see what’s needed to get these people hooked up. The other area Beffort said he’s hoping to see progress involves infrastructure and recreation facilities like arenas. “We can’t forget the smaller areas,” he remarked, adding infrastructure is needed to maintain service for tourism. He pointed out the developments in Mayfield West have small back yards, meaning these new residents are likely to head north for recreation, and these areas need infrastructure to handle the traffic. “I am very excited about 2018,” Regional Councillor Johanna Downey stated in an email. “Caledon and Ward 2 will see the completion of many great projects as well as the birth of exciting new initiatives.”

See ‘McClure’ on page A3

Community Events

SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 The Caledon Seniors’ Centre at Rotary Place in Bolton will be hosting a Bingo & Brunch. A welcome snack will be available at 9:30 a.m. with bingo play starting at 10. A delicious brunch will be served following bingo. Prizes and door prizes will be given out. The cost is $14, which includes three cards and brunch. Pre-registration is required. Call the Centre at 905-951-6114 to reserve a spot. TUESDAY, JANUARY 16 Adjustments After Birth: This support group is for mothers needing additional support following the birth or adoption of a child meets from 10 a.m to noon. Registration is required. Group and child care are offered free of charge. To register, call the Caledon Parent-Child Centre at 905-857-0090 or email [email protected] Let’s Get Together: Sharing the Journey of Raising a Child with Special Needs. An inclusive program for families presented by the Caledon Parent-Child Centre and Brampton/Caledon Community Living. It runs the first and third Tuesdays of each month, from 5:45 to 7:15 p.m. Come play and connect with other families to explore the various issues that surround parenting a child with special needs. Registration is required. To register call 905-8570090 or email [email protected] WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17 TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Chapter #ON1381 meets every Wednesday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., at the Friendship Room of Knox United Church in Caledon village. This non-profit weight loss group meets to learn about nutrition and exercise. Call Barbara at (519) 927-5696. Caledon East Seniors Club #588 meets every Wednesday at 1:15 p.m. at the Caledon Community Complex, Caledon East. Everyone welcome for an afternoon of friendly euchre and lunch. For more information, call (905) 951-9376. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) ON 1344 Bolton is looking for new members who want to lose weight in a healthy way and keep it off. We’re a non-profit group and meet in Bolton United Church at 8 Nancy St.Hours: Weigh in 6:15 to 6:45 p.m., followed by a meeting at 7. We look forward to meeting you. For more information, call Marion at 905-857-5191 or Lorraine at 905857-1568. The Caledon Parent-Child Centre is offering a program called Growing Together at Stationview Place in Bolton. Each Tuesday, a small group of families and their children will meet to share a meal, play and learn from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Staff will also be available to provide information and support to parents. Activities will include topics like healthy foods, active living and wellness. This program is designed for families with children up to six years of age who have a total household income of less than $45,000. Growing Together in Peel is funded by CAP-C. Contact the Caledon

An evening of euchre is held the first and third Friday of the month at Terra Cotta Community Hall. Play will start at 7 p.m. sharp. The cost is $3 per person, and proceeds raised will go to the operation of the hall. For more information, contact John or Cheryl at 289-344-0033. Cardball will be played at Caledon Seniors’ Centre from 10 a.m. to noon. Darts will be played at Caledon Seniors’ Centre from 1 to 2:30 p.m. TUESDAY, JANUARY 23 Adjustments After Birth: This support group is for mothers needing additional support following the birth or adoption of a child meets from 10 a.m to noon. Registration is required. Group and child care are offered free of charge. To register, call the Caledon Parent-Child Centre at 905-857-0090 or email [email protected]

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24 TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Chapter #ON1381 meets every Wednesday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., at the Friendship Room of Knox United Church in Caledon village. This non-profit weight loss group meets to learn about nutrition and exercise. Call Barbara at (519) 927-5696.

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Caledon East Seniors Club #588 meets every Wednesday at 1:15 p.m. at the Caledon Community Complex, Caledon East. Everyone welcome for an afternoon of friendly euchre and lunch. For more information, call (905) 951-9376. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) ON 1344 Bolton is looking for new members who want to lose weight in a healthy way and keep it off. We’re a non-profit group and meet in Bolton United Church at 8 Nancy St.Hours: Weigh in 6:15 to 6:45 p.m., followed by a meeting at 7. We look forward to meeting you. For more information, call Marion at 905-857-5191 or Lorraine at 905-857-1568. The Caledon Parent-Child Centre is offering a program called Growing Together at Stationview Place in Bolton. Each Tuesday, a small group of families and their children will meet to share a meal, play and learn from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Staff will also be available to provide information and support to parents. Activities will include topics like healthy foods, active living and wellness. This program is designed for families with children up to six years of age who have a total household income of less than $45,000. Growing Together in Peel is funded by CAP-C. Contact the Caledon Parent-Child Centre to determine if you qualify at 905-857-0090. Wellness, Interaction, Social and Exercise (WISE) is a health promotion and social program for seniors (55+) happening at Cheltenham Baptist Church 14520 Creditview Rd. Wednesday mornings. Low impact exercise/falls prevention session starts at 10 a.m. with regular programming with refreshments following. Call 905-857-7651 for more information.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 19 Wellness, Interaction, Social and Exercise (WISE) is a health promotion and social program for seniors (55+) happening at the Palgrave United Church Friday mornings. Low impact exercise/ falls prevention session starts at 9:30 a.m. with regular programming with refreshments starting at 10:15. Call 905-857-7651 for more information.

Do you know how LinkedIn can help you find work? Jobs Caledon at Caledon Community Services, in the Royal Courtyards in Bolton, is hosting a workshop, Find

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Cardball will be played at Caledon Seniors’ Centre from 10 a.m. to noon.

Bolton Banter Toastmasters meet every first, third and fifth Thursday at the Albion-Bolton Community Centre at 7 p.m. Lose your fear of public speaking and build leadership skills. Everyone welcome. Email [email protected] or visit www.boltonbanter.org

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 12 Wellness, Interaction, Social and Exercise (WISE) is a health promotion and social program for seniors (55+) happening at the Palgrave United Church Friday mornings. Low impact exercise/falls prevention session starts at 9:30 a.m. with regular programming with refreshments starting at 10:15. Call 905-857-7651 for more information.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 18 “Has your life been affected by someone else’s drinking? Al-Anon Family Group is for you.” The Bolton group meets Thursdays at 8:30 p.m. at Caven Presbyterian Church (110 King W, Bolton). Call 416-410-3809 or http://al-anon.alateen.on.ca

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“Has your life been affected by someone else’s drinking? Al-Anon Family Group is for you.” The Bolton group meets Thursdays at 8:30 p.m. at Caven Presbyterian Church (110 King W, Bolton). Call 416-410-3809 or http://al-anon.alateen.on.ca

Wellness, Interaction, Social and Exercise (WISE) is a health promotion and social program for seniors (55+) happening at Cheltenham Baptist Church 14520 Creditview Rd. Wednesday mornings. Low impact exercise/falls prevention session starts at 10 a.m. with regular programming with refreshments following. Call 905-857-7651 for more information.

ALBIO

THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 Bolton and District PROBUS Club presents Beverley Stavely of Headwaters Education Team addressing the topic of “diagnosis and treatment of diabetes with special reference to juvenile diabetes.” It will be at at Albion Bolton Community Centre starting at 9:45 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Refreshments will be provided.

Parent-Child Centre to determine if you qualify at 905-857-0090.

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This column is provided as a free public service to non-profit organizations to announce up-coming events. Please contact Bill Rea at the Caledon Citizen at (905) 857-6626 or 1-888-557-6626 if you wish to have an announcement published.

EGANS HELD ANNUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE

Egan Funeral Home held their 23rd annual Christmas Memorial Service at Nashville Road Community Church in December. More than 700 people gathered to hear Bill Webster’s message on “An Unexpected Change of Direction.” Anyone who has experienced a loss, whether this year or in years passed, were invited to attend. Many families commented how they begin their Christmas season with the candlelight service, as it helps them manage through the holiday season, along with Bill’s suggestions. After hearing Angela sing O Holy Night, families lit candles on the tree in memory of their loved one and then listened to Angela sing Breath of Heaven. Everyone found comfort in the readings by the clergy who attended. Pictured are Rev. Dr. John Vincent, Rev. Lloyd Paul, Johanna Webster, Angela Hay, Rev. Carol-Ann Chapman, Dr. Bill Webster, and organist Anatoly Ivchenko.

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CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

Thompson and others planning to run in this year’s elections By Bill Rea The year that’s just started is going to be a busy one in Caledon, made more active by the fact there will be municipal elections in the fall. Several members of Caledon council have announced their political plans for the fall, while others are keeping their intentions to themselves for the time being. Mayor Allan Thompson has said he plans to seek a second term at the head of the council table. “I do know I’m going to be challenged,”

he observed. “That’s what democracy is all about.” “I’ve done the best job I could,” he added. “I call it my performance review.” Ward 1 Regional Councillor Barb Shaughnessy said she is planning to seek office this year, but offered no comment on which one she’ll run for. Councillor Doug Beffort was not prepared to discuss his plans. “I’ve given it a lot of thought, but I don’t want to declare anything at this point,” he commented. Ward 2 Regional Councillor Johanna

Downey said she’s interested in a second term. “I’ll be running again, absolutely,” she declared. “There’s still a lot of work to do.” Councillor Gord McClure is among those who said he’s not made up his mind about seeking another term. “It’s going to be an interesting election,’ he predicted. The coming election is something Ward 3 and 4 Regional Councillor Jennifer Innis said she’s looking forward to. “I’ll be seeking re-election to the same

From page A2

as Regional representative for Wards 3 and 4. “I’m excited for the year to come and moving forward with significant projects.” One of those projects involves the third phase of the Caledon East Community Complex. She said the Town is working with the community to determine what it should include. Innis also said she wants to see progress on Regional Official Plan Amendment (ROPA) 28, which covers the Bolton Employment Lands. That has been approved by the Ontario Municipal Board. “I’m excited that that’s moving forward,” she said, pointing out it should attract new business and investment, meaning more tax revenue for the Town. Councillor Nick deBoer, who holds the area council seat in Wards 3 and 4, was also looking forward to the coming phase at the Community Complex, as well as working with developers in Caledon East. As well, he also said a Town-driven review of the Palgrave Estates policies is coming up this year. “It should be an action-packed year,”

he commented. Annette Groves, Regional councillor for Ward 5, said there are a number of projects on the agenda for the year. “Hopefully, we can move a few things along,” she said. Groves said she was hoping to have public question periods restored to agendas at meetings. “It’s an opportunity for the public to come up and speak to council directly,” she observed. Ward 5 area Councillor Rob Mezzapelli said there are a couple of items he’s hopeful there can be progress on in the coming year. Seniors’ development in Bolton was on his mind, and he observed there are two projects under construction, and he is hoping to see them substantially completed this year. He also said he’s hoping to see the study on the Queen Street Corridor completed this year, so things can progress to the necessary Official Plan designation and zoning for the area. As well, Mezzapelli said he’s looking forward to seeing the completion of the new fire hall for Bolton, and is hoping things can move forward on the Bolton

McClure looking forward to word on GTA West

“I have been fortunate to spend this term learning and working alongside my colleagues on projects such as the Cheltenham Badlands, Southfields Community Centre, Evolve, Peel Boy and Girls Club, Habitat for Humanity, Peel Food Charter and the Credit Valley Heritage Trail,” she added. “Representing my community at many tables has given me incredible insight and opportunity to serve my town and region and build positivity in what I know is the greatest community to live, work and play.” Ward 2 area Councillor Gord McClure said he some personal reasons to be looking positively at the year ahead, as he has another grandchild on the way. “I’m excited about the new year and I’m excited about life,” he declared. Looking to Town issues, McClure said he’s particularly interested in what’s going to happen with the GTA West Corridor. “I think it’s going to be an interesting year,” remarked Councillor Jennifer Innis, who’s completing her first term

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position,” she declared. Councillor Nick deBoer said he’s likely to go for another term as area rep for Wards 3 and 4. “I’m pretty certain I’m going to run for the same position,” he commented. “I’m enjoying the role and enjoying working with the community.” Councillor Annette Groves said she plans to run for another term as Regional rep for Ward 5. “I’ve worked very hard, I believe, over the last term,” she said. Councillor Rob Mezzapelli was another who wasn’t willing to make an announcement. “I’m still determining that, mainly with my family,” he said, adding he’s enjoyed being area councillor for Ward 5 for the last seven years. “I want to make sure it’s a balance with my family life.” He added he plans to remain involved in the community, regardless of what he decides.

Christian Unity Week celebrations coming

Two churches in Caledon East will be holding joint services to mark the Week of Christian Unity. This coming Sunday (Jan. 14) will see a service at Caledon East United Church, starting at 10:30 a.m. The service the following Sunday (Jan. 21) will be at St. James Anglican Church, starting at 11 a.m. Rev Ross Leckie of Caledon East United Church and Rev. Greg Fiennes-Clinton of St. James’ extend an invitation to all and hope they will join them and their congregations these dates. For further information contact: 905 584-9635 or email [email protected] gmail.com

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Fire department warns be careful in the cold of winter Caledon Fire and Emergency Services is urging everyone to keep safety in mind as the temperatures turn colder, and to ensure that they are wearing appropriate clothing when heading outdoors. They remind everyone that frostbite can develop within minutes on exposed skin. “We often see more home fires during the winter months due to heating equipment and appliances,” Fire Chief Darryl Bailey said. “People should pay close attention to potential fire hazards such as fireplaces, furnaces, chimneys and vents, and space heaters.” Here are some other important reminders: • Keep chimneys and intake/exhaust

vents for furnaces and heating appliances free of debris, ice and snow accumulations to reduce the risk of carbon monoxide (CO) build-up from inefficient combustion. • Burn dry, well-seasoned wood in fireplaces and wood stoves to reduce the risk of excessive creosote build-up in chimneys. • Allow ashes from the fireplace or wood stove to cool before emptying them into a metal container with a tight-fitting lid. Keep the container outside. • Keep space heaters at least one metre away from anything that can burn, including curtains, upholstery and clothing. • Replace worn or damaged electrical wires and connections on vehicles and

extension cords and use the proper gauge extension cord for vehicle block heaters. Visit caledon.ca/fireresources for more information and safety tips.

Animal Services would like to remind residents that if it’s too cold for them to stay outdoors, it’s too cold for their pets also. Bring pets inside during cold temperatures.

….ooooops! Feeling like a fish out of water? How can I best care for my aging loved one now- or, in planning for the future? I know… it’s my turn, my responsibility! So much time… So much to do… So much to worry about… I feel so overwhelmed! HELP! We have been helping seniors and their families like you for almost two decades— and, these years give us the knowledge, experience and wisdom to very much understand your situation and to provide you with the highest standard of compassionate and professional personal care for your loved one in his/her unique circumstance. Let’s plan now together the best care for your loved one at an affordable cost.

SHED FIRE ON HIGHWAY 10 SATURDAY

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Traffic was impacted on Highway 10, just north of King Street, for several hours Saturday as crews dealt with a shed fire on a property on the west side of the road. Caledon Fire and Emergency Services reported they were called out at about 10 a.m. The building was fully involved by the time they arrived. Deputy Chief Mark Wallace reported a man tried to fight the fire and received minor injuries. There is no word as to the cause of the fire. Photo by Bill Rea

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The Citizen CROSSWORD

Citizen reports possible impaired driver

butterfly

Caledon OPP are crediting a conThe result was a 48-year-old Bolton cerned citizen with informing them of a woman was arrested Jan. 6 and charged possible impaired driver. with impaired driving, driving with more than the legal limit of alcohol in her system and resisting a peace officer. Puzzle No. 181310 • Solution on page: B1 Police report they received the tip at 27. Relaxing places with a satiny finish discord about 10:45 p.m. regarding a suspected 29. Confiscates 58. Whiskey and 20. Marked by impaired driver in King Township who 31. Gladys Knight’s bread are two smartness in dress was headed to Bolton. fellow performers 59. Scottish tax and manners Officers located the vehicle at an ad33. Witnesses 24. Habitat dress in Bolton and spoke to the lone 34. Taking place in CLUES DOWN 26. Annoy constantly female occupant behind the wheel of a a series 1.Rope used to lasso 28. Full of life 36. Satisfy 2. Idyllic places grey 2011 Mercedes. While speaking 30. Great energy 38. Freshwater fish of 3. Field force unit to her, an officer determined that her N. America 4. Guitar great 32. BBQ and soy ability to drive was impaired by alcohol 39. Laments Clapton are two and proceeded to arrest her according41. “Girls” creator 5. Slang for type 34. Virtuous ly. The woman, however, resisted the Dunham of skirt 35. Not fatty arrest. 43. Indian title of 6. Figure skating 37. Foes Police remind the public to call 9-1-1 respect jump 38. Merchandiser if they suspect that someone is driving 44. Cocoa plum 7. Innocent 46. Network of nerve 8. Mathematical ratio 40. Dishonest scheme while impaired by alcohol or drugs. In 42. Repents cells 9. Slowly drinks doing so, they could be saving lives.

21. Tennis player

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A5

Arts Entertainment

My Fair Lady to open Orangeville Music Theatre’s 40th season By Constance Scrafield Community theatre in this area is remarkable for both the quality of the productions and the loyalty of the audiences. In 2018, Orangeville Music Theatre (OMT) is celebrating 40 years. Now a two-part organization, one might say, producing two performances in the same time frame — one performed by adults and a different one by the children, rehearsed at the same time and produce one after the other — pretty impressive. This year, audiences will be treated to My Fair Lady, played by the adults of the group, and Peter Pan Jr, performed by the children. Each has its story for the journalist and each provides entertainment for the public. My Fair Lady opens at the Opera House at 87 Broadway (the Town Hall) tomorrow (Friday) and runs until Jan. 21. Peter Pan Jr is on for six shows on the weekend of Jan. 26 at Westside Secondary School. Welcome back to Kat Anderson in the role of Eliza Dolittle in My Fair Lady. A total delight on the stage, both a fine singer and a convincing actor, one is always aware that she is very happy to be on the stage. Opposite her, as Professor Higgins, is Desmond Baxter, also a regular with OMT. He had a chance to really dig into who his character is during rehearsals. “He’s self-centred, pompous and he ends up on a journey he doesn’t know he’s on,” he said. “He’s taken on this experiment and she’s teaching him as much as she’s learning. He never felt anything for

anyone, but this has brought a transformation.” For those who do not know the story, it’s a classic. Eliza Dolittle is a poor lady, living in the East End of Edwardian London, who sells flowers out of her basket to the wealthy people coming and going to the opera as they pass on the steps of Covent Garden Theatre. Her speech is marked by a strong East London (Cockney) accent, replete with harsh vowels and strange use of words. One rainy evening, a gentleman hears her speaking and starts to make notes, to which she objects strongly. Her speech delights him with its crudity and roughness. The gentleman is Professor Henry Higgins, a phoneticist. At the same time, he meets, as a coincidence, Colonel Pickering, played by Mark Ladouceur, a linguist who recently arrived from India. They discover that they have heard of and been looking to meet each other. Listening to Eliza, Higgins boasts that he could change her speech so profoundly that she could pass for a lady within six months. He invites Pickering to stay with him at his London home. The following day, Eliza goes to his home, asking to take speech lessons so that she can get a job in a shop. Pickering, offers to pay for the lessons and challenges Higgins to prove his claim. The two men make a wager over the matter. There follows a story of more than one transformation and many endearing characters. “This is a show that shows a lot of

levels and imagination,” Anderson said. “There’s transformation — depth — sass. She goes from selling flowers and ragged edges to being fine tuned. She sees a future for herself and she hopes it’s her way out of her prior life style.” “There’s yelling — shouting — laughter,” she added The cast members spoke out about the characters and the show: “There’s a lot of character in these characters.” “It’s got some guts to it.” “It shows that relationships are so complicated.” Sibbelina Mullis plays the role of Mrs. Higgins, the professor’s mother, who in large part, takes Eliza under her wing. In her second appearance with OMT, she remarked, “It’s a wonderful experience to be associated with OMT. I’m amazed on how everyone makes it happen all the time.” As to what would bring people to see the show, they declared, “It’s funny, very funny.” “There are a lot of characters in this show — you’ll relate to someone.” “It’s relatable — about confidence, relationships between diverse members of the community.” “This is not a typical relationship — but there mutual respect at the end — which comes as a surprise.” It is also a great choice for the 40th Anniversary. For tickets, go to the Opera House at

87 Broadway or the Information Centre on Buena Vista Drive at Highway 10, or by telephone at 519-942-3423. For the first time, this time around, there is also a dinner/theatre package with SteakHouse63 — dinner and theatre for one price. Check out www.orangevillemusictheatre.com for those details. Lucinda Silva has been directing the youngsters for the past several years, and likewise, this year with Disney Peter Pan Jr. “We have a cast of 43 members, ages 6 to 16,” she said calmly. “I’m so used to those numbers now, it’s good. This is a darker Disney — we’re usually more fluffy. It’s a pretty full story — still a musical.” Her praise for her young cast was fulsome. “This cast is so great — actually blown me away with this show,” she said. “It’s getting to the point where I’m nit-picking. They take the advice and come back even better. It’s so great to watch them grow.” “Some of the little ones, they just didn’t get it,” she added. “Where we started to where we are now is miles. Everyone has taken ownership of the show — it’s awesome.” Peter Pan Jr is playing over the weekend of Jan. 26 for six performances. For tickets to that production, go to OMT’s website.

194 McEwan Dr. East, Bolton 905-857-2646 Showtimes FridayJanuary November 4 to to Thursday Thursday November Showtimesfor for Friday 12, 2018 January 18, 201810

CAPTIVATING SHOW FOR COLD NIGHT

Patrons braved the cold of Friday night to take in the performance of Max Layton at CrossCurrents Café. The singer and songwriter performed much of his own material, while also reading from his poetry. He sang of love and celebrated his passion for this country and his diverse experiences. Photo by Bill Rea

MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN (PG) (TOBACCO USE,SOME SCARY SCENES) CLOSED STAR WARS: THE FRI,TUE LAST JEDI (PG)SAT-SUN (FRIGHTENING CAPTIONED, DVS¬Æ 3:55, 6:55; 12:45, 3:55,SCENES,NOT 6:55; MON,WEDREC. 6:55FOR YOUNG CHILDREN,VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTIONED, DVS®, RECLINERS, RESERVED SEATING FRI,TUE 3:30, KEVIN HART: WHAT NOW? (14A) (COARSE LANGUAGE,SEXUAL CONTENT,CRUDE CONTENT) CLOSED CAP6:45, 10:00; SAT-SUN 12:15, TIONED, DVS¬Æ FRI-WED 9:50 3:30, 6:45, 10:00; MON,WED-THURS 6:45, 10:00 PADDINGTON (G) (SOME SCARY LANGUAGE,SEXUAL SCENES) CLOSED CAPTIONED, DVS®, RECLINERS, RE- VITHE GIRL ON THE2TRAIN (18A) (COARSE CONTENT,DISTURBING CONTENT,GRAPHIC OLENCE)SEATING CLOSED CAPTIONED, DVS¬Æ 4:15, 6:50, 9:40; SAT-SUN 6:50, 9:40; MON,WED 6:50, SERVED FRI,TUE 3:45, 6:45,FRI,TUE 9:45; SAT-SUN 12:45, 3:45, 1:05, 6:45,4:15, 9:45; MON,WED-THURS 9:40; THURS 6:45, 9:45 9:50 THE ACCOUNTANT (14A) (GORY SCENES,COARSE VIOLENCE) CLOSEDMAY CAPTIONED, JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG)LANGUAGE,GRAPHIC (FRIGHTENING SCENES,LANGUAGE OFDVS¬Æ FRI,TUE 3:50, 6:45, 9:45; SAT-SUN 12:55, 3:50, 6:45, 9:45; MON,WED 6:45, 9:45; THURS 6:50, 9:45 FEND,VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTIONED, DVS®, RECLINERS, RESERVED SEATING FRI,TUE 4:00, KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES (14A) (GRAPHIC VIOLENCE,SEXUAL CONTENT) CLOSED CAPTIONED, 7:00, 9:55; SAT-SUN 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 1:15, 9:55;4:20, MON 7:00,7:10, 9:5510:00 DVS¬Æ FRI,TUE 4:20, 7:10, 10:00; SAT-SUN 7:10,9:55; 10:00;WED-THURS MON,WED-THURS INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (14A) (DISTURBING CONTENT,GRAPHIC VIOLENCE,FRIGHTENJACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK (PG) (MATURE THEME,LANGUAGE MAY OFFEND,VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPING SCENES) CLOSED RESERVED SEATING FRI,TUE 4:05, TIONED, DVS¬Æ FRI,TUECAPTIONED, 4:10, 7:05, 9:55;DVS®, SAT-SUNRECLINERS, 1:00, 4:10, 7:05, 9:55; MON,WED 7:05, 9:55; THURS 6:55,7:05, 9:55 OUIJA:SAT ORIGIN OF4:05, EVIL (14A) SCENES) 10:05; 1:05, 7:05,(DISTURBING 10:05; SUNCONTENT,FRIGHTENING 10:05; MON,WED-THURS 7:05,CLOSED 10:05 CAPTIONED, DVS¬Æ FRI,TUE 4:25, 7:15, SAT-SUN 1:20, 4:25, 7:15, 10:05; MON,WED-THURS 7:15, 10:05 INSIDIOUS: THE10:05; LAST KEY (14A) (DISTURBING CONTENT,GRAPHIC VIOLENCE,FRIGHTENING INFERNO (14A) (GORY SCENES,LANGUAGE MAY OFFEND,GRAPHIC VIOLENCE) CAPTIONED, DVS¬Æ SCENES) CLOSED CAPTIONED, DVS®, RECLINERS, RESERVED SEATINGCLOSED SUN 1:05, 4:05, 7:05 FRI,TUE 4:00, 7:00, 9:50; SAT-SUN 1:10, 4:00, 7:00, 9:50; MON,WED 7:00, 9:50; THURS 7:05, 9:55 JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG) (FRIGHTENING SCENES,LANGUAGE MAY OFDOCTOR STRANGE 3D (Not Rated) CLOSED CAPTIONED, DVS¬Æ THURS 7:00, 10:00 FEND,VIOLENCE) CLOSED CAPTIONED, DVS®, RECLINERS, SEATINGDVS¬Æ MON 7:00 TROLLS (G) (SOME SCARY SCENES,CARTOON/ANIMATION ACTION)RESERVED CLOSED CAPTIONED, THURS 6:45 L A N D M A R K C I N E M A S . C O M

A6 CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

More memories of 2017 in Caledon New Tony Pontes Public School was opened in July July Canada marked 150 years of Confeder-

“She’s obviously very well qualified,” Tilson observed. “She’s done pretty well everything.” * * * * * * * A 28-player roster was named for the 2017 Women’s Rugby World Cup to be held in Ireland, and there are two members from Bolton. The squad featured 18 returnees from Canada’s 2014 squad that won silver, including captain Kelly Russell as well as her sister Laura. * * * * * * * Cape Breton—Canso MP Roger Cuzner was in town to announce close to $1.5 million in funding for Caledon Community Services (CCS)’s LIFE for Youth project. Cuzner, Parliamentary secretary to Employment, Workforce Development and Labour Minister Patty Hajdu, announced the government will provide funding to help 128 young people who need it most to overcome barriers to getting a job or returning to school. * * * * * * * The Rotary Club of Bolton hosted their annual Rotaryfest. In keeping with tradi-

ation the first day of July, and it wasn’t hard to find celebrations in Caledon. * * * * * * * There were plenty of people out for a good time at the annual Cheltenham Day observances. * * * * * * * The Pride Flag flew at Town Hall in Caledon East. Peel Pride Chairperson Sonya Shorter was on hand for the ceremony, and acknowledged this was the second year the flag had flown at Town Hall. “The second of many more, I hope,” she added. * * * * * * * It was not a very successful season for the Caledon Bandits junior C lacrosse team. The postseason was over for them just a little more than 24 hours after the opening draw. Back-to-back losses on each team’s home floor sent the Caledon squad packing in their opening round best-of-three series against the powerhouse Six Nations Warriors. * * * * * * * Jason Scorcia of Bolton won a gold medal in his class in the golf competition at the 2017 Provincial Summer Special Olympic Games at Caledon Golf Club near Inglewood. * * * * * * * It was somewhat unusual, but Dufferin-Caledon MP David Tilson was praising Prime Ministrer Justin Trudeau. Tilson was pleased with the announcement that Jason Scorcia of Bolton won a gold medal in his class in the former astronaut golf competition at the 2017 Provincial Summer Special OlymJulie Payette would pic Games at Caledon Golf Club near Inglewood. Mayor Allan be Canada’s next Thompson was accompanied by Caledon OPP Inspector Ryan Governor General. Carothers when he presented the medal to him.

tion, ribs were among the main food items available, and there were lines-ups at the various stands of hungry rib fans. * * * * * * * The Caledon FC 2001 Boys U16 Soccer Team travelled to Blaine, Minn. to participate in the USA Cup, and came home champions. * * * * * * * Plans were in the works to have a large sand and gravel operation in Erin cross the border into Caledon, and drew a lot of interest. James Dick Construction Limited put forth the plan, which would require a licence from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) under the Aggregate Resources Act (ARA). A lot of residents were out for a public open house in Erin. Many questions were raised, dealing with such things as impacts on local water supplies, and whether such a pit expansion is really needed. * * * * * * *

Students got their bus restored August It was a nice night for a walk, so that’s

what about 125 people did one Thursday evening early in August. The event was the fourth annual Light Up the Runway, with participants walking the length of the main 3,500-foot runway at Brampton Flight Centre, raising money for Bethell Hospice. * * * * * * * The Davis Centre in Bolton needs its bus to help deliver its programs, and they got a new one. The new bus was formally unwrapped, with several residents and officials on hand to actually help remove the paper. * * * * * * * Students of St. Nicholas Elementary School in Bolton who had lost their bus service learned they would be getting it back. The Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board voted to restore it. “It was a long process,” Trustee Frank Di Cosala, Caledon’s representative on the board, commented after the vote was taken. “We learned to be patient.” * * * * * * * Caledon’s double-hatters were continuing with their efforts to keep serving in their community, and they found lots of

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A new school year started at Caledon’s newest school. And even though it was the middle of summer, there were very few long faces. The new Tony Pontes Public School is slated to go in SouthFields Village in Caledon, but until the actual building is ready, some 250 students and 28 staff are being accommodated in the new Countryside Village Public School in north Brampton (in the area of Dixie and Mayfield Roads). * * * * * * * An altercation in the area of Queen Street South and Martha Street in Bolton resulted in a 36-year-old Toronto man dying and two Bolton residents being charged. * * * * * * * Caledon Public Library (CPL) patrons in the Belfountain area got an innovative way to access library materials. The library holds lockers were officially opened in the renovated Belfountain Community Hall.

support, including from the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO). Caledon District Chief Mandy Gould of the Inglewood station drew two standing ovations when she addressed more than 1,000 delegates at the AMO conference in Ottawa. “I was not really sure what to expect, but it was quite the experience, that’s for sure,” Gould told this Citizen later. * * * * * * * Word on the GTA West Corridor, which makes its way through Caledon, could be just weeks away, it was announced in August. Mayor Allan Thompson said he got that from Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca at the conference of the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO). He said the Minister said an announcement would be coming in “a matter of weeks.” * * * * * * * In the end the Inglewood Ball Hockey League (IBHL) season wrapped up pretty much according to script, with the top two teams squaring off for the title. The only twist was George’s Arena Sports, which finished the regular and

See ‘Former’ on page A8

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CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

News Town of Caledon’s

Get the email version: www.caledon.ca/enews

Get your trees in 3 easy steps!

2018 Tree Seedling Program Online store open until March 2, 2018

1

VISIT CALEDON.CA/SEEDLINGS

2

SUBMIT YOUR ORDER

3

PICK UP YOUR TREES IN THE SPRING!

Accessibility = Good Business Nominations are now open for Caledon’s first ever Accessibility Award for Businesses. It is presented once a year to an organization or business in Caledon that has shown a concerted effort to improve accessibility. Improved accessibility can mean either physical alterations or new programs or features that reduce barriers and permit greater access to services for those with disabilities. Established by the Accessibility Advisory Committee and supported by Council, the Accessibility Award recognizes an organization or business for its efforts to comply with the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulations of the AODA. By recognizing an organization or business, the hope is for others to be encouraged to make accessibility improvements for their patrons. The Accessibility Award is presented at a meeting of Council in recognition of National Access Awareness Week. The recipients are also recognized on the Town’s website and through traditional and social media announcements. Nominations close on March 31, 2018 at 4:30 p.m. For more information and a nomination form visit: caledon.ca/AccessAward

The Town has expanded the Tree Seedling Program by partnering with the Credit Valley Conservation and Toronto and Region Conservation Authority to provide more services. Please visit caledon.ca/seedlings for more information.

As of January 1, 2018, the Town of Caledon has introduced a new Fence By-law

This modernized By-law includes updated fence heights, introduces privacy screens and adds other new provisions to balance the need for privacy while maintaining attractive neighbourhoods and protecting safety. For more information visit the Town’s website at caledon.ca/fence or contact Regulatory Services by e-mail at [email protected] or by phone at 905.584.2272 x. 3462. NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

Proposed Draft Plan of Subdivision, Draft Plan of Condominium and Zoning By-law Amendment FILE NUMBER(S): 21T-16003C, 21CDM-16002C, RZ 16-06 Community Involvement: A Public Meeting will be held to consider a proposed Draft Plan of Subdivision, Draft Plan of Condominium and Zoning By-law Amendment. This is your way to offer input and get involved.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment FILE NUMBER(S): RZ 17-12 Community Involvement: A Public Meeting will be held to consider a proposed Zoning By-law Amendment. This is your way to offer input and get involved. Applicant and Location: Applicant: North West Holdings MPlan Inc. Location:

Area:

20, 22 & 24 Simona Drive Part Lot 1, Plan 43M-1659, Parts 2 to 4, 43R-33994 East side of Pillsworth Road, North of Simona Drive Approximately 0.80 ha (2.00 ac)

A7

HAVE YOUR

SAY

Applicant and Location: Applicant: KLM Planning Partners Inc. on behalf of Villalago Residences Inc. Location:

WHEN Tuesday, Feburary 06, 2018 Info Session: 6:00 p.m. Public Meeting: 7:00 p.m. WHERE Council Chambers, Town Hall, 6311 Old Church Road, Caledon East, L7C 1J6

VISIT www.caledon.ca/development for copy of the location map For more Information Contact: Cristina Di Benedetto, Community Planner, Development 905.584.2272 x.4064 [email protected]

What are the Proposed Changes? To amend the Zoning By-law on the subject lands from Bolton Highway Commercial (CHB) to Bolton Highway Commercial Exception (CHB-XXX) to permit additional commercial-related uses. Additional Information A copy of the proposed Zoning By-law Amendment and additional information and material about the proposed applications will be available to the public prior to the meeting at the Planning and Development Section at Town Hall. Office hours are Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m Appeal Procedure: If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to The Corporation of the Town of Caledon before the proposed Zoning By-law Amendment is adopted, the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of The Corporation of the Town of Caledon to the Ontario Municipal Board.

Area:

9023 5th Sideroad, Bolton Part Lot 5, Part of Road Allowance between West Halves of Lots 5 and 6, Concession 7 (Albion) and Blocks 118, 152-154, 165, 167, 178, 181 and 182, Plan 43M-1251, Bolton East side of Highway 50, south of Queensgate Boulevard and west of Landsbridge Street

Approximately 3.157 ha (7.8 ac)

HAVE YOUR

SAY

WHEN Tuesday, Feburary 06, 2018 Info Session: 6:00 p.m. Public Meeting: 7:00 p.m. WHERE Council Chambers, Town Hall, 6311 Old Church Road, Caledon East, L7C 1J6

VISIT www.caledon.ca/development for copy of the location map For more Information Contact: Mary T. Nordstrom, Senior Development Planner 905.584.2272 x.4223 [email protected]

What are the Proposed Changes? To create a single detached dwelling lot, 2 blocks to accommodate a total of 4 semi-detached dwelling units and a freehold townhouse block to accommodate a total of 7 townhouse units on one new street connecting Queensland Crescent and two Stella Crescents; To create a condominium block to accommodate 104 common element condominium townhouses, private amenity area and private roads; and, To amend Zoning By-law 2006-50 from Prestige Industrial Exception 310 (MP-310), Townhouse Residential Exception 67 (RT-67) and Residential One Exception 68 (R1-68) to Townhouse Residential Exceptions XX1 and XX2 (RT-XX1, RT-XX2) and Residential Two Exception XX (R2-XX) to permit the proposed residential development. Additional Information A copy of the proposed Draft Plan of Subdivision, Draft Plan of Condominium and Zoning By-law Amendment and additional information and material about the proposed applications will be available to the public prior to the meeting at the Planning and Development Section at Town Hall. Office hours are Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Appeal Procedure: If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting, if one is held, or make written submissions to The Corporation of the Town of Caledon in respect of the proposed Draft Plan of Subdivision, Draft Plan of Condominium or Zoning By-Law Amendment before the approval authority gives or refuses to give approval to the draft plan of subdivision or plan of condominium, or before the by-law is passed, the person the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of The Corporation of the Town of Caledon to the Ontario Municipal Board.

If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting, or make written submissions to The Corporation of the Town of Caledon before the proposed Zoning By-law Amendment is adopted, the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to do so.

If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting, if one is held, or make written submissions to The Corporation of the Town of Caledon in respect of the proposed Draft Plan of Subdivision, Draft Plan of Condominium or Zoning By-Law Amendment before the approval authority gives or refuses to give approval to the draft plan of subdivision or plan of condominium, or before the by-law is passed, the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to do so.

How to Stay Informed: If you wish to stay informed of the project described above, you must make a written request to the Clerk of the Town of Caledon, 6311 Old Church Road, Caledon, Ontario, L7C 1J6.

How to Stay Informed: If you wish to stay informed of the project described above, you must make a written request to the Clerk of the Town of Caledon, 6311 Old Church Road, Caledon, Ontario, L7C 1J6.

Accessibility If you require an accessibility accommodation to attend or participate in this Public Meeting, or to access any materials related to this item in an alternate format please contact Legislative Services by phone at 905-584-2272 x.2366 or via email at [email protected] Requests should be submitted at least 10 days before the Public Meeting.

Accessibility If you require an accessibility accommodation to attend or participate in this Public Meeting, or to access any materials related to this item in an alternate format please contact Legislative Services by phone at 905-584-2272 x.2366 or via email at [email protected] Requests should be submitted at least 10 days before the Public Meeting.

Notice Date: January 11, 2018 .

Notice Date: January 11, 2018

FOLLOW US For real-time updates 6311 Old Church Road Caledon, ON L7C 1J6 www.caledon.ca T. 905.584.2272 | 1.888.225.3366 | F. 905.584.4325

To obtain this page in an alternative format please contact x.4288 or [email protected]

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A8 CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

Former councillor remembered

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post-season round robins in second place, eventually prevailed over the league-leading 360º Tire Service in the final game, although they needed overtime to do it. This was the first time in 31 seasons the league needed extra time to pick a champ. * * * * * * * There was support, both in the community and at the Caledon council table, for allowing residents to keep chickens in their backyards, but the Town needed to conduct a process to see if it was appropriate. * * * * * * * There was mourning in Caledon when former councillor Murray Judge died just days after his 86th birthday. * * * * * * * It was announced that the Mount Alverno Retreat Centre on Heart Lake Road was going to be closing its doors in September. Brother David Connolly, director of the facility just south of Highway 9, said it would be closing for mainly financial reasons. * * * * * * * Albion resident Julie French was named to represent the Peel-Dufferin Plowmen’s Caleigh Van Kampen placed the sash and Association for the coming year as Queen crown on her successor as Queen of the of the Furrow. Furrow, Julie French. * * * * * * *

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the ground was officially broken for the new community centre and hub to service the Southfields Village area. Mayor Thompson was joined by representatives of all levels of government for the ceremony. “I think it’s something that’s really important,” he commented, adding the Town has been trying to speed up the process on this project. “We’re finally here.” Councillor Johanna Downey said hubs are nothing new to Caledon. She grew up in Bolton, where the Albion-Bolton Community Centre attracted much of the local attention. “Caledon was doing hubs before hubs were cool,” she remarked. * * * * * * * Policing costs in the Town of Caledon were slated to go up in 2018, but not by a great deal. Town councillors heard a presentation on the proposed budget, and the proposed increase is about 1.52 per cent; from the $12.596 million budgetted for 2017 to $12.788 million next year. * * * * * * * In a pilot project, Grade 9 students at Mayfield Secondary School were to be able to engage in negotiation when it comes to their grades. Principal James Kardash said this would involve four courses this year, with the students receiving input throughout the semester, and being able to use that as they progress. They would be able to receive the feedback, gain from it and use it, he said. * * * * * * * The Traffic Unit of Caledon OPP conducted safety inspections on commercial motor vehicles over two days and 65 vehicles were pulled out of service. * * * * * * * Dufferin-Caledon MPP Sylvia Jones asked Peel Regional councillors for support of her bill regarding sewage bypasses, and she got it. Councillors seemed almost enthused as they unanimously passed a motion supporting the private member’s bill. She had previously noted that the

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King resident Richard Turchinetz was a very lucky man, and he had a brand new set of wheels to prove it, along with two new bicycles and some pretty nifty camping gear. Turchinetz won the grand prize in the Wheels for Meals Lottery, put on in support of Caledon Meals on Wheels.

2018-01-05 11:28 AM

There were a number of interesting things to try, including some hands-on experiences, at the open house at Mono Mills Fire Hall. Sarah Sansom of Orangeville was giving her son Owen, 5, a hand as he mastered the hose on this display as Megan Rook watched.

Ontario Water Resources Act already required bypasses at sewage treatment plans to be reported, but impacted municipalities don’t have to be informed. Her bill, if passed, would require the Ministry of Environment to publish within 24 hours cases of sewage bypasses into waterways. * * * * * * * Two local teens, Alexya Falconi and Paul Martino, came home from the World Taekwondo Championships in the Netherlands with medals. Falconi collected bronze medals in patterns and sparring. Martino also got bronze in sparring, and earned a silver in patterns. * * * * * * * The Bolton Brewers returned to the throne of the North Dufferin Baseball League. It took just five games for the Brewers to take down the New Lowell Knights in a best-of-seven championship series, losing only the second game before three straight wins claimed the title. * * * * * * * Caledon councillors passed a resolution asking Peel Region to consider accepting the upload of Albion-Vaughan Road, from Mayfield Road to King Street. The resolution also called for responsibility for Queen Street South in Bolton, from King Street to Queensgate Boulevard, be downloaded to the Town. * * * * * * * Orangeville business owner Laura Campbell securred the nomination for the Green Party of Ontario (GPO) in Dufferin-Caledon for the next provincial election. * * * * * * * Ali Ramsay of Victoria, B.C. won the Caledon Cup at the Canadian Show Jumping Tournament in Palgrave. Ramsay, 25, won the $86,000 Grand Prix and claimed the Cup after turning in two faultless performances on Hermelien VD Hooghoeve, her ten-year-old Belgian Warmblood mare. * * * * * * * Caledon councillors were called upon to represent then Governor General David Johnston in presenting Sovereign’s Medals for Volunteers to three Caledon residents. One of the recipients was Stewart Thompson, who was recognized for his work with The Gatehouse, a charitable organization that helps adults who have been traumatized by childhood sexual abuse. The other two recipients were Wanda and Harold Janes of Bolton. They were both cited for years of volunteer service with various causes, including food drives in Dufferin County, youth programs like the Sea Cadets and Navy League, and Meaghan’s Music Room. * * * * * * * Santo La Rosa of Bolton lucked out on Ontario 49, coming out $2 million ahead in the Sept. 27 draw. * * * * * * * A little later than scheduled, the $14-million the new ambulatory care wing at Headwaters Health Care Centre (HHCC) officially opened its doors. It will serve as home base for all the hospital’s high-demand clinics, while integral services and programs such as dialysis, chemotherapy, minor procedures, orthopaedics and plastics will also be relocated to the approximately 8,700-square-foot space.

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A9

A10 CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

Regional councillors were told some hard facts about global warming October

sixth consecutive year that the Town has Ontario New Democratic Party Lead- achieved this award. er Andrea Horwath thought it’s time to * * * * * * * protect survivors of domestic and sexual About 25 people were out for a comassault, and Dufferin-Caledon MPP Syl- munity meeting with ideas on what to do via Jones agreed. with the old Alton School building. Jones indicated her support for a pri“It’s got so much energy,” was the way vate members bill Horwath introduced one woman described the building. that would extend 10 days paid leave to Suggestions included setting aside one people who experience domestic or sexu- room in the school and preserving it as al violence. an old classroom, along the lines of the “I think she’s on the right track,” Jones facility in Mississauga operated by the said, pointing out the bill is aimed at Peel District School Board, in the form protecting victims, as well as those they of an Old Britannia Schoolhouse of the love. north. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * It can be seen some trees deserve heriThere are many who believe it’s a tage designation just by looking at them. myth, but Peel Regional councillors were A black willow tree standing in the assured that climate change is very real. back yard of a Cheltenham property reThey got that message Ontario’s Enviceived heritage designation, on the rec- ronmental Commissioner Diane Saxe. ommendation of Heritage Caledon. Saxe said her position had given her The staff report to the committee stat- some additional insights into the seried property owner Kathy Reid had re- ousness of the issue. quested the cultural heritage value of “I thought I had a pretty good idea of the tree be assessed. how bad climate change was,” she told The tree, which is about 100-years- councillors. “I was completely blown old, is notable for a number of reasons, away.” including the fact it has four distinct She asserted that some 97 per cent of trunks, and its broad canopy. scientists agree climate change has been The staff report said the tree “contin- caused by human activity, and that it ues to demonstrate vigour and vitality.” is a serious matter. She said it’s caused * * * * * * * mainly by greenhouse gases in the atOntario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown and former premier Ernie Eves were on hand in Caledon East to help Sylvia Jones celebrate 10 years as an MPP. Even Jones seemed a little mystified at how quickly time passes. * * * * * * * The Town of Caledon received the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award from the Government Finance Offi- The opening night of the 2017 Brampton Fall Fair included encers Association tertainment coming from Classic Championship Wrestling. The (GFOA), for the Ladies’ title was at stake. Champion Aria, the Wild Sapphire, had 2017 budget docu- the edge at this point, but KC Spinelli of Kitchener won the match ment, marking the and the title.

mosphere that prevent solar heat from escaping. Since it causes water temperatures to increase around the world, it also causes water levels to rise. Saxe likened it to a bathtub that has water coming into as fast as it drains. But as hairs get into the drain, it slows down the water that’s leaving, causing the level to rise. * * * * * * * Mars Canada chose Bolton for a significant new step in the company’s growth, and Premier Kathleen Wynne joined company officials to open the Mars Food expanded plant. The 55,000-square-foot facility will increase Mars Food’s capacity to produce ready-to-heat Uncle Ben’s and Seeds of Change rice and grain products, and has created 37 new high-skilled, well-paying full-time jobs, in addition to the jobs created during construction. * * * * * * * The Caledon Basketball Academy was launched in October. The team is playing as part of the Ontario Scholastic Basketball Association (OSBA), and the affiliation is the result of a partnership between the Caledon Cougars Basketball Association and the Peel District School Board to offer the women’s basketball preparation (prep) program locally. Humberview Secondary School is hosting the program. * * * * * * * There were a few reservations, but Caledon councillors decided to accept the

recommendation of Heritage Caledon and agree that pre-notification of owners will no longer be required prior to listing the property on the Register. Listing a property does not mean it has a heritage designation. It means if an owner wishes to demolish or remove a building on the site, there would have to be a 60-day delay to give the municipality the chance to do further checking to see if it has heritage value that should be preserved. Councillor Barb Shaughnessy likened it to hitting a “pause button” on the process. * * * * * * * The Provincial government seemed to have a lot of money to spend on infrastructure which was not being spent, and MPP Sylvia Jones wanted to know why. She raised the issue in Question Period in the legislature, but Infrastructure Minister Bob Chiarelli told her the government is spending considerable funds on projects. Jones cited public accounts documents which indicated the government failed to spend almost $3.3 billion in infrastructure spending during the fiscal year 2016-17. “Ontarians are waiting for essential infrastructure for their communities, from hospitals to highways,” Jones told Chiarelli. * * * * * * * Isabel Bassett uncovered her stone on Caledon’s Walk of Fame in Caledon East.

Trinity Church closed after 118 years November Peel councillors started to hear what

was being proposed for the 2018 budget. Councillors were told by Regional staff that a tax increase of about one per cent was being proposed. Mayor Allan Thompson also reported that staff was proposing a utility rate increase of about $1.7 per cent. Despite the proposed hikes, the Mayor said the rates paid in Peel are a lot lower than what is paid in other places in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). * * * * * * * Meanwhile, preliminary work indicated the town of Caledon was looking at an increase of 3.57 per cent in its share of property taxes. * * * * * * *

According to Toronto Life Magazine’s The Next Hot Neighbourhoods, Bolton was among the top 20 places to buy now. “Prettier and cheaper” than Brampton, Bolton offers “rustic small-town life with the convenience of the big city,” the article states, and an average house price of $830,254. * * * * * * * Peel 4-H members had been very busy working on various projects and learning about agriculture and their community. It was a time to recognize their achievements and the contributions of those who have helped them along the way. Peel 4-H held their annual Awards Night Friday, with a lot of hardware being handed out. * * * * * * * It was a time for mourning at Town Hall. Flags were lowered in memory of former treasurer Sam Jones, who died at 73. “Those who knew and had the privilege to work with Sam will remember him for having a kind heart, a sense of humour and for being a stickler for details,” Mayor Allan Thompson said in a statement. “He was an old-school type of accountant who served our municipality with pride and distinction.” * * * * * * * A couple of days later, former mayor John Clarkson died at 80. “He was an icon in his day,” Mayor Thompson recalled. * * * * * * * Three Caledon residents, who are also firefighters in Mississauga, received Medals of Bravery from Gov. Gen. Julie Payette. Anthony Colabufalo of Caledon, Daryl Roy of Palgrave and Brian Chapman of Bolton were among a group of firefighters and paramedics cited in an incident that took place April 23, 2014. They were instrumental in the rescue of three firefighters injured in a warehouse explosion in Mississauga. * * * * * * * After 118 years, the last service was held at Trinity Church in Campbell’s Cross. It was announced the church would be having a “Sabbath rest” until the Diocese sees a need to reopen it. People’s Warden Pat Thornton explained that will be in effect while the community grows and “until the need arises for an Anglican church.” * * * * * * * Chelsea Crang had always been on top of her game when it came to field lacrosse, and it paid off in rich benxefits. The latest one was an athletic scholarship to Detroit Mercy University starting in September. * * * * * * * Town councillors approved a recommendation from staff to permit the raising of hens in residential areas, although there were several conditions to be imposed. * * * * * * * Four people were injured after a small plane crashed near Brampton Flight Centre. The craft went down on McLaughlin Road, between Old School Road and King Street. Preliminary investigation revealed the four-seater Cessna was attempting to land at the flight centre when it plane struck a tree and crashed on the road.

See ‘New’ on page A11

CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

New church for Wildfield From page A10

VOTED # BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL IN KING

Drive, west of the site of the current church. * * * * * * * There was no Farm Family of the Year in Peel for 2017. Instead, there are about 40 of them. In recognition of the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the Peel Federation of Agriculture recognized numerous families that have been farming in the area from 150 years or more.

There is still a lot of planning to be done, but there seemed to be a lot of enthusiasm for the new St. Patrick’s Church planned for Wildfield. About 50 people were on hand to see the preliminary drawings for the proposed church, which is slate to go at the southwest corner of Mayfield Road and Martin Byrnes

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thing,” MPP Sylvia Jones said. “Lord knows what it is.” * * * * * * * There were a few last-minute changes, but none of them impacted on the final figures. Caledon Council ratified basically the same budget it had approved in committee. It called for a blended property tax increase of 2.83 per cent, which means the bill for at the average Caledon home assessed at $554,000 will be increasing by $134.61 next year. * * * * * * * It was a very special day for Caledon’s newest residents. Four families were handed the keys to their new Southfields Village homes, courtesy Habitat for Humanity. “What a great day to celebrate home ownership,” declared Thomas Fischer, vice-president of gift-in-kind donations for Habitat for Humanity GTA. “These families have worked so hard,” Fischer remarked to the audience. “It’s great to be able to celebrate this success with you.” “With a shortage of affordable housing options across the GTA, we’re proud to provide affordable homeownership to families in the Town of Caledon for the first time in Habitat for Humanity’s history,” Fischer stated.

A big crowd lined the streets of Bolton to help the Kinsmen welcome Santa Claus back to town. * * * * * * * Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown addressed local party members, promoting the Tories’ platform for the coming election, named People’s Guarantee. He also promised that a PC government would complete the environmental assessment on the GTA West Corridor. Work on the Corridor that traverses Caledon was suspended in December 2015 to conduct an internal review of the work undertaken since 2007, and ensure that the project still aligned with current government policy and emerging technologies. Caledon residents and officials have been in the dark on what’s being planned for the lands. * * * * * * * The year ended with some developments on the GTA West Corridor. Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca said in the Legislature that a notice had been posted on the Ministry’s website “that there will be an update regarding this particular project that will be taking place within 60 days of that notice going up on the website.” “I believe that he’s going to say some-

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▼0% APR Purchase Financing is available on select new 2017 and 2018 Mazda models. NOTE: 0% Purchase Financing not available on 2017 MX-5 and 2018 MX-5, CX-5 and CX-9 models. Terms vary by model. Based on a representative agreement using an offered pricing of $23,514 for the new 2018 Mazda3 GS 6AT (D4SK88AA00) with a financed amount of $24,000, the cost of borrowing for a 60-month term is $0, monthly payment is $400, total finance obligation is $24,000. Offer includes freight and P.D.E. of $1,695, $10 OMVIC fee, $17.75 Tire Stewardship Fee, $100 Air Conditioning charge and $90.95 PPSA. Offer excludes HST. ▲Winter Tire Credit Offer is available to qualifying retail customers who cash purchase/finance/lease

a new, in-stock 2017 and 2018 Mazda model from an authorized Mazda dealer in Canada between January 3 – 31, 2018. Winter Tire Credit Offer value of $425. Customer can substitute for a $425 cash discount. Cash discount substitute applied before taxes. Winter Tire Credit will be deducted from the negotiated accessory item price before taxes. Winter Tire Credit Offer cannot be combined with Winter Accessory Credit Offer. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. ‡Winter Accessory Credit Offer is available to qualifying retail customers who cash purchase/finance/lease a new, in-stock 2017 and 2018 Mazda model from an authorized Mazda dealer in Canada between January 3 – 31, 2018. Winter Accessory Credit Offer value of $425. Customer can substitute for a $425 cash discount. Cash discount substitute applied before taxes. Winter Accessory Credit will be deducted from the negotiated accessory item price before taxes. Winter Accessory Credit Offer cannot be combined with Winter Tire Credit Offer. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. † Offer available on retail leases of new 2018 Mazda3 GS 6AT (D4SK88AA00)/2018 CX-5 GS AWD (NXSN88AA00)/2018 CX-3 GS AWD (HXSK88AA00)/2018 CX-9 GS (QXSM88AA00) with a lease APR of 1.00%/3.49%/1.50%/1.49% and 130/130/130/130 bi-weekly payments of $119/$169/$129/$199 for 60/60/60/60 months, the total lease obligation is $17,636/ $24,594/$18,973/$28,617, including down payment (or equivalent trade-in) of $2,195/$2,595/$2,195/$2,695. As shown, Offered Pricing for new 2018 Mazda3 GT (D4TL68AA00)/2018 CX-5 GT (NXTN88AA00)/2018 CX-3 GT (HXTK88AA00)/2018 CX-9 GT (QXTM88AA00) with a lease APR of 1.00%/3.49%/1.50%/1.49% and 130/130/130/130 bi-weekly payments of $135/$190/$160/$249 for 60/60/60/60 months, the total lease obligation is $19,780/$27,263/$22,993/$35,129, including down payment (or equivalent trade-in) of $2,195/$2,595/$2,195/$2,695. NOTE: 2018 Mazda3 lease offers include $1,200 lease cash, 2018 CX-5 lease offers include $400 lease cash, 2018 CX-3 lease offers include $1,575 lease cash and 2018 CX-9 lease offers include $1,000 lease cash. Lease payments include freight and P.D.E. of $1,695/$1,895/$1,895/$1,895, $10 OMVIC fee (all models), $17.75 Tire Stewardship Fee (all models), $100 Air Conditioning charge (all models), $150 Lease Dealer Service Fee (all models) and PPSA of $90.95/$90.95/$90.95/$90.95. First monthly payment is due at lease inception. 20,000 km per year mileage allowance applies; if exceeded, additional 8¢ per km applies (12¢ per km for CX-9 models). Offers exclude HST. Offered leasing available to retail customers only. Licence, insurance, taxes and down payment (where applicable) are extra and may be required at the time of purchase. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary on certain vehicles. Offers valid January 3 – 31, 2018, while supplies last. Lease and finance on approved credit for qualified customers only. Offers subject to change without notice. Visit mazda.ca or see your dealer for complete details. *To learn more about the Mazda Unlimited Warranty, go to mazdaunlimited.ca.

T:10.714”



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S:10.714”

GET A CREDIT ON WINTER TIRES OR ACCESSORIES

A12 CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

Editorial

Some thoughts on sentencing

In this new year, one subject likely to come up in the House of Commons is reform of the Criminal Code of Canada’s provisions setting minimum sentences for a wide variety of offences. The Code has always had some minimum or fixed sentences, one example being life sentences with no parole eligibility for 25 years for anyone convicted of first-degree murder. However, the “tough on crime” agenda of the Harper Conservatives included many new restrictions on the ability of trial judges to impose what they considered to be an appropriate punishment for the particular circumstances of the offence and offender. We may never know whether any minimum sentence actually acted as a deterrent, since none of the offenders expected to be caught and therefore had no reason to reflect on the possible severity of the punishment. However Statistics Canada charts show the number of adults in custody in federal institutions steadily increased during the Harper government’s decade in office. In the circumstances, a recent article in the Globe and Mail should provide a nudge to the Trudeau government. Written by three Aboriginal Legal Services members and Kent Roach, a professor of law at the University of Toronto, the opinion piece suggests sentencing reforms should top Trudeau’s list of new year’s resolutions. Noting that the prime minister promised two years ago to “completely implement” the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 calls to action, the writers drew his attention to the 32nd call which, unlike most of the others, needed only “a simple amendment to the Criminal Code.” In it, the Commission called on the government “to amend the Criminal Code to allow trial judges, upon giving reasons, to depart from mandatory minimum sentences and restrictions on the use of conditional sentences.” The Commission made that particular rec-

ommendation as a way of addressing what the Supreme Court of Canada recognized in 1999 as a crisis of Indigenous over-representation in prisons. In R v Gladue, the court noted sentencing principles under s. 718.2(e) of the Criminal Code directed courts to take into account non-custodial options, “with particular attention to the circumstances of Aboriginal offenders,” and said those principles apply to all Indigenous persons, regardless of place of residence or lifestyle. “The Supreme Court made this extraordinary statement at a time when Indigenous persons constituted 12 per cent. Today, the figure is between 26 per cent and 27 per cent of all prisoners. What was a crisis has become much, much worse,” the article said. The writers contend that abolishing the minimum sentences would do more than reduce the overall rate of incarceration in Canadian prisons, which according to Statistics Canada, saw 40,147 adult offenders in Canadian federal and provincial prisons on an average day in 2015-16, for an incarceration rate of 139 per 100,000 population. “This simple amendment would help address the over-representation of Indigenous people in prisons across the country . . . The public also could have saved money on prison sentences that judges thought were not necessary.” Terming mandatory-minimum sentences “a bad idea,” the writers said Parliament “cannot possibly know all of the varieties of offences and offenders caught by them. They are blind to whether offenders live in abject poverty, have intellectual disabilities or mental-health issues, have experienced racism and abuse in the past or have children who rely on them. The mandatory-minimum sentence does not allow a judge to decide if incarceration is necessary to deter, rehabilitate or punish the particular offender.” As we see it, that should be obvious to one and all, and there is no need for the government to study the issue before acting.

By Janet Clark The Rotary Club of Palgrave has partnered with the Town of Caledon to fund and retrofit the Westview Park in the village of Palgrave and make it completely accessible to adults and children alike. The park is at 19 Brawton Dr., has been renamed the Norma Bangay Park. The goal of the $85,000 project is to make this park a fully inclusive and accessible play and gathering space for the entire Palgrave community to enjoy. The new playground equipment, excavation work and accessibility upgrades will allow seniors, families and individuals with special needs to access and use new upgraded park facilities. Construction for this project is scheduled for the spring of 2018. The park is dedicated to Norma Bangay to commemorate her contribution to children’s education in the local community. Norma began teaching in 1959 at the one room schoolhouse in Castlederg. Upon the closure of this school in 1962, she moved to Palgrave Public School, where she taught kindergarten until her retirement in 1994. Norma continued to volunteer at local schools well after retirement, working with young readers who needed extra attention.

Well loved by students and the community, Norma had a positive and lasting influence on several generations of Palgrave students. The Rotary Club of Palgrave gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the Brampton and Caledon Community Foundation, a public community foundation serving the people of Brampton and Caledon. We would also like to thank Brampton Brick Limited and Sierra Excavating Enterprises Inc. for their generous sponsorship and contributions toward the park upgrade. The Rotary Club of Palgrave is accepting donations to assist in meeting our financial commitment to this community project. All funds raised will be dedicated solely to the project. Please contact us at [email protected] or 647-290-9126 to make a donation to the Westview Park (Norma Bangay) Accessibility Upgrade Project. Thank you for your support. To learn more about how Rotary supports our local community, or hear about other projects both here in Caledon and abroad, please come join us for a meeting at the Caledon Estates Banquet Hall or visit our website at www. rotaryclubofpalgrave.com

Rotary Club of Palgrave’s Weekly Rotary Minute

It happened today

He is remembered as Canada’s first Prime Minister, and much is known about him. But one thing that is in doubt is the date of his birth. Sir John A. Macdonald’s father kept a journal, according to The Canadian Encyclopedia, and he noted the date of birth as Jan. 11. But a certified extract from the registration of his birth states it took place Jan. 10. It looks like his family celebrated the 11th, however. It was even marked as a partial holiday as part of Canada’s Centennial in 1967, as kids got the afternoon off school. So for these purposes, we’ll go with the prevailing view and say Macdonald was born this day, Jan. 11, 1815.

CaledonCitizen

Results from last week’s poll:

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THIS WEEK’S

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WEBPOLL www.caledoncitizen.com

b) Worse

40% 40%

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20%

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The results of this poll are in no way considered to be valid or infallible.

Remembering Bower

The recent holiday season brought some sad news, with word of the passing to the great Johnny Bower. But the sadness had to be muted by the knowledge that this was a man who had a very long life and accomplished so much, getting his real start on his professional hockey career when he was in his late 30s, becoming among the very best goalies who has ever played the game. He was twice awarded the Vezina Trophy for being the best goalie in the National Hockey League. He got to drink from the Stanley Cup four times. There have been many great players who never got to do that at all. And he also was behind the production of a hit record, Honky the Christmas Goose. It was while reading one of his obituaries that I learned this record actually challenged one of the Beatles’ hits. I shouldn’t have been surprised. Bower was revered by many people who would never have seen him play. I was covering a function in town some years ago. It included a silent auction, and one of the items up for grabs was a Maple Leaf jersey, and the number of the back was “1.” I noticed it, and wondered if that would have been one of Bower’s jerseys. I was talking to a man the following day who had been at this event with his son, and the young fellow was evidently impressed to see such a representation of such an icon. The man I was talking to is a couple of years older than me, so I was pretty sure his son never saw Bower play (Bower retired before I was in my teens). I asked if his son really appreciated what Bower represented, and I think he was surprised at my question. “Of course he does,” was the reply I received. I met Bower a couple of times, actually getting to chat with him for a couple of minutes one occasion. It was during the days when I was editing newspapers in Toronto, spending most of my time in East York, and he made an appearance at the arena in Leaside. He was actually seated at a picnic table just outside the arena, and there was a small crowd of young hockey players (most of them boys) who were thrilled to be that close to a legend. They were accompanied by parents (most of them dads) who were also thrilled to be that close to a legend. I was pushing 40 at the time, and I observed I was probably the only one in the group who had actually seen him play. I didn’t ask for his autograph, although I should have, for a reason I will get to in a couple of paragraphs. The man was renowned for never turning kids away. Indeed, I remember one Saturday night many years ago while he was still playing (I guess it was the first Saturday of November), when

I was watching the Leafs’ game. Rather than the usual drivel we got during the intermission, Hockey Night in Canada showed us scenes of the Bowers’ front stoop Halloween night. There’s no denying the guy did know how to attract crowds, and that included trick or treaters. Fast forward a couple of decades, to my first incarnation with this publication. One of the local car dealerships arranged to have Toronto Blue Jays catcher Pat Borders come up to sign autographs for a couple of hours. This was before the Jays won the World Series, but anticipation was high, and Borders proved himself to be a pretty good PR man. There were plenty of young fans lined up to get his autograph and spend a few minutes talking with the hero. But there was one little fellow (he was four, if memory serves) who was not in line. He was standing off to one side, slowing inching his way toward Borders. I guessed he was too shy to actually get his autograph, but he wanted to get close to the main attraction. Borders, of course, was aware of what was going on, and during a bit of a lull in the autograph line, he abruptly stuck his hand out to the kid. The little fellow shook, and then promptly took off. But that hand shake was the picture I got, which I made sure was printed in the paper that week. I forget his name, but I knew that kid very well. Because I was that little kid some 25 years before. One of my sports idols was going to make an appearance at a supermarket. My mother loaded my brother and myself, along with a couple of other kids, into the car, and off we went to meet the guy who was helping to keep the Leafs in contention for the Stanley Cup. All the kids eagerly lined up, but the little boy who was myself got cold feet, and hid inside the store while Johnny Bower signed autographs in the parking lot. I got a good view of him, but had not the courage to approach him. That little fellow who was a fan of Pat Borders did better than I. He at least got a hand shake out of the deal. And I will confess in this spot that getting his picture into the paper was something of a self-serving act on my part. While I did help this kid avoid feeling guilty for what might have been, I got the feeling that I had helped correct a mistake I had made many years before. The mother of the boy phoned me to thank me later that week, and I told her how I missed getting Johnny Bower’s autograph years before. It’s too bad Bower never heard that story. From what I read following the days after his death, I think he would have enjoyed it.

Bill Rea

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CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

A year in review of the current Liberal government

Another year has passed for the current Liberal government. Sadly, 2017 didn’t amount to much for this government, except for scandals, more broken promises, growing deficits, and increased taxes for ordinary, hardworking Canadians and their families. Looking back on the last year for this government, there is little to celebrate leaving Canadians concerned about what 2018 will bring, given the current government’s track record to date. In March, Finance Minister Bill Morneau delivered Budget 2017 in the House of Commons. The current Liberal government enthusiastically claimed that it was “a longterm plan to create jobs and strengthen the middle class.” However, it was anything but. The only thing that was consistent in the Budget was more reckless spending, no results and higher taxes. The tax hikes contained in Budget 2017 only make it harder for struggling families to make ends meet. Furthermore, the Budget confirmed that the Prime Minister broke his promise to keep deficit spending under $10 billion a year and to balance the budget by 2019. It puts the deficit for 2017-18 at $28.5 billion and shows Canada running deficits into the foreseeable future. Budget 2017 also hiked taxes on public transit users, Uber and ride sharing; beer and wine; donated medicines; child care; small business owners (farmers, fishermen, doctors, lawyers, accountants, etc.); oil and

wa Journal

David Tilson P Dufferin-Caledon

Queen’s Park

Sylvia Jones P Dufferin-Caledon

m Peel Region

Ottawa Journal David Tilson MP Dufferin-Caledon

gas companies; and tourism. It also hurt seniors by scrapping the Public Transit Tax Credit; eliminating the Family Caregiver Tax Credit; and the Prime Minister’s continued refusal to appoint a Minister for Seniors. During the summer, the Prime Minister went out of his way to explain that hard-working fishers, farmers and small business owners weren’t really paying their fair share of taxes and were, in fact, tax cheats. The Trudeau Liberals are targeting them with a massive tax hike, threatening jobs and the communities that are sustained by our local businesses. The Finance Minister has been looking for additional tax money, as it’s needed to pay for the Prime Minister’s out-of-control spending. They have not only been targeting small businesses for that tax money, but also Canadians with type 1 Diabetes, mental health issues and autism. While at the same time, their well-connected friends have been

Talk of the Town Mayor Allan Thompson

From Queen’s Park Sylvia Jones MPP Dufferin-Caledon

Ottawa Journal

From Peel

David Tilson Region MP Dufferin-Caledon

Emil Kolb Emil Kolb Hydro, hydro, Regional Chair Regional hydro Chair

We also know that the Liberal hydro policy decisions have led to Ontario spilling 7.6 terrawatt-hours of clean, green Ontario water power. That would have been enough power for 760,000 homes. I have heard from families who have had to make serious decisions about whether they can put food on the table, or pay their hydro bills. I have heard from businesses who have said that skyrocketing hydro rates are costing Ontario jobs and in some cases causing business to move to other jurisdictions or close all together.

By Bill Rea At first glance, one might think things have been tightened down at Caledon Town Hall for some reason, possibly security. But municipal officials are arguing it’s more a matter of efficiency. The aim is to help members of the public navigate the facility in Caledon East, aiming them in the direction they need to go to get the service or information they are seeking. That is done through Service Caledon, which was launched last week. Service Caledon is based at the counter right at the main doors to Town Hall. The idea is the public is greeted at the desk by a staff member, who asks what they are seeking. They are then provided the information they require, or a steered in the right direction. One feature of the new system is that access to the main atrium of the building is controlled, with entry being granted by staff at the Service Caledon desk. As well, directional arrows have been installed on the floor to guide people more frequently visited departments. Mayor Allan Thompson said these controls will not be in effect when there are council or committee meetings at Town Hall. A backgrounder issued by the Town stresses this is not an effort to restrict access to Town Hall. “Town Hall remains a building open to the public and access to council/committee meetings remains,” it stated. Town CAO Mike Galloway said the aim is to try to solve as many inquiries “at the first point of contact” as possible.

“The first point of contact is the front counter,” he added. Galloway said there are many cases in which people are directed from one person to another to another, etc. “We’re trying to be a bit more innovative, as a government sector partner,” he observed. He said the people manning the desk have been trained to deal with various issues and requests. The backgrounder said this is part of the Council Work Plan effort to improve customer service. Part of that involved understanding the state of service at the Town through surveys and observations of front-line staff. Key findings included revelations of difficulties navigating the phone system, people running into challenges finding their way around Town Hall, few issues being resolved at the first point of contact, and insifficient delivery or lack of training when it comes to customer service. Other adjustments that have been made include changes to the town’s phone system and email points of contact, and additional training for employees. “It’s not something new that just popped up,” Galloway commented. He also agreed the new system has not yet been perfected. “The reaction’s been very positive, but again, it’s new,” he said. “There are going to be kinks to iron out.” Thompson said one of the aims is to have staff help people to where they need to go. “It’s not locking out the public,” he asserted. “It’s helping the public get where they want to go.”

Claire Hoy

From Queen’s Park Sylvia Jones MPP Dufferin-Caledon

National Affairs Claire Hoy

It is abundantly clear that residents in Dufferin-Caledon need long term and sustainable hydro relief. That is why Patrick Brown and the Ontario PCs announced a plan to lower the average hydro bill by an additional 12 per cent. The plan will do this through a number of mechanisms. First, it will rebate the government’s portion of the Hydro One dividend directly to ratepayers on their hydro bill. This will result in a savings of about five per cent. Next, the plan will

From Peel Region

New procedures at Town Hall

Emil Kolb Regional Chair

National Affairs

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College of Canada. His reports confirmed a number of concerning issues that are plaguing the current Liberal government. The Auditor General estimates that because of Liberal inaction, the Phoenix Pay System will cost the taxpayer more than half a billion dollars to fix and more than 150,000 public servants still have outstanding pay requests waiting to be processed. The Auditor General’s report on CRA call centres highlighted that the Prime Minister’s tax collection agency only answered 36 per cent of incoming calls, while blocking 29 million calls from Canadians. Worse still, 30 per cent of the time the Agency couldn’t even provide an accurate response! The Prime Minister’s adding insult to injury when he hikes taxes on middle-class Canadians and then allows his tax collectors to ignore or mislead the very people forced to pay for his $100 billion deficit. Throughout 2017, Canadians became increasingly and understandably frustrated by the mounting scandals, tax hikes and hypocrisy displayed by the current Liberal government. We, the Conservative Opposition, have a simple message for Canadians — you cannot trust Justin Trudeau. He and his government created the problems of the last year. Real leadership and vision are required to fix the problems they’ve made. In 2018, we will continue to be the voice of ordinary, hardworking, taxpaying Canadians by holding the current Liberal government accountable.

Talk of the T

Mayor Allan Tho

Ottawa Jour

David Tilson MP Dufferin-Caledo

is on residents’ minds

When I speak to residents in Dufferin-Caledon, whether they are an owner of a small business or a local doctor, whether they are a retired pensioner or they are just starting a family, one issue comes up more than any other: skyrocketing hydro rates. It is not hard to understand why. Hydro rates have tripled, with some families paying $1,000 more than they did in 2003. For years, the government made politically-motivated and reckless decisions that have driven up the cost of hydro. According to the independent, non-partisan office of the legislature, the Auditor General, Ontarians have overpaid $9.2 billion for hydro, because the government provided sweetheart deals to energy companies, meaning hydro customers were locked into 20-year guaranteed price program for renewable energy. More recently, the Auditor General revealed that electricity generators claimed $260 million of ineligible expenses for things like staff car washes, landscaping, scuba gear and raccoon traps.

ional Affairs

avoiding paying taxes here in Canada, as was revealed in the Paradise Papers this fall. This fall, Canadians also became aware of the Finance Minister’s vast assets and his failure to properly disclose, divest or place them in a blind trust as required by the Conflict of Interest Act. This was Liberal hypocrisy at its best, as the Finance Minister was making the most important financial decisions for our country and trying to place tax hikes on those he calls tax cheats, while at the same time, standing to personally benefit from those very tax changes. The fall did not end well for the current Liberal government either. The Auditor General tabled his Fall 2017 Reports which examined the bungled Phoenix Pay System, Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Call Centres, Settlement Services for Syrian Refugees, Oral Health Programs for First Nations and Inuit, Preparing Women Offenders for Release and the Royal Military

A13

Claire Hoy

move conservation funding to the tax base, saving ratepayers an average of about three per cent. The plan will also address Ontario’s oversupply of electricity, by placing a moratorium on any new energy contracts and renegotiating contracts where feasible for an additional four per cent off the average hydro bill. Under the Liberals, hydro rates have tripled to some of the highest in North America. The PC plan for electricity is long-term and sustainable and will mean real relief for families, small business and farmers. Twelve per cent off your hydro bill is part of Patrick Brown and the PC party’s People’s Guarantee. The plan includes five guarantees: 22.5 per cent lower income taxes or the middle class; up to 75 per cent refund for child care expenses; 12 per cent more off your hydro bill; the largest mental health commitment in Canadian provincial history; and the first ever Trust, Integrity, and Accountability Act.

From Queen’s

Sylvia Jones MPP Dufferin-Caled

From Peel Re Emil Kolb Regional Chair

National Affa Claire Hoy

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kia.ca/gtadealers Offer(s) available on select new 2018 models through participating dealers to qualified retail customers, on approved credit, who take delivery from Jan 3 to 31, 2018. All pricing and payments include delivery and destination fees up to $1,740, $10 OMVIC fee, $29 tire fee, and $100 A/C charge (where applicable). Excludes other taxes, paint charges ($200, where applicable), licensing, PPSA, registration, insurance, variable dealer administration fees, fuel-fill charges up to $100, and down payment (if applicable and unless otherwise specified). Other lease and financing options also available. Dealers may sell or lease for less. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. Vehicles shown may include optional accessories and upgrades available at extra cost. All offers are subject to change without notice. Φ 0% financing is only available on select new models to qualified customers on approved credit. Representative Financing Example: Finance a new 2018 Forte LX MT (F0541J)/2018 Sorento LX FWD (SR75AJ)/2018 Sorento SXL (SR75KJ) with a selling price of $15,094/$29,124/$47,374 at 0% for 84/84/60 months for a total of 364/364/260 weekly payments of $41/$75/$182 with $0/$1,995/$0 down payment. Payment amount includes $2,000/$750/$2,000 Bonus. Cost of borrowing is $0 for a total obligation of $15,094/$29,124/$47,374. ≠0% leasing offer is only available on select new models to qualified customers on approved credit. Representative Leasing Example: Lease offer available on approved credit (OAC), on new 2018 Soul LX AT (SO552J)/2018 Soul EX AT (SO754J)/2018 Sportage LX FWD (SP751J) with a selling price of $21,874/$23,474/$26,974 is based on a total number of 208/208/169 weekly payments of $49/$54/$64 for 48/48/39 months at 1.9%/1.99%/2.99% with $0 security deposit, $1,885/$1,885/$2,150 down payment and first payment due at lease inception. Offer includes $975/$750/$1,000 Bonus. Total lease obligation is $10,280/$11,312/$10,878 with the option to purchase at the end of the term for $9,826/$10,780/$14,814. Lease has 16,000 km/yr allowance (other packages available and $0.12/km for excess kilometres). ¶Bonus up to $2,000 offer is available on purchase/lease/finance of select new 2018 models, and trims at participating dealers. Offer will be deducted from the negotiated selling price before taxes. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Some conditions apply. See dealer for details. Offer ends Jan 31, 2018. ‡Model shown Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price for 2018 Forte SX AT (FO747J)/2018 Sorento SX Turbo AWD (SR75IJ)/2018 Soul SX Turbo Tech (SO85DJ)/2018 Sportage SX Turbo (SP757J) is $27,295/$42,495/$29,995/$39,595. The 2017 Kia Forte, Kia Sorento and Kia Soul received the lowest number of problems per 100 vehicles reflecting higher quality in their respective segments in the J.D. Power 2017 U.S. Initial Quality Study (IQS), based on 77,419 total responses, evaluating 189 models, and measures the opinions of new 2017 vehicle owners after 90 days of ownership, surveyed in February-May 2017. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com/cars. The 2018 Sportage was awarded the 2017 Top Safety Pick+ by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) for model year 2018. U.S. models tested. Visit www.iihs.org for full details. Information in this advertisement is believed to be accurate at the time of printing. °Unlimited roadside assistance is only applicable on 2017 models and onward. For more information on our 5-year warranty coverage, visit kia.ca or call us at 1-877-542-2886. Kia is a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation.

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Golden Hawks soar past Schomberg, Alliston By Jake Courtepatte As the Provincial Junior Hockey League season winds down, the Caledon Golden Hawks have proven they are capable of playing well into February. The junior C club knocked off both division rivals the Schomberg Cougars and the perennial powerhouse Alliston Hornets last week, putting distance between themselves and their competitors with just more than two weeks left in the regular season schedule. Caledon entered last Thursday’s match with Schomberg as winners of three of their last four, continuing a high-flying trend with 25 shots in the first two periods, though Mathiau Young scored the only goal on the power play.

Young struck again on the power play midway through the third, and though Schomberg cut the lead in half with less than two minutes remaining, Myles Cook and Marc Simonetta each added late markers for a 4-1 win. A home-and-home series with the 248-0-1 Hornets followed over the weekend, with last year’s league champions continuing a perfect season against the Hawks in a 5-2 win at New Tec Rec Friday. However, it was the Hawks who handed Alliston a rare loss at Caledon East in a rematch Sunday, their first defeat in close to a month. Each side traded goals in the first, with Young scoring his team-leading 27th of the year. A scoreless second period was led by goaltender Chase Kro-

The last night of action before the holidays in the Sunday Night Hockey League saw plenty of goals and two tied games. After all 37 markers had been notched, the Ken’s Lawnmower Repair Blades remained in first place in the standing, although their lead had shrunk a bit. That was after they were held to a tie by the Caledon Hills Brewing Co. Brewers. The second-place Inside Out Family Chiropractic Predators gained a bit of ground by dropping the Glen Eagle Golf Club Griffins. the other matches for the evening saw the Mr. Handyman Ice Hogs battle the St. Louis Bar and Grill Wings to a draw, while the Pommies Cider Co. Wild bested the Ainsley Fire Protection Fire. Ice Hogs 3, Wings 3 The first match of the evening saw neither the Wings or the Ice Hogs able to best the other. Handyman heroes were Steve Pinarello from Adam Minatel and Greg Keenan, Minatel (unassisted) and Brad Sztorc from Marc de Abaitua. Wings’ warriors were Eric Webster from Mike DeFrancesco, Victor Ranieri from Mike Weeda, and Ranieri from Rob Thibeault. Brewers 7, Blades 7 The next match was a true barn burner, with it coming down to the last two seconds for the Blades to tie the game against the Brewers. Blade bin bulgers were Brett Appio with two, Darren Levy, Shawn Simpson, David Payne, Dan Maggio and Scott Drouillard, with help from Appio, Drouillard, Dave Gardilcic, Kevin Wigner, Greg Fuller, Levy, Mark Bauldry, Daryll Simpson and Shawn Simpson. Brewer bashers were Jay Beech

and Brandon Scott with a pair each, Steve Nicoloff, Bob McHardy and Mike Swan. Assists were from Steve Conforti, Beech, McHardy, Brent Spagnol and Dave Matheson. Wild 5, Fire 2 The Wild took full advantage of the tired Fire crew and took the win as well. Wild whippers were Steve Whitten from Mitch Merante, Shaun Heron from Steve Brown, Craig Shaw from Heron, Caledon’s Tyler Whitten and Schomberg’s Thomas Foulds face off at Caledon East last Heron from Shaw and Dale DeleonThursday. ardis, and Merante from Whitten and Photo by Jake Courtepatte Brown. Fire firers were Shane Ainsley from Dave DiMeo, and DiMeo from Ainsley. Predators 6, Griffins 4 The last game of the night had the Predators take a bite out of the Griffins for the win. Predators power came from Darren Brody Kirkham Coulton White Jones with two goals, Fab Iafano, Cam Coulter, Steve Hutchins and Colin Fyffe, with assists by Scott Cantelon, Kevin Robert F. Humberview Christie, Jones, Alex Nordheimer, Kyle Hall Catholic Secondary Bagg and Howard Cantelon. Griffin goSecondary School to guys were Ron Toffan with a pair, School Kevin Norris and Jesse Thompson, helped by Mike Brioux, Toffan, Michael Horsley, Thompson and Norris.

mpocker, whose 15 saves in the frame kept the game at a 1-1 tie. Though he was beaten early in the third to give Alliston the lead, he stood tall the rest of the way as Caledon scored three unanswered goals, off the sticks of Tyler Whitten, Everett Flewelling and Matt Magliozzi to hand the Hawks a 4-2 victory. Seven games remain on the Hawks’ schedule. They will bring an 18-15-0-2 record into their next game tomorrow (Friday) night in Caledon against the last-place Orillia Terriers. They will be hoping to put more distance between them than the seven points that cur-

rently separate them from the fifthplace Cougars, and make up the three points needed to catch the third-place Penetang Kings. Friday’s match with the 3-31-0-0 Terriers could prove to be beneficial to an otherwise tough end-of-season schedule, which includes another meeting with the Hornets as well as two more with the Kings: including a season-ending home game Jan. 28. In the meantime, Friday’s puck drop is set for 8:30 p.m. at Caledon East . For stats, schedules and more information, visit www.jrcgoldenhawks. poinstreaksites.com

Wild-west shoot out style in Sunday Night Hockey League

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This Grade 10 student is a shooting guard on the junior basketball team. Previously, he was the quarterback for the varsity football team, which made it to the first round of the playoffs. He’s planning to play field lacrosse in the spring, as well as taking part in track and field, specializing in high jump and 400 metres. In the community, he plays rep football and basketball. The 15-year-old lives in Mansfield.

Kelyn Young Mayfield Secondary School

This Grade 10 student has been enjoying success as a wrestler, having won two golds in tournaments so far, and she’s confidently looking forward to ROPSSAA in February, where she won last year. “I think OFSAA will be more challenging,” she said. In the community, she wrestles and helps teach at Matman in Kitchener and Brampton. The 15-year-old lives in Brampton.

This 14-year-old is in his first year of wrestling, in the 38-kilo class, and he already has a lot to show for it, including gold medals in three tournaments. He was also involved in cross-country running in the fall. In the community, he plays rep hockey in the Caledon Hawks’ organization. The Grade 9 student lives in Palgrave.

William Vander Veldon St. Michael Catholic Secondary School The 15-year-old plays point and shooting guard on the school’s junior basketball team, which came in second in a tournament at Brampton Christian Academy and is 1-1 in league play. In the community, he’s been a rep player with Brampton Elite Soccer Academy for eight years. The Grade 10 student lives in Bolton.

Bolton DQ 376 Queen St. South (905) 951-1294 DQ.ca Follow us on Instagram @ DQ_Bolton

B2 CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

B3

Cold weather and hot houses there for King curlers

By Shellee Morning King Curling Club The cold frigid temperatures may have forced some to remain indoors, but for the curlers of King, the —20-degree weather didn’t block their path in returning to the sheets. The ladies began their second round of the season with brand new “fresh clean” ice that quickly revealed rather frustrating (fun to some) and challenging ice to read. The new ice was a scheduled task for maintenance that threw most curlers into the scratching and shaking of the head in trying to figure out the curl path. With shots and draws a guess, the rings of hope were more like the rings of surprise. Scoreboards shifted between ends on all four sheets as teams traded points throughout, and the five winning teams after the first game were Brown, Sinclair, Curtis, Gorsline and Oakley. The ice conditions were once again playing havoc for the Wednesday Social League as they began their second half of the season with skips frantically trying to figure things out. The paths that normally involved a curl now provided a straight and direct line with very little curl. Being mesmerized was an understatement, but rest assure in the upcoming weeks, the ice will change and we will all be back to dealing with a wonderful curl. The early draw awarded Teams Pringle, Sinclair and Mussato wins while Teams Gerrits and Petersen settled for a tie. Teams Earl, Lee, Schneider and Kolb all found the win column in the late draw. Thursday Mixed players also re-

turned to the rings with a high octane level of enthusiasm as players greeted teammates after their deserved Christmas break. The second round is proving to be exciting with tight-scoring ends. The added half point incentive to teams completing their eight ends in regulation time could be the deciding factor for the all-important playoff positions. Early draw was kind toward teams Howard, Stronach, Sidon and Clark while Steenhoek, Boynton and Sheardown won their openers and the Barber and Davis game ended in a tie.

CLEARANCE EVENT

Krista Phillips for Team Sheardown delivers her rock during Thursday’s Mixed Entry. The Sheardown team went on to win their Round Two game opener. Photo by Ian Donaldson

produce and raising heritage breeds of livestock, as well as offering bed and breakfast, meeting facilities, an on-farm store, etc. Other nominees include Caledon Hills Cycling in Inglewood. Millcroft Inn and Sapa in Alton has been nominated in the class for Best See, Shop and Stay Visitor Experience. Alabaster Acres and Forks of the Credit Inn in Cataract are both up for the award for Best New Tourism Business. Credit Valley Conservation and Toronto and Region Conservation Authority are both nominated for the Tourism Innovator of the Year Award. Caledon Hills Cycling and Headwaters Health Care Foundation are nominated for the Tourism Partnership Award, along with Caledon Ski Club, GoodLot Farmstead Brewing Co. on Shaws Creek Road, artist Mark Grice, Pommies Cider Co. in Bolton and Tri-Village Treasures in Alton, Belfountain and Erin. The winners will be announced this coming Tuesday (Jan. 16) at the Orangeville Town Hall Opera House, starting at 6:30 p.m.

Region will be collecting Christmas trees During the weeks of Jan. 8 and 15, Peel Region will collect Christmas trees at the curb on regular recycling collection days. To set out Christmas trees for collection, residents should ensure that if they are taller than three metres (10 feet), they are cut in half. As well, all outer plastic bags, ornaments, tinsel, nails, wire and

mixed doubles. One women and one man form a team that play with only six rocks, the first stone being placed in allotted position on the ice depending who has hammer. The game is fast and furious, with the similar style of hitting and draw making, but the strategy is far more competitive for players. Earlier in the year, the club invited the latest craze to curling to graze its sheets with enthusiastic members and will no doubt be holding more events in the future. As the sport is grabbing more attention of people around the globe, clubs will experience a jump in membership. This is a sport where anyone from the ages of six to 86 can play at any desired level, whether it is recreational or competitive. No one is ever too old to start curling.

JANUARY

Several Caledon nominees for Headwaters Tourism Awards

Headwaters Tourism has announced the nominees for the 2018 Headwaters Tourism Awards, and Caledon is well represented on the list. Headwaters Arts, which is held annually in September and October, has been nominated in the class for Best Arts and Heritage Visitor Experience, as has the Alton Mill Arts Centre. In the class for Best Fresh and Local Visitor Experience, the Alton Mill’s Wine and Food Festival, which was held in July, was nominated, as was Rock Garden Farms on Airport Road, north of Caledon East. As far as the Best Fun and Festive Visitor Experience is concerned, the nominees include Cheers Caledon. Caledon’s first Craft Beer and Cider Festival was held in June. Mud Hero — Toronto North 2017, which was held in August at Albion Hills Conservation Area, was also nominated, as was Osprey Valley Golf Course near Alton. Osprey Valley has also been nominated in the Best Nature and Leisure Visitor Experience class. Other nominees include Alabaster Acres, a family farm in Caledon village that specializes in growing heirloom

Ladies’ League The ladies’ league is hosting their Annual Spiel the Wine Bonspiel Feb. 3, and there are just a few spots left for participants. Anyone interested should contact Kelly Stronach at 416-720-7345 or visit the club website at www.kingcurling. com There will be two eight-end games, breakfast, lunch and prizes, along with some cheese and wine tasting. This has been a great day in the past for the ladies, with some good curling and a lot of fun. With less than a month to go before the 2018 Winter Olympics, they are shaping up to becoming one of best sporting events ever. The sport of curling has opened its house to a newly entered division of

tree stands are removed. Trees are not to be placed in or on snowbanks. Residents who miss their collection can also take their Christmas trees to a Community Recycling Centre (CRC). There will be no drop-off fees at the CRCs for Christmas trees during the Christmas tree collection period.

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STEEL BUILDINGS STEEL BUILDING SALE ..."REALLY BIG SALE IS BACK - EXTRA WINTER DISCOUNT ON NOW!" 20X23 $5,798. 25X27 $6,356. 30X31 $8,494. 32X33 $8,728. 35X35 $11,670. One End Wall Included. Pioneer Steel 1-855212-7036 www.pioneersteel.ca

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COACH HOUSE - Mono Mills. $1350/mth. Includes heat/hydro. Single person. No pets, non-smoker. 905757-5469.

ABATE RABBIT PACKERS Meat Processing Facility from Arthur immediately requires 16 Wholesale and Retail Butchers with a minimum of 2 to 3 years of direct hands on experience in meat cutting and processing. Duties include cutting and sectioning of meat, skinning and removing blemishes, deboning rabbits and chickens, cutting meat into specialized cuts and preparing for wholesale and retail sales. HS diploma or equivalent required. Positions offered are permanent full time and salary is $16.00/hr for 42.5 hrs/week. OT after 44 hrs/ week. Please apply in person at 7597 Jones Baseline in Arthur, via email at [email protected] , via fax at 1-519-848-2793 or via phone at 1-519-8482107.

TOWNHOUSES/ CONDOS FOR RENT $1450/month + utilities. Executive level Orangeville rental. Available February 1st. Spotless 1 bedroom plus den. High ceilings stainless appliance, central air. Modern and spacious. Call Jason Haist Broker of Record, Coldwell Banker Cornerstone Realty, Brokerage 519-942-9499. Exclusive. Not intended to solicit buyer(s) and or Seller(s) currently under contract. BRAND NEW 3 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE for rent. 2.5 bath. Available now. $1875.00/month + utilities. Please call to inquire 647-515-9909.

VEHICLES WANTED CASH FOR SCRAP VEHICLES. Scrap vehicles wanted, any size. No ownership required. Fast service, free towing, loose scrap removed. Also, cash paid on the spot. Call 905859-0817 or 647-227-3954. Open Sundays.

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IN HOME DAYCARE - Loof yards of new cation: Nobleton. Safe des100% nylon carpet. ignated play environment, educational activities, nu- Will install livingroom tritious snacks, hot meals, & hall for as little as smoke free environment, $389.00 Public/Catholic designated (includes carpet, pad & install) bus stop. Available for full time, part time and before and after school. Patient and experienced profescarpetdeals.ca sional in a loving environment. Weekend services BOXING WEEK CLEARavailable. Call Patricia at ANCE SALE! Final week, 416-949-5585 up to 70% off mattresses, sofas, recliners, carpet, vinyl, hardwood, laminate & GENERAL HELP plank flooring. Country CarWANTED pet & Furniture, Mount ForWe require a full time est. 519-323-1331. Ends January 13th, 2018. DENTAL RECEPTIONIST to work in our busy family REID FARM MARKET practice in Bolton. Dental OPEN 7 days/week! assisting experience an as- Soups, Meat, Carrots, Onset. Please send resume to ions, Potatoes & More! 4th Dr. A. Howarth at dentalr- line Mono, north of [email protected] way 9. www.reidspotatoes. com.

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Seasoned firewood $335/bush cord. Fresh cut $245/bush cord. Call 905-729-2303 SERVICES The Lord Dufferin Chapter IODE holds their meetings at the Lord Dufferin Centre on the 4th Tuesday of every month. We are looking for women who would like to help in the Community. Call 519941-1865. TOPS (TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY) meets at 6:15 pm every Wednesday night at the Avalon Retirement Centre, 355 Broadway. For more information call Trudy Rockel 519-941-6146.

SERVICES DRUG PROBLEM? We’ve been there, we can help! Narcotics Anonymous meets every Friday & Sunday at 7:30 pm, Westminster United Church, 247 Broadway, Orangeville, or every Thursday 8:00 pm at St. Paul’s Anglican Church, 312 Owen Sound St., Shelburne, or call 1-888-8113887. ALZHEIMER SUPPORT GROUPS meet monthly for spousal & family support. Call (519) 941-1221. FOR INFORMATION regarding HEART and STROKE, call Dori Ebel (519) 941-1865 or 1-800360-1557.

General licensed Technician Huge used car inventory, servicing all makes/ models. Must have valid drivers license, tools & applicable licenses. We offer a great pay plan boot allowance and benefits. 1st or 2nd Year Automotive Apprentice Technician required Please apply by email or in person [email protected] 12435 Highway 50 S, Bolton, ON L7E 1M3 905-857-7888

LA LECHE LEAGUE Orangeville offers breastfeeding support. For more info call Erin at 519-943-0703.

ARE YOU A WOMAN living with abuse? For safety, emergency shelter, and counselling call Family Transition Place, (519)941HELP or 1-800-265-9178.

PUBLIC NOTICE

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Dr. Richard Ehrlich The Elm Tree Dental Clinic 17201 Regional Rd. 50, Palgrave, ON 905-880-7003, 905-880-4175 fax [email protected]

The Perfect P/T Job for a People Person Theatre Orangeville is looking for a Part-Time Box Office Customer Service Representative

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on behalf of Harjinder Gill application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario for an Act to revive Sant Darbara Singh Ekonkar Trust Inc._The application will be considered by the Standing Committee on Regulations and Private Bills. Any person who has an interest in the application and who wishes to make submissions, for or against the application, to the Standing Committee on Regulations and Private Bills should notify, in writing, the Clerk of the Legislative Assembly, Legislative Building, Queen’s Park, Toronto, Ontario, M7A 1A2.

IF YOU WANT to keep drinking, that’s your business. IF YOU WANT to stop drinking, that’s our business. Call Alcoholics Anonymous Hot Line, 1-866-715-0005. www.aanorthhaltonerin.org.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING Presentation of the 2017 IPM Annual Report for Legacy Pines Golf Club SATURDAY JANUARY 27Th AT 9Am Legacy Pines Golf Club, 9 Zimmerman Drive Palgrave. If you plan to attend please contact Michael at [email protected]

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CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

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B5

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DISTRIBUTOR OF WESTON’S BRANDS (Bread & Buns) The successful distributor will use their best efforts to develop and maximize the sale of Weston Brand Products to outlets within the sales area. Duties include: maintaining an adequate and fresh supply of products in all outlets, properly rotating all products and promptly removing all stale or out-of-code products. • Compensation package varies with experience • Independent Contractor position available • Employee position available • Full time / Part-time positions available • Retail experience • Clean drivers’ abstract • Reliable, honest

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Carriers Wanted

The Shelburne Free Press is currently seeking newspaper carriers to deliver once a week. Owen Sound St Willow St Marie St Jane St Anne St Silk Drive Jelly St James St Centre St First Avenue

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• with or without license • new to country • good work environment • flexible hours • Part and full time position available • Wages paid according to experience.

CAll AMAR @ 905-893-9908

Peacefully in her sleep, at Woodhall Park Care Community, Brampton, on Saturday, January 6, 2018, Martha Geerdina Barton, at the age of 91 years, beloved wife of the late Percy John Barton. Loving mother of Linda and Bill Boyle, Ron and Dawn Barton, Robert (deceased) and Lois Barton, Jim Barton (deceased), Gerilee Barton and Erin Jacob. Proud grandmother of Dr. Robert Boyle, Steve Boyle, John Barton, Martha Barton, Andrea Barton, Joe Barton, Becky Barton. Cherished great-grandmother of Ella and Josephine. The family will receive their friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-857-2213) Saturday, January 13 from one o’clock until time of memorial service in the chapel at 2 o’clock. Reception to follow at the funeral home. Private family interment of cremated remains will take place at a later date in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bolton. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Peel, 60 Briarwood Avenue, Mississauga L5G 3N6. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.EganFuneralHome.com FOLEY, Doris Gertrude (nee Green) Passed away peacefully surrounded by her loving family at the Headwaters Health Care Centre in Orangeville on January 7, 2018 at the age of 75. Doris was the beloved wife of David for 55 years. She was the loving mother of Sean and his wife Eleanor. Cherished by her two grandchildren Paige & Sydney. Doris will be greatly missed by her family and friends. A big thank you to Dr. Joshie and all the nurses in “E” and “F” wings for helping make her last days comfortable. A Celebration of Life will be held on January 28, 2018 at 40 Lawrence Avenue from 1 to 4 pm in the common room in Orangeville. In lieu of flowers the family would appreciate memorial donations to Headwaters Health Care Foundation. Condolences may be offered to the family at www.dodsandmcnair.com

OBITUARIES

OBITUARIES

GRIFFIN, Pamela Mary Peacefully at Headwaters Health Care Centre, Orangeville on Tuesday, January 2, 2018, Pamela Mary Griffin, Caledon East, beloved wife of Derek Griffin. Loving mother of Sonya Mary and her husband Randy Cheslock, William Griffin and Bruce Griffin. Proud Nana of Adele, Lena, Dale, Emily and Kaylin. Dear sister of Graham (deceased), John, and Angela. The family will receive their friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-8572213) Friday, January 12 from 5 - 8 o’clock. Funeral service will be held in St. James Anglican Church, 6025 Old Church Road, Caledon East on Saturday morning, January 13 at 11 o’clock. Followed by cremation. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.EganFuneralHome.com PINKETT, Freida Eileen Peacefully with her family by her side, at West Oak Village Long Term Care, Oakville, on Sunday, January 7, 2018, Freida Pinkett, in her 89th year, beloved wife of the late George Pinkett. Loving mother of Tom, David and his wife Cathy, and Susan. Cherished grandmother of Jennifer (Sean), Kaitlyn, Jeffrey, Johnathan and Brent. Proud great-grandmother of Mason, Bennett and Campbell. The family will receive their friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-857-2213) Thursday evening 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, January 12 at 3 o’clock. Followed by cremation. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Peel, 60 Briarwood Avenue, Mississauga L5G 3N6.. Condolences for the family may be offered at www. EganFuneralHome.com

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IN MEMORIAM HARKIES, Alice ‘Jean’ In loving memory of Alice ‘Jean’ Harkies 1928 – January 13, 2012 I remember the day I met you And the day God made you mine. I remember the day God took you And will till the end of time We made our vows together Until death do us part. But the day God took you from me My world fell apart. Sometimes I think I am dreaming I can’t believe it is true’ That I can go on living When I no longer have you. And the memories of the happy years, when we were together. The joys, the fears, the love, the tears Will stay with me forever. And when I am sad and lonely and everything goes wrong, I seem to hear your voice whisper ‘Cheer up, Ralph, and carry on.’ Each time I see your picture you seem to smile and say ‘Don’t’ cry. I’m sleeping. We’ll meet again someday.’ Sadly missed by Your loving husband Ralph

, K E E W 1 BUY S K E E W 3 GET

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TINUE N O C , S T L U S E R E IF YOU SE ES. AT OUR LOW Rrd adAsTonly. sified wo *Offer is for clas Display ad costs. fo l Call or emai r

519-941-2230 • EMAIL: [email protected] 905-857-6626 • EMAIL: [email protected]

B6 CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

ARBORISTS

ELECTRICAL

GARAGE DOORS GARAGE DOORS

GARAGE DOOR EXPERTS FINANCIAL SERVICES

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Visit our showroom at 48 Centennial Road, Unit #20, Orangeville

519-942-1956 • 1-800-957-5865 www.allmontdoors.com

CAREER SERVICES Start a Great Career Path!

Work Locally!

Opportunity for contract and fulltime benefits available after 4 months Production work, all shifts Team Environment - Apply Today! www.adecco.ca 519-925-3030 ext 3200

CLEANING SERVICES

GENERAL CONTRACTING/ REPAIRS

From corporate and HST returns, to tax advice for owner/operators, we offer convenient services that make running a business easier. Corporate tax returns starting at $855+HST at our Broadway location. Speak to an H&R Block Tax Expert today. Call now for a quote.

Insured with 25 plus years experience

519-941-3900 | HRBLOCK.CA | © H&R Block Canada, Inc. At participating offices.

TOTAL ESTATE CARE

Professional, Residential Maid Service

• Weekly, biweekly cleaning, move in and move outs • “Top to bottom cleaning” • Insurance Claims-War Vets & Disability • Registered and Insured

Phone: 519-751-6639

Lisa Hayden - Owner

CHIMNEY SERVICES

Serving Dufferin Caledon for over 40 years Woodburning appliance cleans WETT Inspections for insurance and real estate New stove and liner installations Liners for oil furnaces Don Crole, Registered Chimney Sweep - Reg. No. 1473

416-628-8445 416-889-8294 [email protected] www.fixits.ca

519-941-5213

MORTGAGES

[email protected]

MGG CHIMNEY SWEEP • CHIMNEY REPAIR • INSTALLATION • LINERS • FIREPLACES • INSERTS 519-215-2822 905-783-7029

FOREST CITY FUNDING

• WOOD STOVES • RAIN CAPS • INSPECTION • ANIMAL REMOVAL

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Carol Freeman Mortgage Broker

www.mggchimneysweep.com

519-925-6700 X102 CELL: 519-938-6518 FAX: 519-925-6800 [email protected]

WWW.CAROLFREEMAN.CA

Be sure to Validate your local chimneysweep to ensure your safety. Go to www.wettinc.ca for full details.

DISPOSAL SERVICES

Lic # 10671

211 MAIN ST E, SHELBURNE, ON L9V 3K4

MOVING/STORAGE

FURNITURE

BIN RENTALS JUNK REMOVAL 5 - 20 YRD BINS 416-248-5543 1-844-DNT-TOSS

www.dropntoss.ca

PAINTING SERVICES ORANGEVILLE

MINI STORAGE Monthly

Ask us how to get your FREE month!

CONTAINERS FOR RENT YOUR SITE OR OURS

*Applicable Taxes • Prices Subject To Change

Yearly

42 Green St., Orangeville

519-939-7070 519-941-3852

CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

PAVING SERVICE

REAL ESTATE CONT.

SEPTIC

COPPERTONE ng

Pavi

LTD

ORANGEVILLE

INC. Brokerage

Complete Paving Service Asphalt Sealing Asphalt Paving Free Estimates Grading & Excavating Interlock Snow Removal Specialists in driveway & parking lot paving

Sarah Fleming Broker of Record/ Owner

Karen Atkinson

Locally Owned & Operated

519-941-4246

Duane Breese Fax (519) 943-1025

PLUMBING

Sales Representative

Maureen Bruce Sales Representative, SRES, Manager

Liana Maddocks Sales Representative

ADJALA ACRES CUSTOM SERVICES • Septic Systems Installed And Repaired • Excavation/Grading/Trenching • Building Site Preparation • Basements/Driveways

416-459-4718

SNELL SEPTIC SERVICE

Peter Riccio Sales Representative

Chris Thompson

• Septic Tank Pumping • Septic Inspections

905-584-2261

Credit/Debit Available BRIAN SNELL - Owner/Operator

LICENSED SEPTIC SYSTEM INSTALLER SINCE 2010

Sales Representative

CALL FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS 42 Queen Street N. Bolton ON

416-400-6599

POOL SERVICES

www.FlemingRealtyInc.ca

SUPPORT SERVICES

905-857-3830

274 QUEEN ST. S. BOLTON

www.breezewoodpools.ca OOL OENING & CLOING WEELY AINENANCE ACAGE LEA DEECION INYL LINER RELACEEN AEY COER UILER EAER

• COUERID WAER EING OOL A CEICAL OOL ACCEORIE ROBOIC CLEANER AL U SYE OOL REAIR

RENOVATION

1.844.732.7575

8575 Keele St. #5-6, Concord, ON L4K 3P4 1153 Canal Road, Bradford, ON L3Z 4E2 [email protected] [email protected] www.pearlknstructions.com

1.844.732.7575

www.d-dpools.com

www.pearlknstructions.com

Re-sanding • Refinishing • Sales • Installation • Service Re-sanding • Refi nishing • Sales • Installation • Service

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@ HEPBURN TRAILER SALES

416-409-9730

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REAL ESTATE

VET SERVICES

B7

B8 CALEDON CITIZEN | JANUARY 11, 2018

AWD SE model shown.

2018 RAV4 FWD LE ALL-IN LEASE

FOR 39 MONTHS AT

59 1.49

$

1,000

%



$

APR

CUSTOMER INCENTIVE ♦ APPLIED

WITH $4,350 DOWN

WEEKLY

INCLUDES FREIGHT AND FEES. HST EXTRA.

• 6.1" Touchscreen Display Audio with Bluetooth® Capability • Pre-Collision System with Pedestrian Detection • 17" Aluminum Alloy Wheels • Backup Camera

2018 HIGHLANDER FWD LE

2018 COROLLA CE ALL-IN LEASE

ALL-IN LEASE

FOR 39 MONTHS AT

$

%



APR

WEEKLY

ALL-IN LEASE

99 3.99

39 0.49

$

2018 CAMRY LE

FOR 39 MONTHS AT

$

APR

WEEKLY

WITH $2,200 DOWN

79 2.49%

%



FOR 39 MONTHS AT

WITH $5,000 DOWN



APR

WEEKLY

WITH $3,200 DOWN

$750 CUSTOMER INCENTIVE ♦ APPLIED. INCLUDES FREIGHT AND FEES. HST EXTRA.

INCLUDES FREIGHT AND FEES. HST EXTRA.

INCLUDES FREIGHT AND FEES. HST EXTRA.

• Pre-Collision System with Pedestrian Detection

• Pre-Collision System with Pedestrian Detection

• Entune 3.0 Audio & App Suite

• Lane Departure Alert

• Automatic High Beam

• Dynamic Radar Cruise Control

• Backup Camera

• Lane Departure Alert

• Backup Camera

• 6.1" Touchscreen Display Audio with Bluetooth® Capability

• Dynamic Radar Cruise Control

• Pre-Collision System with Pedestrian Detection

• 6.1" Touchscreen Display Audio System with Bluetooth , ®

Steering Wheel Controls and SIRI Eyes Free • Backup Camera

XSE model shown.

XLE AWD model shown.

XSE V6 model shown.

Your local Dealer may charge additional fees of up to $989. Charges may vary by Dealer.Ω Limited time offers available from Toyota Financial Services on approved credit. †0.49%/2.49%/1.49%/3.99% lease APR for 39/39/39/39 months on a new 2018 Corolla CE (Model BURCEMA)/2018 Camry LE (Model B11HLTA)/2018 RAV4 FWD LE (Model ZFREVTB)/2018 Highlander FWD LE (Model ZZRFHTA) with an all-in price of $18,444/$29,544/$29,674/$38,374 equals a weekly payment of $39/$79/$59/$99 for 169/169/169/169 payments with a $2,200/$3,200/$4,350/$5,000 down payment or trade equivalent when you apply the $750/$0/$1,000/$0 customer incentive. Total lease obligation is $9,572/$16,520/$15,366/$21,776. All-in lease includes freight and fees (PDE, EHF, OMVIC fee and air condition tax, where applicable). HST, licensing, registration and insurance are extra. Dealer may lease for less. Based on a maximum of 60,000KM/60,000KM/60,000KM/60,000KM. Additional KM charge of $0.07/$0.10/$0.10/$0.15 for excess kilometres, if applicable. ♦$750/$1,000 Customer Incentive is valid on retail delivery of a new 2018 Corolla CE (Model BURCEMA)/2018 RAV4 FWD LE (Model ZFREVTB). Offer is valid to retail customers (excluding fleet sales) when leased, financed or purchased from an Ontario Toyota dealership. Customer Incentive will take place at time of delivery, include tax and will apply after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price. Vehicles receiving Customer Incentives must be purchased, registered and delivered from January 3 to January 31, 2018. ΩDealer Fees may be added and may be comprised of administration/ documentation fees, VIN Etching, anti-theft products, cold weather packages or other fees. Fees may vary by Dealer. For more information on vehicle features, please see toyota.ca, your local Toyota Dealer or Owner’s Manual for details. Offers are valid from January 3 to January 31, 2018, and are subject to change without notice. All rights are reserved. Dealer may lease or sell for less. Dealer order/trade may be required, but may not be available in all circumstances. Please see your participating Ontario Toyota Dealer for full details.

GETYOURTOYOTA.CA OTD-680_4C_JAN_14A.indd 1

2018-01-09 9:51 AM