Treaty of Paris 1783 Overview - Education Extras

Treaty of Paris 1783 Overview - Education Extras

Treaty of Paris 1783 Alyson Jones Nataki Talibah Schoolhouse of Detroit Summer 2008 Signing of the preliminary Treaty of Paris, November 30, 1782.. ...

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Treaty of Paris 1783 Alyson Jones Nataki Talibah Schoolhouse of Detroit Summer 2008

Signing of the preliminary Treaty of Paris, November 30, 1782..

Students will learn about the purpose of treaties and why the Treaty of Paris of 1783 was significant to the making of the United States of America. George Washington’s Revolutionary Army fought until they wore down the British troops. Finally, Washington and his French allies forced the British Army to surrender at Yorktown, Virginia in October 1781, beginning a peace process that ended with British recognition of American Independence two years later. This lesson will examine the process and the importance of the document that forged a New Nation. Overview/ Materials/LOC Resources/Standards/ Procedures/Evaluation/Rubric/Handouts/Extension

Overview Objectives

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Students will: • View and analyze and interpret digitized primary source documents. • Define what a treaty is and describe its importance to the making of the new nation. • Define vocabulary words, associate an image with the word and write the word in a sentence. • View pictures of signers of the Treaties in Paris, France. • Gain competence in analyzing primary source documents An Adventure of the American Mind Illinois State University

• Recommended time frame Grade level Curriculum fit Materials

Reading and responding to a map

Three days 5th grade Social Studies/ Language Arts Pictures that represent the vocabulary words Dictionaries Glue Sticks Digitized copy of the Treaty of Paris Modified Written document worksheet Document Reflection Worksheet Thanks George! Worksheet Copy of the Map (Mitchell Map) after the Treaty of Paris 1783 was signed. Classroom copies of the Preface and the 10 agreements in the Treaty of Paris 1783. Copy of the painting of John Jay, Benjamin Franklin And John Smith Lined Paper Pencils Dry Erase Board Computer LCD Projector Our Documents – Treaty of Paris (1783) www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=6

ational &Michigan Learning Standards Back to avigation Bar National Standards: Standard 2: Historical Comprehension A. Identify the author or source of the historical document or narrative and assess its credibility. G. Draw upon data in historical maps. State Standards: Social Studies 5-U3.2.4 Describe the significance of the Treaty of Paris (establishment of the United States and its boundaries) (National Geography Standard 1, p.169. C) English Language Arts An Adventure of the American Mind Illinois State University

W.PS.04.01 Exhibit personal style and voice to enhance the written message in the informational text: precision, established importance and transitions.

Procedures

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Day One: 10 minutes Teacher displays images primary sources and secondary sources, while explaining the difference between the two sources. Teacher announces to the class they will use a primary source to understand how the United States gained Independence from Great Britain. Students complete the Thank George Worksheet? Teacher listens to student responses. Teacher writes on the essential question on the board: Why was the Treaty of Paris in 1783 important to the making of the United States? 25 minutes Vocabulary lesson Treaty Agreement Ratify Signatories Teacher will: Distribute the Visual Vocabulary Worksheets, dictionaries, glue sticks, pencils and 4 pictures that will represent each vocabulary word. Students will: Listen to instruction and view the teacher modeling using the word Treaty, Then the students will complete the Visual Vocabulary Worksheet. 10 minutes Students will: Write what they think Treaties are important. Teacher will listen to student responses. Day Two Restate the Essential Question An Adventure of the American Mind Illinois State University

15 minutes Teacher explains to the class that the Revolutionary war was not finished until American Independence was realized for the colonies. Both Countries have to agree on the separation. The purpose of a treaty is to build a new relationship based on recognition, sharing and respect, so that both countries can co-exist in a meaningful way. We are going to learn about a special treaty. Students view the digitized copy of the Treaty on the Board. Teacher discuss the characteristics of a treaty Treaties have – Two or more parties Agreements between countries Signatories 25 minutes Student gather in small groups to receive a digitized copy of the Treaty of Paris. The students will analyze the document and complete the written document analysis worksheet. 10 minutes Teacher will introduce the second primary document used to understand the Treaty of Paris 1783, the Mitchell Map. Students will view the Mitchell Map. Students will compare a picture of a current map of United States with the Mitchell Map in small group and identify two differences. Day Three Restate the Essential Question 10 minutes Teacher distributes a paper with the contents of the Treaty of Paris 1783. The class reads and discusses the preface statement and the agreements in the Treaty of Paris 1783. 30 minutes Students will work together in small groups to write at least two paragraphs explaining the An Adventure of the American Mind Illinois State University

Treaty of Paris 1783. The students can use copies of the Mitchell map to make their argument. 5 minutes After completing the writing assignment a representative from each group summarizes their paper in a few sentences. Conclusion Student will complete the Document Reflection Activity sheet

Evaluation

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Interactive discussions about images Completion of the Visual Vocabulary Worksheet Completion of the Written Document Worksheet Reading http://rubistar.4teachers.org Rubric ID#1601675 Writing http://rubistar.4teacher.org Rubric ID#1601678 Final Project Assessment Questions: 1. Description of the Treaty 2. Tell where and when the Treaty was signed. 3. Were two agreements from the Treaty used to show how the Treaty separated the two countries in the Treaty? 4. Was their evidence that the student gained insight about the significance of the Treaty of Paris? 5. Did the student use vocabulary words to talk about the document? 6. Was the work neat and handwriting litigable?

Extension

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Students can investigate the lives of the signers on Social Studies for Kids: Treaty of Paris of 1783 www.socialstudiesforkids.com/wwww/us/treat yofparis1783def.htm Students can write a thank you letter to the peacemakers! The letter should be addressed to one of the signers of the Treaty of Paris. The students final draft must be cursive and in letterform. Sign me up! After examining the signatures on the Treaty of Paris 1783. Students can practice writing their signature three different ways. Students will may discuss the may things that need signatures and why signing your name is different from writing your name in manuscript.

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Primary Resources from the Library of Congress Back to avigation Bar

George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741-1799: Series 4. General Correspondence. 1697-1799 United States and Great Britain, November 30, 1782, Provisional Articles to Treaty

http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mgw/mgw4/089/0100/0134.jpg

Mitchell Map Mitchell Map using for the Treaty of Paris 1783

United States. 1783.

http://memory.loc.gov An accurate map of the United States of America, with part of the surrounding provinces agreeable to the Treaty of Peace of 1783, by Ino. Cary. CALL UMBER G3700 1783 .C3 Vault REPOSITORY Library of Congress Geography and Map Division Washington, D.C. 20540-4650 USA DIGITAL ID g3700 ar074700 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3700.ar074700

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Our documents - Treaty of Paris 1783 http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=6

American victory that ended the Revolutionary War on October 20, 1781. British General Charles Cornwallis had met defeat in the south, at Cowpens, ... www.socialstudiesforkids.com/ wwww/us/treatyofparis1783def.htm

Treaty of Paris (1783) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Signing of the preliminary Treaty of Paris, November 30, 1782.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Paris_(1783

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Rubric Back to avigation Bar

Replace this text with an assessment rubric for your learning experience. There are some excellent web sites such as http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php that simplify rubric development.

Reading - Analyzing Information : Treaty of Paris 1783 4

3

2

1

Student lists all the main points of the article without having the article in front of him/her.

The student lists all the main points, but uses the article for reference.

The student lists all but one of the main points, using the article for reference. S/he does not highlight any unimportant points.

The student cannot important information with accuracy.

Student accurately Relates Graphics to Text explains how each

Student accurately explains how each graphic/diagram is related to the text.

Student accurately explains how some of the diagrams are related to the text.

Student has difficulty relating graphics and diagrams to the text.

Identifies details Student recalls

Student recalls several details for each main point, but needs to refer to the article, occasionally.

Student is able to locate most of the details when looking at the article.

Student cannot locate details with accuracy.

Student uses several sentences to accurately describe what the article is about.

Student summarizes most of the article accurately, but has some slight misunderstanding.

Student has great difficulty summarizing the article.

CATEGORY Identifies important information

graphic/diagram is related to the text, and accurately determines whether each graphic/diagram agrees with the information in the text. several details for each main point without referring to the article.

Summarization

Student uses only 13 sentences to describe clearly what the article is about.

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Handouts Back to avigation Bar

Thank You George for keeping your Treaties! Primary Sources are resources that help us to know about our history. The cool thing about primary sources is they are first hand accounts of events in history like recordings of speeches or written documents. We are going to study the Treaty of Paris 1783. President George Washington did not only pay attention to the agreements of the actual treaty but he also kept copies of the Treaty for us to see.

Why do you think we need to use primary sources when studying events?

What do you hope to experience when you study a primary source document?

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The Treaty of Paris 1783 Preface. Declares the treaty to be "in the name of the most holy and undivided Trinity," states the bona fides of the signatories, and declares the intention of both parties to "forget all past misunderstandings and differences" and "secure to both perpetual peace and harmony." 1. Recognizing the 13 colonies as free and sovereign States;[1] 2. Establishing the boundaries between the United States and British North America (for an account of two strange anomalies resulting from this part of the Treaty, based on inaccuracies in the Mitchell Map, see Northwest Angle and the Republic of Indian Stream); 3. Granting fishing rights to United States fishermen in the Grand Banks, off the coast of Newfoundland and in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence; 4. Recognizing the lawful contracted debts to be paid to creditors on either side; 5. The Congress of the Confederation will "earnestly recommend" to state legislatures to recognize the rightful owners of all taken lands "provide for the restitution (to restore) of all estates, rights, and properties, which have been taken belonging to real British subjects [Loyalists]"; 6. United States will prevent future confiscations of the property of Loyalists; 7. Prisoners of war on both sides are to be released and all property left by the British army in the United States unharmed (including slaves); 8. Great Britain and the United States were each to be given perpetual access to the Mississippi River; 9. Territories captured by Americans subsequent to treaty will be returned without compensation; 10.Ratification of the treaty was to occur within six months from the signing by the contracting parties. Resource: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Paris_(1783)#agreements

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An Adventure of the American Mind Illinois State University

An Adventure of the American Mind Illinois State University

Name _____________

Primary Document Study Written Document Analysis Worksheet 1.

Type of Document (Circle one): A. B. C. D. E. F.

Newspaper Letter Map Memorandum Advertisement Official government document

2. Unique Physical characteristics of the document (Circle one or more): A. B. C. D. E. F.

Interesting Letterhead Handwritten Typed Seals Notations “RECEIVED STAMP”

3.

Date of Document __________________

4.

Author (or Creator) of the Document ____________

5.

For what audience was the document written?

___________________________________________ ___________________________________________

Name ____________________________

Document reflection activity After studying two pages of the Treaty of Paris, reading and discussing the actual agreements in the document please, complete these reflections. A. List three things the Author wrote that you think is important:

B. Why was this document written and signed? ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ C. List two things the document tells you about life in the Untied States at the time that it was written.

D. Write a question to the Signers that may be left unanswered by the document?