Untitled - University of Toronto

Untitled - University of Toronto

PROCEEDINGS THE ) NEW JERSEY HISTORICAL SOCIETY, A MAGAZINE OF HISTORY, BIOGRAPHY AND GENEALOGY. NEW SERIES VOLUME 1916. r-S 1. - 2- F /...

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PROCEEDINGS THE )

NEW JERSEY

HISTORICAL SOCIETY, A MAGAZINE OF HISTORY, BIOGRAPHY

AND GENEALOGY.

NEW

SERIES

VOLUME 1916.

r-S

1.

-

2-

F

/-A

.

-J7

CONTENTS.

JANTJAKY, 1.

1916.

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CHAPLAIN JAMES CALDWELI/S DEATH, by Joseph F. Folsom

-

1

2.

NEW

-

12

3.

CASPAR STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS, by P. H. Hoffman

13

4.

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS, by John Neafie

-

29

5.

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS, by George

Sehuyler Bangert

-

30

6.

BOOK NOTICE

-

-

48

SERIES

-

-

-

-

-

-

CONTENTS.

APRIL,

1916.

1.

THE OLD BARRACKS AT TRENTON, by Edwin

2.

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS AT NORWOOD

3.

MIDWINTER MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S BRANCH, by Mrs.

R.

Walker

56

57

-

Mary D. Ogden 4.

49

-

BEGINNINGS OF THE MORRIS & ESSEX RAILROAD, by Joseph

F.

60

Folsom

5.

FULLARTON, by Edith H. Mather

6.

CASPAR STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS, by P. H. Hoff-

man 7.

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS AT NORDHOIT

8.

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS COUNTY

9.

BOOK NOTICE

-

100

10.

NECROLOGY

-

101

11.

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

-

89

108

CONTENTS.

JULY,

1.

1916.

NEWARK'S Two HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY, by Joseph F. Folsoni,

2.

113

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR,

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS AT GREENVILLE, by John

Neafie,

4.

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS COUNTY,

5.

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS AT HARRINGTON PARK, by

-

-

129

-

146

-

147

Joe. Elting

Sloat,

-

159

6.

COLONEL PETER SCHUYLER AT ALBANY, by Joseph P. Folsom,

160

7.

CASPAR STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS, by P. H. Hoffman,

164

8.

VOLUME IX OF "COLLECTIONS,"

176

-

CONTENTS.

OCTOBER,

1916.

1.

THE BALLAD

2.

LAFAYETTE, by

Richard

3.

LAFAYETTK IN

QUAINT VERSE,

4.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOCIETY: Minutes, 197; Report of the Board of Trustees, 198; Report of the Treasurer, 199;

OF

177

NEWARK, by Joseph Fulford Polsom,

Wayne

183

Parker,

196

Report of the Woman 's Branch, 201 Report of the Corresponding Secretary, 204; Report on the Newark Celebration, 210; Report of the Library Committee, 212; Report of the Membership Committee, 214; List of Donors, ;

216.

5.

ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS,

6.

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

7.

LIST OF OFFICERS,

8.

INDEX TO VOLUME

IN

220

CEMETERY

IN

220

PATERSON,

221

I,

NEW

SERIES,

-

223

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

New VOL.

I.

Jersey Historical Society*

NEW

SERIES

No<

1916

Manuscript Light on Chaplain James Caldwell's Death.

BY JOSEPH

F.

FOLSOM.

Some

papers, long lost from sight, which relate to the and the death of the famous Chaplain James Caldwell of Elizabethtown were bought by the Historical Society on November 22, 1915, at an auction sale of some of the books and historical documents of the late William Nelson, held at the American Art Galleries, Madison Square South, New York City. Especially important among these documents are a number of legal papers which directly relate to Caldwell's tragic death at the hands of James Morgan, a sentinel, on November 24,

career

1781, at Elizabethtown Point. They include the report of the inquest held by Isaac Woodruff, Esquire, Mayor of the Borough of Elizabethtown, to which the signatures of the Mayor and of twenty-one jurors are subscribed; the voluntary confession of James Morgan, and a number of the depositions made by witnesses of the shooting, with a recognizance binding certain of the witnesses to appear at the next Court of Oyer and Terminer, to be held at Newark. A letter and a discharge each signed by Caldwell in 1778, are also included in the purchase.

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CALDWELL'S DEATH.

2

The

existence of these papers probably

was unknown

to the local historians of the nineteenth century. Sketches of Caldwell's life by Rev. Edwin F. Hatfield, D. D., in his

"History of Elizabeth" and by Rev. Nicholas Murray, in Volume Three, First Series, of the Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, seem to show that tradition and contemporary newspaper reports were the main sources of material. An examination of the legal papers may lead some to agree with the late Captain William De Hart, of Elizabeth, who suggested that Morgan possibly should have been tried by a military rather than a civil court, which suggestion, it is said, aroused Dr. Murray to a defense of the verdict that hung Morgan. James Caldwell, the patriot preacher, was born in April, 1734, at Cub Creek, Charlotte County, Va. He entered the College of New Jersey, then at Newark, under the leadership of Rev. Aaron Burr, and was graduated in 1759, after the college had been removed to Princeton, its president at that time being Rev. Samuel Davies. Caldwell was ordained September 17, 1760, by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, and appointed to supply vacant churches in the South. Called to the Elizabethtown he was installed church, pastor in March, 1762, by the of New York. Presbytery Caldwell's ardent temperament led him to throw all his energy on the side of independence at the outbreak of the Revolution. His congregation upheld him, and there is a list of forty commissioned officers from that body, headed by the name of Governor William Livingston. Caldwell in May, 1776, went as far as Johnstown, N. Y., with Colonel Elias Dayton's regiment, on its way to relieve the forces before Quebec. He was not only chaplain of the New Jersey Brigade, but assistant commissary gen-

D. D.,

eral until his death.

At

Springfield

on June

23, 1780, oc-

curred the memorable incident when Caldwell, on the British attack, having entered the church and taken the hymn books for gun-wadding, called to the troops, "Put Watts into them, boys !" His wife was shot by the

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CALDWELL'S DEATH.

3

Farms on June 8, 1780. on November 24, 1781, went to Elizachaplain, bethtown Point, to meet at the wharf there, Miss Beulah Murray, who had come from New York. He went on board the vessel and ordered some goods to be brought on deck, which he said he would carry to a magistrate to be examined for anything condemnable. Miss Murray was already in a conveyance brought British in a house at Connecticut

The

by Caldwell, when a sentinel observed that she held a parcel tied in a handkerchief, and proposed to examine Caldwell said he would reit, as possibly contraband. turn it to the sloop, and was in the act of doing so, when Morgan, stationed on the sloop, told him to stop, and then deliberately shot him. The following papers relating to the death of Caldwell at the hands of

Morgan are printed in chronological the Following legal papers will be printed a letter and an order, each written by Caldwell.

order.

"An

Inquisition indented, taken at Elizabeth

Town

in the

Borough of Elizabeth and County of Essex aforesaid, the twenty fourth Day of November, in the Year of our Lord, one thousand, seven hundred and eighty one, before me Isaac Woodruff, Esquire, Mayor of the said Borough of Elizabeth, in the County of Essex and State of New Jersey, upon view of the Body of the Reverend Mr. James Caldwell, Minister of the Gospel then and there lying dead, upon the oaths of Jonathan J. Dayton, Isaac Arnett, Moses Hetfield, Aaron Hetfleld, Matthias Crane, William Clark, Benjamin Winans, John Potter, Thomas Quigley, William Crane, George Price, Bointen Remsen, Mellyn Miller, Edward Thomas, Samuel Woodruff, William Woodruff, Samuel Smith, Daniel Searle, Joseph Hawkins, David Lyon & Samuel Lee good and lawful men of the Borough aforesaid who being sworn & charged to inquire on the Part and Behalf of the said State of New Jersey, when, where, how and after what Manner the said James Caldwell came to his Death & say upon their Oath, that late of Elizabeth Town, not hav"One James Morgan ing God before his Eyes, but being moved & seduced by the Instigation of the Devil, on the twenty-fourth Day of November, in the year of our Lord, one thousand, seven hundred and eighty one, at three o'clock in the Afternoon of the same Day, with Force and Arms at Elizabeth Town in the County aforesaid, in and upon :

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CALDWELL'S DEATH.

4

the aforesaid James Caldwell then & there being in the Peace of the said State, feloniously, voluntarily & of malice aforethought, made an assault. "And the aforesaid James Morgan then and there with a certain Musquet, charged with Powder and Lead, of the Value of five shillings, which he the said James Morgan then & there held in his Hands, the aforesaid James Caldwell just above his Breast Bone did discharge thro his Body, thro the Left Shoulder Blade, and one mortal Wound of the Breadth of one Inch and of the

God and of

Depth of six Inches, did give, of which said mortal wound, the aforesaid James Caldwell then & there instantly died.

"And

so the said

James Morgan then & there feloniously

and murdered the said James Caldwell, against the Peace of the State, the Government & Dignity of the Same. "And moreover the Jurors aforesaid upon their Oath aforesaid do say, that the said James Morgan had not nor as yet hath any Goods or Chattels, Lands or Tenements, within the County aforesaid or elsewhere to the knowledge of the said Jurors, In witness whereof as well tne aforesaid Mayor, as the Jurors aforesaid have to this Inquisition put their Seals on the Day & Year aforesaid, and at the Place aforesaid. "Isaac Woodruff, Jonathan I. Dayton, Isaac Arnett, Moses Hatfield, Aaron Hatfield, Matthias Crane, William Clark, Benja'm killed

Winans, John Potter 3rd, Thomas Quigley, Wm. Crane, George Price, Boynton Remsen, Melyn Miller, Edward Thomas, Samuel Woodruff, William Woodruff, Samuel Smith, Daniel Sale, Joseph Hawkins, David Lyon, Samuel Lee."

The signed names, as may be seen, vary in several instances from the manner in which they are written in the body of the document. John Potter adds "3rd" to his name. Bointon Remsen signs his first name Boynton, and Daniel Searle his surname Sale. Dayton signs himself Jonathan I. instead of J., and Mellyn Miller is satisfied to write one "1" in his first name. Next chronologically comes the first deposition by a witness, that of Anthony Palmer :

"County of Essex ss. Personally appeared before me, Isaac Woodruff, one of the Justices of S 'd county, Anthony Palmer, who being Duly sworn Deposeth & saith that after Mr. Caldwell had been in the Boat, he, S 'd Caldwell got into his Chear & Palmer see Mr. Caldwell have a hamper he then said to Mr. Caldwell I be-

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CALDWELL'S DEATH.

t

must siez you in the name of the thirteen United States for I believe you have got contraband goods. Mr. Caldwell then answered he did not know what it was. Caldwell then said he would bring it on Bord again & Palmer told him he might; this deponent further saith that he did not call to James Morgan on Bord the Boat, but as Mr. Caldwell was going to the Boat Morgan lieve I

shot s 'd Caldwell & this deponent did not hear one word spock from Morgan to Mr. Caldwell and further saith not.

"Sworn ' '

before

me

his

this

Day of Nov.r, 1781 "Isaac Woodruff.

25

Anthony

X Palmer

mark"

"The Examination and Voluntary Confession of Jamei Morgan (A Prisoner in Custody for the Murder of the Rev'd James Caldwell) who saith: "That he has been nine years and a half in North America, that he was born in Herefordshire in England, that he landed in Charlestown, that he bought a place near Portsmouth in Virginia and there resided about 18 Months, that he then served on board a Continental sloop of War in capacity of Steward 10 Months, that he afterward entered as Sergeant of the First Reg't of Artillery, commanded by Capt'n Harrison, that afterwards he lived in Philadelphia and kept a Public House with legal Permission, that he entered into the seven months service in the Pennsylvania line, then he came to Elizabeth Town and entered into the twelve months service.

"That he was on duty and had the Command of the Guard Town Point at the time of the fatal accident happen-

at Elizabeth

ing to Mr. Caldwell on Saturday, the 24th inst., that after Mr. Caldwell came to the Point and was on board of the flagg, he, the Examinant, saw two hampers of wine & Porter and some bale Goods brought on Deck, that Mr. Caldwell said he would carry the above mentioned goods to a Magistrate in the waggon (then at the Shore) and if there was anything condemnable, he would give this examinant satisfaction, the examinant saying that he was satisfied therewith, that Mr. Caldwell then went on shore (the goods

above mentioned remaining on board), that this Examinant Did not see Mr. Caldwell go on shore nor see him on shore, untill he heard one Palmer, a Centinel, on shore say stop, that he this Examinant immediately said stop and threatened that if he did not stop he would shoot him, after which he picked up his gun and brought it to a charge (showing the Bayonet charge) in which position she went off, that he, this Examinant, did not know Mr. Caldwell as he was approaching the vessel, who it was he bid to

6

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CALD WELL'S DEATH.

stop, nor who it was that was killed by the discharge of the untill Lieut. Woodruff came out of the Cabin and mentioned

gun

who

was, and that afterwards this Examinant picked up the handkerchief that Mr. Caldwell had Dropped, saying that he was sorry for the accident, but since it was so he was glad to find some Contraband goods with this man who was so cryed up for his honesty, that he, the Examinant, had never known Mr. Caldwell & did not know him when came on board the vessel, untill he was informed who he was. it

"Taken

this 26th day of Nov'r, 1781, "Before me, Matthias Halsted."

' '

State of

New

Jersey,

"County of Essex. "William Halley,

late

a prisoner with the enemy but escaped

from within the British* lines, personally appeared before me, William Burnet, Esq.r, one of Judges of the Court of Common pleas and also one of the Justices assigned to keep the peace in and for the said county, On oath Declareth and saith that being in New York about fifteen days ago, he verily believes he saw James Morgan (now in Custody for the Murder of the Rev.d James Caldwell) in a tavern there, that he saw him, or verily believes he saw him, in the house of one Day five or six times, and that on the most thorough view and examination of the Prisoner, he verily believes him to be the same Man he then and there did see.

"Sworn

this 26th day of Nov.r., 1781, "Before me, William Burnet.

William Halley (signature)

"

"Essex County ss: Personally appeared before me Isaac Woodruff Esqr. one of the justices of the peace of sd county Henry Linch who being duly sworn deposeth and saith that on the twenty fourth instant Novem'r he this deponant was at Elizabeth Town Point and about three of the clock of said day he saw the Reverend Mr. James Caldwell Sitting in a wriding chair at said Point and he this deponant herd a certain Soldier then on his post by the name of Anthony Palmer ask Mr. Caldwell what he had in his chair box. Mr. Caldwell say'd only a few trifling things said Palmer said he must see what they were Mr. Caldwell made answer he would take them on board the flag Boat and there he the said Palmer might see them, accordingly he the said Caldwell went towards the Boat with a small bundle in his hand tied in a handkerchief, then this deponant heard James Morgan say to Mr. Caldwell I '11 not let you come on Board no by God I wont 111 shoot

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CALDWELL'S DEATH.

7

you. Stand damn your eyes, upon wich Mr. Caldwell immediatly He this deponant then saw the said James Morgan instoped. stantly cock his gun and bring it partly up to his face and fired, he this deponant then saw the blood gush forth out of the mouth of the said Caldwell and saw him step off of a stick of timber

which helped to compose the wharf and then in a stagering manner endeavored to go farther in which attempt he the said Caldwell fell

to the earth

and instantly died, and further

this

deponant

saith not.

"Henry Lynch.

"Sworn

before

me

this

"twenty ninth day of Nov. 1781 "Isaac Woodruff".

"Essex county personally appeared before me Isaac WoodEsqr. one of Justices of peace of said County William Fielding and being duly sworn deposeth and saith that on the twenty fourth of Nov'r Ins. he this deponant was in company with the above said Henry Linch at Elizabeth Town point and saith that the above depositon as it stands wrote it just and true and further saith not. Sworn before me this 29th day of Nov. 1781. ruff,

"Isaac Woodruff. his

William

X

Fielding

mark" "Essex County ss: Personally appeared before me Isaac Woodruff Esqr. one of the Justices of said County William Holbrook who being duly sworn deposeth and saith that on Saturday the twenty fourth instant Nov he this deponant was at Elizabeth town point on board of a Flag Boat and about three of the clock in the afternoon of said day he saw the Rev. Mr. James Caldwell ome to said E town point in a chair and saw said Caldwell walk to the boat and heard said Lt. David Woodruff ask him the said Caldwell to come on Board who appeared as tho it was immaterial whether he came on Board or not, saying he had never been on board of a flagg Boat since the present war (or to that Amount) but on a second request he the said Caldwell came on Board the Flag, soon after which this deponant herd the said James Caldwell conversing with one James Morgan but was not nigh enough to hear what was said, but he this deponant drawing nearer to the said Caldwell and Morgan herd the said Morgan say he would sieze what ever went on shore. Mr. Caldwell sayd if Morgan was dissatisfied with regard to things that was to be sent to town they

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CALDWELL 'S DEATH.

8

should be carried before Alderman Woodruff for Examination, upon which the said Morgan made answer that it was well for he dident believe as Mr. Caldwell was a Law Maker that he would be a Law breaker afterwards this deponant saw Mr. Caldwell standing by his chair and take a small Bondle from under his coat and put it in the Box of the chair and herd the Centinal say to Mr. Caldwell I believe I must sieze you in the name of the United States he this deponant did not hear Mr. Caldwell make any reply but saw him return towards the Boat with the Bondle in his hand, and also herd said Morgan bid said Caldwell stand, and instantly hearing a gun fire he this deponant turned round and saw Mr. Caldwell fall to the ground and died immediately and further saith not. ' ' Sworn before me this his ' 29th Nov 'r. 1781 William Holbrook

X

'

' '

Isaac.

mark

Woodruff

' '

"Essex County. Personally Appeared before Me Isaac Woodone of the Justices of saith County Lt. David Woodruff who being duly sworn on the Holy evangilist of Almighty God de-

ruff Esq.,

posith and saith that on the Twenty-fourth day of November, 1781, Instant, he this deponant was at Elizabeth Town Point on Board of a flag Boat and while he was on board of said flag the Reverend

Mr. James Caldwell came down to the Point in a chair; he this deponant on seeing Mr. Caldwell Asked him to come on Board of said flag. Mr. Caldwell made answer he only wanted a Certain small Trunck from on Board belonging to a Certain Miss Murry and seemed rather indifferent of coming on Board, But afterwards did come on Board and went into the Cabbin and came out again in a few Minutes. But he this deponant did not see him the said Caldwell go out of the Cabbin he this deponant on comeing upon Deck saw the said James Caldwell Advancing Towards the Boat and within Ten or twelve feet of said Boat and immediatly on his, this deponant, seeing said Caldwell in the place and position just mentioned he heard a certain James Morgan who was then on Board the Boat say stop, on which the Rev. Mr. Caldwell did instantly atop & at the same instant this deponant saw said James Morgan Bring his gun to a present and it appeared to this deponant that said Morgan took sight at Mr. Caldwell, and discharged his gun at the same time this deponant saw the Blood Gush out of the mouth of said Caldwell and he the said Caldwell turned partly about and walking a step or two in a stagering manner fell to the Earth, he this deponant Immediately went to Mr. Caldwell and found that he the said Caldwell was dead and further this deponant saith not.

"Sworn before me this "29 Day of Nov., 1781 "Isaac Woodruff.

)

David Woodruff, Lieut."

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CALDWELL'S DEATH. Personally appeared before me Isaac Woodone of the Justices of said County Edward McHugo who being duly sworn deposeth and saith that on the twentyfourth day of November instant and about three o'clock in the afternoon of said day he this deponant was at Elizabeth Town Point on duty and was Sergeant of the Guard of said place and whilst he was relieving the old guard, he this deponant saw the Rev. Mr. James Caldwell coming down to the point afs'd, in a wriding chair and saw him alight from the same and go towards the flag boat then lying at the Point afs'd and just as this deponant had relieved the guard and he toald a certain James Morgan who was then on Board the Flag Boat that he was relieved and had no business on Board but said Morgan did not come on shore this deponant then went on board the flag Boat and there heard Lieu't. David Woodruff arsk Mr. Caldwell to come on Board. Said Caldwell seemed indifferent whether he did come on board or not, he this deponant then arsked Mr. Caldwell if he was oming on Board Mr. Caldwell made answer why I don't know I havent been on Board a flag since the Contest. This deponant said he dident think the Officer had any objections, with that Mr. Caldwell steped on Board the Boat and went into the Cabbin after ome conversation with the aforesaid James Morgan concerning some Trunks that was then on Board. Mr. Caldwell told said Morgan if there were any Contraband goods in said truncks they should be carried before a Magistrate and examined. Said Morgan said that that was fair enough he was contented. Some short time after he this deponant herd a gun fire upon which he came out of the Cabbin and saw Mr. Caldwell falling to the ground and made in-

"Essex County.

ruff Esquire,

who it was that fired the gun. Lt. Woodruff made answer was James Morgan and ordered this deponant to ty said Morgan immediately for he had killed the Priest, and further saith not "Edward McHugo. sworn before me this "29th Day of Nov'r 1781

quiry it

'

'

"Isaac Woodruff."

MANUSCEIPT LIGHT ON CALDWELL '8 DEATH.

10

"State of N. Jersey

"C.

Bound

"Henry Linch

Wm.

}

B. River

Recognizance of one

sum

gold or Silver.

"

Holbrook

in

the

hundred pound proclamation money Each in

Freling

Anthony Palmer, Ms County " Edward McHugo

Wm.

in

"the Condition of the above Recognizance is such that if the above mentioned persons shall be & app ar at the next court of Oyer terminer to be held at Newark in and for the County of Essex to give Evidence in behalf of the State concerning the murder of the Rev'd. Mr. James Caldwell and do not depart the Court without lieve then the above Recognizance is void otherwise in force and acknowledged.

"Taken before me this "29th Day of Nov'r, 1781 "Isaac Woodruff." (Letter of Rev.

James Caldwell

to the

Honorable Mr. Geary,

in

Congress, Philadelphia, by Mr. Denman.) "Springfield, Oct.

6,

1778.

"Dear Sir "The attention :

I have always observed you pay to public busiacquaintance I have had the pleasure of with you, subject you to the trouble of this. "General Mifflin has been pleased to assign me a pretty large District in the settlement of old accounts, which I am however de-

ness and the

little

termined, God willing, to go through with. For this end I have engaged Col. Wallace Formerly of Philadelphia, a capable merchant & honest man, to assist me besides which I intend in each district to have one or two Magistrates or principle Persons present to assist in determining upon doubtful accounts. In many instances the inhabitants were imposed upon and delivered their forage to ;

private soldiers. It will in my opinion be cruel injustice to bury accounts which are only deficient in point of form.

"But my chief design of addressing you at present was on account of service done for the sick. By a Resolve of Congress, I believe, the settlement of those accounts belongs to the Director General or some of the Physical Tribe. They will not pay the people. In the various marchings of the Army and parts of it thro' this state soldiers are left sick. Sometimes too sick to be sent to the Hospital, sometimes not so sick as to require such expense as a distant transportation. It is our duty as Quarter Mas-

MANUSCRIPT LIGHT ON CALDWELL'S DEATH. ters to provide Quarters for those sick nurse them look to us for their pay

men. yet

11

The Inhabitants who we have apprehended

ourselves not authorized to pay. Now, Sir, while I am settling accounts, the inhabitants will bring those also. If I cannot pay them their murmurings will be great, and great my trouble in

putting them off. And what is worse they will refuse in future to take care of the sick. Will you, Sir, be so kind as to let me know what shall be the line of my conduct in this case. The Bearer will wait upon you at any time you fix for your answer.

"You have no doubt had daily Enemy of late. They continued

accounts of the movements of pretty still between the North and Hackensack River till yesterday when they crossed Hackensack and advanced to the Heights east of Passaick River driving and carrying off all they could till evening when they returned back I have not heard of any movement to-day. to their old ground. The whole of this time they appeared in force with great preparations upon Staten Island to invade by the way of Eliz. Town & Woodbridge. The spirit of our Militia here is excellent. But it is exceeding difficult to leave their farms at this time. Many of them suffer more by their absence from their farms than their fines would amount to, but they act upon more generous principles. But the Militia back in the Country cannot be persuaded to stay any time out. And therefore the Enemy may from the situation of Head Quarters, effectually ruin this fine Country before Winter Cut off the source of many supplies to the Army and reduce to absolute poverty several thousand families most faithful in the But Jehovah reigns, and I am sure all will be well. good cause We do not despond We are determined to yield our Country but the

by Inches, and sell them dear. "Since I came from Philadelphia I have not had time free from business to write one letter & as I have been obliged to talk to different people upon different subjects while writing this, you will therefore please to excuse inaccuracy.

"With due

respect and sincere esteem,

"your most ob'd't and "very humb. sev't "James Caldwell." (Discharge signed by Caldwell). "Springfield, Nov.r 16, 1778.

"Jonathan Meeker, Jun.r hath been taken from other military duty by order of Major General Dickinson and employed in making Cartridges for the army since the 22d of Sep.r to this day, except one week he was absent by leave, and is now discharged.

"James

Caldweil, D. Q.

M. G."

NEW

II

SERIES.

The foregoing legal documents mind the tragedy that caused

bring

vividly

to the

great lamenting throughout New Jersey, and in other states. A careful study of this newly discovered material will enable the

who next attempts to write the story of Caldwell to set the sad event of his taking off in a clearer light than others heretofore. historian

The "New"

Series.

With this issue the "Proceedings" begins another series, known as the "New" Series, and to continue indefinitely. The Third Series ended with Volume X, (1915). The Second Series was issued in thirteen volumes and the First in ten.

to be

Hereafter the volumes will run on indefinitely under the New Series. Whatever reason there may have been in the past for breaking up the publication into numbered series, there seems

no good reason for continuing the system. For ready reference it has proved confusing, or at best it has required a carefulness that better might have been used for more important matters. Had there been no system of series the present volume would be numbered thirty-four. While the terse designation "New" will be used in a formal way,

it is

expected that the initiated users of the Prodrop any reference to the series except

ceedings will gradually to designate the First,

Second or Third. Especially will this be the case, we may believe, when the volumes reach fourteen and beyond, because volume thirteen was the highest reached in

any of the former

series,

and there

will be

no confusion.

It is a coincidence that

purposes of in

memory

may be valuable at least for the that the New Series begins with the year

which Newark celebrates That every reader may

its

250th anniversary.

live far

the anniversary wish of the Editor.

up

into the

New

Series

is

Caspar Steymets and his Descendants.

BY

HOFFMAN.

P. H.

STORY OF HIS LIFE 1615

-

1702.

came to Among America and settled on the Island of Manhattan (now New York) was the well-known pioneer, Casparus Steynmutzen, or "Caspar Steinmets," as it came to be spelled in America. The time and place of his birth has not been definitely ascertained. From the best information we have, it was in or near the town of Zeeland, or Zutphin, near the Zuider-Zee, in the North of Holland. The date of his birth was probably sometime between 1615 and 1622. The time of his arrival in New Amsterdam was about 1630. Family tradition says that he came with his brothers who owned and sailed trading vessels and came from time to time to this country, sailing up the Hudson for cargoes of furs and things that could be procured from the Indians. Caspar from one of these voyages remained behind and cast his lot with the Aertsons and Garretsons and Corneliusons. Very few settlers were found on Manhattan at the time and they were in and about the Fort on the extreme and lower end of the Island. Indians were more numerous at that time than the whites, and were sometimes very dangerous neighbors. The first record we have of the presence of Caspar in this country was at the Baptism of a child of Michael Misner in the year 1648. He was acting as sponsor or witness on this occasion. Mention of this Baptism is made in the Records of. the Old Dutch Church of New York. The other witnesses the earliest arrivals of Hollanders that

CASPAR 8TEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

14

were Roeloff Cornelison and Gerrit Gerritson. These friend* and associates, we find to have been his business and family connections (brother-in-law) throughout his long and active public

life.

He seems

to

have been married about this time to Dorothea

Aertson (or Aeston).

Church

They had a

child baptized in the

Dutch

New York July 14, 1650, named Caspar. His soon after. And on March 31, 1652 he, as widower,

of

wife died

was married to Jeannetje Gerritson, a young maid recently arrived from Holland and living at Ahasimus Bergen, N. J., with her brother Gerrit Gerritson who was an intimate friend and companion of Steimnets. The vessel in which she sailed was named The "Faith" owned and commanded by Capt. Verlath. She was registered as coming from the town of Zutphen, Holland, on the Zuider-Zee. Steinmets soon became a very prosperous business man,

owning houses and

lots in

New Amsterdam,

as

is

shown by

one of the oldest maps on record. In 1655 he is shown as the owner of a large lot on Winkle St. near Fort Amsterdam. The West India Company owned at that time a large portion of the land in the lower end of the Island, and also many acres across the North River in Bergen. They built houses

and sold them as opportunity occurred. They built a row of fine stone houses near the Fort on Manhattan about the year 1645-6, with gable ends to the street on Whitehall Street (or Marketvelt) and fronting on a lane called Winkle Street. One of these houses was disposed of by the Company to Henry Jansen a baker, and one to Maximilian Von Geile, and one to the highly esteemed "Dominie Everardus Bogardus", whose wife was the well known and famous widow Annake Jans. Annake Jans, after the death of her husband, willed their farm running from Broadway to the North River and facing about one mile on the river and nearly as far on Broadway. This she conveyed to the Trinity Church Organization, making it the largest and weathiest church organization in New York at that time, even as it has been until the present day (1907).

The fourth house

in this row, according to the Historian

CASPAB STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS. H. Innes, was sold to a certain Caspar Steinmets. house on the corner of Bridge Street, was sold English gentleman named George Holmes.

15

The

J.

last

to

an

These houses, lots, and plots of the early settlers are very plainly shown on maps in a book recently published by J. H. Innes in

New

York.

These associates of Steinmets at this early date, indicate that he was a man of influence and means, as he also was in later years. He, like the other Dutch settlers, very early became interested in trading with the Indians in Bergen, New Jersey, and became also one of the foremost business men and large property owners in New Amsterdam.

In about 1652 he purchased a large "Bowerie" or farm Bergen and erected suitable buildings thereon to shelter himself and his family. He moved his business here and continued as trader and farmer in his new home but trouble arose between the white settlers and the Indians and the families were compelled to flee back to New Amsterdam where they remained for several years until peace was restored and it became safe for them to return to their homes and farms in Bergen. Caspar remained in Bergen until his death which in

;

occurred in 1702.

Steynmets raised a large family of children. Some were born in New Amsterdam, but the majority perhaps were born in Bergen but all of them were baptised in New York. ;

Their births are all recorded in the "Old Dutch Church" of New York. Their marriages were also recorded there in later

The Church and Court Records for the surrounding towns and villages were kept in New York until the establishment of Courts and the building of Churches in these nearby years.

towns.

Caspar Steynmets had ten children. His first wife had one child named Caspar, born July 14, 1650. The mother died and the child probably died also as no record of any kind regarding it is found afterwards, and the fact the second wife of Steynmets had a child named Caspar would seem to confirm the

opinion.

As has been already

stated,

his

OAPAB STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

1

second wife was also a Hollander, named Jeannetje Gerritson. To them were born nine children, as follows :

1.

2.

Johannes, born Oct. 5, 1653. Altje, born Jan. 31, 1655.

born Aug.

27, 1656.

3.

Gerrit,

4. 5.

Annetje, born Oct. 30, 1658. Christoffel, born Dec. 19, 1660.

6.

Caspar, born Sept.

7.

Orsolena, born March 15, 1665. Joanna (Joannetje), born Dec. 29, 1667. Benjamin, born Jan. 16, 1670.

8. 9.

5,

1663.

After the trouble with the Indians and the war and disturbance that followed, Steinmets seems to have settled in New Amsterdam and to have sought employsome kind, a% we find that on Feb. 22, 1656, he applied for and obtained a license to tap beer and wine for the accommodation of Burghers and strangers. How long this business continued, we are not told; but we know that on April 11, 1657, he was admitted to all the rights of a small

down again ment

of

He continued in business, however, until Jan. 1658 with the other settlers from Bergen who had fled from he,

burgher.

and

;

the fierce cruelties of the Indians, petitioned the Directors General, and their

"Mighty Highnesses", to be permitted to return to and occupy their lands and farms in Bergen as they had done previous to the Indian troubles. This the Lord Directors would not permit unless they settled in communities and not on scattered farms, on account of the dangers

from hostile Indians. These families returned about this time and began preparing themselves for self-defence. They organized a company of Militia, and on June 21, 1657, Caspar Steinmets was commissioned Lieutenant of the Company, and very soon thereafter was appointed Captain. (See Colonial History of New Jersey, pages 11 and 597.) In the course of trading with the Indians and doing busthem Steinmets and others had become familiar with their language and were able to converse with the Indians and interpret for others, as we find by a certain application that was made by a Sachem or Indian Chief named iness with

CASPAR 8TEYMET8 AND HIS DESCENDANTS. Wappenghrezewan, who wished

17

to dispose of a large tract of

land stretching across the State of New Jersey reaching to and including the lower end of the Delaware River. Portions of

were settled upon and occupied by German and Swedish people who had made some claim to it. Therefore the Indian Chief came to the Burghers and authorities of Bergen this tract

and through them to the "Lords Proprietors" of New Amsterdam, and Governor Stuyvesant of the State of New York. The petition presented by the chief was a very lengthy one,

and endorsed by the Authorities of Bergen and read somewhat as follows:

To the Governor Peter Stuyvesant, and to the Directors General, in behalf of the High and Mighty Lords States Gen" eral", and the Incorporated West India Company", on the ' '

date hereof, and in the presence of the said Directors, did come and appear in proper person, a certain Sachem weD

known

to us,

"Wappanghrzewan by name, who hath to us

declared, (we being well versed in the Indian language) ana at the same time besought us to interpret and make known to the said "Directors General", that

he the said Chief about days ago was sent for by Mr. John Printz who claimed to be the Swedish Governor of South "West Jersey Settlement, and made a request to the Chief that he and the people of the Settlement might bargain for and purchase the land six

owned by the

said Sachem; Wappenghrzewan however preferred to dispose of his claims to Governor Stuyvesant and the Dutch. An agreement was prepared and signed by the

Chief with his

mark made by himself

at Tamecaugh, N. J., by the Burghers and Officers present as follows Brian Newton, George Baxter, David Letschew, Caspar Steinmetz, Herman Jensen, Reiner Domineus, Peter Harmenson, Hans Loderwicke, and countersigned

July

30, 1651.

It

was

also signed

:

by Cornelius Van Riper, Secretary. This request of the Chief was complied with so far as Ber-

gen and

all its neighborhood and surroundings was conPurchases of the land were made and Indian titles to the land were given after that peace and harmony prevailed.

cerned.

;

CASPAR STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

18

Some

of the Indians remained on the land but the greater

part moved away. The Steinmets family and other Hollanders began to long for a church, where they could hold Divine Service and their children brought up and catechised and instructed as they

were in their old country homes. A petition was prepared and circulated by Mr. Steinmets and others, to be presented to the Lords Proprietors at New Amsterdam, to have sent to the families in Bergen a Clergyman to minister to the spiritual wants and needs of this growing settlement of Bergen and

surrounding neighborhoods, and to teach them by precept and example how to lead Godly lives, and to train their children, and fulfill their duties as citizens in this new community.

The "Schepens" say they have visited the inhabitants and received pleadges to the amount of 417 Guilders in Wampum (money). This was signed by the Schepens of the village, viz. Caspar Steinmets, Tilman Van Vleck, Harman Sweedman and Machgryse Jansen. The list of subscribers numbered 25, with the various amounts opposite their names.

Among ders,

the rest, Caspar Steinmets subscribed twenty-five guilthe largest amount on the list. The Lords Proprie-

much

tors received this request quite favorably and sent the petition to the government in Holland, and in accordance with their desire, a Clergyman was sent by the next ship that sailed

for

New Amsterdam.

The village of Bergen was growing so rapidly (1662) that the people desired a court with more power. When this petition was received by the Lords Proprietors in New Amsterdam, they appointed Caspar Steinmets to be First Schepon, and Gerrit Gerritsen and Englebert Steenhuysen to be Assistant Schepens. (Done at Fort Amsterdam October 16, 1662.)

Later in the season complaint was made that the Schout (Sheriff) Van Vleeck, and Schepens Caspar Steinmets and Herman Sweedman had fenced in some of the best pasture lands running up into the highlands. It was ordered that they appear before the Directors General, for a hearing. Pursuant to an appointment made December 28, 1662, a meeting

CASPAR STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

19

and hearing was held by the Lords Proprietors, when Michael Jensen and Adrian Post appeared for the inhabitants of Bergen, as Deputies, and stated that it would cause damage to the inhabitants of the village if the parties continued with their fencing. The aforesaid Steinmets, Van Vleeck and

Sweedman maintained

that no obstacle whatever could arise was then ordered that the land be surveyed and the Surveyors report to the Directors General, and afterwards directions would be given. This was done and full permission was given to go on with the fencing, so long as they did not trespass on the public pasture land.

therefrom.

On

It

Jan. 24, 1662, a petition was presented to the Court,

asking for a public well. Caspar Steinmets signed the petition, with others interested, and on its being presented to the Directors General and Council of New Netherland at their

headquarters at 1662.

New Amsterdam,

The Village

it

was granted on Feb.

9,

Geomonepen (Commimipan) needed to a defence against the Indians, who were alof

be palisaded as ways prowling about watching for an opportunity to steal, or scalp any unprotected inhabitants of the neighborhoods. Some of the people were indifferent or unwilling to assist in this

much needed safeguard. Caspar Steinmets, Tilman Van Vleeck and Herman Sweedman presented a petition to the Directors General, that all should be compelled to was ordered on the 10th day of March, 1661.

assist.

This

Caspar Steinmets was one of the pioneer officers in Bergen and being engaged in business for himself as well as for the public, he purchased and sold property. And we find by searching the records that he gave deeds, bought property in New Amsterdam, and in transaction of busi-

Bergen and in ness,

sometimes he was sued and sometimes he sued others.

He

We

find in the Court Records evidently was a very busy man. that on June 10, 1652, Caspar Steinmets obtained judgment

against Jacob

Van

Curler.

Steinmets Caspar Steinmets versus Jans Hendrick. in the that his wife's brother was employ of Hencomplained drick for nine months and was harshly treated. He asked for better treatment

and that he receive decent clothing and pay-

CASPAR STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

20

ment boy

as agreed upon.

The Court ordered payment and the

released.

Caspar Steinmets had considerable disagreement with a When it got beyond enneighbor named Don Hermson. durance he sued him for slander. When brought into Court Hermson not only failed to prove his innocence but replied that he had nothing but good to say concerning Steinmets. 1658, July 27, Steinmets purchased a house of Hendrick H. Kip, for which he received a deed dated as above. The property was situated on the South side of Brewers Street in New Amsterdam. This plot is shown on a map recently published by J. H. Innes in the History of the first Settlers of New Amsterdam. Capt. Judike Verkith sailed from Amsterdam, Holland, bound for America with merchandise and passengers. Among the passengers came a young maid, Jeannetje Gerritson, whose brother Gerritson had been in America for some time and waa settled iu Bergen. She, in part payment for her passage, was She arrived to render certain services on board the vessel. safely and was living with friends at Ahasimus, Bergen, N. J., when in 1652 she was married to Caspar Steinmets, as mentioned on another page. 1666.

Caspar Steinmets sued the Town of Bergen for

rent of his building for a school in the sum of 260 Florins. was asked to wait as there was no money in the Treasury.

asked them again, when the reply of "no

He He

money" was made

again.

owned was situated on Stone This was assessed for $1,000. which at this day seems very small, but the selling price and the taxing price was quite different even in those days, as well as at the

One

Street,

of the houses that he

New York.

present time.

March 12th, 1668. Steinmets purchased of Gov. Philip Carteret a large tract of land and meadows in the Town of Bergen. This purchasing of property, and the various transactions of public and private business, together with the public and prominent offices which he held, such as Judge of

CASPAR STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

21

the Court, Captain of a Military Company, and other important offices would show the confidence and esteem in which he

was held by the leading 1661.

An

citizens of the

new

settlement.

ordinance was passed by the Directors General New Amsterdam, creating a Court of Jus-

and Councillors of tice in

Bergen, N.

J.

In 1662 Peter Stuyvesant on behalf of

the Mighty Lords Proprietors, did choose as Judges honest intelligent persons, owners of real estate, who were lovers of peace, promoters and professors of the Reformed religion as it is taught in the word of God and in the Order of the

Synod

of Dordrecht in Holland, to consist of one Schout and of three Scheppens. The men appointed were

(Sheriff)

Caspar Steinmets,

sheriff

;

Michel Jensen and

Herman Sweed-

man

as Scheppens. This action of the Lords Proprietors established the first Municipal Government in New Jersey. ( See

Winfield's History of

The

first

New

Jersey.)

public act of the

New Government was on

Jan.

when an order was passed

for the digging of a public 28, 1662, well inside of the enclosure, or stockade, that had been erected to protect themselves from the Indians. This order was signed

by Steinmets, Van Vleeck, Sweedman and Jensen, SchepThis well was still in use as late as 1895, in Jersey pens. City. Philip Carteret was appointed Governor of New JerHe arrived in July and in August he assumed control sey. and authorized Capt. Nicholas Verlath to call and constitute a Court. He did so by calling the following persons and appointing them as Magistrates in the Town of Bergen, Caspar (These Steinmets, Herman Sweedman and Elias Michaels. records are mostly lost and not obtainable.) The officers were requested to subscribe to an oath, binding themselves to support the Government of the "West India Company as maintained in New Amsterdam and Bergen, N. J. This continued from 1661 to 1666. After the surrender of the Dutch Government to the English in 1664, Caspar Steinmets and other officers were continued in office by Gov. Philip Carteret, and in 1665 a Court of Adjudicature was organized for the Town of Bergen, with Capt. Verlath as President,

and Caspar Steinmets

22

CASPAR STEYMET8 AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

and others as Assistants and Judges. Thus, Officers Steinmet s, Jensen and Sweedman stand out prominently as the first Judges for a local court in this section of the country which soon after became the County of Bergen.

Steinmets, like his associates, was a farmer and large land owner, and held important offices, as Judge, Sheriff, State Senator, Captain of a military company, &c., &c. (See History of Bergen County.)

When Philip Carteret arrived in this Country and in his capacity as Governor of New Jersey, with Headquarters at Elizabeth-Town, in August 1665, he proceeded to re-organize the Courts for Bergen, Geomenopen, Ahasimus and Hoboken.

Caspar Steinmets was appointed Judge for the County of Bergen and a few years later was elected a Representative to the first and second session of the New Jersey Legislature held at Elizabethtown. Balthazar Bayard was also chosen for the County of Bergen. In Gov. Philip Carteret 's time the Legislature consisted of the Governor with his council of seven members in the upper house, or Senate.

The

Citizens of the

Town

of Bergen in 1673 were ordered

by the Lords Proprietors of New Orange (as New York was then called) to take the oath of allegiance or be constrained

thereto

by

the

force

of

arms.

They

did

not wait for the latter alternative, but freely surrendered to the new order of things, and sent in the names of the

most prominent citizens to the new authorities of ange. The oath was as follows

New

Or-

:

"We do promise and swear in the presence of Almighty God, to be loyal and faithful to their Mighty Highnesses, the Lords States General of the United Netherlands and his Serene Highness, the Prince of Orange, and the Governor already appointed or to be appointed, and to compart ourselves on all occasions as loyal and faithful subjects are bound to do." Signed by the proper officers on the 4th of September, 1673.

The Town of Bergen having sent

in

names for that

purpose the Authorities of New Jersey selected the following military officers, for Captain, Caspar Steinmets; 1st Lieu-

CASPAR STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

23

These were tenant, Hans Diederieck; Ensign, Adrian Post. appointed officers of a Foot Military Company of Militia to be enlisted in Bergen, Geomoneopen, Ahasimus and Hoboken, for the purpose of preserving order and enforcing the laws

and ordinances of the County and

to

protect

them from

the ravages of the Indians. It is

proper here to give some account of the Settlement what is called the West-India-Company's especially as in later years, through the changes by

in earlier days of

farm, death and by marriage the management of it came into the hands of Caspar Steinmets, as did also the ownership, both for himself and his two sons, John and Garet. this time (1636) Cornelius Von Voorst, lived at near the water and Ferry to New Amsterdam Ahasimus, between what is now 4th and 5th Streets in Jersey City, in a frame house, thatched with reeds. This house was burned by the Indians, on the 25th of June, 1636. After the West

About

India

Company had purchased

the

interests

of

Pauw

in

Pavonia, Ahasimus was reserved for their own use, as a trading and shipping port, especially as trading post with the

Van Voorst remained in possession of it until his death in the same year. On the 16th of March 1639 his widow took a lease of the Company's Bowerie (Farm) at Indians.

Ahasimus for twenty years, agreeing to keep it in repair and to build a new frame house, and to keep in repair the buildings already erected. She afterward married Jacob Stoffelson. Within a year she died, leaving Stoffelson in possession.

He

held it as tenant of the Company until Feb. 1647, when he took a lease and it as tenant of the Company until May 1661. During the year 1643 he was driven out by the Inhis dians, buildings burned and the farm laid waste. Shortly before the expiration of the lease he appeared before the Directors of the Company and said he had been expelled by the savages, stroyed,

all

"Two

his

property burned and everything deHe now asked an extension of his

times".

This was granted him for five years, at a rental of one-quarter of the produce the house and other buildings at the expiration of the lease to go the Company. In 1665 the

lease.

;

CASPAR STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

24

buildings were burned again by the Indians and everything about the farm destroyed.

In consideration of this loss, the farm was granted to him on the first of December, 1656, without rent for one year. In the latter part of 1658 a new house was built on the place. In June he obtained a lease for one year, which he renewed in February 1662. Next door to him lived his step-son Ide Van Voorst in a house which was built shortly after the Indian "War of 1656. Van Voorst had returned to his house sooner than most of his neighbors and probably without the sanction of the Government, which was doing all in its power His situation put him in to discourage isolated settlements. who from the great peril savages prowled about watching an to strike a blow against defenceless settlers. opportunity

Jacob Stoffelson, who had married Treintie, widow of Jacob Wallinger Van Hoorn, on Aug. 7th, 1657, was in possession of the "Bowerie" (farm) when the country was surrendered by the Dutch to the English in 1664. Stoffelson remained in possession as tenant of the West India Company

who

still

owned the property by virtue

of the first of the

Stoffelson, being in possession, Capitulation. to improve the farm. This being in derogation of the

Articles of

moved

rights of the Lords Proprietors, they served

him with the

following notice,

"Whereas, Jacob Stoffelson is about to fence in a certain parcel of land, in and about Warsimus, displeasing to the other inhabitants there, and without any authority there, this is to require the said Stoffelson to forbear the fencing

Given under my hand and seal this 5th day of March 1665. Signed Philip Carteret, Governor of New Jersey." This notice was not served but was burned at the house of Samuel Edsall, and renewed July 14, 1672. War between England and Holland was declared in 1665. The Dutch in New York were compelled to surrender and all their property was confiscated. At the time of the surrender the only families in Ahasimus were, the Van Voorsts, the of the said land until further orders.

;

Stoffelsons,

Ide

Van

Voorst,

(brother-in-law of Stoffelson)

and

CASPAR STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

25

and wife received a

lease of

C. J.

Purmarent.

Stoffelson

the farm from Gov. Nicholls, of New York, from the first day of January, 1667, during all the days of their lives, to either

of them, in consideration of the care they had taken of the farm and the improvements they had made thereon. Stoffel-

son died before the expiration of a year, leaving his wife in possession. She married Michael Tades, June 17, 1668. Tades died shortly afterwards, leaving his wife still in possession. In June, 1671, she married Caspar Steinmets (His former wife

Jeannetje Gerritsen having died a few years previous). Steinmets and his new wife continued in occupancy of the famous farm, acting on the terms of the lease of Governor Nicholls to Stoffelson and wife, and claiming it and all the land Stoffelson

Steinmets inclosed and fenced some of

had improved.

the adjoining lands; and in 1671, Gov. Carteret ordered to take down the fence with this order he complied.

him

;

When the Dutch try,

Van

re-established their authority in this counVoorst and his brother-in-law Purmarent protested

against Steinmets having any greater privileges than he had under Gov. Stuyvesant. Steinmets then asked for a confirmation of the lease of the

"Bowerie" made

to his wife

and

her former husband by the English Government, when that government was in possession. This was granted, and a lease obtained on the 12th of April, 1674. This stirred up Van

Voorst and Purmarent, who charged Steinmets with appropriating more than his share of the farming land in and about Ahasimus. Steinmets, however, was allowed to fence in all the unappropriated land in the valley appertaining to Ahasimus and Van Voorst and Purmarent were allowed to fence ;

in all the tillage

and valley land belonging

to

them in lawful

property. still in possession of the old West India the English again obtained authority. Shortly after Gov. Carteret had re-organized the Government he ordered the prosecution of Steinmets before the Court of Ber-

Steinmets was

Farm when

was due the Lords ProprieGov. Andrews, of New York, sent George Cook to Bergen on the 6th of March, 1675, to defend the suit which Gov.

gen, for the rent which he claimed tors.

CA8PAE STEYMET8 AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

26

Carteret of New Jersey had instituted against Steinmets. "What became of this suit is not known, as no record can be found of its having been taken up again. In 1678, Gov. Andrews again leased the West India

"Bowerie" (farm) at Ahasmius to Steinmets, for and during and one entire year thereafter; Steinmets to yield and pay therefor the sum of Four hundred Guilders "Servant" to the Governor of New York. This lease was repudiated by the authorities of New Jersey, and on the 5th of October, 1678, Steinmets was summoned to appear before the Court of Bergen at its next sitting, to show his authority to occupy the farm and he was commanded in the meantime to pay more rent. He did not obey this summons until the 23rd

his natural life,

;

of November, giving as an excuse for not appearing sooner, that he could not read the summons, and that he did not know

what

it

was until the Constable had told him.

(Being a Hol-

On lander, he was not familiar with the English language.) the same day he was told by Gov. Andrews to continue in It is not known that any further possession of the farm. claim was exercised about the farm. About 1683, Samuel

Brown, one of the East Jersey Proprietors demanded rent from Steinmets. Gov. Duggan, of New York, sent Brown a threatening letter which effectually silenced him. While the Proprietors were thus seeking an acknowledgment of their claim, they were a continual source of trouble to the Governor of New York, in that they annoyed the tenants and prevented the collection of rents.

farm

To prevent further trouble about the

which belonged to his "Majesty," Donnelly gave to Judge Palmer a release of the reversion for 99 years, from the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel next enat East Jersey,

suing after the determination of the estate of Steinmets. This lease was dated August 13, 1685, and was made upon condition that

Judge should pay as a

to the King, in case

fine,

the

he should not see

sum fit

of Sixty

to forgive

Pounds it, and

annum, and to defend the title. getting old, and the farm was manand Gerrit. On February 5th, his two sons John aged by of his lease, for Fifty Pounds. AfPalmer 1686, they bought

the rent of 20 shillings per

Steinmets was

now

CASPAR STEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

87

ter the death of their father in 1702, they divided the farm between them, John taking the Southern half and Gerrit the Northern half. On February 4th, John Steinmets conveyed all of his share in this property to his wife for life, and after her death His nephew to the children of his sister Johanna Preyor. Jacob Preyor fell heir to his interest in the farm. After the death of John Steinmets, his widow married Peter Van Wooglam, and they, with Jacob Preyor and his wife Leah, assigned to David Hennion alias Danielson, the remainder of the term under the Palmer lease for 675 pounds. Danielson entered into possession of the Southerly half of the farm about the year 1715, and remained there during the nine years following. At this time the only buildings in Harsimus were the house, barn and brew-house of Danielson; the house, barn and cowhouse of Ide Van Voorst and the house, barn and old house of Garret Steinmets which was built by his father Caspar Steinmets in 1658. ;

On the 10th of October, 1727, Garret Steinmets, who held the Northerly half of the farm under the Palmer lease, surrendered to Kennedy and accepted a lease for life at the rent of one ear of barley-corn when demanded, and a proper pro(His portion of the quit-rents reserved to the proprietors. interest in this lease he assigned to Matthyis De Mott on Feb.

This gave Kennedy possession of the Northerly 20, 1679.) half of the Steinmets (formerly "West India Company) farm.

John Steinmets had died about 1708. (He was born Oct. Garret Steinmets, who was born Aug. 27, 1656, died in 1733. They were both sons of the immigrant Caspar Steinmets, and his second wife Jeannetje Gerritsen (she died in The third wife of Caspar Steinmets, Treintie Jacobs, 1670.) widow of Jacob Stoffelson, died in 1676. (Caspar was married 5,

1653. )

to this wife in 1671.)

After his marriage to Stoffelson 's wi-

dow

in 1671, Steinmets took possession of the "West India Company's farm at Ahasmius, consisting of about 385 acres, and as had always been the case with the possessors of the

farm, he soon became involved in troubles with his neighbors. Complaint was made by Chas. Jensen and Ide Van Voorst liv-

M

CASPAR 8TEYMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

ing at Ahasimus, against Steinmets in regard to the pasture It was decreed by the Governors General and Council

lands.

and ordered that Caspar Steinmets, the lessee, shall be allowed provisionally, and until the Governors General and Council, by themselves or their Deputies shall have occasion to investigate the circumstances there, to fence in all the

ungranted lands appertaining to Ahasimus, or so he shall have need to use.

The third wife

of Stoffelson

much

aa

(who was the widow of Stof-

felson) was also a native of Holland. Her maiden name was Treintie Jacobs. She married her first husband Jacob

Town

of Winklee, North Holland; and they After the death of Walling she married Jacob Stoffelson, a widower, on the 17th of August 1657. And after the death *of this husband, she married Caspar Steinmets, on March 15, 1671, as stated on another page. On account of old age and increasing disabilities, Steinmets transferred his interest in the old West India Farm to hii two eldest sons John and Gerrit, who divided it into two parts and disposed of it as mentioned in a previous page. Johannes (John) Steinmets, the oldest son, married a young widow, Annetje (Jacobs) Van Winkle. He continued a resident of Bergen; and like his father he was always more or less interested in public affairs. He was elected Magistrate in Ber-

Walling, of the

had

six children.

gen, and served in the Legislature of the State. The records show that he witnessed as Clerk of the Town of Bergen an affidavit

made by

Claes Arentson Tours.

Gerrit Steinmets continued to live in Ahasimus until

on the

Henderson Street in Jersey the 10th of October 1727, he leased his share and interest in the West India Company's farm to other 1715,

City, N. J.

line of the present

On

parties and retired to a more quiet life, being then about 71 years of age. He lived in Bergen until his death in 1733. He was buried in the church-yard of the old Dutch Church at

Bergen, in which church the records show the fact of his marriage, the date of his death and his burial.

In further considering the life of Caspar (Casparus) Steinmets (Steymets,) a number of items will be recorded

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS.

29

which have been culled from Court Records and other sourreferring mostly to the active business life of this very man in the early days and history of our Country and confirming what has already been written concerning his

ces,

busy

active characteristics

and

Courts show the following

ability.

The public records of the

facts.

(To be continued in the next number.)

Tombstone Inscriptions OLD GRAVEYARD AT HOHOKUS, BERGEN

CO. N.

J.

Located about 300 feet south of the Erie R. R. Station.

Copied 1. 2.

May 301910, by John

Neafie, N. Y. City.

d. Feb. 171792, aged 69 years. Elsey, consort of Garret Hopper, d. Mch. 8 1816, aged

Garret Hopper,

89 yrs. 11 mos. 3. Mary, consort of Henry Zabriskie, d. June 3 1821 aged 69 yrs. 8 mos. A large brown stone next to the above, with the lettering 4. all scaled off, with a foot stone marked C. I. Z. 5. Mrs. Francis W. Perry, widow of James H. Perry Esq. and daughter of Mr. H. & Mrs. Sally Zabriske,

251814

b.

June

d.

Nov. 27

1834

ae 20 years.

2276 4672

7.

Henry Zabriskie Junr. d. Feb. 23 1839 aged Henry H. Zabriskie, d. Feb. 27 1832 aged

8.

Sally, relict of

6.

H. H. Zabriskie,

years.

d.

May

11

1829

ds.

ds.

aged 41

7923

Garret H. Zabriskie, d. Aug. 6 1867 aged ds. Caty Van Voorhase, wife of Garret H. Zabriskie, d. Nov. 1833 aged ds. 1L Garret Zabriskie, son of Henry and Lavinia Banta, d. Oct. 16 1832 aged ds. 12. Ann, widow of Jacob Bamper, d. Feb. 26 1844 aged 90 yrs. 2 mos. A number of rough stones without marks. 9.

10.

41112

4723

The New Jersey Shippens. BY GEORGE SCHUYLER BANGERT.

Much

has been written about the old colonial family of New Jersey branch of the family has been

Shippen, but the

much

neglected.

In order to correct this deficiency the writer

has prepared a book on the whole family including the New Jersey branch and the* later generations of the other branches

which have never been written up.

A

brief synopsis of the

New

Jersey branch

is

therefore

presented. 1.

born

John Shippen

Yorkshire, England 1565.

died

? ? ? ?

Dorothy Bubwith, daughter of Richard Bubwith and Elizabeth Wakefield, being granddaughter of Walter Bubwith and Ellen Watkins, and being great granddaughter of Thomas Bubwith of Bubwith Hall, Old Pomfre, Yorkshire, England. married

2.

born

Village

of

William Shippen

Monk

Fryston, Yorkshire,

England,

1600.

died

Stockport,

married

England

1681.

Mary Nunnes, July

Nunnes and Effam a.

Robert.

b. c.

Mary. Ann.

d.

Dorothea.

Crossfield,

16, 1626,

and had

daughter of John

issue

i.

e.

:

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS. e.

William.

f.

Edward.

:t

3. Edward Shippen (the emigrant) (Deputy Governor of Pennsylvania and 1st. Mayor of born Yorkshire, England, March 5, 1639.

died

I

Phil.)

Philadelphia, Oct. 2, 1712. (1) Elizabeth Lybrand, 1671.

married

(2)

Howard

Rebecca

Richardson,

Sept.

4,

1689. (3)

Issue

1st.

a.

Joseph.

b.

Ann. Edward.

c.

Esther Wilcox James, 1706.

marriage

d.

Frances.

e.

Edward.

f.

William.

g.

Elizabeth,

h.

Mary.

i.

e.

Issue of 2nd. marriage a. Elizabeth. Issue of 3rd. marriage a.

John.

b.

William.

:

i.

i.

e.

:

e.

:

born

4. Joseph Shippen. Feb. Boston, 28, 1678.

died

Germantown,

married

(1)

Pa.,

July

28, 1741.

Abigail Gross, Aug.

(2) Rose

5,

1702.

Budd Me Williams Plumley, May

4,

1721.

Abigail Gross was the daughter of Thomas Gross and Elizabeth More, and granddaughter of Clement and Mary Gross, and great granddaughter of Isaac Gross. Issue of Abigail Gross, i. e. :

a.

William.

b.

Edward.

c.

Elizabeth.

THE NEW JERSEY 8HIPPEN8.

32 d.

William.

e.

Ann.

f.

Elizabeth.

g.

Joseph.

Dr. William Shippen, Sr.

5.

of Continental Congress) Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 1, 1712.

(Member

born died

Germantown, Pa., Nov. 4, 1801. Susanna Harrison, Sept. 19, 1735, and had

married issue

i.

a.

b. c.

e.

:

Joseph William. Susanna. William Jr. (Medical Director of Military Hospitals during the Rev.) John.

d.

Joseph William Shippen.

6.

(The

born

New

Jersey branch). Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 17, 1737.

Oxford Furnace, N. J., Sept. 13, 1795. married Martha Axford and had issue i. e. died

a.

John

b.

Abigail.

c.

Susan.

d.

Maria.

e.

Ann. William

f.

g.

:

Blair.

I.

Joseph (Confused with his father ried in Oxford Furnace, N. J.) 7.

he died unmar-

John Blair Shippen.

born

Oxford Furnace, N.

died

Hamburg, N.

J.,

J.,

1771.

1818.

DeCamp, 1808, daughter of Aaron and Ketura Clarke, granddaughter of Aaron DeDeCamp Camp, great granddaughter of John DeCamp and Mary Prael, 2nd great granddaughter of Lawrence DeCamp and married

Mary

Elsie DeMandeville.

Polly

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS.

33

They had issue i. e. Benjamine DeCamp. :

a.

b.

Lucretia.

c.

Samuel Carpenter. Benjamine DeCamp Shippen.

8.

born died

Caldwell, N. J. (Horseneck) July 20, 1815. Jersey City, N. J., Jan. 2, 1897.

Sarah Mead, June 1835, daughter of Adrian Bush and granddaughter of John and Maria Bush. They had issue i. e. a. Samuel Carpenter. married

Mead and

Elizabeth

:

b.

Ann

c.

Mary

d.

Lucretia.

e. f.

g.

Eliza.

Elizabeth.

Emma Clayton. Eveline Constance Taylor. Eliza Ann. Samuel Carpenter Shippen.

9.

married

(1)

Nancy Carter, daughter of Wm. Carter and Sarah Elizabeth Long and had issue. Married March 9, 1857. Elizabeth Long and had issue. Married March 9, 1857.

Mary E. Harrison Nancy Carter i. e.

(2)

Issue with

c.

Ida Augusta. Sarah Elizabeth. Carlton Arquet.

d.

Samuel

a.

b.

Frost, Aug. 17, 1887.

:

Clifford.

Ida Augusta Shippen.

10.

born Newark, N. J., March 15, 1861. Living in East Orange, N. J. married Louis Bangert, Oct. 20, 1880.

They had

issue

i.

a.

Leslie Louis.

b.

Raymond.

e.

:

THE NEW JEESEY SHIPPENS

34

Helen Elizabeth.

c.

d.

George Schuyler.

ANCESTORS OF DR. WILLIAM SHIPPEN,

SR.

John Shippen.

I.

born

Yorkshire, England, 1565.

died

married

Dorothy Bubwith.

issue.

William Shippen (Gentleman). born Village Monk Fryston, Yorkshire, England, 1600. died Stockport, England, 1681. married Mary Nnnnes, July 16, 1626.

II.

issue

William Shippen, Rev. born Methley, England, 1637.

a.

died

Methley, England, 1693.

married b.

Ann

born died

Shippen. Methley, England, Nov. 21, 1630.

Young.

married c.

? ?

Rev. Leybourne.

Dorathe.

born

Methley, England, Feb. 1681, 9th day.

died

Young.

Robert Shippen. born Methley, England,

May

died

Young.

d.

e.

Methley, England.

20, 1627.

Mary Shippen.

born

Methley, England, June 24, 1629.

died

married

William Chapman, 1663.

THE NEW JEESEY SHIPPENS. f.

Edward Shippen (emigrant

1st.

Mayor

8ft

of Philadel-

phia and Deputy Governor of the Province o Pennsylvania. ) (See next generation.) III.

Edward Shippen.

born

Methley, Yorkshire, England,

March

5,

1639.

Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 2, 1712. married (1) Elizabeth Lybrand, 1671.

died

Rebecca Howard Richardson, Sept. (3) Esther Wilcox James, 1706.

(2)

issue 1st. marriage, a.

i.

e.

Edward Shippen. Boston, Mass., Feb. 10, 1677.

died

Phila., Pa., Dec. 29, 1714.

married

Anna Francina Vanderspeyden.

Mary Shippen.

born

May

6,

died

Aug.

30, 1688.

c.

1689.

:

born

b.

4,

1681.

Elizabeth Shippen.

born

Boston, Mass., Aug. 21, 1676. Boston, Mass., Aug. 15, 1678.

died

William Shippen. born Boston, Mass., Oct.

d.

died e.

1675.

4,

Boston, Mass., 1676.

Edward Shippen.

born

Boston, Mass., Oct.

died

Boston, Mass., Nov.

Frances Shippen. born Boston, Mass., Feb.

2, 2,

1674.

1674.

f.

died g.

12, 1672.

Boston, Mass., April

9,

1673.

Ann

born died

Shippen. Boston, Mass., June 11, 1684. Phil., Pa., Dec. 6, 1712.

married

Thomas

Story, July 10, 1706.

/

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS.

86 h.

Joseph Shippen. (See next generation.)

IV.

Joseph Shippen. born Boston, Mass., Feb. died

July 28, 1741. (1) Abigail Gross, July 28, 1702. (2) Rose Budd MeWilliams Plumley,

Germantown,

married

28, 1678.

Pa.,

1721. issue with Abigail Gross,

a. Joseph Shippen. born Phil., Pa., Nov.

died

Germantown,

married

i.

e.

:

28, 1706.

July

Pa.,

10, 1793.

Mary Kearney.

Elizabeth Shippen.

b.

born

Phil., Pa., Sept. 28, 1714.

died

Phil., Pa., Dee. 3, 1714.

Ann

c.

Shippen.

born

Phil., Pa.,

died

Phil., Pa.,

married

Aug. June

5,

1710.

23, 1790.

Charles Willing, Jan. 21, 1731.

William Shippen. born Phil., Pa., Aug.

d.

died

31, 1708.

Phil., Pa., Dec. 29, 1716. .

e.

Elizabeth Shippen.

born

Phil., Pa.,

died

Phil., Pa.,

f.

April

June

8,

17, 1705.

1714.

Edward Shippen.

born died

Boston, Mass., July 9, 1703. Lancaster, Pa., Sept. 25, 1781.

married

(1)

Sarah Plumley, Sept.

20, 1725.

May

4,

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS. (2) g.

J7

Mary Gray Newland, Aug.

1747.

William Shippen.

(See next generation.)

DESCENDANTS OF

WILLIAM SHIPPEN,

DR.

Sr.

The New Jersey Shippens. Dr. William Shippen,

I.

(Member

Sr.

of

Continental

Congress.)

born

Philadelphia, Pa., Oct.

1,

1712.

Germantown, Pa., Nov. 4, 1801. married Susanna Harrison, Sept. 19, 1735. died

issue a.

:

Dr. William Shippen, Jr.

(Medical Director of Mili-

tary Hospitals.)

born

Phil., Pa., Oct. 21, 1736.

died

Germantown,

married b.

Pa.,

July

11, 1808.

Alice Lee, 1760.

Dr. John Shippen. Phil., Pa., Jan. 23, 1740.

born died

Baltimore, Md., Nov. 26, 1770. Not.

married

Susanna Shippen. born Phil., Pa., Oct. c.

died

23, 1743.

Germantown, Pa., Oct. 12, 1821. Rev. Samuel Blair, Sept. 24, 1769.

married d.

Joseph William Shippen

(Paymaster in Military

Hospitals). (See next generation.)

Joseph William Shippen. born Phil, Pa., Oct. 17, 1737. died Oxford Furnace, N. J., Sept. married Martha Axford.

II.

issue,

i.

e.

:

a. William I. Shippen, born Oxford Furnace, N.

died

married

Margaret

?

J.

13, 1795.

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS.

38 b.

Ann

born

Shippen.

Oxford Furnace, N.

J.

died

married

John McMurtrie, Sept.

Maria Shippen. born Oxford Furnace, N.

15, 1803.

c.

J.

died

married

Samuel

Blair, Oct. 5, 1803.

Joseph Shippen, (confused with his father. unmarried and not his father.) born Oxford Furnace, N. J. died Oxford Furnace, N. J., 1811. married Not. d.

e. Susan Shippen. born Oxford Furnace, N.

died

Blairstown, N.

married f.

J.

died

1784.

April 16, 1856.

Isaac Chrisman, Jan.

1,

1806.

Abigail Shippen.

born

Oxford Furnace, N.

died

Bartleyville, N.

married g.

J.,

He

J.,

1786.

J., Oct. 10, 1868. McTeir, July 4, 1807.

James

John Blair Shippen.

(See next generation.) III.

John Blair Shippen. Oxford Furnace, N.

born died

Hamburg, N.

married

Mary

issue, a.

i.

J.

(Polly)

e.

J.,

1771.

1818.

DeCamp,

1808.

:

Samuel Carpenter Shippen (Dropped the name Shippen and known as Carpenter due to a dispute with his brother.)

born died

Caldwell (Horseneck) N. J., 1808-9. City, N. Y., Nov. 1881.

New York

married

Emily Ayres.

THE NEW JEESEY SHIPPENS. Lucretia Shippen. Caldwell (Horseneck) N.

b.

born

J.,

Feb. 17, 1810.

Newark, N. J., April 3, 1899. married Josiah Courter, Aug. 29, 1829. died

c.

Benjamine DeCamp Shippen.

(See next generation.)

Benjamine DeCamp Shippen. born Caldwell (Horseneck) N.

IV.

died

Jersey City, N.

issue,

Eliza

Jan.

2,

J.,

July 20, 1815.

1897.

Sarah Mead, June, 1835.

married

a.

J.,

i.

Ann

e.

:

Shippen.

born

Newark, N. J., April 9, 1855. died Newark, N. J., Oct. 24, 1895. married (1) Smith Nafie, Nov. 16, 1872. (2)

Edward

Gibson.

Eveline Constance Taylor Shippen. Caldwell, N. J., July 20, 1845.

b.

born died

Jersey City, N. J., Feb. 23, 1916. (1) Charles Pierson, Feb. 5, 1861.

married

(2) c.

David Sheldon, June

28, 1872.

Emma

born

Clayton Shippen. Newark, N. J., Sept.

4,

1850.

died

married

William Henry Brown, Sept.

Lucretia Shippen. Caldwell, N. J., Feb. 14, 1841. died Newark, N. J., May 26, 1893. d.

born

married e.

Mary

Alvin H. Pool, Oct. Elizabeth Shippen.

born

Caldwell, N.

J.,

1848.

died

Caldwell, N.

J.,

1853.

2,

1859.

20, 1865.

39

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPEN8.

40 f.

Ann

born

Eliza Shippen. J., 1839.

Caldwell, N. Caldwell, N.

died

J.,

1846.

Samuel Carpenter Shippen.

g.

(See next generation.)

V.

Samuel Carpenter Shippen. born Caldwell, N. J., (Horseneck) Oct. Kearney, N. J., April 27, 1908. married (1) Nancy Carter, March

17, 1836.

died

1857,

9,

and had

issue.

(2)

Mary

E. Harrison Frost, Aug. 17, 1887,

and no issue with

issue.

Nancy

Carter,

i.

e.

:

Samuel Clifford Shippen. born Newark, N. J., July 3, 1878. a.

died

married

Bertha Woodruff Griffith, July 17, 1902. child Ida May Shippen, born Bloomfield, N.

(They had a J.,

April b.

7,

1903,

and died Bloomfield, N.

J.,

Feb.

4,

1904.)

Carlton Arquet Shippen. Newark, N. J., April 21, 1863.

born died

(Disappeared) (Reported died in Baltimore, Md.) married Not.

Sarah Elizabeth Shippen. born Newark, N. J., Aug. 27, 1859. c.

died

married

George William Angell, March

Ida Augusta Shippen. born Newark, N. J., March

31, 1883.

d.

15, 1861.

died

married

Louis Bangert, Oct. 20, 1880.

issue, a.

i. e.

Leslie Louis

1882,

d.

:

Bangert

b.

Newark, N.

there Oct. 11, 1882.

J.,

June

29,

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS. b.

Raymond Bangert d.

c.

b.

Newark, N.

J.,

41

Sept. 13, 1883,

there Oct. 27, 1883.

Helen Elizabeth Bangert,

Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan.

b.

13, 1897.

Dr. George Schuyler Bangert,

d.

b.

Newark, N.

J.,

Jan.

27, 1885.

In addition to the above the following descendents

NOTE.

Samuel Carpenter Shippen who dropped the name of Shippen and was known as Samuel Carpenter i. e. issue of the

first

:

;

a.

Mary

born died

married b.

Elizabeth Carpenter,

New York, N. Y., 1836. New York, N. Y., 1907. Theodore Haubner.

Emily Theresa Carpenter, New York City, April 29,

born

1850.

Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 1, 1904. married Stephen Patrick Stanford, Feb. 14, 1869. died

c.

Charles Carpenter,

born died

New York New York

married

City.

City.

Jennie

?

(no issue.)

d. Susan Ann Carpenter, born New York City, 1854.

died

married

(2)

Lawrence Morrissey, Sept. 24, 1871. Eugene Smith, Feb. 5, 1885.

(3)

Captain Haubenestle.

(1)

e. Ithamar Carpenter, born New York City,

died

New York

married

City.

(1)

Mary

(2)

Lucy

? ?

No issue. Had issue

Carpenter.

i.

e

:

Harry Ithamar

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS.

42

SKETCHES OF NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS. 1.

JOSEPH WILLIAM SHIPPEN.

All accounts agree that he settled on his father's estate at Oxford Furnace, N. J., and that he was manager of the estate for 30 years.

An

that he died unmarried.

error is made, however, in stating This error was due to the fact that

he had a son, Joseph Shippen, who died unmarried in Oxford Furnace, N. J. ( See Will of Dr. William Shippen Sr. in which the names of his grandchildren, i. e. children of Joseph William Shippen, are all named including this Joseph Shippen son of Joseph William Shippen) also (See Secretary of State Record, Trenton, N. J. Letters of Administration for Joseph Shippen, Oct. 14, 1814, and Inventory filed Feb. 13, 1813, and an account and order, of distribution entered during the May term, 1814, also see Record, Surrogate's Office, Newton, N. J. Sussex County). The administration of the estate of Joseph Shippen by his brother William I. Shippen, in which his property

is

divided between his brothers and sisters and their

names are given letters that

ace, N. J.

as below.

The statement

is

made

in these

Joseph Shippen died unmarried in Oxford FurnIn addition to these we have in Trenton, N. J.,

Letters of Guardianship of

Abby Shippen, daughter of Joseph William Shippen, Book 40, page 514, Wd. 1803 and 992 S. in Index to Wills, Secretary of State's Office, Jan. 16, 1804, also a series of Deeds recorded in Sussex County, Newton, N. J., in which repeated mention is made of the children of Joseph William Shippen, who was the son of Dr. William Book K. 234, 1804, Newton, N. J., menShippen Sr., i. e. tions William Shippen as the eldest son of Joseph William Shippen, also Book O, page 452, mentions the sons of Joseph William Shippen i. e. William, John, and Joseph Shippen, also Book R, 489 Book T, 366 Book K, Book 0, 452 234 489 596 R 130 326 R, P, X, X, (2) 106 205. last This mentions all children Deed of the of Joseph T, William Shippen, i. e. four daughters, to wit Maria, Ann, Susan, Abby, and three sons, to wit William, John, and Joseph Shippen.

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS.

43

Joseph William Shippen married his housekeeper, MarHe died in Oxford Furnace, N. J., Sunday, Sept. 13, 1795, aged 58 years. After his death his children tha Axford.

separated and married. at

Joseph William Shippen occupied the old Shippen Manor Oxford Furnace, N. J., (picture in possession of the writer)

for

years with his family until his death in 1795. Every friends would visit him from New York and Philadel-

many

fall,

and a grand hunt with the hounds would take place. All during the winter the old stone house would echo with the sounds of revelry as the guests warmed under the stimulating phia,

effect of the well filled

wine

cellars.

The wife

of Joseph William Shippen aristocratic as the times would warrant.

was as thoroughly While taking her

morning walk she would be accompanied by a colored boy carried her train on his shoulder. William Joseph Shippen was a paymaster in the Bethlehem Army Hospital during the Revolutionary War. At this same Hospital his brother, Dr. William Shippen, Jr., served as member of staff and Medical Director of the U. S. Army,

named James Burr, who

1779.

He was Justice of the Peace in Sussex Co., N. J., He was also a merchant, being a dealer in limes, indigo,

1775. etc.

Joseph William Shippen died intestate, and his brother William Shippen acted as administrator of the estate (Index of Wills, Trenton, N.

J.,

36-134).

Joseph William Shippen had issue with his wife Martha Axford. %

2.

JOHN BLAIR SHIPPBN.

Son of Joseph William Shippen and Martha Axford, was born on the old ancestral estate in the Shippen Manor, Oxford Furnace, N. J., 1771. (He is mentioned as the son of Joseph William Shippen, and the grandson of Dr. William Shippen, in Deeds recorded at Newton, N. J., i. e. Book T, 363 T, 366 in also the Will of Dr. William etc., Shippen, filed at Philadelphia, Book Y, page 614, dated Sept. 1, 1783, in the last Codicil.)

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS.

44

He

later as a

young man

settled

in Caldwell,

N.

J.

Shippen Homestead on the corner of Brookside and Westville Avenues. Here he met and (Horseneck) and

built the old

married Mary (Poly) DeCamp, of Roseland, N. J. (Centerville) 1809, daughter of Aaron DeCamp and Ketura Clark. John B. Shippen was a farmer in Caldwell, N. J., and when a young man taught school on Long Island. He was well educated for his time and spoke French as well as English. He was dark and slender and was thought by many to

He

be of foreign birth.

later learned the trade of tan currier,

becoming an authority on leather. He patented a shoemaker's awl which is still used to this day. He frequently spoke of his wealthy and distinguished family connections in Philadelphia, referred to the fact that they had been Quakers, and complained that he had been cheated out of property which should by right have descended to him. His death at the age of 47 years occurred while on a business trip, in Hamburg, Sussex County, New Jersey, in 1818. The cause was heart failure. His body was never brought home for burial. The following incident

is

told

by

his grandchild, Mrs. Elizabeth Foster.

ter his death a lady

Af-

from the South and her daughter, no

doubt relatives of his father's brother, Dr. "William Shippen, Jr., of Virginia, and his wife, Alice Lee, visited his in Caldwell, N. J. The facts that most impressed the children, and which they now remember, are that the lady

widow

was very distinguished in manner and appearance, and that the daughter could not button her own shoes or brush her own hair.

He was probably a Presbyterian as he attended the First Presbyterian Church of Caldwell, N. J., and it is believed that he was married by Eev. Stephen Grover of that church. After his early and sudden death the children were brought up by their grandfather Aaron DeCamp, in Roseland, N. J., until his death in 1827, and then Mary Shippen supported herself by nursing. One of her cases was her attendance on the mother of Grover Cleveland on the occasion of his birth. For a number of years Grover Cleveland sent annually a letter to

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS.

45

her daughter, Lucretia Shippen, commenting on the fact on his birthday.

John Blair Shippen and had

his wife,

Mary

Polly

DeCamp,

issue.

3.

BENJAMIN DECAMP SHIPPEN,

Son of John Blair Shippen and Mary Polly DeCamp Shippen was born in the old Shippen Homestead, corner of "Westville and Brookside Avenues, Caldwell, N. J. (Horseneck) July 20, 1815. He was at the age of thirty years about 5 feet 9 inches in height, broad shouldered, stout and muscular. He possessed a happy temperament and a fine character. He wore long whiskers, and had a military carriage. He had a good education and was very religious. He followed closely the rules of the Methodist Church and frequently attended the revival services. He was a good eater. He was

among

the

first to

serve on the Newark, N.

being a night watchman and

official

lamp

J.,

Police Force, using the

lighter,

uniform of that day consisting chiefly of a large cape. He was also a farmer in Caldwell, N. J., and for some years a dock and bridge builder; and for many years a shoemaker, once having a shoe factory in partnership with Merritt in His work was of an excellent character. He Caldwell, N. J. was also a teamster. He was by nature of retiring tastes and led a simple life. He had one of the marked characteristics of the Shippen family, i. e., a willingness to do any thing to help others, but a will which could not be overcome by opposition.

He

spent much of his later years reading his Bible, to the "Sons of Temperance". He was so hon-

and belonged

he believed everybody else equally so and although he amassed considerable wealth through his efficient methods he lost all because of his belief in universal honesty. est that

He married Sarah Mead of Dutchlane, Franklin, N. J., daughter of Adrian Mead and Elizabeth Bush, on June, 1835. Rev. Wm. Cleveland of the First Presbyterian Church, Caldwell, N. J.,

He

performed the

services.

died at Jersey City, N.

J.,

Jan.

2,

1897, aged 82 years,

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS.

46 after a

week 's

illness of valvular disease of the heart.

buried in Arlington Cemetery, Arlington, N. J. He lived to see the Eighth Ave., Newark, N.

J.,

He was

Methodist

Episcopal Church well established, he having been one of charter members.

Benjamin DeCamp Shippen and had

his wife

its

Sarah Mead,

issue.

4.

SAMUEL CARPENTER SHIPPEN,

Son of Benjamin DeCamp Shippen and Sarah Mead, was born in Caldwell, N. J. (Horseneck), Oct. 17, 1836, on Central Avenue, in the Shippen Courter Homestead.

home

later

known

as the

He was

about 5 feet 4 inches in height, gray eyes, brown very obliging temperament, well built, but not as broad shouldered as his father, a most pleasing gentleman, hair, of a

like other members of his family could and would not be forced against his will, which was most obstinate. As a boy in Caldwell, N. J., he played with Grover Cleveland. He was a

but

steam engineer having been Engineer for the Newark, N. J. Fire Department for many years. He was also a Volunteer Fireman and a member of the Exempt Firemen's Association and was commissioned by the Newark N. J. Fire Department

Department of New Orleans, La. He received a jeweled badge for 25 years service in the N. F. D. He was for a number of years Engineer of Engine No. 5 (Hiawatha). He enlisted for the Civil War at the age of 26 years. to inspect the Fire

His war record reads "Samuel Carpenter Shippen, Private 13th N. J. Volunteers, Co. F. enlisted Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered in Aug. 25, 1862, for 3 years. Discharged at Ward U. S. Army Hospital, Newark, N. J., March 13, 1863, due to wounds received in action at Antietam, Md. ' '

He

attended school in the State Street School, Newark, and was a member of the Eighth Ave. M. E. Church, Newark, N. J. He was an Odd Fellow. On March 9, 1857, he was married by the Rev. Joseph Wilson, in the parsonage of the Reformed Dutch Church of Fairfield, N. J., to Nancy CarN.

J.,

ter of Franklin, N. J.

They both joined the Central Metho-

THE NEW JERSEY SHIPPENS.

47

dist Church, Newark, N. J., Sept. 24, 1876. Nancy Carter Shippen, died Sunday, Feb. 5, 1882, and he married a second Wednesday, Aug. 17, 1887, Mrs. Mary B. (Harritime, i. e.

son) Frost, by Rev. Daniel Halleron. She died 1911, and he died at the age of 72 years at 5 o'clock A. M., April 27, 1908, of myocarditis and Brights complicated with cerebral apoplexy at the Soldiers' Home, Kearney, N. J. He was buried in the Soldiers' Circle, Arlington Cemetery, Arlington, N. J. Samuel Carpenter Shippen and his wife Nancy Carter

had

issue.

He had no 5.

issue

from

his second marriage.

IDA AUGUSTA SHIPPEN,

Daughter of Samuel Carpenter Shippen and Nancy Carwas born at the corner of Green Street and N. J. Railroad Avenue, Newark, N. J., March 15, 1861. She was brought up in Newark, and was educated at the Lawrence Street and the Newark High Schools. She was married at the age of 19 years on Oct. 20, 1880, at her parents' home, 92 Ferry St., Newark, N. J., by the Rev. R. B. Collins, of the Union St. Baptist Church of Newark, N. J., to Louis Bangert, Ph. G. ter

6.

GEORGE SCHUYLER BANGERT, Ph.

G.,

M.

D.,

Author of these sketches, son of Louis Bangert, Ph. G. and Ida Augusta Shippen, was born at Newark, N. J., in the Budd Homestead, 88 Congress Street, near Ferry Street, and opposite Christ Episcopal Church on Jan. 27, 1885. He is a practising physician and a member of the staffs of a number of Essex County hospitals. He has a sister, Helen Elizabeth, born at Brooklyn, New York, on January 13, 1897. East Orange, N. Feb. 22, 1916.

J.

Book Notice.

Gouldtown, a very remarkable settlement of ancient date. Studies of some sturdy examples of the simple life, together with sketches of early colonial history of Cumberland County and southern New Jersey and some early genealogical records, by William Steward, A. M., and Eev. Theophilus G. Steward, D. D. Press of J. B. Lippincott Co., Phil., 1913. 8vo., cloth, 237 p. Under this title is published the annals of Gouldtown, Cumberland county, ftew Jersey, a copy of which has recently been received at the Historical Society. The authors are William Steward, A. M., and Rev. Theophilus G. Steward, D. D., Chaplain U. S. Army, Retired. Both are descendants of the Goulds of Gouldtown. The remarkable fact about Gouldtown's history is, that many of the inhabitants are believed to be the descendants of John Fen wick, one of the New Jersey Proprietors, through Elizabeth Adams, his granddaughter, and one Gould, whose first name is not known. In John Fenwick 's will is found a provision to give her five hundred acres of land if she would leave Gould, who was colored. The Goulds were mulattoes, and they intermarried with Finns and other whites and as the time passed they progressed socially and intellectually, many of the descendants attaining to high positions in business, the ministry, law and educational circles. The history is very copiously illustrated with portraits of many Goulds

and other persons of related families. They make human documents of great interest. Other illustrations are reproductions of dwelling houses and street scenes in Gouldtown. The chief families from a numerical viewpoint related to the Goulds seem to be those of Pierce, Cuff, Murray, Sheppard and The simple life lived by these people produced Steward. longevity. Families of six to ten children, we are told, lived to reach mature years and in many cases all reached old age. Altogether this history of a quaint Jersey town is indeed re-

markable, bearing out the claim made for it by its authors. One of the descendants of the family is Benjamin F. Lee, President of Wilberforce University, Ohio.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

New VOL

Jersey Historical Society*

NEW

I

SERI ES

No

2

1916

The Old Barracks

at Trenton.

Address of Edwin Robert Walker, at a Meeting of the

Woman 's

Branch of the

New

Jersey Historical

Society, February 24th, 1916.

For a time preceding the year 1757, the war cry of the France was heard upon the then frontier of our country; in parts then remote but now accessible in a few hours by our modern methods of transportation. Born of their fears, the desire of the colonists of New Jerallies of

sey that suitable protection be afforded against the expected incursions of the savage Indians found expression in petitions to the Legislature for the erection of Barracks, in which to

house the troops of Great Britain, and of the colony, mobilized for defensive purposes, and at the same time to ease the bur-

den of supporting soldiers quartered in the houses of the

in-

habitants.

In compliance with the prayers of the petitions, the Legismade an appropriation for the erection of these Bar-

lature

racks at Trenton, among others, and they stand to-day the only one of five defensive fortresses built in New Jersey in

17571758. Prior to the war of the Revolution, this building was occupied not only by the colonial militia, but also by English

50

THE OLD BAERACKS AT TRENTON.

.

and Scotch

troops, the peculiar dress of the Highlanders, we much interest among the people of this

are told, creating town.

Throughout the period of colonial development the English, Dutch, Irish, Scotch and other settlers became evolved homogeneous family, and, raising a high standard of libgovernment for themselves, they naturally chafed under the yoke with which England oppressed them, and it came to pass that the two forces of monarchial and republican government could not peaceably occupy this land together; and the into a eral

irrepressible conflict for absolute independence inevitably followed. With what success history is replete, and to that suc-

we owe

the liberty which we enjoy to-day. In a humble way, it may be said that these Barracks at Trenton bear something of the same relation to this eity as does the Tower of London 'to the historic city of that name. So great was the fear of invasion and massacre by the French and Indians that the building was erected in the space of ten cess

months, being completed in March, 1758. To build the Tower of London levies were made upon the various counties of England by William of Normandy. In order to erect the Barracks at Trenton and its kindred structures within the short space of time to which I have alluded, draft

must have been made upon the various communities of the colony of New Jersey for artisans and builders.

We

cannot boast that this stronghold has never fallen

hands of a foreign foe, as England proudly boasts of her Tower of London; but we may with pride allude to the fact that within these walls no such frightful scenes of blood and carnage have been enacted as in that gloomy fortress on the banks of the River Thames. Lord Macaulay in his history of England waxes patheticinto the

ally eloquent in his description of the little cemetery within

the walls of the Tower, and says "In truth there is no sadder spot on the earth than that little cemetery. Death is there associated, not, as in West:

minster Abbey and St. Paul's, with genius and with virtue, with public veneration and imperishable renown; not, as in

THE OLD BARRACKS AT TRENTON.

51

the humblest churches and churchyards, with everything that is most endearing in social and domestic charities; but with

whatever is darkest in human nature and in human destiny, with the savage triumph of implacable enemies, with the inconstancy, the ingratitude, the cowardice of friends, with all ' '

the miseries of fallen greatness and of blighted fame. With us, quite differently, these bloodless Barracks are associated with hallowed memories of the Revolution; the war which resulted in the independence of the United States.

of this stronghold on the morning of Dewitnessed the assault upon the mercenary cember 26, 1776, Hessian soldiers in the service of England, which resulted in

The grim walls

such a signal victory for the cause of Liberty, without the loss of a single patriot soldier, while the loss in dead and wounded on the side of the enemy was about one hundred. They saw the columns of Washington and Sullivan march

upon the town in the gray dawn of that memorable day they saw the great commander in front on the Pennington road come up to a man who was chopping wood and heard him inquire which way was the Hessian picket; they heard the man's surly reply "I don't know;" they heard Capt. For;

:

rest, of the Artillery say to the

man

:

"You may

tell

for that

General Washington;" they saw the aspect of the man change in an instant they saw him raise his hands to heaven is

;

and say

"God

and prosper you The picket is in and the sentry stands near that tree." They saw the impetuous assault and heard the cannons reverberate through the streets and lanes; they saw the surrender, and later they housed and protected the army of their country in the place of the foreign foe which it had dis:

bless

!

that house

lodged.

The people of Trenton on that morning witnessed the which has been truly said to have been the turning

battle

point of the Revolutionary struggle. Napoleon, after the battle of Austerlitz, addressed his soldiers and said that no matter where they went or what they

did thereafter, they had only to say that they fought at Auspeople to exclaim that they were brave men.

terlitz for the

THE OLD BARRACKS AT TRENTON.

52

would rank participation in the affair at Trenton as of more enduring fame than to have fought with Napoleon in any of

I

his battles.

Our cause was

so just, our resources so few, the odds

against us so tremendous, and the chances of success so slender, with nearly, if not quite, half the people at home disaffected

and many of them united with our foreign foes against us, that ne who took up arms against that sea of trouble was brave beyond the power of words to tell. The whole story of the Revolutionary War was succinctly told a few years ago in the speech of a superlative orator, now no more, who said "We follow the patriot's bleeding feet from Lexington to Valley Forge and from that midnight of despair to Yorktown 's cloudless day. In vain would have been all the sacrifice, all the hardship, all the struggle, all the war that devastated this fair land and saturated its sod with the blood of heroes and of martyrs, had :

' '

not our statesmen, the leaders of thought, the molders of government, written into constitutions and statutes with their pens, what our soldiers upon the land and our sailors upon the sea had wrested from despotism by their valor and the prowess of their arms.

As long

as the constitution of the United States shall en-

dure, that long will liberty, civil and religious, the birthright and heritage of a free people, be vouchsafed to us and our

descendants.

Speaking of constitutions it may be that you all do not that New Jersey was a free and independent state two days before the birth of the United States, which resulted from the adoption of the Declaration of Independence by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia and to those of you who are unacquainted with the fact, let me say that it is the pride of New Jersey that on July 2, 1776, the legislature of this state, then called the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, assembled in Burlington, adopted the constitution under which the commonwealth was governed until that instrument was amended, in 1844, and modeled after that of the United States

know

;

adopted in the year 1789.

THE OLD BAEEACKS AT TEENTON. In that notable state paper, the first constitution of Jersey, the representatives of our people said

53

New

:

"Whereas all the constitutional authority ever possessed the kings of Great Britain over these colonies, or their by other dominions, was, by compact, derived from the people, and held of them for the common interest of the whole society; allegiance

and protection

are, in the

nature of things,

reciprocal ties, each equally depending upon the other, and liable to be dissolved by the other's being refused or with-

drawn. And whereas, George the third, King of Great Britain, has refused protection to the good people of these colonies and, by assenting to sundry acts of the British parliament, attempted to subject them to the absolute dominion of that body and has also made war upon them in the most cruel and unnatural manner, for no other cause than asserting their just rights all civil authority under him is necessarily at an end, and a dissolution of government in each colony has consequently taken place. ;

;

;

"And whereas,

in the present deplorable situation of these fury of a cruel and relentless enemy,

colonies, exposed to the

some form of government is absolutely necessary, not only for the preservation of good order, but also the more effectually to unite the people, and enable them to exert their whole force in their own necessary defense and as the honorable, the continental congress, the supreme council of the American colonies, has advised such of the colonies as have not yet gone ;

into the measure, to adopt for themselves respectively such government, as shall best conduce to their own happiness and safety, and the well-being of America in general; we, the representatives of the colony of New Jersey, having been elected by all the counties in the freest manner, and in congress as-

sembled, have, after mature deliberation, agreed upon a set of charter rights, and the form of a constitution in manner following, that is to say :" Then follows that superstructure of our free government in New Jersey, which, in its essential features, is embedded in

the

amended

constitution under which Jerseymen live

flourish to this day.

and

THE OLD BARRACKS AT TRENTON.

54

In the year 1793 these Barracks were partially dismanFront Street was then, by proper governmental action, extended through the north end of the main building, leaving the north wing running east, including the officers' quarters, on the new street. They were turned into four separate dwellings, the officers' quarters into one by itself. The original external walls of these detached buildings were never disturbed, although they were partially disguised by additions tled.

and in other ways. The remaining portion of the main building and the south wing running east have never been seriously disturbed. This portion, so long conspicuous on the south of Front side Street, now vacated and obliterated, was sold after the Revolutionary war, and was used prinby the state cipally for apartments until 1855, when it was purchased by the Widows' a*nd Single Women's Home Society, and used in the work of philanthropy until 1902, when that institution moved elsewhere and the Society offered the Barracks property for sale. To prevent the ancient structure falling into the hands of operators who would doubtless have sunk its historic walls into the ground to make foundations for other buildings, the women of Trenton and elsewhere throughout the state resolved that those gray walls should not pass into commercial hands and become obliterated, but should be preserved in their historic originality.

For their having thus rescued them from ultimate demoand spoliation, those women are entitled to enduring praise. That work or rescue made possible the splendid work lition

of restoration of the State of

now

almost entirely finished by the generosity

New

Jersey. of the Bunker Hill

The project

and

monument,

I

am

told,

completion finally resulted from the efforts of of New England. the women patriotic The women of the Old Barracks Association and the

lagged for years

its

of the New Jersey Historical Society are of their granddames of the Revolution. descendants worthy It is not inappropriate for me to pay some tribute to the

Woman's Branch

women

of that period.

Comparatively

little

has been written about the heroism

THE OLD BARRACKS AT TRENTON.

55

and self-sacrifice of the women of 1776. History does not do them justice. It does not show us the important part borne by women in laying the foundation upon which stands the maour government. Jersey Gazette of October 11, 1780, we find this "No mean merit will accrue to him who shall justly Shall not their generous celebrate the virtues of our ladies contributions to relieve the wants of the defenders of our jestic fabric of

New

In the :

!

country supply a column to emulate the stripped of their jewels them ?"

when

Roman women

the public necessity

The women of the Revolution

demanded

visited the hospitals daily

;

sought the dungeons of the provost marshal and the crowded holds of prison ships carried provisions to the captives, their ;

;

only means of recompense being the blessings of those

were ready

who

to perish;

grain, gathered it, made bread and carried it army, or to prisons, accompanying the supply with exhortations to the men never to abandon the cause of their

They raised

to the

country.

The burial of those

slain in battle often devolved

upon

them; and sometimes enemies would not have received sepulture without the service of their hands.

Many

of the

young women of the day went so far as not any suitors who had not obeyed the

to receive the addresses of call to

arms.

By

the zealous exertions and willing sacrifices of those

women

not only was the pressure of want removed, but the sympathy and favor of the fair daughters of America, says one of the journals, "operated like a charm on the soldier's heart,

gave vigor to exertion, confidence to his hopes of success,

and the certainty of ultimate victory and peace." General Washington, in a letter of acknowledgment to a committee of ladies, said

:

its sufferings,

"The army ought not to regret its sacrifices or when they meet with so flattering a reward as is

the sympathy of your sex

;

nor can

it

fear that

its interest will

be neglected, when espoused by advocates as powerful as they are amiable."

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS AT NORWOOD.

56

Neither the alarms of war, nor the roar of

woman

strife,

could

encouragement or in prayThe horrors of battle or massacre could not drive her

silence the voice of er.

lifted in

from the post of duty.

As

the Revolutionary struggle recedes into the dim vista

it is regarded with increasing interest and greater veneration by those who enjoy its results. This truth is abundantly evidenced by the numerous patriotic societies

of the past,

which have been formed by and among the descendants of the heroic hosts that shared the disasters

and

successes of that

sacred war. If in the calm that succeeded the storm

if

during the

the supporters and deperiod that followed the struggle fenders of our country, weary of the conflict, turned their hearts and minds to other things and permitted the ravages of

many an object of historic interest, we, their descendants, atone for their sins of omission, and, fired with an unalterable zeal, are resolved, that every remaining relic

time to obliterate

shall be preserved

a sacred altar

!

at

whose shrine we

may

worship.

In this

spirit the Old Barracks at Trenton are being generously restored by the State of New Jersey that they may be a link connecting preserved for all time and for all people,

our warlike past with our peaceful present.

Tombstone

Inscriptions.

GRAVEYARD ON BARNEY FERDON FARM, NORWOOD,

NEW JERSEY (BERGEN

1.

27117. 2. 3.

4.

27

00.)

Copied, Nov. 1909. wife of Nicholas Thompson d. 29 Susan,

May

Mary Thompson d. 30 Nov. 1831 ae. 45 yrs. Benjamin Charlston d. 16 Mch. 1860 ae. 61 yrs. Phebe Charlston b. 30 Apr. 1834, d. 27 May 1852

1831

ae.

18

d.

513.

James Charlston d. 14 Feb. 1832 ae. John Ernest d. 12 Nov. 1841 in 71 yr. About a dozen rough stones as markers. The majority, if not all, of the above, were colored

5. 6.

people.

ae.

y.

Midwinter Meeting of the Woman's Branch. BY

MRS.

MARY

D. OGDEN.

The inauguration a few years ago by the Woman's Branch of the New Jersey Historical Society of a mid-winter meeting to be held in the southern part of the state was an important advance in the development of woman's work for the Society. The idea originated with the President, Miss Mary McKeen, and it has been a pleasure and a satisfaction

who

are active in the organization to see the growth and membership in the southern part of the state, largely due to these meetings. Our state is so rich in history that we can hardly go to any locality without finding someto all

in interest

thing of absorbing interest.

The meeting

in Trenton on

February 24th

last

was no

exception to this rule. Members arriving by train were met and were placed in automobiles by Mrs. Charles Ellis Hayes

and a committee of

ladies.

From

the Pennsylvania station

the guests were taken through Clinton to Perry street, past the Swamp Angel at the corner.

To Montgomery

street, to State street,

passing the Quaker

meeting house, at the corner of Hanover, in soldiers were quartered it was built in 1739.

which Hessian

;

To Broad

passing the First Presbyterian church on the right, where Colonel Ball and twenty-four Hessian soldiers are said to have been buried. street,

To Ferry street, passing (1) Taylor's Opera House, in the rear of which stood the apple orchard where Von Knyphausen's regiment surrendered; (2) the Assanpink block, the location of the only bridge over the Assanpink creek in 1776 (3) the German Lutheran church, on the southwest side, ;

where the Douglas house stood in which General "Washington

58

MIDWINTER MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S BRANCH.

held a council of war on the night of January

march

2,

1777, prior

Mercer Court House on the tavern on the right, which stood there in right; (5) Eagle in of what appears to be the view 1776; (6) Roebling's mill, end of the street. To Fair street, the Trenton ferry, just below the river bridge, where a part of Washington's army crossed to Pennsylvania on December 7, 1776. To Bridge street, to South "Warren street, to State street, passing (1) the Trenton bank on the right, where stood the jail from the steps of which the Declaration of Independence was read; (2) the Mechanics Bank on the corner, where the tavern stood in which the Continental Congress held several

to his

to Princeton;

(4)

meetings.

To Willow

street, to

West Hanover

street, the route of Sullivan's

army

street, to

Prospect

to the battle of Trenton,

December 26, 1776. To West State

street, to Parkside avenue, passing at Colonial avenue the Hermitage on the left where General Sullivan attacked the Yager picket post.

Through the park, to Hillcrest avenue, to Scotch road, passing the Soldiers and Sailors monument on the left. To Pennington road, the Odd Fellows' Home at the junction, where Generals Washington and Greene attacked '

the Hessian picket post.

To Princeton avenue, at the corner

to Sandford street, the high ground where General Washington observed and from

which he directed the battle. To Brunswick avenue, the Fox Chase tavern location on the right, a little below and nearly opposite Montgomery street.

To Broad street, passing the Trenton Battle Monument, near which, on Warren street, Captain Hamilton opened his battery, and Broad street, where Captain Forrest opened on the morning of December 26, 1776. To Perry street, to Montgomery street, to Academy street, to Broad street, passing (1) the Public Library on the right (2) the northeast corner of Academy and Broad streets, his battery

;

MIDWINTER MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S BRANCH.

59

where the Methodist church stood into which Colonel Rail was carried after being wounded (3) Isaac Yard's house on Broad street, in front of which Colonel Rail was shot. To Perry street, to Warren street, to West Front street, passing (1) Bishop McFaul's residence, on Warren street, opposite Perry street, where stood the house of Stacy Potts, in which Colonel Rail had his headquarters and where he died, December 27, 1776; (2) the English or St. Michael's church on the left where the Hessian troops were quartered before the battle; (3) the northwest corner of Warren and State streets, where stood the house of Abraham Hunt, in which Colonel Rail drank and played cards while Washington was crossing the river at McConkey's ferry. To West Front street, through which General Sullivan's brigade passed to the bridge on South Broad street during ;

the battle.

To the Old Barracks, with the State House in view. Mary McKeen, Justice Francis J. Swayze, Mrs.

Miss

William S. Stryker, Mrs. J. Welling Titus, Mrs. Edwin Robert Walker, Mrs. Elmer Ewing Green, Mrs. Charles W. Parker and others received the guests. After luncheon Mrs. Stryker gave the address of welcome, which was responded to by Miss McKeen, President of the Woman's Branch. Chancellor Edwin Robert Walker read an interesting paper on the Old Barracks, giving its history and an account of its purchase and rehabilitation. An able address on the Battle of Trenton was delivered by General Thomas S. Chambers. During the afternoon Miss Jeanette Miller Wells sang many quaint old songs and Miss Messerschmidt played charmingly on the harp. Justice Swayze closed the programme with an address of farewell.

The Beginnings

of the Morris

& Essex

Railroad,

Light is shed upon tke early history of the Morris & Essex Railroad by documentary material, both printed and in manuscript, long preserved by descendants of Colonel William Brittin, one of the early surveyors of the road, and more recently possessed by the late Fred A. Bardon of Madison. The documents include a pamphlet entitled "Morris & Essex Rail-Road: Its Prospects, Expenses, &c. By the " a Directors, Sep 't. 10, 1835 manuscript dated January 20, articles of 1836, containing agreement between the company ;

and Major Ephraim Beach of Newark and Abraham Brittin, contractors, and a manuscript letter containing the names of stockholders of the road at an election held in June, 1849. Accompanying the pamphlet is a map drawn under the direction of Ephraim Beach, who also was one of the civil engineers employed

by

the road.

Probably the pamphlet is the first report ever printed by & Essex Railroad Company. Its charter had been obtained from the Legislature January 29, 1835, and by March 23, following, nine directors had been elected. The manuscript agreement shows that just nine days before a order of the Morris

year had elapsed, after the granting of the charter, a contract to build the road was signed.

The pamphlet

sets forth the "prospects, expenses, &c." Essex Railroad. It reads quite as if a few neighbors had gotten together on some matter pertaining to

of the Morris

&

The details in the report as to the peoproducts and topography of the region to be traversed

the general welfare. ple,

make

excellent historical material.

BEGINNINGS OF THE MOERIS & ESSEX BAILEOAD.

61

The directors in their statement ask and answer two The first is " Is it practicable to construct a Rail Road from Morristown, to some point or points in Essex questions

:

:

county, contiguous to the tide waters near the harbor of New York, in such manner as greatly to facilitate the intercourse Can The second reads between the country and the city ? such a road be constructed at such expense, as that the ' '

' '

:

transportation of passengers, the production of the country, and merchandise, may offer a fair and reasonable remunera-

who may embark in it?" To answer to the first question, two engineers had been engaged by the company, Benjamin "Wright of New York and Ephraim Beach. Judge "Wright, it is stated, "was one of the most experienced and able engineers in the United States," and he chose Major Beach, with whom he had long

tion to those

been connected in professional business, as his assistant. During Wright, in a letter, pays his assistant this tribute a personal acquaintance and association with Mr. Beach for 15 or 16 years, on canals and railroads, I have had every op' '

:

portunity to test his judgment and

skill in

locating public

works and estimating their cost, and I should place as much confidence in his judgment in the location and fairness in estimating the cost, as any Engineer of my acquaintance." The engineers in investigating the practicability of buildIt railroad made Morristown their starting point. the ing was found that "a good road of easy elevation, either for horse or steam power, can be constructed, and in readiness for the cars, at an average expense of about $9,000 per mile." This average estimate included the building of the necessary bridge over the Passaic River below Chatham at a cost of $20,000.

Between Millville (now Millburn) and Newark there were two proposed routes, one by way of South Orange and Orange, as now existent, and the other by way of Vauxhall and the country lying between the present Irvington and Union, then known by the names of Camptown and Connecticut Farms. This southern route, had it been adopted, would have brought the railroad to the junction of the

62

BEGINNINGS OF THE MOKRIS & ESSEX RAILROAD.

present Avon and Elizabeth avenues, and through the present Clinton avenue to Broad, and up to the Four Corners in Newark. All this is clearly shown on the map of Engineer

By either route the distance was about twenty-three "if extended through Newark to the Passaic River" but miles, about twenty-four miles. Major Beach estimated the cost of the whole road, "with a single track and turnout to each mile," at $217,345.73 by Beach.

the "Southern route," and at $219,193.54 by the "Orange Doubtless the Orange route was adopted because of the greater population, the other route lying through a thinly

route."

populated farming region. Except at Short Hills, where the grade reached seventy feet to a mile, there were no grades by either route, that exceeded sixty feet. It was stated, the assumption being that the Orange route would be chosen, that "the citizens of the north end of Newark

"besides subscribing $100,000 to the capital stock, have given a free passage to the road, through a beautiful avenue of eighty feet in width to Broad street, and thence through the town to the Rail Road bridge over the Passaic River." This

" beautiful avenue" is the present Railroad avenue, and the road when built ran down Broad and through Center street to the Center street bridge of the Pennsylvania Railroad, then as the New Jersey Railroad and Transportation Com-

known

pany. This was the only railroad bridge at the time over the Passaic at Newark.

Beach's map shows an alternate connection between the Orange route and the New Jersey Railroad, possibly meant as an additional spur to be used as a more direct route for trains intended to go southward on the New Jersey Railroad. This branch was to leave the Morris and Essex near the present Grove Street Station and run along the old Orange Road, now Warren street, to Market street, taking generally the route of the present Bank and Warren or Orange electric cars. The second question, as to whether the road would be profitable, involved expenditures for building, equipment and maintenance, as compared to receipts from freight and passengers. Taking the round sum of $219,000 as the cost of

BEGINNINGS OF THE MORRIS & ESSEX RAILROAD.

63

building, the engineers added for equipment $3,000 for four cars at $750 each, and $20,000 for four engines at $5,000 each, bringing the total to $242,000 as the cost of the road. It

was proposed to adopt the same form of superstructure by the New Jersey Railroad between Newark and

as that used

Jersey City, consisting of mud-sills laid along the road-bed held in position by cross-ties about three feet apart, and wooden "rails," six by six inches, upon which were laid the iron tracks, or plates, two and one quarter inches wide by The sills and ties were to be five-eighths of an inch thick.

made of native oak and of chestnut, and the "rails" of Norway pine. It was estimated upon the basis of passengers and freight carried by stages and wagons along the route that the income of the company would be $49,708.00 yearly, and that the ex-

pense of maintaining and running the road would amount to $20,120.00, leaving "the sum of Twenty Nine Thousand Five

Hundred and Eighty Eight Dollars to be divided among the Stockholders of the Company, which is an income of about 12 per cent, on the amount of capital invested. ' '

As an example

of the calculations, Morristown

and

its

environs were shown to be paying at the time $24,640 for transportation of passengers yearly by stages and private conThe veyances, and $14,712 for freight, a total of $39,352.

and save the comwas figured could save $1,608,

railroad could do this business for $26,376,

munity $12,976.

Chatham

$5,457,

Madison, Providence $5,312, Springfield $10,933 it

New

and Orange $17,000. No wonder the directors naively suggested that "the owners of land through Orange, and thence to Morris, will find their interests promoted by giving the soil freely" in order that the road might be built with as little

expense as possible.

Th6 names of the incorporators mentioned in the charter granted January 29, 1835, are James Cook, William N. Wood, William Brittin, Jepthah B. Munn, Israel D. Condict, John J. Bryant and Isaac Baldwin. The road, according to the charter,

might run from one or more suitable place or

places,

64

BEGINNINGS OF THE MOEEIS & ESSEX RAILROAD. ' '

to intersect one or more places in the village of Morristown, in the railroad known by the name of the New Jersey Rail-

Transportation Company, at Newark or at Elizabethtown, in the county of Essex, or between those

Road

and

' '

places.

Some

interesting things are found in the manuscript agreement drawn up on January 20, 1836, between the Morris & Essex Railroad Co. and the contractors, Ephraim articles of

Beach and Abraham Brittin. The basis of the agreement was the report and estimates of Wright and Beach, presented to the company July 18, 1835, the substance of which was printed in the pamphlet previously mentioned. The contract covered eleven miles of the proposed railroad, which Wright and Beach were to "excavate, build and construct," furnishiijg all materials necessary, from Morristown to the termination of the eleventh mile. This section included the bridge over the Passaic below Chatham, and extended into the present Summit, which at the time was not on the map, or mentioned by name. The consideration was ' '

' '

$114,597.88.

One of the articles provides for the viaduct (the largest bridge of the road) to be built "across the Passaic river near Bonnel's Mill (in Chatham) of solid masonry". Another

article prohibits intoxicating liquors

from being

used by employees of the contractors.

To the agreement is signed the name of Lewis Condict, president of the railroad, and also the names of Beach and Barnabas Day, the proprietor of Brittin, the contractors. the Park House, Newark, was a witness to the signing of the agreement. Major Beach was one of the engineers of the Morris Canal, completed from the Delaware to the Passaic in 1832.

The agreement

in full reads as follows;

Articles of Agreement made and Signed this twentieth day of January A. D. 1836 Between "The Morris and Essex railroad " Compy. parties of the first part and Ephraim Beach Esqr. of Newark in the County of Essex & State of New Jersey, and

BEGINNINGS OF THE MORRIS & ESSEX RAILROAD.

65

Abraham

Brittin Esqr. of Madison in the County of Morris in said State parties of the second part. Whereas by an act of the Legislature of the State of New Jersey passed the twenty ninth day of January A. D. 1835 entitled

an "Act

to incorporate the Morris and Essex railroad Company" for the purpose of Constructing a railroad from Morris Town in the County of Morris to intersect the railroad of the New Jersey railroad and transportation Company and :

Whereas under the provision of the said Act, the parties of the first part acting by their president and board of Directors have caused an estimate of the expense, of Constructing and finishing the said road and a survey of the rout to be made by their Engineers Benjamin Wright and Ephraim Beach Esqs. detailing the dimensions and prescribing the mode of Making the road, on the bases of which report, a Contract has been entered into with the parties of the second part for the Construction of part of the said road on the terms following to wit ;

The Official report and estimate of Benjamin Wright and Ephraim Beach Esqs, Engineers of the Company made to the Directors and bearing date the 18th day of July last shall Article

1.

constitute the basis of this agreement as to the dimensions, route, Materials and mode of Constructing the road, and shall at all times be received and Constitute part of this agreement.

Article 2. The parties of the second part agrees to excavate, build and Construct the road as located by the aforesaid Engineers in their said report and to furnish all materials necessary and proper for the same for eleven miles. That is to say from the Commencement of the road at Morris Town in the County of Morris and proceeding through Madison crossing Passaic river

near the Mills Jonathan C. Bonnell and thence to the termination of the Eleventh Mile, measuring the line and estimating the distance as the road shall be permantly located according to the Dimensions, rout and mode stated in said report for the Consideration or Sum of One hundred and fourteen thousand, five hundred and ninety seven dollars & eighty eight cents and in case the parties of the first part shall vary the line of the road and the

mode of Constructing

it, (which they expressly reserve the right of doing in their direction) an Equitable allowance shall be made by the parties to this agreement therefore, for any increase or diminution of expences by reason of such Variation, and in Case of a disagreement respecting such allowance the same to be refered to men indifirently chosen by the parties, and in case the Engineer Benjamin Wright is so circumstanced that he can Conveniently attend to the same it is understood that the same shall

be refered to him.

66

BEGINNINGS OF THE MORRIS & ESSEX RAILROAD.

Article 3. The parties of the first part agree to pay the parties of the second part the sum named in the second article of this agreement for the services to be done and materials found

by them under

agreement in the Following manner to Wit, the part agree to make by their Engineers or agents Monthly estimates of the Work done and Materials found by the parties of the second part, which estimates or Copies thereof shall be delivered to the parties of the second part and they shall be paid immediately so much as the work done and Materials furnished are estimated to be worth by the said Engineers or agents Compared with the whole work to be done under this agreement two thirds thereof in money and one third in stock parties of the

this

first

as hereafter mentioned, and all the materials there furnished delivered and paid for shall thereafter be the property of the rail-

road Company. 4. The work by the

Article

parties of the second part agree to

Commence

next and to prosecute it with day of diligence and to finish the whole work Contracted for under this agreement by the first day of January 1837 unless prevented from going on by the Company in which Case they shall be allowed an their

additional time after that period equal to such detention. Article 5. A Viaduct is to be built across the Passaic river near Bonnell's Mill of solid masonry and of enduring materials with one or more arches resting upon solid and sufficient abute-

ments, embankments and piers from forty to fifty feet in height so as to ensure a sufficient Vent for the Water at all seasons and a safe and easy passage for locomotives, engines, Cars of burthen and passengers as long as the Charter of the Co. shall exist extraordinary Convulsions of Nature, and Wanton destruction by man allways excepted. The Masonry in different places upon the line being intended for Various uses will be varied in its Structer, stile and Materials according to its importance and situation. The ring stones and coping for Viaducts, bridges & Culverts must be hammer dressed, cut or tooled, and it is the understanding of the parties that the engineer of the Co. is to prescribe and furnish the plans and direct the mode of Constructing & grading the road and all the bridges, Viaducts, Culverts and drains belonging to it. He shall decide upon the quantities of all the Material to be used whether of wood, stone, iron, lime, sand, or clay and their suitableness & fitness for the use intended, he shall prescribe the thickness and dimensions of all Walls and of the Cement and Morter to be used, the dimensions, species, and qualities of every material No unnecessary nor to be used in every part of the 'Contract. superfluous expense is to be required or exacted of the Contractors,

BEGINNINGS OF THE MORRIS & ESSESX RAILROAD.

67

yet it is understood and intended by both parties, that in all respects the entire work is to be executed and performed in a good substantial firm and workmanlike manner of good materials, so as to answer all reasonable expectations of its durability, utility

and Convenience. Article 6. The parties of the second part agree to take one third part of the Consideration or sum agreed to be paid them under this agreement in the Capital Stock of the Company at par Value for which stock they are to be called on for no payments except in their monthly settlements with the Company when they

are to be Credited on the treasurer's Book as part payment of their Stock for one third part of the amount then due them, But if the Directors at any time during the progress of the Work shall deem it adviseable or necessary to retain some portion of monies due the parties of the second part for labour or Materials, as a pledge or Security for the faithful performance of the Whole Contract under this agreement, the parties of the second part hereby assent to the exercise of the right to retain such Sum provided it shall at no time exceed in amount an average of ten per Cent on the whole amount to be paid under this Contract. Article 7. If any Solid rock shall be found in the line of the road which it shall become necessary to remove, the parties of the second part are to be allowed an equitable and Just amount for the extra labour and expence necessary for its removal. Article 8. Experience may 'Suggest Modifications and changes in the plan and execution of the road and in the Materials to be used. It is admitted that the Directors by their Engineers may at

any time make such modifications and changes as they shall from time to time deem to be necessary and proper, and the Contractors shall Conform to the directions and instructions of the Engineers at all times, during the progress of the work the effect of all such Changes and modifications shall be fairly estimated and Valued by the Engineer, and allowance made therefor, either to the Contractors or to the Co. as equety shall require. Article 9. It is admitted that the Engineer of the Co is to prescribe and dictate the Manner of Constructing the road, the quantity dimensions and Character of all materials to be used, yet it may Serve to show the intention and Views of the parties to particularise and give details of some items which are now to be expressed Subject however to be revised, corrected and altered by the Engineer according to the sound Exercise of his best Judgment

and

discretion.

wide Varying

its

The road is geneially to be graded fifteen feet Width in excavation and embankments as may

68

BEGINNINGS OF THE MOERIS & ESSEX RAILROAD.

be required.

It is to

be graded as nearly level as can be Con-

sistantly done, and it is expected that no part of this Contract West of the Short Hills will exceede in its elevation Sixty feet to the Mile

materials (Subject to decay as roots, Stumps of are to be removed and excluded from embankAll necessarj ditehes side drains Culverts Conductors ments. etc. are to be Constructed as the Engineer shall direct, to Secure the slope, excavations embankments etc. from the Effects of Water and the whole Surface of the embankments, excavations side slope etc. are to be dressed off in a smooth neat and workmanlike manner. The Grading for the Double track at the turnouts is to be at least twenty-four feet wide, and the number of turnouts not to exceed on an average one to each Mile, to be located at the discretion of the -Engineers. The Horse path to be filled with good materials, as the Engineer shall approve, the timber for the Superstrueter to be of the best of the sort mentioned in the Estimate, and of such dimensions as the Engineers May direct to be put down under his Directions the foundations being all firm, the timbers well beded and secured and both timber and Iron to be inspected before it is put down, in the Constructions of all Viaducts, bridges, and Culverts it is expected that the foundations be made secure. Where the stream passes over rock if practible the rock shall be the foundation of the Superstructer of Masonry. trees, old

all

timber

&

Article 10. For the preservation of peace and good order, to prevent riots and brawls and other disturbances along the line of this work it is mutually agreed that no ardent Spirits nor any Kinds of intoxicating drinks shall be permitted by the Contractors, who hereby pledge themselves to use all proper endeavors, and to exert their best influence to prevent its introduction and use amongst the labours employed upon the work. Article 11. As Ephraim Beach Esqr. is the Engineer of the as well as a party to this agreement and as by the terms of this agreement many matters are Submitted to his direction and Controle as engineere and must necessarily be so now to avoid any Difficulty which my arise therefrom it is agreed that in case the Company shall not be Satisfied with the decision on any of the

Company

Matters refered to his discretion and Controle, under this agreeall such matters shall be refered to impartial men to be Selected Mutually by the parties, it being understood that in case the aforesaid Benjamin Wright Esqr. can Conveniently attend

ment that

to the same, it shall be refered to him.

In Witness whereof the parties of the first part have hereunto caused this agreement to be Signed by their president and the Seal of the Company to be affixed and the parties of the second

BEGINNINGS OF THE MORRIS & ESSEX RAILROAD.

69

part have hereunto Set their hands and seals the day and year above Written Lewis Condict, President of Morris & Essex R. Road. Co.

first

Morristown January 20th 1836 Witness present :

Ephraim Beach

Abraham

Brittin

Barnabas Day. Postscript, Since the parties to this instrument have made their verbal agreement Various causes have delayed its final execu-

tion on paper. The work however has actually commenced at Passaic river & at Madison some weeks prior to the Signature &

date of these articles.

The manuscript list of stockholders, dated 1849, is in the form of a letter without comment addressed to "Abram Brittin" at Madison and postmarked June 9, Newark, N. J. It is headed "List of Stockholders of the Morris and Essex Railroad, June Election, 1849". The names of many prominent Jerseymen of that period are on the number of shares they owned. The

the

in full follows

Ailing 152, Bonnell 137,

;

Jonas Agens

John Ailing

W.

Britten

44,

together with

list

alphabetically

William Agens

40, Charles

120, A. Britten 203, John C. 8, Daniel Babbit 240, R. D.

Baldwin 20, John Blackburn 266, win 64, H. N. B. 20, G. Burnham

Edward Condit

list,

J. C.

B.

20, C.

D. Bald-

125, C. B. Campfield

Lewis Condit 50, 20, Bethuel Crane W. W. & Pool J. Condit J. C. 12, 355, 48, Crane & Little Ira Dodd M. W. Dodd S. D. 32, 142, 16, Day & Co. 248, S. D. Day & Bailey M. H. G. L. Ford 150, 44, Day 16, W. S. Faitoute 32, J. C. Garthwaite 200, Wm. Garland 10, E. Gray 24, James Henderson 10, H. & Redfield 4, James Hague 4, William Hague 20, Oliver J. Hague 140, Charles Johnson 45, Kitchell & Ward 12, John M. Lindsley 80, George Lindsley 72, Richard Lean 110, Ephraim 36,

376, Silas B. Condit

Marsh

5,

134,

H. B. Campbell

Ralph Marsh 458, John Marsh-40, Henry B. Noah Matthews 70, C. C. Meeker 58, Johnson 20, Moses B. Martin 12, Oba Meeker 16, David Ma20, Newark Bank 50, Orange Bank 200, Albert Pierson

Munsell Martin gie

152, Silas Condit

200,

BEGINNINGS OF THE MORRIS & ESSEX RAILROAD.

70

(blank), Estate of S. Condit 168, Jonathan Parkhurst 420, J. P. Phoenix 300, Jonas S. Quimby 22, William Ran-

kin

Reynolds 73, Moses Reynolds 20, Alexander 50, Eliza Reynolds 26, Ezekiel B. Smith 26, Caleb Smith 20, Thomas L. Smith 72, James R. Sayre 100, Ellen E. Shipman 8, Moses Sayre 100, George W. Fitch Smith Estate Hanford Smith Sharp 20, 110, Samuel Smith John F. Voorhis & Co. -100, 40, 8, 120, D. D.

W. Rogers

James Vanderpool 302, Beach Vanderpool 35J5, Beach Vanderpool Trustee 60, Beach Vanderpool Trustee for E. F. Baldwin 4, Stephen Vail 342, George Vail Estate

108, Alfred Vail

100,

Mary A.

Vail

100, C.

Van Antwerp

James Wood

33, 100, Thomas T. Thomas T. Wood William N. Wood Trustee 146, 8, James A. Williams Williams Charles 156, 84, 48, Maria Williams 32, Margaret Williams 32, William Wright 880. J.

102,

D. Vermilye

Wood

Closely related to the foregoing documents is a letter written by Lewis Condict to the financier Nicholas Biddle, a

copy of which was obtained by the late William Nelson, Corresponding Secretary of the New Jersey Historical SocieThe letter refers to the Morris and Essex Railroad, then ty. building, and suggests a branch of the United States Bank for Morristown.

It

reads as follows

:

Morristown, N. Jersey, Apl. 18th, 1836. (Rec'd. Apl. 22.)

Gentlemen,

&

Permit me to introduce to your friendly regards, my worthy esteemed friend, James Wood, Esqr., a native & a resident of

this vicinity.

He

thinks of proposing to the Directors of the U. S. Bank, an office in this place, under the auspices & instructions of the Board. His plan is, as I understood him, to commence upon a small & oeconomical scale, augmenting it, as experience & future octo establish

casion

may

suggest.

A

Rail

Road

it 's

is

in progress,

from Newaik

Contractors are pledged to finish by the

to this place,

first

which

of January next.

BEGINNINGS OF THE MORKIS & ESSEX EAILROAD.

71

Measures are taking for its extension, Westward, to Carpenter's point, with a view to the great Erie R. Road of N. Y. believe that Banking capital may be beneficially employed

We

here, both for the lender willing,

upon mature

&

Should the Bank be an experiment here, with more worthy of it's entire

the borrower.

reflection, to try

$50,000, or $75,000, I know no man confidence than Mr. Wood, as well for his integrity, as for his He has been long qualifications & fitness to superintend it.

engaged here, in successful trade, & for many years, has conducted the State Bank here, with high reputation for himself. He knows well, the circumstances of all our business people, & possesses the confidence, respect, & esteem, of all classes of our citizens. He was for several years, the sole Representative of this County, in He has not done homage, the Legislative Council of our State. nor bowed his knee, to the political Dagon of his day, & therefore has shared the fate of many other good & honorable men. He is advantageously known in N. York, both in Wall Street & Pearl Street, & can bring ample testimonials from there. If his views should meet the approbation of your board, he can give ample security for any pecuniary trust, which may be confided to him.

With high

respect

&

esteem,

Your very

obt. Servt.

&

friend,

Lewis Condict.

Honorable N. Biddle, Prest. U. S. Bank, & Honorable John Sergeant, one of it's Directors.

Joseph F. Folsom.

Fullarton.

BY EDITH H. MATHER.

also spelled Fullerton, and The family of Fullarton is an ancient and well estabevery other imaginable way lished one in Scotland. According to Nisbet, Sir Adam Ful-

larton of that

ilk,

son of Eeginald Fullarton of the same, ob-

new charter of the lands of Fullarton and others from James, High Steward of Scotland, 1240, afterwards confirmed by charter in the first year of King Robert II. See tained a

Nisbet 's Heraldry, Vol.

Arms

1.,

p. 331.

The arms given are

:

Argent, three otter heads erased, gules. Crest camel's head, proper. Motto Lux in tenebris. Supporters Two savages wreathe about the head and middle with :

:

A

:

:

laurel, all proper, holding in their

hands branches of

laurel.

Burke, in his Dictionary of the Landed Gentry, Supplethe following incident in their early history "Goldfridus Fullerton of Fullerton in the counties of Perth

ment,

p. 57, gives

:

and Forfar got from King Robert the Bruce a charter of the office of King's Fowler, the grantee and his successors being obliged to serve the king's house with wild fowl when the king and his successors shall come to Forfar, when Fullerton shall be entertained with a servant and two horses." Now,

Fullarton of Kennaber

is

a cadet of the house of Fullarton of

shown by the arms which

are, Argent, on a two mullets of the field between three otters' heads erased of the second. Motto Mihi terrasque lacusque, which means, "I have lands and waters." Nisbet goes on to say that "the otter lives both in land and water and is said by

that

ilk,

clearly

fess gules

:

FULLARTON some

to

mean

ever, that

it

73

a shifty warrior." It is much more likely, howas being symbolical of their posses-

was adopted

sions as expressed in the motto.

Thomas and Robert Fullarton, who came to East Jersey in 1684, were the sons of John Fullarton of Kennaber. On April 22, 1684, Robert Barclay of Urie in the Kingdom of Scotland conveyed 1/10 of 1/48 part of the province of East Jersey to "Thomas Fullarton brother germane to Ken-

New

naber"; and the same amount

Robert Fullarton, also "broA of East Jersey Deeds, pp. 325, 326). In July of that year they sailed from Montrose, Scotland, arriving in the province in October. They went first to Perth Amboy but afterwards to Elizabethtown, as it was older and afforded better accommodations (East Jersey under the Proprietors, p. 304). Robert F. Fullarton brought over nine servants and had them registered, October 1684 (Liber A of Deeds, p. 187). See New Jersey Archives, Vol. XXI., p. 65. A great many Scotchmen came over about this time, but ther germane to

to

Kennaber" (Liber

the Fullartons, the Gordons, Johnstone of Spotswood, John Forbes and John Barclay, the Governor's brother, seem to have been particularly intimate. They all took up land to-

gether along Cedar Brook, "close under the Blew MounIt covered rather an extensive territory and part

tains". of

it is

now known

as Scotch Plains.

Jersey Under the Proprietors,

In Whitehead's East

p. 304, there is

"A

letter

from

Thomas

Fullerton, Brother to the Laird of Kennaber, to his Brother in Law Doctor Gordon in Montrose." The letter is

written from Elizabethtown and dated January, 1685. He gives a short account of his voyage and a description of the

country; does not altogether enjoy

its

hardships and loneli-

He

appreciates the clear and beautiful weather, the healthfulness of the climate and the fertility of the soil, but there seems to be a longing for the society of his friends in ness.

Scotland.

He

country and that than in Scotland. It is, on

realizes the possibilities of the

his opportunities here are better

The "Doctor was written, was John Gordon

the whole, rather resigned than enthusiastic.

Gordon",

to

whom

this letter

FULLAETON.

74

of Colieston, brother of Thomas and Charles Gordon of Perth Amboy and son of Robert Gordon of Pitlurg and Stralloch.

By

referring to the lineage of this family in

Burke 's Com-

moners of Great Britain, p. 45, it will be seen that his first wife was Katherine, dau. of John Fullerton of Kennaber. As Dr. Gordon was the Fullartons' brother-in-law, the assumption that they were the sons of John Fullerton of Kennaber, seems warranted. Another letter of the same date written "to the Laird of Brotherstown in the Maims," says "You were pleased so keenly to concern yourself with my welfare when I was by you (and I find that absence augments true :

friendship) that I

am

obliged to acquaint you with my present shall be far better than what I could

fortune, which I hope

expect by so

much Stock

gether boorish, for at

in Scotland.

This place

New York you may

is

not alto-

have railing and

Gallantry enough, the* inhabitants are generally great spendDear Brothertoun write to me, and give me an accompt ers. of affairs, for I assure you, neither Governor nor Council will

meddle with yours to me, nor mine to you by my next I will write to Clunie and John Johnstone in the meantime present my service to them. I am in haste to end writing, tho ever :

:

being

"Your Obliged Commerad and humble Servant "Tho: Fullerton." The friend

to

whom

this letter

was written was Scot of

Brotherstown, one of the numerous lairds of the great family of Scot. Clunie mentioned in his letter was Robert Gordon of Clunie, one of the Twenty-four Proprietors, and Johnstone was the well-known Dr. Johnstone of Perth

boy,

who came

over in the

John

Am-

Henry and Francis with George

Scot of Pitlochie.

Thomas Fullerton acted here

as

proxy for the Thomas

Barker, the Proprietor, while his brother Robert was

Thomas

Hart's proxy. Robert Fullerton 's letters seem a little more cheerful. He writes a letter to his "Brothers and Sisters" from Perth Amboy, Nov. 6, 1684, probably written soon after their arrivaL He tells of their rough voyage over, one hundred and thirty

FULLAETON. passengers in a small crowded vessel.

75

They both speak

affec-

tionately of their grandmother, who was evidently opposed to their coming, as Robert says to "assure her that she wronged the country in her opinion." Kennaber seems to

have bought land here also, for Robert writes to him Jan. 7, 1685, "We have made choise of your land next adjacent to mine and have placed your servants there." They were both among the Commissioners appointed by the London Proprietors, Aug. 1, 1684, to confirm Acts of Assembly, settle matters in dispute between Proprietors and former Planters of said Province as to arrears, quit rents, &c., to dispose of land by patent, &c. to purchase land from the Indians, to set out land to settlers, to run lines of division between the Province ;

and New York or West Jersey (Learning and Spicer, p. 195). They were also among the Commissioners for Business of Lands, appointed July, 1685 (Ibid, p. 213). They did not remain long in New Jersey, but went over to New York sometime during the year 1686, and Robert died there.

Thomas went on

to the island of

Barbadoes and Thom-

Rudyard, Deputy-governor of East Jersey, left him his executor for Barbadoes and England (N. J. Archives, Vol. as

XXI.,

XXI.

p. 210).

of

New

The following abstracts of deeds from Vol. Jersey Archives will show on what grounds

these statements are made. 1687, Sept. 2, Confirmation to Robert Fullartone, late of Amboy, 300 acres of land in the Blew Hills (p. 122).

Thomas Fullertone now

1688, Nov. 15,

of the island of

Barbadoes

(p. 163). 1691, Oct. 13,

Angus County, late of

New

Power

of Attorney,

Scotland, to his brother

York,

now

John Fulertoun of Thomas Fulertoun,

of the island of Barbadoes, to settle

the estate of their deceased brother Robert Fulertoun of

York, who

died January, 1687 (p. 202). same as Forfar.

Angus County

New

is

the

1693, Oct. 26, Confirmation to Thomas Foulerton of the island of Barbadoes, in his own right and that of his brother

Robert, deceased, 550 acres in Middlesex Co. (p. 207). 1698, April 8, Deed. "Thomas Foulerton of the island of

FTJLLABTON.

76

Barbadoes appointed by Thomas Rudyard of the same island, with Hannah Beamont, executor of his will, to George Willocks and Margaret his wife, for all his right, title, etc., in

him by the said Rudyard" (p. 317). 1702, April, Confirmation to Thomas Fullarton as his second dividend of 500 acres of land, etc. (p. 334). and

to the legacies left

There was also a James Fullarton in Perth

Amboy

about

the same time, but I have not yet found any record that identifies him. 1687, Aug. 10, James Fullarton is witness to the will of David Campbell of Perth Amboy (N. J. Archives, Vol. XXI., p. 217).

1693, James Fullerton, one of the Petit Jury at a court held at Middletown, Monmouth Co., 28th, 29th, June (Old

Times in Old Monmouth,

p. 255). 1695, "James Filldrton, plaintiff, Jeffrey Jones, defendant, in a suit in 'Ejectment for Lands,' held by plaintiff

from the proprietors, which the defendant was in possession of deriving his right by Indian purchase and conveyance from Col. Richard Nichols, etc." (N. J. Archives, Vol. VII., p. 268). Is he the

same as James Fullerton of Salem

Co., or

another

?

1694, Oct. 16, "Will of Robert Donne of Alloways Creek, Salem Co., leaves James Fullerton, schoolmaster at Salem,

Greek and French books (Vol. XXIII., p. 141). 1729-30, Jan. 22, Inventory of personal estate of James Fullerton, of Fairfield, Cohansey, Salem Co., merchant,

his Latin,

Jan. 30. 1729-30,

Bond

of

John Fullerton of Salem

Co., as

admin-

Josiah Brooks, fellow bondsman (p. 176). 1749, April 5, Will of James Fullerton of Somerset Co.,

istrator.

Leaves five children, James, Mary, Elizabeth, Joan, J. John, all under age. No wife mentioned. Executors, Ephraim Lockhart and William Logan. Recorded June 19, 1749. (Liber E of Wills, p. 291, at Trenton, N. J.)

N.

Caspar Steinmets and His Descendants. BY

P. H.

(Continued from

HOFFMAN.

last

January Number.)

ABSTRACTS FROM COURT RECORDS REFERRING TO CASPAR STEINMETS. In suit of Caspar Steinmets vs. Jacob Burler. 1652. In Court Plaintiff received Judgment against Defendant (according to the Records of the Manhattan Courts, 1652.) In suit of Caspar Steinmets vs. Capt. Van Judike 1653. Plaintiff demands a balance Verlath, in Manhattan Court, of 71 Libers according to the account of wages by his wife Jennetje (nee Gerritsen) from said defendant Capt. Verlath

for services rendered on board ship from Amsterdam, HolDefendant claims that 75 florin and 15 land, to America.

Libers in

Wampum

only

is

due; he also complains that she

received goods to the amount of 128 Flo., including freight, so that a balance of only 39 Florins is due. The Burgomasters and Schepens decide that each must render copies of their accounts, and the wife of Steinmets must personally appear at the next Court, to be held March 10, 1653.

Court met; and the case of Verlath was Capt. again taken up.

September 10th, 1653. Steinmets

vs.

The Burgomasters and Schepens find that the parties have not written agreements, and having carefully listened to the statements of both sides, decide that the services began when she went on board the ship at Amsterdam, Holland and according to the confession of the plaintiff, the passage from Holland was to be deducted from the wages and to settle the question of goods received, Jacob Cowenhoven and Pieter Cornelison Van-Der-Veer are hereby appointed to balance ac;

;

counts.

Signed Sept.

15, 1653.

78

CASPAR STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

Captain Verlath owned and sailed a vessel named "Faith" and brought passengers and freight from Amsterdam, Holland, to New Amsterdam, America. Miss Jeannetje

Note

:

Gerritson engaged passage and was to perform certain duties on board the vessel as part payment for the passage. After the arrival in New Amsterdam she went to live with her brother Gerrit Gerritsen at Ahasimus, in Bergen, N. J. She there became acquainted with her brother's intimate friend and business associate, Casparus Steynmets, who was also a native of Holland, and apparently from the same part of the country as the Gerritsens. Steynmets was at this time a young widower, whose wife Dorothea Aertson had died leaving him a small child which had been presented for baptism in the Old Dutch Church in New Amsterdam" July 14, 1650. The child was named "Caspar", ^or his father or some ancestor of that name. The friendly acquaintance of Steynmets and Jeannetje ' '

Gerritsen resulted in their marriage,

March

found in the Old Dutch Church Records in 1653.

31, 1652, as is

New Amsterdam.

Sept. 29.

Caspar Steinmets, Plantiff, Richard Bredienville, Defendant. In case of arrest for 12 fi 10, which defendant hath vs.

agreed to pay to Plaintiff for Jan Bother, and to pay for him Defendant acknowledges the debt, and that he is security for Botsos; he is therefore condemmed to pay or in default

self.

thereof to give security. 1654. Caspar Steinmets conveyed land to Pieter Jacobsen Beeys, in New Amsterdam; took mortgage in return. (See

Valentine Manual, p. 205.) 1655. Nov. 22. Caspar Steinmets, with 20 other residents of Bergen took the oath of allegiance to the Lords Proprietors of 1656.

New Amsterdam. June

16* vs.

Caspar Steinmets,

Plaintiff,

Jan Hendriecks, Defendant.

Steinmets' brother-in-law served the defendant 9 weeks,

and was treated very badly and harshly and was dismissed without payment. He asks that defendant may be compelled him with decent clothes. The court ordered it done

to furnish

and the boy

released.

CASPAE STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

79

April 22, Caspar Steinmets was made a Freeman

1657.

and received the rights of a Burgher in New Amsterdam. 1657. Feb. 12, Caspar Steinmets, Plaintiff, vs.

Loedervicke Pos, Defendant.

Court ordered payment to be made at once, on Judgment This case was continued from Sept. 1653, to Dec.

rendered.

31st of that year. In that year Steinmets received a deed for a house 1658. and lot, sold to Hendrick H. Kip, situated on the South side

of Brewers Street in

New Amsterdam.

Price not given.

1658. Dec. 18, Gertie (Steymets) Hoppe, (daughter of Caspar Steinmets) and widow of Andries Hoppe, gives notice that

her late husband appointed Cornelius Aertson and as guardians for her children (by her first

Lambert H. Moll, husband. )

Caspar Steinmets sued Bartol Claaerson and injuring a boy. Court ordered that the boy be released, and damages paid, and a fine imposed. 1659. Aug. 13, Caspar Steinmets, Plaintiff, vs. Rutger Jensen, Defendant. Defendant in default. 1659.

Oct. 20.

for abusing

1659.

Gertie (Steymets) Hendricks,

Hoppe, deceased,

widow

of Andries

wills to their 4 children, Catrina,

Wilhelm,

Hendrick, Matthias Adolphus, 200 Guilders each. Sept. 16, Caspar Steinmets, as Judge, heard the of Tomas Verdon vs. Claves Petersen, in regard to complaint the use of a canoe. Settlement advised and referred to a higher 1660.

Court. 1661.

Aug.

10,

Caspar Steinmets

vs.

Deavoue Herms-

Court decides den, Defendant, case of slander and injury. that Hermsden must pay to the support of the poor and costs for his misbehaviour.

Case continued.

Caspar Steinmets vs. Anthony DeWitt. Plaintiff sues for time and services which he rendered to Defendant 1661.

at a place called Marion in Bergen. orders payment.

1664.

Court sustains him and

Caspar Steinmets received a Mortgage from Dirke

.

CASPAE STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

80

Tight on property situate in New Amsterdam. (See City Records, p. 84, Also Valentine's Manual, p. 84.)

Gerritsen

Van

The second court of Bergen was established and and Scheppens. Tilman VanVleeck was appointed Schoutt until March 2, 1664. Balthazar Bayard and Claas Arentse Tours, Scheppens. 1664.

consisted of the Schoutt

1665.

Aug.

30,

for Bergen Court 1666.

June

Caspar Steinmets was appointed Judge

by Gov. Carteret of New Jersey.

12,

Caspar Steinmets appeared in Court and

obligated himself as security for Cornelius Aertson in the matter of purchasing a horse. (This Aertson was doubtless a brother to Steinmets' first wife.)

October. Caspar Steinmets, Plaintiff, and the Plaintiff asks pay for the of Defendant. Gov. Bergen, City use of a building usecl for a school house which he had rented 1666.

to the City. He was asked to wait awhile as there in the Treasury. money

was no

1667. By the war between England and Holland the West India Company's farm was tranf erred in 1664 to EngIn March, 1667, Jacob Stoffelson and wife lish authorities.

received a lease during the lifetime of the "longest liver" of The wife survived Stoffelson, and in 1671 she mar-

the two.

ried Caspar Steinmets (Steinmets' wife having died a few He obtained a lease in 1674 in right of his wife. few years later, (in 1677) she died, and he obtained

years previous).

A

a lease in his

own

right in 1678, receiving a lease of the farm

Gov. Dougin of New York on Aug. 13, 1675, gave to John Palmer a lease for 99 years "of the reversion", from the feast of St. Michaels next ensuing after the determination of the estate of Caspar Steinmets. In 1686, Feb. 5, for his lifetime.

Steinmets' sons, John and Garret, bought the lease of Palmer, and after the death of their father they divided the farm, John taking the southerly one-half and Garrit the northerly half.

1668.

May

12,

Caspar Steinmets, Capt. Verlath and

Douwe Hermansen conveyed Lot 22 Newark.

to

Council, sitting in

CASPAE STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 1668.

meadow

81

Caspar Steinmets purchased 2 tracts of land and

of Gov. Carteret in the

Town

of Bergen.

Treintie (Jacobs) Wallinger (widow), applied to the Court for a Guardian of her six minor children of her late husband Walling. After the death of Walling she 1668.

Oct. 12.

1671 while she as a widow was

still

in

possession of the

1671 while, she as a widower was still in possession of the West India Company's farm, she married Caspar Steinmets (widower). They occupied and cared for this West India Company's Farm until her death, on May 11, 1677. He then

John and Garret until his death at an advanced age in 1702. In Gov. Carteret 's time the Assembly of New 1668. Jersey consisted of the Governor with his Councillors, of 7 lived with his sons

members who composed the Upper House and 10 Burghesses who composed the Lower House. In the General Assembly of that year Caspar Steinmets and Balthazar Bayard represented Bergen in the Upper House. Steinmets sold to Eppa Banta over 200 acres of land on

May

12, 1668.

The land was

resold the

same day

to Michealse

Vreelandt. 1672. Caspar Steinmets served as juror in the Special term of court held at Elizabethtown and called by Gov. Philip Carteret.

1673. At a meeting of the Commanders and Sept. 4. Honorable Councilors, held at Fort William Henry, New Amsterdam, there were present, Jacob Benckes, Cornelius EvertThe nomination of Offisen, Jr., and Capt. Anthony Colve. cers for the Military Co. of the Town of Bergen was as follows Capt., Caspar Steinmets; Lieutenant, Hans DedeThese officers were all elected. rick; Ensign, Adrian Post. Petition was made at the same meeting by Ide VanVoorst and Claude Jensen, that Caspar Steinmets may not be allowed any more privileges than were allowed him under Gov. Stuyvesant's rule, and Government of New Amsterdam. (This related to the fencing in of some pasture land.) Ordered that the same be granted. It was signed, Commissioners of the Council of war. (See Colonial His:

CASPAR STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

82

597 &c., Jacob Benckes, Cornells Evertsen, Anthony

tory 99. Colve). 1673.

May

(Walling

20.

Jacobs

Caspar Steinmets and wife Treintie Stoffelson) forbidden to fence land at

them by Gov. Nicholls. 1674. Aug. 18, The election of Schepens for the Town of Bergen was held and the following persons were elected.

Harsinms leased

to

Assistants, Gerrit GerritSchepen, Caspar Steinmets, Thomas Fredericks, Pieter Masen, Englebert Steenhuysen, Claes cellison, Walling Jacobs, Jensen, Elias Michealse, Cor1st.

nelis

Abrahamsie, and Englebert Steenhuysen,

Jr.

Steinmets

Judge and Herman Sweeman, Elias Van Ide Michaelse, Voorst, were associate judges, and Tyrnament VanVleeck, clerk. 1674. April 1$. At a council in Fort William Henry in New Netherlands, present, Governor Colve, Councilman Steen-

was

elected presiding

vycke, Fiscal, Knyfte.

Caspar Steinmets presented a petition requesting that the by his wife and her former husband (Stofwith the felson) English Government, whereby the Bowerie of the West India Company at Harsimus was granted (farm) and leased by them during their lives, may be confirmed. It was ordered that the petition be ordered and allowed, and the farm allowed and granted him in the premises. 1674. Dec. 1. Johannes Steinmets (son of Caspar) this was married to Annetje (Jacobs) Van Winkle (widow). day 1674. Jan. 30. Capt. Caspar Steinmets and Claude Arientie Schult were appointed Deputies from Bergen to the Council General of the Governor General at New Netherlands to provide War measures for the protection of the Dutch Col-

lease entered into

onies.

Caspar Steinmets owned a house and lot on Stone Street, situated between Whitehall and Broad Streets. Valued for taxation at $1,000. (Steinmets was then

New Amsterdam,

classed as Dutch, Hollander.) 1677. May 12. Steinmets received a deed

1

New

from Gov. Car-

Jersey for land in and about Bergen, as follows 10 acres in the "New Maisland" between Dunne Herman-

teret of

;

CASPAR STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS. sen and Hendricke DeBracken. 2

17^

acres of

83

wood land

and meadows next land

;

16 of woodto Capt. Nicholas Verlath ; 3 No. 4, Town lot next to Herman Edwartse ; No. 5, One

lot of Gerrit

1677.

Gerritsen

Nov.

10.

;

No.

6,

A

town

lot,

100 acres in

all.

Steinmets received a deed from Gov.

Carteret, in right of Trientie Walling his deceased wife (formerly widow of Jacob Stoffelson) six acres for a garden at

Harsimus, situate west of Ide Corneliusius. 1685. Feb. 20. Caspar Steinmets gave bond for ten for rent of farm at Harsimus next to "King James pounds,

West India Company farm.

' '

1698. Christoffel Steinmets (son of Caspar) received a deed for land which he purchased at Acquackamonek from Garret Van Waganingen of Essex County, being for Lot 6, with half of the privileges belonging to the 14th part of the

Commenages

there.

Caspar Steinmets died and was buried in the Old Ground of the 1st Dutch Church of Bergen, as now Burying the Records of that Church still in existence appears by The also Records show the dates of birth, marriages (1908). and deaths and burials of several other members of his 1702.

family. 1709.

Oct. 22.

of the Will of

Christoffel Steinmets

Abraham Bockee

was made Executor

of Acquackanonch, both of

Hackensack, N. J. Note: In the Town of Winkel, North Holland, lived Jacob Walling. About 1647 he married Treintie Jacobs. They to America and settled in Bergen they had six children. After his death in 1657 she married one Jacob Stoffelson. And as the widow of Jacob Stoffelson, on March 15, 1671, she married Caspar Steinmets. He was her third husband; and she was his third wife. She died in 1677 and he died in 1702.

came

;

Caspar Steinmets.

The following

him

offices

and positions of trust were held by

:

1633 to 1674. Court of Bergen.

Appointed and served as Judge in the

CASPAE STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

84

Was

a soldier with Gov. Stuyvesant in Curacoa; recommended by him to be Captain of a Military Co. Mar. 22. Took the oath of allegiance to the Lords 1654. 1651.

New Amsterdam. April 22. Was made

Proprietors of 1657.

a Freeman, with the rights

of a Burgher. 1660. Appointed Oct. 16.

1662.

Judge for Bergen. Appointed as first Scheppen by the Lords

Proprietors. 1665. Reappointed as Jersey. 1671.

Judge by Gov. Carteret

in

New

Took position of Overseer of the West India Com-

pany's Farm

of 385 acres. Served as juror in Elizabethtown, N. J. Sept. 4th. Delegate in Council of War held at

1672.

1673.

New Amsterdam.

New

1674.

Elected First Judge.

1674.

Made Deputy from Bergen

to

General Assembly of

Jersey in the 1st and 2nd sessions. 1675. Reappointed Associate Judge.

Meeting of Committee of Members and CommandFort William Henry, New Amsterdam. 1678. Also mentioned as Commissioner in Colonial 1675.

ers of Public Officers of Council held at

Records. Capt. of Military Co. assisted by Capt. Verlath.

1678.

Family Genealogy of Caspar Steinmets. Steinmets was born in Holland, tradition says in the city of Zutphen, in the Province of Overijsel. Tradition says also he came to this country in a trading vessel with his two

The brothers were traders and America Caspar decided to remain here and

brothers in the year 1631.

on one trip

to

seek his fortune but the brothers returned to Holland. ;

record of Casparus' presence here was at the of a child of Michael Misner, in 1648. The records baptism of the Old Dutch Church show that Steinmets and Roelef Cor-

The

first

and Gerrit Gerritsen were witnesses or Sponsors. Two years later, July 14, 1650, he came with his wife Dorothea

nelison

Aertson, to have their child baptized.

CASPAE STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

85

Caspar Steynmets and Dorothea, his wife, (1st wife) had son Caspar, baptized July 14, 1650, died 1673, aged 21 years. Dorothea died shortly after the birth of Caspar. Caspar Steinmets (widower) married Jeannetje GerritMarch 31, 1652. She died January 12, 1669. By this wife there were nine children, viz., Born Oct. 5, 1653. Married Dec. 1, (1) Johannes, 1674, to Annetje (Jacobs) Van Winkle. No living children. He died 1708. He was magistrate in Bergen, 1686 7 and owned 35 acres of land on Harsimus Creek, which he willed at his death to his sister Joanna Prior and her children. Born Jan. 25, 1655, Married Sept. 1673, to (2) Altje, married again Sept. 1679, to John J. Rider. Children Casparus, born Nov. 1, 1682; Jeannetje, born July 29, sen,

,

:

1686. (3)

Married

born Aug. 27, 1656. Died Nov. 1736. Vroutje Claes, March 10, 1685. (2nd) Catrina

Gerrit, (1st)

(Gerrits) Post, widow of Adrian Post, July, 1691. Gerit's children, Jeannetje, born 1685, Anna, born

Annetje, born 1688 Ariantie, born 1691 Caspar, born 1695; Hermanes, born 1696; married 1726, to Elsjee Herrmann, children, Margaretta, Gerrit, Annetje, Catherine. He-

1686

lena,

;

;

;

born 1698.

Born Oct. 20, 1658. Married Sept. Tadeas Magelse. Children, Jeannetje, born 1682 Jennekie, born 1697. Married March, 1709, Johannes (Hiborn) Hyer.) child(4)

Annetjes,

21, 1679, to

;

ren, Vrontje, 1712; Walter, 1714; Gertrude, 1716; Catherine, 1718. (5) Christoffel, born Dec. 18, 1660, married Oct. 6, 1684, to Jeannetje Gerrits, their children, Casparus, born Oct. 11, 1686; Annetje, born Oct. 1, 1688; Jeannetje, born March 15, 1691; Gerrit, born Oct. 1692; Judith, born 1694;

Benjamin, ancestor of the Hoffman, born 1696. their Married 1699, Sarah Ann Vannest, (2nd wife) children, Elizabeth, born 1700 Joanna, born 1707. Ancestors of Mrs. C. Walsh, Armenia, N. Y. Casparus (son of Christoffel) married Rachel (Pieter) Powlse; Annetje ;

CASPAE STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

86

married Jacob VanNoostrand, Sept. 1715; Jeannete married Caspar VanNoostrand, Oct. 22, 1720; Judith, married Herman VanRiper, 1721; Elizabeth, married Jurrie VanRiper, Nov. 1730. Benjamin, married 1st. Sarah VanStee 2nd. Sara Emans, 1720 (Ancestors of P. H. Hoffman). Joanna, married 1st, ;

2nd, Claeson Garrabrant, 1731. (6) Caspar, born Sept. 5, 1663, died 1683, age 20 yrs. Buried in Bergen Dutch Church yard, Jersey City, N. J. (7) Orsolena, born March 14, 1665, died 1731. Married Roelof Lubbertse "Westervelt (of Meppel, Holland) 1688. Children, Jennetje, born March 28, 1689 Kasparus, born July 1, 1694, (ancestor of Mrs. Quackenbush of South Orange) Johannes, born July 11, 1696 Arientie, born Aug. 1699. Line of descent to Mrs. Ef. E. Quackenbush. Maritie, born March, 1705 Annatie, born October 5, 1707. i

;

;

;

;

Kasparus, son of Orsolena and Roelof L. Westervelt, born July 19, 1694, married Nealtie Bougart, May 7, 1715, and their son

Benjamin Westervelt, born Dec. 3, 1727, married Elsie Earl, Aug. 8, 1751, and Hath-

Alfred

away

Lorton,

Sarah Howell Mulford.

their son

Kasparus Westervelt, born Sept. 15, 1752, married Nancy Campbell, Sept. 16, 1772, and their daughter Sarah B., married Lewis Lorton, and their daughter (born Nov. 29, 1855) Minnie B., married Benjamin E. Quackenbush, Apr. 18, 1878, and their daughter Eveline, born May 10, 1880, married Edward VanDyke, June 10, 1902, their born Apr. 6, 1904; children, Lorton, Elizabeth, born Oct. 24, 1906.

1667, married Andreas Preyer (Prior), 1688; (2nd) married G. VanNoostrand, 1699. (8)

Joanna, born Dec.

(9)

Benjamin, born January 16, 1670. Nothing can be he probably died young.

learned of his family

;

29,

CASPAE STEINMETS AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

87

The Westervelts. The Westervelts, (or Von Westervelts) (Historical), came from the province of Overyssel, Holland, one mile east of the Zuider Zee in the Town of Meppel. Near Meppel lived William and Lubbertson, two sturdy farmers and cattle raisIn April, 1662, they sailed for New Amsterdam, America, Lubbertson with a wife and six children and William with a wife and four children. They arrived on April 30, 1662, on the Dutch West India Ship "Faith". William settled in New Utrecht, L. I., and Lubbert with ers.

his wife, Jessie Roelofs

VanHouten,

settled at Flatbush, L.

I.

Lubberts prospered as a large farmer, owning slaves and much land. At his death his sons, Rupper, Roelef and John went to Bergen, N. J. John married Magdalena VanBlarcom and Roelef married Oroselena Steinmets (daughter of Caspar Steinmets). They bought land of the Indians at High wood and Wresskill. Their children intermarried with the Demarests, Noages, Blauvelts and others. Their descendants are still quite

ina

numerous in Bergen County.

(Line of Ancestry from Caspar Steinmets to Mrs. Georgof Amenia, N. Y.)

Walsh

Caspar Steinmets, the immigrant, through his son Christoffel, born Dec. 18, 1660, and his grandson Casparus, born Oct. 11, 1686, and his great-grandson Jacob, born Aug. 14, 1721, to Mrs. Georgina (Thompson) Walsh, of Amenia, N. Y., 1910.

Caspar Steinmets, born in Holland, about 1620, 1st wife, Dorothea Aertson, date and place of her birth unknown; she died 1650 or 1651. 2nd wife, Jeannetje Gerritson, born in Zutphen, Holland, 1630, died in Bergen, N. J., about 1670. Christoffel Steinmets (son of Caspar and Jeannetje) bora Dec. 19, 1660, married Jeannetje Gerrits in 1684. 2nd, Sarah

Ann

Vannest, in 1699. Casparus Steinmets (son of Christoffel and Joannetje) born Oct. 1686, married 1st. Rachel (Pieters) Powlse, June their son Jacob, born Aug. 14, 1720. 2nd, Maritje 6, 1713 ;

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS AT NORDHOFF.

88

Hendricksen, their children, Abraham, born 1724 Benjamin, born 1727; Catharine, born 1728; Isaac, born 1731; Gerrit, born Nov. 24, 1733. ;

Jacob Steinmets (son of Casparus and Rachel) married their children, Isaac, born March 19, 1755 Rachel, born Nov. 17, 1756 Isaac, born Apr. 4, 1759 Maria, born Sept. 3, 1760 Margaret, born Sept. 15, 1767.

Mary Dean (Dey) ;

;

;

;

(2) Amey Steinmets (daughter of Jacob and Mary) married Samuel Brown, who was born in England, 1758,

died 1846. (3)

Jacob Steinmets Brown (son of

(4)

Mary

T.

Brown (daughter

Amey and

of

Jacob

Samuel). Steinmets

Brown) married George Thompson. (5) Georgia Thompson (daughter of Mary and George) married Charles Walsh. They are now living at Amenia, N. Y. (1910) 1916.

(To be Continued in July Number.)

Tombstone

Inscriptions. OLD BURIAL GROUND, ENGLEWOOD, BERGEN CO., LOCATED ON THE VAN BRUNT PLACE, (NORDHOFF,) EAST SIDE OF GRANT AVE., BELOW LINDEN AVE. Copied May 5, 1912, by John Neafie, N. Y. City. 1 Polly, Daughter of John and Mary Benson, died November 10th 1802, aged 21 years, 19 days. 2. Eve Bard, wife of Samuel Counover, died May A. D. 1816, aged 83 years and 22 days, born April 131733. (broken). 3. Peter Cownover, born Sept. 11776, died May 281807, aged 30 years, 8 months and 28 days. 4. J. H. B., a large brown stone with the top broken off, containing the rest of the inscription. A small brown stone without marks. 5.

Revolutionary Pension Records of Morris County.

About a year ago there was rescued from rubbish in Morristown a manuscript account book without covers which was found to contain court records of certificates presented by petitioners for pensions based

upon Revolutionary War

services.

Most of the petitioners were widows of soldiers, but some were disabled veterans. The certificates usually were written by officers under whom the soldier had served, and in most cases several written by different persons, were offered to the court. The decision of the court follows each case. The dates run from 1779 to 1795. The manuscript book in spots is fast becoming illegible, some acid or other liquid having soaked through the pages and

Through the possession of a good copy we are print the records. They will be found not only his-

caused decay. able to

torically interesting because of the

many

people, battles, local-

ities and incidents mentioned, but useful genealogically especially to patriotic societies because of the clear evidence of loyal service on the part of the soldiers concerned. One of the

certificates additionally is certified

petition

Ford,

is

Jr.,

by Washington.

The

last

that of Theodosia Ford, widow of Colonel Jacob once owner of the Ford mansion, later occupied by

Washington, and still existant as Washington's Headquarters at Morristown. Interesting facts in Ford's career are set forth in the certificates recorded.

The thirty-nine petitions will be printed in instalments continuing through the present volume of the Proceedings. At the head of each petition, or group of certificates, will be given the

name

of the petitioner.

BEVOLUTIONABY PENSION RECORDS OF MOEEIS

90

CO.

ELIZABETH HORTON. Morris County September Term 1779.

A

ing

Certificate

was presented

to the

Court in the words follow-

:

"New Windsor 21 September 1779. This is to Certify that Doctor Isaac Spafford Surgeon of the Artillary under my Command had the charge of the Sick and other parts of the army at Mendham near Morristown in New jersey in the beginning of the year 1777 the Sick being so numerous as to require More assistance Doctor Spafford was authorized by the Surgeon Genl. and Myself to appoint Doctor Jonothan Horton as his Assistant at the rate of one Dollar and two thirds pr Day, the said Doctor Horton officiated in said capacity and died in the Service of the united States. Signed

"H. Knox

Brig. Genl. Artillary".

Also a certificate in the words following : "New Windsor 21 September 1779. This is to certify that Doctor Isaac Spafford S*urgeon to the Artillary in the begining of 1777 was fully authorized by me the subscriber Surgeon General of the Army to appoint Doctor Jonathan Horton as his assistant at the rate of one Dollar and two thirds pr Day to take care of the Sick who were then too numerous for one Surgeon to attend and that the Said Doctor Jonathan Horton died whilst in the Service of the united States.

Signed "John Cochran Surgn. Genl. to ye army".

And

words following the Subscribers two of the justices of the State of New jersey assigned to keep the peace in the County of Morris do hereby certify that Elizabeth Horton Widow was the Lawful Wife of Doctor Jonathan Horton who died in the service of the united States of America, as witness our hands at Morris Town in the also a Certificate in the

"We

said county of Morris the twenty ninth day of September 1779.

Signed

"Elijah Horton "Constant King".

An affidavit of Frederick King and also an affidavit of C. Victor King Respecting the appointment of the Said Jonathan Horton as assistant Surgeon in the Service of the united States and his dying in the Service on the 24th day of May 1777, were presented to the Court.

And after Examining the Said certificates and affidavits The Court adjudged that the said Elizabeth Horton widow of the said Jonathan Horton Deceased is by the Law of this State in such case made and provided, entitled to Receive during her widowhood

EEVOLUTIONAEY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS the Monthly half pay of her

Husband

CO.

91

the said Jonathan Horton

Deceased.

HANNAH Deer.

Term 1779

in favor of the

MORRIS. Widw. Hannah Morris.

A Certificate was presented to the Court in the words following "I hereby certify that Major Joseph Morris, of the Troops of the State of Newjersey, who was appointed Major in the light :

corps commanded by Coll. Morgan was wounded in the Head, in an action with the Enemy about the 6th December 1778, at Edgehill in the State of Pennsylvania and that he Died in consequence sometime after. I acted as Lieut. Coll. in the corps with him at the time, and am certain of the fact. "Richd. Butler Coll. "9th. Pensa. Regt." Maj 'r Morris a brave & Meritorious officer was wounded and

Died as certifyed above .... "G. Washington." Morris County December Term 1779 In favour of the Widdow Hannah Morris. A certificate was presented to the Court in the words follow"I the underwritten, Surgeon of the third Newjersey Regiing ment of foot, in the Service of the United States of America, do hereby certify, that Joseph Morris Esqr who was Major of the first Newjersey Regiment of foot under the Command of Coll. Ogden, was while he occupied the said Station, wounded in an engagement with the Enemy at white Marsh in the State of Pennsylvania sometime in the month of December 1777, that I the underwritten attended the said Major Morris so as aforesaid wounded as a Surgeon until his death which was occasioned by the wound he received in the above engagement. In witness whereof I have hereunto Set my hand this twentyninth Day of September Anno Domini 1779. :

"To all whom May concern And

it

)

"Lews. Dunham."

}

also the following certificate

"We

the underwritten, two of the Justices of the State of Newjersey assigned to keep the peace in the county of Morris, do hereby certify, that Hannah Morris, Gentle Woman was in our Belief the Lawful Wife of Joseph Morris Esqr. late Major of the

Newjersey Regiment of Foot commanded by Coll. Ogden, and Hannah Morris is the real widdow of the aforesaid Major Joseph Morris Deceased, Given under our hands at Morris Town in the Said County of Morris this twentyninth Day of September AnDo 1779.

first

that the 'Said

BEVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

92

"To all whom it ) May concern { & also the following

"Benjn. Hallsey "Benjn. Lindsly

CO.

)

,,

j"

certify that Major Joseph Morris was a Member of Parish, that on April 12, 1759, I joined him & Mrs. Hannah Ford in the Holy Banns of Marriage & they lived together in friendship till the unhappy battle of white Marsh where the Major Received his fatal wound gallently fighting in his countries

"These may

my

cause, but Survived till he was brought to his afflicted consort but on Jany. 7, 1778 he expired, & the next Day was Buried with the Honors of War. "Test Timy Johnes Pastor of the Church " after Examining the above certificates the court were of

opinion that the Said

Widw. Morris

is

Intitled to half pay.

"Morris Town, "Feb. 21y. 1781."

JOSIAH BURNET. Morris County, December Term 1779. A Certificate was presented to the Court in words following, Viz "This May certify that Ensign Josiah Burnet was wounded in the Leg at an action near Second River in September 1777 by which wound he was Rendered unfit for Service. " Morris Town ) "Decemr. 21st 1779 J "Silvs Seely Coll." :

The court having Examined the above Certificate were of opinion that the Said Josiah Burnet is entitled to Receive his half pay and that he is fit for gard or garison Duty.

MARTHA HATHAWAY. March Term 1780 a words,

&

certificate

figures following Viz

was presented

to the Court in the

:

"Hardistown Sussex County the 10th March 1780 certify that Shadrack Hathaway Inlisted with Me during the war the 23 day of November in the year 1776 in the fourth Jersey Regt. Commanded by Coll. Ephraim Martin and Served as a Serjent in Said Regt. untill the 4th. day of October in the year 1777 and then was wounded in the Battle of Germantown and died in four days after. "Noadiah Waid Capt." and also the following affidavit "This

is to

Morris County ss. Ezekiel Parkhurst personally appeared before Me this day and made oath that he was present when the Revd.

EEVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

93

Mr. Pepper Maried Martha Hathaway to the within Mentioned Shadrach Hathaway and that the Said Martha is now the widow and further of the ahove Shadrach Hatheway. Sworn before Saith not March 18 1780. Ezekiel Parkhurst. Benjn. Hallsey, J. P. The court having examined the foregoing certificate and affidavit adjudged that the Said Martha Hatheway is entitled to Receive the half pay of her Said Husband quarterly during her

widowhood.

LOUIS FISHER. July Term 1780 Louis Fisher presented to the Court a certificate in the words and Figures following Viz "I certify that John Fisher the Husband of Louis Fisher was an inlisted Soldier in late Captain Pater:

sons Company of the third Jersey Reginfent and that said John Fisher lost his life in the Service of America some day in June 1778 at the time of the Enemy's Marching from Philadelphia to

New York

through Newjersey.

"F. Barber

L. Coll. Corny."

"Pompton " June 29 1780

"I do hereby Certify that on the 24th day of December 1777 Married Louis Duryee to John Fisher, now deceased. Witness Matts. Burnet Jus. My hand Hanover July 1780." I

"We

the 'Subscribers do hereby certify that Louis Fisher, to the best of our knowledge and belief was the Lawful wife of John Fisher who was killed in the Service in June 1778, and the said Louis is the Real widow of the said John Fisher. Witness our

hands, this 4th. day of July 1780.

"Morris Town.

"Benj'n Hallsey ) "Benn. Lindsly { Justices." The court having examined the foregoing certificates adjudge that the Said Louis Fisher is entitled to Receive the half pay of her late Husband John Fisher Deceased Quarterly from the 28th day of June 1778 during her Widdowhood.

PHEBE SALTER. March Term 1781 Phebe Salter produced to the Court a and

figures following, viz

"Mendham

certificate in the

words

:

17th March 1781 These do certify that Benjamin

94

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

Salter a Militia Soldier was called out to oppose the Enemy on the day of September 1777 and was in the battle at Second river on the 6th of the Same Month under My command when he received a wound in his Body from the Enemy of which he died the

fifth

next day.

"Wm. Winds then Brigadier Genl."

and also an affidavit in the words and "Newjersey Morris county ss.

figures following viz.

''Personally appeared before Me Abraham Kitchel one of the Justices of the peace for Said County, John Salter who being duly sworn Saith that he Saw Benjamin Salter Married to Phebe Merit by the Revd. Mr. John Walton which Said Benjamin Salter was wounded in an action with the Enemy at Second river Some time in September in the year 1777 of which wound he died the day

following and the Said Phebe is now the widow of him the Said Benjamin Salter dec., and further this Deponent Saith not. Sworn before me this 2lt. day of March 1781. ' '

"Abrm. Kitchel." The Court having taken the Same into consideration are of opinion that the ISaid Widow Phebe Salter is entitled to the half pay of her Deceased Husband and that a Certificate do Issue accordingly.

RAiCHEL SHORES. Sept.

Term 1781

A

certificate

in favour of the

following, viz

from William Winds was presented to the court Shores in the words and figures

Widdow Rachel

:

"Mendham

10th September 1787 to

all

whom

it

may

concern

these are to certify that Pelick Shores was a Soldier in Capt. Mekers Company in the years Service in the Continental army in my Regiment and died at fort-george the fourth of August 1776.

"William Winds "then Colonel." and

also the following deposition

"Morris County State of Newjersey personally appd. before me Stephen Day one of the Justices of the peace of sd. County Benjamin Day Esqr. and being duly Sworn deposeth and Saith that the Widow Rachel Freeman was Lawfully married by him to Pelig Shores and that she still remains his Widow. Benjamin Day.

"Sworn

before

me

to the above

"Stephen Day."

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS The Court having examined the Said

certificate

CO.

95

and deposidraw the from the

tion adjudge that the 'Said Rachel Shores is intitled to half pay of her late Husband Pelig Shores deceased

fourth day of August 1776 during her Widowhood agreeably to a Resolution of Congress and a Law of this State in Such case made and provided and that a certificate be made out accordingly.

RACHEL CORY. September Term 1781. Rachel Cory late the Widow of Capt. Archibald Dallas produced a certificate in the words and figures following, viz. This may certify Captain Archibald Dallas was a Captain in and Served as a good and brave officer until! he fell Regiment My which was in a skirmish with the enemy near Christian bridge in Delaware State in Sept. 5, 1777. Oliver Spencer Coll. Mendham May 12, 1781 and also the following Deposition

The Deposition of Samuel Frost taken on oath before Me one of the Justices of the peace for the County of Morris deposeth and Saith that in the year 1772 he the Said Deponant Saw Rachel Frost Married to Archibald Dallas and Since Said Dallas 's decease She the Said Wife hath Married to David ory Senr. of Persippany. Sworn before

Benj

'n.

Me

this 6th

day of July 1781

Howell

and also the following certificate This May certify the General Assembly that David Cory was Joined in the Holy bands of Marriage to Rachel Dallas the Widow of Archibald Dallas Deceased and pronounced before Witnesses lawful Man and wife the 28 of January 1779 by Me Joseph Grover Sept. 11 1781

Presbyterian Minister

and also the following Deposition The deposition of Sarah Frost taken on oath

this 20th

day

of Sept. 1781 before Me one of the Justices of the peace for the county of Morris is as follows viz. which Deponant Saith that on the 22d day of Septr 1777 She the Said Deponant delivered Rachel Dallas the Wife of Archibald Dallas of her Son Archibald Dallas and further Saith not. Sarah Frost taken and Sworn before on the day above written.

Benj'n Howell.

Whereupon the court adjudged that Rachel Cory late Widow of Archibald Dallas is entitled to the half pay of her late husband Capt. Archibald Dallas Deceased from the 5th. day of Sept. 1777,

96

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

to the 28th.

CO.

day of January 1779 and that her Son Archibald Dal-

Legal representative is entitled to draw the half pay of his Father Archibald Dallas from the said 28th. day of January 1779, untill he arrives at the age of eight years if he lives untill that time which will terminate on the 22d. day of Sept. las or his

1785.

JEMIMA GORDEN. Morris County Ss At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of the peace in and for the 'County of Morris on the nineteenth day of :

December Anno Domini, one thousand Seven hundred & Eighty one Present

David Thompson Benjn. Halsey John

Stiles

&

Will Woodhull

Esqrs., Justices.

Application was made to the Court in behalf of Jemima Gorden widow of William ftorden, deed, late a Captain in the 3rd. regt. of the Troops of this State of Newjersey in the Service of the United States for a Certificate to entitle her to a Warrant for the halfpay of her late Husband and Certificates were presented to to wit the Court in the words & figures following I Certify that Captain William Gorden who Died about 1st. April 1777 was at the time of his Death a Captain in the Third Jersey Regiment. F. Barber Morris Town

December

&

9th. 1781.

Lieutt. Coll.

also the following Certificate

We whose names are Jersey Morris County hereunto Subscribed being Justices of the peace in Said County do Certify that Jemima Gorden was Wife of Captain William Gorden & that they lived together in Honour and Reputation Several Years before his Decease in this Township & that the above said Jemima is now the Widow of him the said William Gorden who died while in the 'Continental Service as Witness our hands in Pequanock Township September the Twenty fourth 1781. Abrm. Kitchel 2nd.

New

William Ross. The Court having considered the Same, are of opinion that the Said Jemima Gorden is entitled to the half pay of her late Husband Captain William Gordon from the Thirty eth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred & Seventy Seven during her Widowhood and that a Certificate be made out accordingly

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

97

ELIZABETH MILLER. At a Court of General Quarter Sessions Morris County ss. of the Peace held at Morris Town in and for sd. County of Morris on the nineteenth day of December Anno domini one thousand Seven hundred & eighty one. Present David Thompson Benn. Halsey Jonn. Stiles John Brookfield William Woodhull & Seth Babbet Esquires Justices Application was made to the Court in behalf of Elizabeth Miller Widow of Daniel Miller deed, late a Soldier in Coll. Winds Regt. of the Troops of this State of New Jersey in Service of the United States at Lake George, &c. & a Certificate was presented to the Court in the words & figures following, to wit. Mendom 19th. December 1781. These may certify that Daniel Miller was a Soldier in the Years Service in 1776 in my Regiment and deceased the first of August 1776 at Lake George according to Returns made to me by Captain Silas Howell in whose company he was a soldier. Wil. Winds then Colonel, :

also the following Affidavit Viz.

Morris County December 19th. 1781. Personally appeared be for me Stephen Day one of the Justices of the peace in said County Stephen Bowers and wife & being duely sworn Say they saw Daniel Miller (Deed.) Married to Elizabeth Bowers in November 1771 and She still remains his Widow and farther Saith not .

.

Steph Bower

Phebe Bower Sworn before me the day and date above Stephen Day Justice

The 'Court having considered the said

Certificate

&

affidavit,

are of opinion that the said Elizabeth Miller is intitled to the half pay of her late Husband Daniel Miller from the first day of August one thousand Seven hundred & Seventy Six during her

Widowhood &

that a Certificate be

made out Accordingly

ABIGAIL CARMAN. At

the above mentioned Court of Quarter Sessions Application was made to the Court in behalf of Abigail Carman Widow of Moses Carman deed, for Certificates to entitle her to a Warrant for the half pay of her late Husband And the fol-

lowing Vouchers were presented to the Court in the words

&

figures following, to wit This may Certify that Moses Carman was a Soldier in my Regiment in the Contl. Service and died at Valley Forge the beginning of 1778 (I believe in the month of February) having

Served whilst he lived as a good

Mendham

Dec. 15th. 1781.

&

faithfull Soldier.

Oliver Spencer

98

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

& figures following Viz. This Certify that Moses Carman was a Soldier of Coll. Spencers Regiment in the Continental Service & that he died at Valey Forge the beginning of the Year 1778. Morris Town Deer. 18th. 1781. Jabez Campfield Also a Certificate in the words

may

Surgeon to Said Regiment Also an Affidavit in the words & figures following October 15th. 1781. This Day personally appeared before me Benj. Lindsly one of the Justices of the peace for the County of Morris, David Bates & made oath upon the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God that he Saw Moses 'Carman Married to Abigail Dean which Abigail

is

now

the

Widow

Sworn before me

of Moses Carman. day of Octr. 1781 Benjn.

this fifteenth

Lindsley.

The Court having considered the Same are of opinion that the Said Abigail Carman is entitled to the half pay of her late Husband Moses Carman from the 28th. day of February anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and seventy eight during her Widowhood & that a Certificate be made out accordingly

DEBORAH MINTHORN. At a Court of General Quarter Sessions held at Morris Town in and for the County of Morris on the Third Tuesday of March Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred & Eighty Two Present

David Thompson & Benjamin Halsey Esqr. Judges. Benn. Lindsly John Brookfield Jonn. Stiles Steph Day WilMinthorn liam Woodhull Joseph Wood Ab. Kitchel & Esqrs. Justs.

Application was made to the Court in behalf of Deborah

Widow

of Wil Minthorn Minthorn late a Soldier of Capt. Holmes Co. of 1st. Jer. Regt. in Service of the United States A Certificate was presented to the Court in the words & figures viz. following I Certify that William Minthorn a Soldier of my Company enlisted to Serve during the War died of the wounds he received before York in Virginia on the 2nd. day of November one thousand

Seven hundred & Eighty one Given at Camp near Morris Town Feby. 20th. 1782 Sign'd Jno. Homes Capt. also an Affidavit in the words & figures following

first

N.

Jersey Regt. Mendham Morris County. Personally appeared before me Sether Babbit one of the Justices for the Said County Parmenas Dodd and being duly Sworn deposeth & Saith that about Eleven Years

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS ago he was personally present and ried to

Deborah Dod

&

that She

is

CO.

99

Saw William Minthorn Marnow his widow March 18th.

1782

Signd

Parmenus Dod The Court having considered the Said Certificate & Affidavit are of opinion that She the Said Deborah Minthorn is entitled to the half pay of her late husband William Minthorn from the Second day of November one thousand Seven hundred & Eighty one during her Widowhood and that a Certificate be made out acSeth Babbit

cordingly

ABIGAIL MINTHORN. At a Court of General Quarter Sesions held at Morris Town in and for the County of Morris on the Third Tuesday of March anno Domini one thousand Seven hundred & Eighty Two. Present

David Thompson & Benjamin Halsey Esqrs. Judges. Benjn. Lindsly John Brookfield Jonn. Stiles Steph. Day William Wodhull Joseph Wood & Abr. Kitchel Esqrs. Justices .... Application was made to the Court in behalf of Abigail Minthorn widow of William Minthorn late a Serjeant of the 1st. N. Jersey Regt. in Service of the United States. A Certificate was presented to the Court in the words & figures following Viz. I hereby Certify that Phillip Minthorn died the 23rd December 1780 a Serjeant in the first J. Reg. enlisted for the War (Signed)

March

M. Ogden

13th. 1782

An

Affidavit

was

also presented to the Court in the

Col.

words

&

figures following Viz.

This may Certify that George Minthorn personally appeared before me John Brookfield and being duly Sworn deposeth & Saith that he Saw Phillip Minthorn Lawfully married to Abigail Minthorn now the Widow of the said Philip Minthorn.

(Sign'd)

Taken & Sworn before me George Minthorn the 21st. day of March 1782 (Sign'd) John Brookfield The Court having considered the Said Certificate and Affidavit are of Opinion that She the Said Abigail Minthorn is entitled to the half pay of her late Husband a Serjeant Wilm. Minthorn from the Twenty third day of December one thousand Seven hundred & Eighty during her widow and that a Certificate be made out accordingly

(To be Continued in July Number.)

Book Notice. Memorial Cyclopedia of New Jersey, Under the Editorial Supervision of Mary Depue Ogden. Published by the Memorial History Company, Newark, New Jersey, 1915. quarto, two volumes, pp. 412 with index in each volume. This work will prove of great value to New Jersey biography and history. It gathers together sketches of men of the past whose histories otherwise might be lost in the general mass of newspaper, pamphlet, magazine and manuscript material scattered about. Also it brings out of obscurity many persons whose lives are full of interest to historians, antiquarians and genealogists. Only through such a business enterprise could such an object be attained, and with the issuing of succeeding volumes the field, it is understood, will be developed even more extensively. The plan provides for a succession of volumes giving the biographies of Jerseymen who have passed away after life work The editor's foreword reveals the deserving memorialization. wide field of biographical effort in view. "Every age in the state's history, from the earliest times, bears many shining names. Even when New Jersey was a practically unknown wilderness, from the Hudson to the Delaware, there were Indian chieftains of remarkable attainments, including old Oraton, famed throughout the region for his wisdom and ' '

uprightness.

Among the persons whose careers are sketched are to be found many who never before have been noticed in general works, and many whose

annals have been heretofore discovered only after the most patient research. New Jersey's first Governor, Philip Carteret, whose biography occupies the first pages, while generally known to readers of state history, has not been previously included in general works, to any marked degree. David Young, the

New

Jersey almanac-maker and astronomer, is one among many in for their first extended recognition. Among the most modern of those noticed is Rev. Hannibal Goodwin, the inventor of the photographic film, who was for a long time a resident of Newark. The record of his interesting career is, through this publication, made available. There is an extended biography of Jonathan W. Roberts of Morris Plains, long the president of the Washington Association of New Jersey, and of the New Jersey Historical Society. There are included many Newarkers, whose careers previously have not been searched out. The editor, Mrs. Ogden, is a member and a former President

who come

of the

Woman 's

Branch of the

New

Jersey Historical Society.

Necrology. WILLIAM LEETE STONE, a well known historian and editor, Mont Vernon, N. J., on June 11, 1908, at the age of seventy-three years. He was a descendant of William Leete, a Colonial Governor of Connecticut. His father was editor of the New York Commercial Advertiser from 1822 until the time of his death in 1844, and his grand-uncle was the Eev. Francis Wayland, a president of Brown University. Mr. Stone graduated from Brown University in 1858, and, after some time spent in Germany in translating historic journals, he attended the Albany Law School and practiced in Saratoga undied at

In 1859 he married Miss Harriet D. Gillette, of Cleveland. In 1869 he returned to his birthplace, New York City, and was editor of the Journal of Commerce for several years. He was the author of numerous historical works pertil

1863.

taining to Revolutionary days. He was survived by his widow and four children William M. Stone, Arthur Douglas Stone, Francis Wayland Stone and Miss Susanne M. Stone. He was :

elected a corresponding

member

of this Society in 1899.

DR. CHARLES S. STOCKTON, at the time of his death the dean of the dental profession in New Jersey, died on September 9, 1912. He was born in Springfield township, Burlington County, on December 17, 1836, the son of Stacy and Elizabeth (Rossell) Stockton. He attended Pennington Seminary and at the time of his graduation was valedictorian of his class. He studied dentistry with Dr. George C. Brown, at Mt. Holly, and in the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery, graduating from this institution in 1868. He succeeded Dr.

Brown in Mt. Holly in 1873 he removed to Newark, where he remained up to the time of his death. He was a descendant of Richard Stockton, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. On September 23, 1857, he married Miss ;

NECROLOGY.

102

Martha Ann Smith, and she survived him with two children Dr. Frank 0. Stockton and Mrs. Robert W. Elliot. He was :

elected a life

member

of this society on January 20, 1876.

RUTHERFORD /STUYVESANT, died in Paris on July 4, 1909. His real name was Stuyvesant Rutherford and among his ancestors were Governor Peter Stuyvesant Governor John Win;

throp, of Massachusetts; Governor Dudley, of Connecticut; Lewis Morris, Chief Justice of New York and first Governor of

New

His father was Lewis Morris Rutherford and his

Jersey.

mother was Margaret Stuyvesant Chanler. By the will of his mother's great-uncle, Peter Gerard Stuyvesant 's property was

him upon the condition of his changing his family name to Stuyvesant, which was done by an act of the Legislature. In 1863 he graduated from Columbia College and in the same left to

year he married Ma*ry Rutherford Pierrepont, daughter of Henry Evelyn Pierrepont and Anna Maria Jay. Mrs. Stuyvesant died in 1879. On June 16, 1902, he married in London the Countess Mathilde E. de Wassanaer, the widow of a

Dutch nobleman. A son was born of this marriage. Mr. Stuyvesant, who was sixty-nine years of age at the time of his death, was a brother of Winthrop Rutherford, who married Alice Morton, and of Mrs. Henry White, at that time American Ambassador in France. He was a cousin on his mother's side of "William Astor Chanler and Mrs. Richard Aldrich. He was the owner of Tranquility Farms, near Tranquility, N. J., famous for its elk and deer park and extensive English pheasant preserves. He was elected a life member of this Society on

May

19, 1870.

contributing member on died May 5, 1899, February 11, 1912, at -two aged seventy years.

AARON PECK CONDIT, who became a of this Society

Madison, N.

J.,

on

WILLIAM HORACE CORBIN, for many years one of the most prominent members of the New Jersey bar, died in Sullivan county, N. Y., on September 15, 1912. He was born in the town of McDonough, Chenango county, N. Y., on July 12,

NECEOLOGY.

103

at the academy at Oxford, N. Y., he secured a in Cornell University and after graduating from scholarship this institution studied law in Columbia College, New York

1851.

While

City.

In 1870 he took up his residence in Elizabeth, N. J., He was a at the time of his death.

and was a resident there

member

of the Elizabeth

City Council and of the

Board of Education,

New

of the Elizabeth

Jersey Assembly.

His law

office

was in Jersey City and he was prominently

identified

with

many financial institutions in that city, including the New Jersey Title Guarantee & Trust Company, the First National Bank, the Pavonia Trust Company and the Dixon Crucible Company. He was survived by a widow, two sons and a daughter. He was elected a contributing member of this Society on January 27, 1891. REV. DR. ELIJAH RICHARDSON CRAVEN, died in Philadelphia on January 5, 1908. He was born in Washington, D. C.,

on March

28, 1824,

and graduated from Princeton University

of age. He took up the study of law but not finding himself adapted to that profession returned to Princeton in 1849, and entered the theological seminary. For some time he was pastor of the Second Presbyterian church of

when eighteen years

Somerville, N.

J.,

and for thirty-three years pastor of the

Third Presbyterian Church of Newark. He resigned this pastorate in 1888 to accept the position of secretary of the Presbyterian Board of Publications and Sabbath-school Work, with headquarters in Philadelphia, later becoming secretary emeritus. For forty-five years he was a trustee of Princeton University and at one time moderator of the General Assembly. He was twice married. His first wife was a great-grand-

daughter of Commodore Tingey, and his second wife a daughVan Ransselaer Moore, of New York, and grand-daughter of Bishop Moore, of Virginia. He was survived by two sons and two daughters Commander John E. Craven of the U. S. Navy; Rev. Charles I. Craven, pastor of the Presbyterian church of Mattituck, N. Y. Miss Margaretta T. Craven, of Newark, and Miss Evelina Green Craven, of Philadelphia. He

ter of

:

;

became a

life

member

of this Society on

May

20, 1858.

NECROLOGY.

104

MBS. EMILY E. HORNBLOWER WILLIAMSON, who died on July 13, 1909, was the wife of Benjamin Williamson, the eldest son of the late Chancellor Benjamin Williamson and grandson of the late Governor Williamson of New Jersey. She

was the daughter of Erastus F. and Emily N. Read HornIn 1885 she founded the State Charities Aid and blower. Prison Reform Association. In 1899 she was elected president of the State Federation of Women's Clubs. In 1902 she was appointed Probation Officer of Union County by Judge Vail, an office she held until the time of her death. She was a director of the Federation of

Women's

Clubs, a

member

of the

National Board of Charities and Correction, a member of the State Board of Children's Guardians, a member of the State

Aid Association, a member of the Woman's Advisory Committee of the University of New York, secretary of the In-

Charities

stitution for the Feeble-minded at Vineland, N. J., member of the Sorosis, of New York, a member of the Monday Club, of

Elizabeth, secretary of the Home for Aged Women, President of the Day Nursery Association (now Egenolf Day Nursery),

and president of the first conference of Charities and Corrections. She was identified from its beginning with the New Jersey Review of Charities and Corrections. She was appointed by President Roosevelt to be a delegate to the Congress of the International Prison Association at Budapest, and at

made an extensive tour of Europe, inspecting prisons. She was active in bringing about the establishment of the State Reformatory at Rahway. She was also well known for her magazine work. She became a contributing member of this Society on May 19, 1887. the time

ERNEST LUTOLPH MEYER, who died on April 3, 1902, was the son of Dr. Nicholas Meyer, a British half -pay officer who took part in the campaign against the first Napoleon under Wellington, and Johanna Frederica Elizabeth Dorrien.

He

was born in Horneburg, Hanover, on August 26, 1828, and after studying at the Polytechnic School of Hanover and the University of Gottingen, and some time spent in the chemical factory of his uncle, in Rehme, Prussia, came to this country

NECROLOGY.

105

In the following year he became Assistant City Surveyor of Elizabeth, and, subsequently as City Surveyor, completed the plans of Evergreen Cemetery. He was the author of a History of Elizabeth. On November 24, 1858, he married Eugenia Mathilda Wirz, daughter of Rev. Johann Carl in 1851.

Furchgott Wirz, who belonged to one of the best known families of Switzerland, and Fernandine Oswald, of Stuttgart, Germany. Mrs. Meyer died April 25, 1889. The deceased was survived by three children Alina Fernandine, who Frederick Sprainger Mabbatt; Ernest Hugo Lu(married tolph, who married Alice Christina Shailer, and Oswald Lincoln Paul. He became a life member of this Society on May :

16, 1895.

REV. DR. DONALJ> SAGE MACKAY, died on the

way

to his

Blue Hill, Me., on August 27, 1908. He was born in Glasgow, on November 20, 1863. He was educated at the University of Glasgow, and New College, Edinburgh, obtaining a license to preach from the Presbytery of Glasgow.

summer home

at

He came

to this country in 1890, and, after serving four years as pastor of the First Congregational Church ot St. Albans, Vt., came to Newark, where he assumed the pastorate of the

North Reformed Church, after which he became pastor of the Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas, New York City. While at St. Albans he married Miss Helen L. Smith, daughter of J. J. Gregory Smith, president of the Vermont Central Railroad and the war governor of Vermont. He was survived by her and four children. He became a life member of this Society on May 16, 1895. Miss FRANCES A. McMuRTRY, who became a contributing of this Society on April 5, 1901, died at Newton, N. J., on August 10, 1912.

member

CHARLES BORCHERLING, for many years a prominent resident of Newark, died in that city on February 5, 1912, aged eighty-five years. He became a contributing member of this Society on

May

17, 1886.

NECROLOGY.

106

KEY. DR.

ALLEN H. BROWN, who was one

Presbyterian ministers in

New

of the oldest

Jersey, died on

November

5, 1907, at Montclair, aged eighty-seven years. For the greater part of his life he was a missionary in the southern counties

of the state, whither he went immediately after his ordination at Princeton Theological Seminary.

York

city

He was born

and graduated from Columbia

College.

in

New

For many

years he held the position of synodical missionary of the Presbyterian church, retiring from the ministry about ten years before his death. He left a sister, a son and two daughters.

He became

a life member of the Society on May 20, 1875. MRS. KATHARINE MYERS FREEMAN, widow of Wilberforce Freeman, died on February 25, 1912, at Orange, aged sixtyShe was born in Whitehall, N. Y., the daughter eight years. two of Mr. and Mrs. John Kirtland. She was survived by * Will of and Mrs. Mrs. John H. N. Condict, Orange, daughters, Howe Foote, of Old Lyme, Conn. She was elected a life member of this Society on May 3, 1905.

REV. DR. Louis SHREVE OSBORNE, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church of Newark, N. J., died on January 27, 1912, one day after the twenty-second anniversary of his delivering his He was born October 10, 1851, first sermon in that church. in Salem, Mass., and graduated from Harvard College in 1873. He studied theology in the Divinity School in Philadelphia,

and, after some missionary work in southern Ohio, was called Church in Sandusky, Ohio. In 1884

to the rectorate of Grace

he was called to Trinity Church in Chicago and in 1889 became rector of Trinity Church, Newark. He was married in Sandusky in 1878 to Miss Maria Ashburner, of Philadelphia, whom he had met when a student in Divinity School. She died in 1889, and he was survived by one son and two daughters :

Algernon A., Elizabeth

member

C.,

of this Society on

and Helen.

May

He was

elected a life

16, 1895.

DR. EDGAR HOLDEN, a prominent physician of Newark, He was born at J., died on July 18, 1909, at Chatham. on November 1838. His 3, father, Asa Hingham, Mass., a of that his grandwas manufacturer and Holden, place,

N.

NECROLOGY.

107

father was John Holden, an officer in the Continental army, promoted for bravery at the battle of Bunker Hill and one of the founders of the American Society of Cincinnati. Dr. Holden graduated from Princeton College in 1859, and from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York in 1861. He enlisted in the latter part of 1861 and served in the United States navy throughout the civil war. He was an authority on diseases of the larynx and the inventor of several surgical instruments in general use. Dr. Holden 's first wife was Miss Katherine Hedden, daughter of Jotham Hedden, of East Orange, whom he married in 1862. She died in 1870 and Dr. Holden in 1873 married Helen Stewart Burgess, daughter of John Burgess, of Orange. He was survived by his widow, two sons and three daughters. He was elected a life member of this Society on January 16, 1873.

FRANCIS HENDRICKS, who for many years was engaged in the manufacture of copper at Belleville, N. J., died in New

York on March 8, 1912, aged seventy-five years. He was unmarried and was survived by a brother and six sisters, all residents of New York City. He was a graduate of New York University. He was elected a life member of this Society on January 26, 1896. MRS. ANNA E. WRIGHT, died in Newark on March 8, 1912. She was Miss Anna E. Quinby, daughter of James M. and Phebe Sweasy Quinby, and was born in Newark on October She was married to Nelson Wright, of New York, 18, 1840. on October 5, 1865. She was the first vice president of the Guild of St. Barnabas Hospital, a leading member of the Society of Colonial Dames and took a great interest in the Woman 's Branch of this Society. She was survived by a daughter, Mrs. Arthur H. MacKie, with whom she had made her home. She was elected a life member of this Society on April 6, 1900.

M. D. WHEELER THURSTON, died in New York City on June 26, 1908, at the age of thirty-nine years. He had devoted a great deal of time to genealogy of

New

Jersey families

and was engaged in the advertising business in New York. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel H. Thurston, of

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS.

108

East Long Branch. He was married to Mary C. Kenyon, of Toronto, Canada, and survived by her, his parents and three children Richard Townley, Dorothy P. and Margaret Elizabeth. He was elected a contributing member of this Society on :

November

1,

1901.

Miss JULIA H. TICHENOR, daughter of James H. and Lydia Nuttman Tichenor, died in Newark on March 24, 1912. She was elected a life member of this Society on January 24, 1893.

Bergen County Tombstone Inscriptions. OLD BURIAL GROUND .AT DEMAREST, BERGEN Copied May, 1910, by John Neafie and 5,

1.

1912,

by

J. Neafie,

Benjamin Blacklidge,

d.

W.

B.

Van

New York

Nov. 27

CO., N.

Alstyne, Verified

J.,

May

City.

1815, aged 72 yrs., 3

mos., 2 ds. 2. Cathalinetye, wife of Benjamin Blacklidge, died Oct. 5 1836, aged 82 yrs., 6 mos., 4 ds. 3. Jacobus Blacklidge, d. Aug. 20 1811 aged 31 yrs., 6 mos., 26 de. Isaac Blacklidge, b. Nov. 91794, d. Sept. 10 1811, aged 4. 16 yrs., 10 mos., 7 ds. 5. Benjamin Blacklidge Jr. b. Sept. 171770, d. Oct. 13,

1811, aged 41 yrs. 26 days. 6. Peter Blacklidge, d. Nov.

91832, aged

50 yrs. 8 mos. 21

ds. 7.

Maria Blacklidge, wife of Daniel Van Sciven,

b.

May

Jan. 61823, aged 50 yrs. 7 mos. 14 ds. 8. Elizabeth Blacklidge, wife of Cornelius Van Valer, d. June 211839, aged 51 yrs. 7 mos. 21 ds. 9. Benjamin Blackledge, d. Aug. 281849, aged 52 yrs. 7 mos. 19 ds. 10. John Van Sciven, b. Apr. 61807, d. Jan. 311849, aged 41 yrs. 9 mos. 22 ds. Daniel Van Sciven, d. July 101843, in his 95th yr. a 11. Patriot of the American Revolution. Children of James P. and Maria Blackledge. 12. George, died Sept. 30 1852, aged 4 years.

231772,

d.

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS.

109

1855, ae. 3 yrs. 1 mo. 19 ds. Meierhoff, b. at Spaden in Germany, died at New York Feb. 201848, aged 25 years. Maria Gecox, d. May 30 1842, aged 83 years, 9 mos. 15.

15

13.

Andrew, died May 2

14.

Meta

ds.

16. Jane Parcels, wife of Joannis Blauvelt, died Aug. 14 1832, aged 77 years, 9 mos. 5 ds. 17. H. Bening, (a wooden marker, without any other inscription.) 18.

Abraham

I.

Riker, d. Aug.

57 yrs. and 29

31839, aged

days. 19. Hannah, wife of Abraham Riker, died aged 72 yrs. 6 mos. 7 ds. 20.

Eliza Riker, wife of

aged 28 yrs. 10 mos. 13

Henry M.

21

May

Allison, died

1868,

May 91850,

ds.

A

foot stone marked J. D. Sophia Bogert, wife of Wiert Westervelt, d. Feb. 21 1879, aged 93 yrs. 11 mos. 24 days. 23. Wiert Westervelt, died Dec. 271845, aged 60 yrs. 9 mos. 13 ds. 21.

22.

Albert M. Bogert, b. Sept. 131783, d. July 201871, 24. aged 87 yrs. 10 mos. 7 ds. 25 Catherine Westervelt, wife of Albert Bogart, d. Jan. 201832, aged 48 yrs. 8 mos. 26. Matthew M. Bogert, d. Mch. 301871, aged 91 yrs. 4 mos. 24 ds. 27. Willempy Haring, wife of Matthew M. Bogert, d. July 251859, aged 75 yrs. 27 ds. 28. Henry Ver Valen, son of Jacob M. & Maria Bogert, d. Nov. 301847, aged 4 yrs. 2 mos. 12 ds. 29.

Maria A.

Pullis, wife of

Andrew Nodine,

d.

Dec. 18

1843, aged 25 yrs. 3 mos. 2 ds. Sarah Bogert, wife of Martin Hagens, d. Oct. 30. aged 77 yrs. 8 mos. 6 ds.

Children of Samuel 31.

14

Eliza, b.

Dec.

311837,

d.

&

111828,

Sally Haring.

Feb.

141855,

ae 17 yrs. 1 mo.

ds.

Margaret,

33.

John Debevoise,

d.

1841, aged 5 mos. 11 ds. Aug. 231847, aged 33 yrs. 6 mos.

Apr. 14

32.

d.

10 ds. 34.

James, son of John & Sarah 1 yr. 5 mos. 2 ds.

Ann

Debevoise,

d.

Sept.

271838, aged 35.

Sheldon Leavitt, son of Jeremiah aged 1 yr. & 2 mos.

May 181852,

& Susan

Pangburn,

d.

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS.

110

36. Mary, daughter of John & Lydia Lefferts, d. Mch. 4 1834, aged 3 yrs. 2 mos. 16 ds. Children of and C. Pullis.

K

37.

James,

d.

38.

241830, aged 4 mos. Nov. 301833, aged 8 yrs. 5 mos. 27 Sept.

ds. Jacob, d. Lydia, wife of John B. Lefferts and daughter of Cornelius and Rachel Blackledge, d. May 25 1839, aged 37 yrs. 7 mos. 40. Garret Ackerman, b. Oct. 301790, d. Dec. 241836, aged 46 yrs. 2 mos. 4 ds. 41. Westervelt, d. 101809, aged 42 yrs. 11 mos, 8 ds. (broken.) 42. brown stone, next to the above, with the inscription

39.

A

entirely scaled 43.

off.

A large

rough stone, next to the above,

all

lettering illegi-

ble.

''Here Lyes the Body of Maria Meabe who Departed this January the 30th 1773. Born March the 27th 1739. Aged 33 (a literal copy) years 10 months and 3 days. 45. M. J. a low stone, very old. 46. M. N. or M. A. a low rough stone, uncertain, almost illegible. a fragment. 47. Mel X, 48. Joseph Jordan, d. Mch 1 1843, in 59th year of age. 49. Elsey Parsels, wife of Joseph Jordan, b. June 12 1763, d. Feb. 111836, aged 72 yrs. 8 mos. 2 ds. 50. Wiman Bell, a small brown stone, \iO dates. 51. Lettitia Van Valer, wife of Peter Anthony, died June 44.

life

1875, aged 74 years. 52.

Cornelia Ann, dau. of John & Mary Anthony, died Mch. 1 yr. 1 mo. 21 ds. 1794 a small rough stone.

231830, aged 53.

M. H.

Douwe Talema, d. May (murdered by a Party of Tories). 54.

111779

in

his

90th

year,

M. T. a small brown stone, next to the above. Jacob, son of John and Nancy Van Valen, d. Oct. 3 1838. 57. Peter D. Haring, b. June 131773, d. Jan. 281842, aged 68 yrs. 7 mos. 15 ds. 58. Maria, widow of Peter D. Haring, d. Mch. 151868, aged 93 yrs. 1 mo. 24 ds. 55.

56.

59.

aged 23 60.

aged 40 61.

Lydia Haring, wife of Peter Brush, yrs.

10 mos. 8

Oct.

111834,

d. Oct.

131838,

d.

ds.

Miss Sophia Haring, mos. 9 ds.

b. Dec.

41797,

yrs. 10

John

Cole, d. Jan.

51863, aged

67 yis. 4 mos. 23 ds.

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS. 62. Sophronia Cole, 59 yrs. 11 mos. 20 ds.

b.

Feb.

63.

Justis Dill Jr. d. Mch.

64.

Children of David Chariot Mary, d. Mch.

141798,

Feb.

d.

211881, aged

Ill

61858, aged

32 yrs. 6 mos. 19

ds.

65. 66.

John Lawrence, William Henry,

d. d.

& Rachel Angevine. 71837, aged 4 yrs.

3 mos. 10 ds. 1838, aged 1 yr. 11 mos. 24 ds. Apr. 171840, aged 6 yrs. & 9 ds.

May

7

Children of Henry & Catherine Dubois. 67. Isaac H. d. May 101815, aged 1 yr. 5 mos. 5 ds. 68. Abraham, d. Sep. 231834, aged 1 yr. 5 mos. 18 ds. Sarah Ellen, d. Oct. 251840, aged 1 yr. 27 ds. 69. 70. Aaron, son of John & Maria Dubois, d. Sept. 14 1833, ag-ed 7 mos. 17 ds. Cornelia White, b. Aug. 151805, d. June 281842. 71. 72. Thomas Dubois, d. July, 271830, aged 53 yrs. 6 mos. 1

3 ds.

Sarah Dubois, d. Apr. 5 1815, aged 36 yrs. 1 day. Rinear Dubois, b. Dee. 241778, d. July 241860, aged 81 years, 7 months. 75. Elizabeth Jordan, wife of Rynear Dubois, d. Oct. 19 1844 aged 61 yrs. 6 mos. 1 day. 76. John Henry Dutcher, 22d N. J. Vols. d. Mch. 301863, ae. 26 yrs. 4 mos. 4 ds. 77. Stephen S. Demarest, d. July 25 1858, aged 64 yrs. 1 mo. & 18 days. Children of DSvid S. and Naney A. Demarest. Sarah Catherine, b. Aug. 11850, d. June 281851. 78. 73.

74.

S. b.

Aug. 171846,

79.

Joseph

80.

Brazil Shevrotier,

81. 82. 83.

85. 86. 87.

88.

Feb.

261847.

aged about 35 yrs.

ds.

Ann Maria Demarest, widow 261834, d. July 121875.

84.

10

d.

May 151826

A rough stone, no marks, next to the above. Jacob Shevrotier d May 151862 aged 39 yrs. 3 mos. 6 ds. Joseph Shevrotier, b. May 151821, d. June 51872,

aged 51 yrs. 21 Sep.

d.

A

large

brown

of Joseph Shevrotier, b.

stone, lettering all 'scaled

off.

Another large brown stone, all lettering scaled. Little David White, no dates. John Debevoise, d. Aug. 231847, aged 33 yrs. 6 mos.

ds.

89.

James, son of John and Sarah 1 yr. 3 mos. 2 ds.

Ann

Debevoise,

d.

Sep.

271838, aged 90.

Jesse, son of

aged 7 mos. 8

ds.

John H. and Rachel Brush,

d.

Apr. 21

1834

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS.

112 91.

James D. Haring,

d. Oct.

181890, aged

81 yrs. 11 mos.

20 ds. 92.

Albert Waldron,

b.

Apr.

211751,

d.

Apr.

271833, aged

82yrs. (dim). 93. Rachel, widow of Albert Waldron, dau. of Richard & Sophia Herring, b. May 41760, d. Sep. 151834, aged 74 yrs. 94. Polly Demarest, wife of Matthew Bogert, d. Aug. 27 1832, aged 65 yrs. 1 mo. 9 ds. 95. Samuel M. Bogert, d. Aug. 19 1832, aged 31 yrs. 3 mos. 14 ds. Children of Samuel M. and Lydia Bogert. 96. Matthew, d. Aug. 141832, aged 3 yrs. 5 mos. 25 ds. 97. David, d. Aug. 221832, aged 9 yrs. 11 mos. 14 ds.

Walter Parsel, b. Feb. 101766, d. Aug. 121832, aged 98. 66 yrs. 6 mos. 2 ds. 99. Ann Westervelt, wife of Walter Percil, d. Sept. 131861, aged 88 years. 100. Margaret Parsel, wife of Stephen D. Demarest, d. Apr. 111848, aged 52 yrs. 10 mos. 12 ds. 101. Jacob Parsells, b. July 211802, d. Mch. 141835, aged 33 yrs. 6 mos. 12 ds. 102. Cornelia Blauvelt, wife of Jacob Parsells, b. Aug. 27 1806, d. May 4, 1891, aged 84 yrs. 8 mos. 8 ds. 103. Jacob Parcell, d. May 191838, aged 36 yrs. 1 mo. Daniel W. Cole, b. Mch. 221826, d. Sept. 81882. 104. 105.

A

large thick rough stone, illegible. stones without marks.

Many rough

UNION CEMETERY, RAMSEYS,

N.

J.

1. Leah Doremus, wife of Peter I. Post, d. May 31854, aged 62 yrs. 2 mos. 8 ds. Peter G. the murdered son of Peter I. & Leah D. Post, 2. died Oct. 5 1854, aged 24 yrs. 5 mos. 27 ds. John P. Post, d. Oct. 181843, in the 83rd year of his age. 3. 4. Catherine Rough, wife of John P. Post, d. Sep. 91844, in the 82d year of age. Earliest dates Aug. 14 1827 Apr. 21 & Sep. 201831.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

New VOL.

Jersey Historical Society*

NEW

I.

SERIES

No

1916

Newark's 250th Anniversary Celebration. Newark

at present is celebrating its

two hundred and

fif-

through a series of elaborate events and While spectacles running through a period of five months. through various avenues of publicity the story in detail has tieth anniversary

gone forth to the world,

it is

proper that the records of the

Historical Society also should present some ordered account however brief of the celebration. The Society suggested the celebration and largely furnished the necessary historical materials.

On December

5,

1916, Jonathan

W.

Roberts, late Presi-

dent of the Society, appointed at the suggestion of Charles Bradley a "Committee on the 250th Anniversary of Newark". It consisted of Charles Bradley, Chairman, Charles M. Lum,

Swayze, William S. Disbrow, William C. Morton, George R. Howe and Joseph F. Folsom. Subsequently President Francis J. Swayze appointed William T. Hunt and Joseph M. Riker, omitting himself. Mr. Bradley conferred with the Honorable Jacob Hauss-

Francis

J.

then Mayor of Newark, and with other city authorities, regarding a great civic celebration, and to his initiative largely ling,

owing the Committee of One Hundred appointed by the Mayor after legislative action had been secured. Twenty members of the Historical Society were named on that committee, of whom three are members of the Society 's committee is

NEWARK'S

114

250th

ANNIVERSAEY CELEBRATION.

previously named. Mr. Bradley is a member of the execucommittee of the Committee of One Hundred.

tive

The City's committee recognized the appropriateness of asking the Society to formally receive and entertain the invited delegates of the various historical and other learned societies of the

United States on

May

the

first,

when

the opening

The reception 200 distinguished guests and a uni-

exercise of the celebration were to be held.

judged by the presence of versal appreciation was a success. Later the guests were conducted to the new Proctor 's Palace Theatre on Market street, west of Halsey, where before a great assemblage of citizens literary exercises of high character were held. Addresses were delivered by the Honorable Franklin Murphy, a former Governor of New Jersey, and the chairman of the Committee of One Hundred by the Honorable Thomas L. Raymond, Mayor of Newark by the Honorable James F. Fielder, Governor of New Jersey; and by the Honorable Francis J. Swayze, Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey and President of the New Jersey Historical Society. The celebration ode was read by its author, the Reverend Lyman Whitney Allen D. D., of the South Park Presbyterian Church of Newark. The Right Reverend Edwin S. Lines D. D., Protestant Episcopal Bishop ;

;

of the Diocese of Newark, a trustee of the Society, offered the 'Connor, D. D., invocation, and the Right Reverend John J. Roman Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of Newark, assisted by

the Right Reverend Monsignor Isaac P. nounced the benediction.

Whelan D.

D., pro-

The guests of the city and the Society on this memorable day entertained were the following American Academy of Arts and Letters, 70 Fifth Ave., New York Prof. William M. Sloane, New York. American Academy of Political and Social Science, West :

:

Mr. Frederick L. Hoffman, Newark, N. J. Hon. Franklin Murphy, Newark, N. J. American Bible Society, Bible House, Astor PL, New York Mr. Churchill H. Cutting, New York; Mr. Joseph F.

Phila. Station, Philadelphia, Pa.

:

;

:

Randolph, Morristown, N.

American

J.

Historical Association, 1140

Woodward

Build-

NEWAEK'S

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

115

Washington, D. C. Prof. William M. Sloane, New York. American Jewish Historical Society Mr. Albert M. Friedenberg, New York; Mr. Leon Hunner, New York; Rabbi Solomon Foster, Newark, N. J. Rabbi Charles I. Hoffman, Newark, N. J. American Library Association, 78 East Washington St., Chicago, 111. Mr. J. C. Dana, Newark, N. J. Miss Beatrice Winser, Newark, N. J. Mr. Frank P. Hill, Brooklyn, N. Y. ing,

:

:

;

;

;

;

;

Miss Clara Hunt, Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss Jessie Hume, Jamaica, N. Y. Mr. Edwin H. Anderson, New York; Mr. Benjamin Adams, New York; Miss Annie Carroll Moore, New York. ;

;

American Philosophical

Society,

Independence Square, New York Mr. Jul-

Philadelphia, Pa., Dr. J. Dyneley Prince, ius F. Sachse, Philadelphia, Pa.

;

American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, Tribune Building, New York, George Frederick Kunz, Ph. D., Sc. D., New York Hon. N. Taylor Phillips, New York Mr. ;

;

Henry Harper Benedict, New York. Bangor Historical Society, Bangor, Maine, Dr. Thomas

Upham

Coe, Hotel Vanderbilt,

New

Bergen County Historical

York.

Society, Hackensack,

N.

J.,

Mrs. F. A. Westervelt, Hackensack, N. J. Mr. W. 0. Allison, New York Mr. Robert T. Wilson, Saddle River, N. J. Dr. Byron G. Van Home, Englewood, N. J. Mr. Cornelius V. R. ;

;

;

;

Bogert, Bogota, N. J. Brooklyn Public Library, 26 Brevoort Place, Brooklyn, N. Y., Hon. David A. Boody, Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss Emma V. ;

Baldwin, Brooklyn, N. Y.

San Francisco, Cal., Mrs. Mr. Bethuel Merrit NewSan Cal. Francisco, Cyrus Walker, Mr. San comb, Francisco, Cal.; George Henry Andruss, San Orra Cal. Mr. Eugene Monnette, Los Angeles, Cal. Francisco, Historical Society, Auburn, N. Y., Mr. Cayuga County Frank W. Richardson, New York. California Genealogical Society, ;

;

Colonial

Dames

New

of America,

William Libbey, Princeton, N.

J.

;

Jersey Society, Mrs. Mrs. S. Meredith Diekin-

sen, Trenton, N. J. ; Miss Elizabeth Alford Smith, Trenton, N. J. ; Mrs. Ward, Trenton, N. J. ; Miss Mary Sherrerd

Edmund

NEWARK'S

116

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

250th

Clark, Belvidere, N. J. Mrs. E. T. Gill, Haddonfield, N. J. Miss Anne Mcllvaine, Trenton, N. J. Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn., Eev. Samuel Hart, Middletown, Conn. Mr. Clarence W. Bowen, New York; Mr. Edward J. Brockett, East Orange, N. J. ;

;

;

Daughters of the American Revolution, State of New JerMrs. William D. Sherrerd, Haddonfield, N. J. Mrs. James sey, F. Fielder, Jersey City, N. J. Mrs. Henry D. Fitts, Newark, N. J. Mrs. George W. Gedney, Montclair, N. J. ;

;

;

Daughters of the Revolution, State of

John

New

Jersey, Mrs.

Weller, Weehawken, N. J. Mrs. John R. Weeks, Newark, N. J. Mrs. Horace S. Osborne, Newark, N. J. I.

;

;

Descendants of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, Charles T. Adams, New York Mr. Carl M. Kneass, Philadelphia, Pa. Mr. Albert McC. Matthewson, New Haven, Conn. ;

;

Essex Institute, Salem, Mass., Hon. Joseph Hodges ChoaSeth Low, New York. te, Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Pa., Mr. Edward Weston, Sc. D., LL.D., Newark, N. J. Mr. Alexander C. Humphreys, Sc.D., LL.D., Hoboken, N. J. Historical Society of Burlington, Moorestown, N. J. Mr. William Lippincott, Moorestown, N. J. Dr. Asa M. Stackhouse, Moorestown, N. J. Mr. William T. Kirk, Jr., Beverley, N. J. Mr. George Cuthbert Gillespie, Moorestown, N. J.

New York Hon. ;

;

;

;

;

;

Historical Society of Hudson County, Free Public LibraJersey City, N. J., Mr. Daniel Van Winkle, Jersey City, N. J. Mr. Louis Sherwood, Jersey City, N. J. Mr. John W. Heck, Jersey City, N. J. Mr. George W. Case, Jersey City, ry,

;

;

;

N. J. Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

Holland Society of New York, 90 West St., New York, Mr. Edward Van Winkle, New York Hon. William BrinkerMr. Frank I. Vander Beek, New hoff, Jersey City, N. J. York. ;

;

Hunterdon County Historical

Society,

Flemington, N.

NEWARK'S J.,

Dr. William

seeler,

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

W. Hawke, Flemington,

Flemington, N.

N. J.

;

117

Mr. Elias Vos-

J.

Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, N. Y., Mr. William B. Davenport, Brooklyn, N. Y. Mr. John J. Pierrepont, Brooklyn, N. Y. Rev. L. Clarke, D.D., Brooklyn, N. Y. Mr. Cyril H. Burdett, Brooklyn, N. Y. ;

;

;

Louisiana Historical Society, The Cabildo,

New

Orleans,

La., Mrs. Charles Le. Sassier.

Massachusetts Historical Society, Fenway, Boston, Mass., Mr. Worthington Chauncey Ford. Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the U. S., Brig. Gen. Joseph W. Plume, Newark, N. J. Lieut. Theodore W. ;

Alston, Newark, N. J. Capt. Theodore Gray, Newark, N. J. Mr. Edmund F. S. Joy, Newark, N. J. ;

;

Minnesota Historical Society, Saint Paul, Minn., Mr. WilNew York; Hon. James T. McCleary, New

liam P. Clough, York.

Minnisink Valley Historical Society, Port Jervis, N. Y., Jervis, New York Mr. James Bennet, Port Jervis, New York.

Hon. William H. Nearpass, Port

;

The Mount Vernon Ladies Association of the Union, Miss Harriet Clayton Comegys, Dover, Del. Miss Amy Townsend, New York Mrs. Charles Curtis Harrison, Pennsylvania Mrs. Henry W. Rogers, Maryland; Mrs. Eliza T. Leary, Washing;

;

;

ton; Mrs. Antoine L. Foster, Delaware; Mrs. Willard Hall Bradford, New Jersey; Miss Annie Burr Jennings, Connecticut Mrs. E. B. A. Rathbone, Michigan. ;

National Historical Society, 310 East 42nd St., New York; Mr. Frank Allaben, New York Mrs. Henry J. Hoerner, Newark, N. J. Mrs. Augustus W. Rowand, Columbus, N. J. National Society of U. S. Daughters of 1812, 322 West 87th St., New York Mrs. Mathias Steelman, Elizabeth, N. J. ;

;

;

;

Mrs. S. Drayton, Mrs. A. G.

Van Houten,

Mrs. T. Clayton. The Naval History Society, 247 Fifth Ave., New York, Mr. Robert W. Neeser, New York. New Brunswick Historical Club, New Brunswick, N. J., Rev. John A. Ingham, D. D.,

New

Brunswick, N.

J.

;

Prof.

NEWARK'S

118

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

John H. Logan, New Brunswick, N. J. New Brunswick, N. J. New England Historic Genealogical ;

Mrs. John H. Raven, Society, 9

Ashburton

W. Hardon, New York; Mr.

PL, Boston, Mass., Mr. Henry Levi Holbrook, New York.

New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, N. H., Mr. George B. Leighton, Monadnock Farms, Monadnock, N. H. New Haven Historical Society, New Haven, Conn., Judge A. McClellan Mathewson, New Haven, Conn. Mr. Seymour C. Loomis, New Haven, Conn. ;

New

Jersey Historical Society, 16 West Park St., Newark, Hon. Francis J. Swayze, Newark; Mr. George R. Howe, East Orange; Mr. Charles M. Lum, Newark; Mr. Charles Bradley, Newark; Mr. A. Van Doren Honeyman, Plainfield; Rev. Joseph F. Folsom, Newark Mr. "William C. Morton, Newark; Hon. James J. Bergen, Somerville; Dr. Austin Scott, New Brunswick Mr. Wallace M. Scudder, Newark Rt. Rev. Edwin S. Lines, Newark Mr. Frank Bergen, Jersey City Mr. Frederick A. Canfield, Dover Hon. William J. Magie, Elizabeth; Hon. Edwin R. Walker, Trenton; Dr. William S. Disbrow, Newark; Mr. Joseph M. Riker, Newark; Mr. Edwin B. Goodell, Montclair; Mr. Hiram E. Deats, Flemington; Mr. J. Lawrence Boggs, Newark; Miss Mary McKeen, Moorestown; N.

J.,

;

;

;

;

;

;

Mrs. Louis Pennington, Washington, D. C.

;

Miss

Maud

E.

Johnson, Newark.

New

Jersey Historical Society, Woman's Branch, 16 West St., Newark, N. J., Miss Mary McKeen, Mrs. George Batten, Montclair; Mrs. Charles W. Parker, Jersey City; Mrs. Henry S. White, Red Bank Miss S. F. Condit, Orange Mrs.

Park

;

;

Arthur H. Mackie, Newark

Miss Ginevra Freeman, Orange ; Miss Mary Louise Wheeler, Newark Mrs. Ruth E. Fairchild, Parsippany Miss Florence Congar, Newark. New Jersey State Library, Trenton, N. J.. Mr. John P. Fullard, Trenton, N. J. ;

;

;

New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, 226 West 58th St., New York, Mr. Richard Henry Greene, New York; Mr. Josiah Collins Pumpelly, New York; Mr. Woodbury Gersdorf Langdon,

New

York.

NEWAEK'S

New York

250th

ANNIVEBSAEY CELEBEATION.

119

Park West, Mr. Robert H.

Historical Society, 170 Central

New York;

New

York, Mr. James Benedict, Kelby, New York.

New York State Historical Association, Room 330, cation Building, Albany, N. Y., Hon. Stuyvesant Fish, 52

EduWall

New York Hon.

George A. Blauvelt, New York. Society, Newport, R. I., Rev. Dr. Roderick Terry, Newport, R. I. Mr. Frank K. Sturgis, New York; Mr. Lawrencec L. Gillespie, New York; Miss Mabel St.,

;

Newport Historical

;

Simpson, Newport, R. I. Old Colony Historical Society, Taunton, Mass., Dr. Charles H. Vinton, Atlantic City Mr. Duane P. Cobb, South Orange; Mr. Harold W. Hack, Short Hills. ;

Order of the Descendants of Colonial Governors, Miss Mrs. Francis C. Lowthrop, Trenton Mrs. Frederick Winston Merrell, Morristown. Gail Treat, Greenwich, Conn.

;

;

Order of the Founders and Patriots of America, Rev.

Edward Payson Johnson, New Brunswick Prof. William bey, Princeton 'Mr. Henry Snyder Kissam, New York. ;

Lib-

;

Order of Founders and Patriots, New Jersey Society, Mr. Walter Chandler, Elizabeth Mr. Merritt G. Perkins, Newark Mr. Graham B. McGregor, Newark Mr. John B. Wight, Montclair; Mr. William Frederick Dix, East Orange; Mr. Charles ;

;

;

Francis Stone,

Jr.,

Montclair.

Princeton University, Princeton, N.

J.,

Dr. Ernest Gush-

ing Richardson, Princeton.

Royal Historical Society, 22 Russell Square, W. C. London, Eng., Prof. R. B. Merriman, Cambridge, Mass. Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J., Dr. W. H. S. Demarest, New Brunswick; Dr. Austin Scott, New Brunswick; Prof. John H. Logan, New Brunswick. Society of Colonial Wars, General Society, Mr. John Lenord Merrill, East Orange. Society of Daughters of Holland Dames, Miss Charlotte New York; Mrs. Robert Stockton, Elizabeth; Miss

C. Hall,

Dora Smith, New York Miss ;

Elise S. Crane,

Society of Mayflower Descendants, Gov.

New

York.

and Mrs. Richard

NEWARK'S

120

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

Henry Greene, New York Rev. E. ;

J.

B. Terry and Miss Marion

Terry, Brooklyn, N. Y. Mrs. Levi Holbrook, New York. Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Jersey, ;

Hon. William Pennington, Newark; Mr. Henry D. Maxwell, Easton, Pa. Mr. William Mck. Reckless, Freehold. Society of the War of 1812, in New Jersey, Mr. Nelson J. H. Edge, Jersey City; Mr. Horace Holden, Morristown; Mr. Harry Dailey, Jersey City; Dr. George H. Richards, Orange Mr. Lovell H. Carr, Jersey City Mr. Isaac Kemp. ;

;

;

Somerset County Historical Society, Somerville, N. J., Mrs. William W. Smalley, Somerville; Mrs. John Olendorf, Somerville; Mrs. A. L. Stillwell, Somerville. S. A. R., Montclair Chapter, Mr. Frank L. Dyer, Montclair Mr. Frederick M. Haviland, Montclair Mr. George Batten, Montclair; Mr. Philip Goodell, Montclair; Mr. John B. Wight, Montelair Mr. Frederick B. Lovejoy, Montclair. S. A. R., Morris Co. Chapter, Mr. S. Chudleigh Hicks, Morristown; Mr. Harvey J. Genung, Madison; Mr. Edward Q. Keasbey, Morristown. S. A. R., Orange Chapter, Mr. S. Carl Downs, East Orange; Rev. S. Ward Righter, East Orange; Mr. Adelbert A. Kenyon, East Orange Mr. Thomas W. Williams, East Or;

;

;

;

ange. S. A. R., Paramus Chapter, Mr. Carl M. Vail, Ridgewood; Mr. Richard T. Wilson, Ridgewood; Mr. Louis F. Halsted, Ridgew ood; Hon. Cornelius Doremus, Ridgewood. Sons of the Revolution, Mr. James Mortimer MontgomYork Col. William Libbey, Princeton Gen. Thomas New ery, H. Chambers, Trenton. Sons of the Revolution, N. J. Society, Mr. William Reed r

;

;

Barricklo, Jersey City; Gen.

Thomas

S.

Chambers, Trenton;

Hon. Gilbert Collins, Jersey City Col. Joseph Frelinghuysen, New York Hon. William M. Johnson, Haekensack Mr. Henry C. LaRowe, Brooklyn, N. Y. Mr. Charles L. Meyers, Jersey City Dr. Franklin Rightmire, Paterson Mr. John V. B. Wi;

;

;

;

;

;

coff,

W.

Trenton.

Sussex County Historical Society, Newton, N. J., Judge H. Morrow, Belvidere Mr. W. W. Woodward, Newton. ;

NEWARK'S

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

121

United States Catholic Historical Society, New York, Mr. Stephen Farrelly, New York Rt. Rev. Mgr. Henry A. Brann, D. D., New York; Rev. Thomas J. Campbell, New York; Prof. Arthur F. J. Remy, New York; Mr. Joseph H. Fargis, New ;

York. Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Va., Mr. Hiram E. Beats, Flemington, N. J. Washington Association of New Jersey, Morristown, N.

Mr. Alfred Elmer Mills, Morristown Miss Altha E. Hatch, Morris Plains; Mr. Henry C. Pitney, Morristown; Mr. Wynant D. Vanderpool, Morristown; Mr. Edward Q. Keasbey. Woman's Burlington County Historical Society, Mrs. Al-

J.,

;

ban Spooner, Beverly; Mrs. Philip

S.

Clarkson, Edgewater

Park.

Yale University, Newark, N. J.

New Haven,

Conn., Mr. Albert H. Atha,

The following is a list of Societies and Institutions, from which letters were received expressing regret that they were unable to send delegates, and conveying their best wishes for the success of Newark's 250th anniversary celebration. American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass. American Geographical Society, Broadway & 156th St.,

New York

City.

American Newspaper Publishers Association, New York City.

Bradford Historical & Antiquarian Society, Bradford, England. Buffalo Historical Society, Buffalo, N. Y. Colonial Dames of America, General Society,

New York

City.

Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Ga. Hartford Theological Seminary, Hartford, Conn.

Hyde Park

Historical Society, Hyde Park, Mass. Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, Ind. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas.

Library Company, Locust Pennsylvania.

& Juniper

Sts.,

Philadelphia,

NEWAKK'S

122

250th

ANNIVEESAEY CELEBRATION.

Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, Mo. Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia, Pa. Oneida Historical Society, Park Ave. & Elizabeth St., Utica, N. Y. State Historical Society of Iowa, Iowa City, la. State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society, Vineland,

N.

J.

On the seventeenth of May, Wednesday, appointed as "founder's day" following a precedent as to date established without historical basis fifty years ago at the 200th anniversary, were held in the evening literary and historical exercises in the auditorium of the Old First Presbyterian Church. The speakers included the Pastor of the church, Rev. William J. Dawson D. D., who delivered the oration, Governor Fielder, ' '

' '

Mayor Raymond, Former-Governor Murphy, and

the dis-

tinguished guest of the city, Governor Marcus H. Holcomb of Connecticut. During the day a parade of military and civic bodies had taken place.

On Sunday

afternoon, May 28, was held in Weequahic in the amphitheatre prepared for the pageant, a great religious service attended by approximately seventeen thous-

Park

and people of all sects and denominations. Addresses were delivered by representatives of the Protestant, Jewish and Catholic elements of the City. Rev. William J. Dawson D. D., Pastor of the "Old First" Presbyterian Church, Rev. Solomon Foster, Rabbi of the Congregation B'nai Jeshurun, the oldest Jewish synagogue in the City, and Mr. John L. O'Toole, a prominent Catholic layman, were the speakers. Undoubtedly this religious service was the largest ever held in the city of Newark. The Honorable Franklin Murphy, who presided, suggested that a memorial stone should be erected on the site. The motion for holding this meeting, as the minutes of the Church Participation Committee of the Committee of One Hundred show, was offered by the writer, its originator.

To

detail all the varied events of the celebration thus far

carried through would require space too valuable to use in view of the fact that elsewhere in the daily press and in peri-

NEWARK'S

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

123

odicals the story in large has appeared. The Newarker, published monhly by the Committee of One Hundred since No' '

'

'

its organ of publicity, contains month by illustrated record of all matters related to the richly

vember, 1915, as

month a

When concluded with the October number of 1916 this periodical will make a volume of great historical value - - indispensible for future reference. Its editor is celebration.

Henry Wellington Wack,

the Adviser of the celebration.

Unquestionably the most outstanding feature of the celebration was the historical pageant staged in a natural amphi-

Park under the personal direction of Stevens, the author of the drama, which under

theatre in Weequahic

Thomas Wood the

title of

"The Pageant

of

Newark" has been published

in

The drama is a dignified contribution to the literature of Newark, and its enactment on the four evenings between May 30 and June 2, inclusive, by thousands of .citizen players was an acknowledged inspirational success. The text pamphlet form.

while properly imaginative in many details does no violence to historical accuracy even where for the requirements of the

movement liberties are taken. Mr. Stevens and the writer, who had been appointed chairman of the committee on the pageant book, were in frequent conferences to insure historical consistency. There were four movements to the drama, three were historical and the fourth a spectacular masque in which hundreds of representatives of the various nationalities which have adopted Newark as their home, and America as their country, played their parts. Any description of the pageant would fail to convey to the absentee its marvelous scope, its

romantic atmosphere and left in the souls of those

its

The effect brilliancy of color. of entering into its

who were capable

Newark Evening News, of June 3, 1916, since been beautifully interpreted by Leonard H. Robbins in a spirit has in the

sonnet as follows

:

The Message of the Masque.

The

the rainbow pictures fade; Their magic beauty and their color-flow And rythmic grace no eye again shall know; Tis ended now, the lovely masquerade, lights are out

:

I

NEWARK'S

124

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

And those who, wondering, looked, and those who played, Back to the busy commonplace they go, To toiling life that moves so dull and slow;

And

darkness cloaks the parkland glade.

silent

The rainbow pictures fade; but still there gleams The rainbow hope to hold us to our dreams; And lowly toil grows beautiful and bright As hearts urge forward to the coming light;

And men

in lifelong memory will see vision of the city that shall be.

The

The Newark Poetry Competition was a feature

of the cele-

bration which engaged widespread attention, and brought forth contributions of verse from all parts of the United States and from other lands. Thirteen cash prizes were to be

awarded, amounting

tor

one thousand dollars.

The conditions

down

for competitors were generous, permitting every imaginable kind of poetry on any subject related to Newark. The judges who gave their services to the City were

laid

:

From Newark

Hon. Frederic Adams, Judge of the Circuit Court, State of New Jersey; Hon. Thos. L. Raymond, Counsellor-at-Law, and Mayor of Newark; Miss Margaret :

Head

of English Department, Barringer High School Hunt, Associate Editor, Newark Sunday Call. At large Prof. John C. Van Dyke, Professor History of Art, Rutgers College; Lecturer Columbia, Harvard, Princeton; Author; Editor College Histories of Art; History of American Art New Brunswick, New Jersey Coult,

William

;

S.

:

:

;

;

' '

Thomas L. Masson, (Tom Masson,) Literary Editor Life Author Editor Humorous Masterpieces of American ' '

;

Literature

;

;

and

The Joy of Life and other Earth and other Poems; Contributor to MagaPoems; Cry Theodosia Garrison, Author

:

zines.

The winner of the first prize, the amount $250.00, was Clement Wood, of New York, whose poem was entitled "The Smithy of God". Anna B. Mezquida, San Francisco, won the second of $150.00, with "The City of Heritage", and Albert E. Trombly, of Philadelphia, the third of $100.00, with

"New-

NEWARK'S

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

125

ark 1916". The ten remaining prizes of fifty dollars each, were taken by the following poets in the order of their naming, Sayres Coe, Glen Ridge, New Jersey, "The Voice of the City"; Katherine Baker, Wildwood, New Jersey, "Puritan

Newark"; Daniel Long, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, "To Newark"; Minnie J. Reynolds, "West Portal, New Jersey, "Newark"; Alice R. Rouse, Covington, Kentucky, "The Ballad of Seth Boy den 's Gift James H. Tuckley, Irvington, New Jersey, The Silent Message Berton Braley, New York City, "The Builder"; Simon Barr, New York City, "The Hill ' '

;

' '

' '

;

Folk Speak"; Ezra Pound, London, England, "To a City Sending Him Advertisements"; Edward N. Teall, Bloomfield, New Jersey, "The Soul of the City, (Newark 16661916)." During the celebration a number of monuments and tablets have been unveiled. Three were erected by the Committee of One Hundred and were designed by Gutzon Borglum of New York. They are the bronze and stone shaft on Washington street at Broad near the Public Library, with figures of a Puritan and an Indian; an ornamental bronze electrolier on the safety isle at Branf ord place and Washington street and the fountain with inscription to the founders at the foot of ;

Saybrook place, in Landing Place Park. Christian W. Feigenspan, a member of the Committee, has presented the City a copy by J. Massey Rhind, of New York, of the famous Col-

The unveiling is to take leoni equestrian statue of Venice. Park during this at in the of erection Clinton site place month. Other memorials have been placed by various organizations at different points of historic interest, and still others are list of Newark 's historical monuments is printed

to follow.

A

in the official

manual of the

with several on intersecting

Along Broad

celebration. streets, are

street,

placed massive pylons

of staff upon which are inscribed quotations of prose and poetry epigrammatic in character. One of the selections, taken from a poem in the "Newarker" reads The manes and the stars fortell A greater Newark till her fame Resplendent cast a wondrous spell On land or sea where sounds her name. :

NEWARK'S

126

250th

ANNIVEESAEY CELEBRATION.

The great musical

festival held in the First

Regiment

nights beginning May the first, and the industrial exposition held in the same building from May 13 to June 3, together with numerous parades and sporting events are some

Armory four

of the

many

other features of the celebration already carried

out.

A

bibliography of the varied literature produced by the

celebration will be valuable for reference in the future, the contributions making good historical material. While the list

to follow

may be

incomplete

it

contains most of the im-

portant items.

The "Newarker", a periodical formerly published by the Free Public Library and edited by John Cotton Dana, the Librarian, was turned over to the Committee to be used for a year and greatly enlarged. It began November, 1915, in its new form and will conclude in October of this (1916) year. It publishes all the news of celebration and is beautifully ilIt is the official record of the

lustrated.

mittee of

One Hundred.

Wack. The

Official

' '

It is edited

work

of the

Com-

by Henry Wellington

Guide and Manual of the 250th Anniversary

Celebration", edited by Henry Wellington Wack, and published by the Newark Sales and Advertising Company, is an illustrated pamphlet of 182 pages including an index, which contains a wealth of information about Newark and its cele-

bration. ' '

Newark 's Anniversary

Industrial Exposition,

May

13 to

June 3, 1916", is an illustrated programme of 144 pages, which contributes much historical material. "The Pageant of Newark" contains the words of the pageant enacted on the four evenings of May 30 to June 2, inThe author is Thomas Wood clusive, at Weequahic Park. Stevens, and the pamphlet was published by the Committee. It contains

112 pages.

The "Newark Directory" for 1916, (250th Anniversary Edition), published by Price, Lee and Company, contains special features in recognition of the celebration. Thirty-two pages are given to an announcement of the celebration by

NEWARK'S

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

127

Henry Wellington Wack, and there is a chronological history of Newark by Joseph Fulford Folsom, running to ten pages. "Newark's 250th Anniversary Celebration," a pamphlet of thirty-two pages compiled by Henry "Wellington "Wack, Executive Adviser of the Committee, published by Price, Lee

and Company, contains the same material as that to be found Wack's article in the Newark Directory of 1916. The pamphlet "Historic Newark" compiled by the "Walton Printing and Advertising Company, Boston, Massachussetts, and printed for the Fidelity Trust Company of Newark, contains fifty-six pages, and is finely illustrated to show historic sites and scenes. "Newark 250 Years Old", by Franklin Murphy, forGovernor of New Jersey, is a pamphlet of ten pages conmerly an address at the 48th annual banquet of the Board of taining Trade of the City of Newark, at the Robert Treat Hotel, on

in Mr.

May

13, 1916.

' '

Addresses, Delivered at a Banquet Given at the Washington, Newark, N. J., April 29, 1916", is a pamphlet of forty-one pages with addresses delivered at a splendid dinner given Mr.

Murphy by

the Committee of

One Hundred.

The

text of the

invocation by Rev. Joseph F. Folsom, and of the addresses of

Mr. Uzal McCarter, Honorable Franklin Murphy, Governor James F. Fielder, Mayor Thomas L. Raymond, Mr. Charles Bradley and former Mayor Jacob Haussling is printed in full.

The pamphlet "Historic Ceremonies and Exercises" contains the proceedings at Proctor's Palace Theatre at the opening of the celebration on May the first, 1916. The program,

Former Governor Murphy, Mayor Thomas L. Raymond, Governor James F. Fielder, and the Honorable Francis J. Swayze, Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey, and the celebration ode by Rev. Lyman Whitney Allen,

the addreses by

D. D., are included.

"What Mean

These Stones", by Rev. William

J.

Daw-

son, D. D., an illustrated pamphlet of twenty pages, contains an historical sermon delivered in the ' ' Old First ' ' Presbyterian

Church, on ers'

May

Day", May

14, 1916,

and an oration delivered on "Foundsame edifice.

17, 1916, in the

128

NEWARK'S

250th

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

The "Music of the Christian Church" by Alfred Lewis is a handsomely printed pamphlet of 34 pages containing an essay on Christian music, and the program and words of the musical pageant presented in the "Old First"

Dennis,

Presbyterian Church on Friday,

May

12,

and Sunday, May

14, 1916.

"Ceremonies at the Unveiling of a Copy of the Colleoni is a pamphlet of sixteen pages containing addresses by Former Governor Franklin Murphy, Justice Francis J. Swayze and Mayor Thomas L. Raymond, with notes on the history and meaning of the statue, and the letter of presentation of Mr. Christian W. Feigenspan, the donor. "A Brief History of the Newark Academy" by Wilson Equestrian Statue"

Farrand, issued as "a contribution to the celebration of the 250th anniversary of the founding of Newark", contains twenty pages of local history in which the academy plays a part.

The "Clinton

Hill

Year Book,

1916",

an

illustrated

pamphlet of sixty-four pages with cover in colors, representing the landing of Robert Treat, published by the Clinton Hill Im-

provement Association, contains many cuts of Newark buildings and scenes. "Patriotic Essays" by Elroy Headley, inscribed "Origcommemorating the celebration of the two

inal limited edition

hundred and

fiftieth anniversary of the City of Newark, 1666book of sixty-four pages containing a cloth-bound 1916", brief essays on patriotism as related to many departments of is

social life.

"The 250th Anniversary of Newark, New Jersey" by A. Cundari, Editor, is a pamphlet of twenty-four pages, published at Harrison Newark, New Jersey, which contains a chronological history of Newark, with a sketch of Mr. Cundari

's

business career, making an interesting contribution by an citizen of foreign birth.

American

JOSEPH F. FOLSOM.

The Orderly Book

of Lieutenant

(July 17 to

December

4,

John Spear.

1781.)

John Spear, a lieutenant in the Jersey Brigade, was a resident of Second River, now Belleville. He was born on March 7, 1754, and died September 24, 1818. His wife was Margaret Jaroleman, who was born on March 26, 1763, and died December 13, 1831. Revolutionary traditions about the Spear family have locally survived. The best known is the shooting by John Spear, Sr., father of Lieutenant John, from the spire of the Dutch Reformed Church, Belleville, of a British or Hessian soldier, who was in a boat on the Passaic River. The silver watch secured from the dead foe is preserved at the New Jersey Historical Society together with Lieutenant John Spear's sword and other relics, the most valuable of which is the manuscript orderly book now for the first time printed. The relics were presented by John J. Tucker. The Speers came from Amsterdam in 1642 on the ship

"Faith", Hendrick Jamsen Spier and his wife Madeline Hanse being the founder immigrants. The orderly book covers a period when the Jersey Brigade was at Dobbs Ferry, New York, and at Connecticut Farms, and at Newark, Essex County, New Jersey. Brigade Orders, Dobbs Ferry, 17th July,

81.

The Commandant directs that the utmost attention is paid by every Officer to preserve the property of the inhabitants, particularly of those in the vicinity of Camp, any person guilty of a wanton destruction of the Fruits, fencing, or any other Article the property of the Inhabitants may depend on the severest punishment being instantly

inflicted.

Head Quarters Dobbs Ferry Aug.

1st, 1781.

Extract from Oen'l Orders.

The prohibition against plundering any species of property from the inhabitants of the Country however unfriendly they may

OEDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAE.

130

be have been repeated so frequently and in such positive terms that the General flatters himself there is no further occasion to give

any more caution on that Head. Brigade Orders

Dobbs Ferry

July 16th.

The Commandant directs that in future neither Officer or Soldier belonging to the Jersey Brigade stay out of Camp a Single Night without his particular permission as we are now about to join and act in conjunction with the main Army it is recommended in the most positive manner to the Officers to be particularly attentive to the discipline of the men, for this purpose they are to parade at 5 0' Clock every morning and evening, when the commanding Officer of Reg't will see that they are properly instructed in the manuel Exercise, and the Evolutions at their own discrission.

Particular attention must be paid to their duty by Officers upon Guard from which they are by no means to be absent on any

pretence whatever.

The unsoldierly practice of firing in Camp and the wanton destruction of Ammunition by any other means are strictly forbidden and will be punished in the severest Manner. B.

Orders

Dobbs Ferry

Aug.

8th, 1781.

Coll. Seelys Rgt. will parade for Exercise at Sunrise in the morning and 5 ''Clock in the Afternoon. The Commandt is verry sorry too little attention paid to the Orders of the 16th Ultimo, which prohibits in the most positive

Terms any

Officer staying out of Camp without leave previously obtained from the Commanding Officer of the Brigade and hopes this may be the last occasion he shall have to notice theire neglect, so destructive to the safety and regularity of Camp as he is determined to arrest any Officer who shall be guilty of a breach of this Order. Any Soldier who is caught Stragling more than two hundred Yards from Camp after retreatbeating may depend on being pun-

ished.

B.

Morning Orders

A

Aug. 12th 1781.

party consisting of 1 Capt. 4 Subs, and 60 NonComsd Ofwill be immediately detached for Command, and hold themselves in readiness to march upon the shortest Notice.

ficers

and privates

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR. B.

Orders

131

Aug. 12th, 1781.

Capt. of the day tomorrow 1st Reg. 6 C P T Adj. Halsey 34 Grand Parade

122

Regimental Orders llth Aug. 1781. sit this Day at 12 Oclock whereof Capt. Guild be President for the Tryal of Prisoners now Confined. Thomas Skilmari soldier of Capt. Rickeys Company having been tryd for Theft by a Court Martial whereof Capn. Ralph Guild

Court Martial to

is to

was President, was Acquitted. The Col. disapproves of the above sentence and orders a Court to be Warn 'd to sit to morrow at Eleven Oclock A. M. for his Tryal and others. Brigade Orders

Dobbs Ferry 13th Aug.

1781.

Capn. of the day tomorrow 2nd Regiment. Adjutant Bishop.

A

fatigue party Consisting of one Sub. 40 Men to Parade to at Guard Mounting at Dobbs Ferry,

morrow morning Guard

Sub.

L

C

P

1

2

2

33 16

Fatigue 1

Regimental Orders.

The Col. is exceeding unhappy in hearing of the disorderly practice that the soldiers has got into of Fighting and abusing one another he therefore requests and enjoins that all the Officers under his Command take the greatest care that no such disorders are committed.

Thomas Skilman of Capn. Rickey's Company having been tried for Theft by a Court Martial whereof Capn. Israel Rickey was President was found Guilty and was ordered by said Court to pay two hard Dollars to Lt. Fendin for his Damage and to stand before the Regiment & Confess his fault and by forgivness of his Company for bringing Scandal on the Soldiers. Thomas Penn Belonging to Captn. Craig's Company having been Tried by said Court for Insulting John Emly the Charge not being supported the Court have Acquitted him. The Coll. approves of the above sentences and Orders that the above said Thomas Skilman appear on the Parade this evenand that said Penn be ing and Comply with the above sentence discharged from his Confinement.

131

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR. Brigade Orders Dobbs Ferry Officer of the

Day tomorrow Capn.

14th Aug. 81.

Guild.

Adjt Halsey.

Guard & Fatigue

as before.

Regimental Orders

Camp Dobb's Ferry August

14th, 1781.

Whereas Numbers of disorderly Acts have been committed by the Soldiery since we have arrived at this place and sundry of said Soldiers have been confined for such disorders. But the Coll. being willing to make use of linent measures has forgiven them in hopes it would reform them he therefore gives them this warning that he is determined not to forgive any such Offences for the future and the soldiers are to take notice and govern themselves accordingly. The Officers and soldiers warned for duty are not to Attend exercise in the morning but are to be called out as soon as the Regiment is Paraded and after being formed are to be dismis'd un* till the Troop Beating. The soldiers are to Provide a piece of Wood to put in their socks in stead of flints & to put them in to exercise with & to take them out as soon as Dismist & put their flints in again every day they are to Exercise. Regimental Orders

Camp Dobbs Ferry

15th August 1781.

The Officers Commanding Companys are to see that their Provision Returns are handed in the evening before they draw the Provision may be drawn early.

Head Quarters Near Dobbs Ferry Augt. 15th The Army

to hold itself in perfect readiness to

1781.

move

at the

shortest Notice.

Extract from Genl. Orders.

Brigade Orders Augt. 16th, 1781. Capn. of the

Adjutant

Day tomorrow from

the 2nd Regiment.

Halsey.

Regimental Orders

Camp Dobbs Ferry

16th August 1781.

All soldiers are strictly forbid going into any Cornfield or Garden on any pretence whatever.

Regimental Orders August 17th, 1781.

A Court this

Morning

accordingly.

Martial to be warned to sit at half after Ten Oclock all Persons are to take notice and govern themselves

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR.

13*

It is with the greatest Concern that the Coll. has heard numbers of Pieces fired in Camp without orders. In order to put a stop to such unsoldierly like Practices he Strictly forbids any soldier firing without obtaining leave of the Commanding Officer. And any soldier that is Catched so offending

shall be immediately tied up & receive fifteen lashes without benefit of a Court Martial John Halsey, Levi Davis & Orry Consalle being Tried for stealing by a Court Martial whereof Capt. Jonas Ward was President they were all acquitted Jacob Allen being Charged with firing his piece without leave was Tried by the same Court, pleads Guilty to the charge and was ordered by said Court to march back and forward through the Regiment with his hat under his Arm and thank the Coll. for the favour shewn him. The Coll. Approves the above sentences and orders them put in Execution this Evening at Parading.

Brigade Orders 18th Augt. 1781.

The Commandant directs that Coll. Seely 's Regiment parade precisely at half past four Oclock this Afternoon and March to this place, to attend the Executions of William Clark Soldier in the 1st Jersey Regt.

Regimental Orders Dobbs Ferry 20th Augt. 1781. Officer of the

Parole

Day tomorrow

Captn. Rickey.

C. S.

The Orderly Sergts. are to Report the Names of the Sick and the place they are at to the Doctr. Tomorrow Morning & he is to Make Report to the Colonel as soon as may be of those that are able to

March.

No soldiers is to be absent from Roll Call tomorrow Eighther Morning or at 12 Oclock on any Pretence whatever. S.

Detail for

Guard

1"

Sergt. 4

C.

P.

450

Regimental Morning Orders 21 Augt 1781.

The Officers & Soldiers are to draw two days flour and one days Beef and have it drest ready to march at a moments warning. The Waggoners are to have there Horses up and Waggons ready to receive the Baggage at two Oclock this Afternoon preThe soldiers at the same time to return all the Axes, sisely. Spades, and other heavy Baggage to the 2d Master and Strike the Tents and have them loaded. The sick are also to Assembly at the Coll. Quarters all that are able to march at three Oclock the Baggage & sick are to move of -

134

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR.

S S C Guard Consisting of 1 1 1 march as a Guard and a Careful Serjant

A

Officer of

Day

P

&

20 are to be ready to

to take care of the sick.

Cap. Guild.

Evening Orders.

The

Coll.

are not to

having received Counter Orders the sick and Baggae as ordered above.

Move

day tomorrow, Capt. Baldwin Parole Granadier, Countersyns (Morris, (Essex Guard as Usual.

Officer of the

-

Regimental Orders Augt. 22nd 1781.

The Coll. is convinced that not only the safety of the Troops under his Command but those of the whole Army at this time depends on the Vigilance <$c activity of the Officers and soldiers under

Command

he therefore not only requests but enjoins it that the both Commissioned & Non Commissioned take the Greatest care that the soldiers do their duty & Especially the Guards The Coll. has Frequently founed the Centinels Sitting on their posts which is an unsoldierly practice and renders him unfit to do

his

Officers

his duty Properly - - The soldiers are therefore strictly forbid doing the like for the future & what ever Officer finds any Centinel so Offending are to Confine him & send in his Crime to the Officer of the Guard Officer of the day tomorrow Captain Guild. Parole C. S. (Newark

(New York Guard as

before.

Regimental Moving Orders 23rd 1781.

A Court Martial to be warned to sit this Morning at Nine O'Clock for the Trial of Prisoners now Confined all persons are to take Notice and Govern themselves Accordingly Regimental Orders Dobbs 23rd Augt. 1781. Parole

Jersey CoSyn

(Amboy (Trenton

Officer of the

day tomorrow, Captn. Ricky.

It is truly mortifying to the Coll. to find that some of the soldiers under his command are so lost to all reason that he is obliged

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR.

135

to make use of publick chastisement to bring them to a sense of their duty, he therefore request that the soldierly will take warning by the punishment that now is to be inflicted on those who so justly deserve it and not be guilty of the like or any other misdemeanour

which

will force the Coll. to bring them to the like Punishment. Caterline soldier in Capn. Baldwins Company, Robert

Hiram

Hartlock and Michael Cornelius of Captn. N. Blairicom's Company being tried for absenting themselves from Roll Call Jos. Cook of Capn. Baldwin's, Benjamin Bond of Captn. Ricky's, and Joseph Daily of Capn. Guild's Company being tried for firing their Guns without leave, all which Persons where found guilty by a Court Martial Whereof Captn. Jonas Ward was president, and Hiram Cataline, Robert Hartlock, Michael Cornelius, and Joseph Daily, was Ordered By said Court to receive fifty lashes each on the bare Backs. Jos. Cook and Benjn. Bond where appointed to be tied up by one of their arms and have one Quart of cold Water poured down their Arms The Coll. approves of the above sentences and Orders them to be put in Excution this Evening at the Usual time of

Parade.

The Commandant thinks proper to Pardon Michael Cornelius, and Benjamin Bond, from the punishment that they where ordered to receive this Evening, and they are to re-

Jos. Daily, Jos. Cook,

turn to their duty Accordingly.

Regimental Orders Dobbs Ferry Aug. 24th 1781. Parole

C.

Syn

( (

Officer of the

day tomorrow.

is to warn a Regimental Court Martial whereof Captn Ralph Guild is to be president to sit at the presidents Quarters this Day at 9 OClock A. M. for trial of Prisoners now confined

The Adjutant

in the Quarter Guard. The Officers of the

Guards are to make report of their different Guards every Morning at Eight Oclock to the Officer of the day and he is to make report to the Commandant by 10 OClock A. M.

Robert Hadlock a soldier in Capn. Van Blarieom's Company having been tried for using abusive Language to the Officers and speaking very disrespectful of the Coll By a Court Martial whereof Capn. Ralf Guild was president was found guilty, and was ordered by said Court to receive fifty Lashes on the bare Back The Coll. approves ^of the above sentance and orders it executed this

Evening at the usual time of Parade.

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR.

136

Regimental Orders, Parole

C.

Syn

Camp

Connecticut Farms Aug. 20.

(

(

day tomorrow Capn. A Court Martial to be warned to sit to morrow Morning at Nine OClock the president whereof is Capn. Guild to sit at the Officer of the

presidents Quarters. Regt. Orders.

Parole

C.

Syn

Camp Farms

Augt. 30th, 1781.

(

(

Sub. Serj. Corp. Prt. 2. morrow Capn. 1. 1. 20, horseman to be ready to go on Command to morrow at twelve OClock and a party of the like number to be ready at 12 OCloek every Day until further orders Detail *for Guard to morrow

Officer of the

to

day

Sub.

Corp.

Serj.

1..

2.. 1.

Fatigue

.

.

.

Privt.

30

3.. 6.

.

.

Regt. Orders

Camp Farms

Sep. 81.

Adjutant is to warn a Court of inquiry to set this day at eleven oClock whereof Cap Jonas Ward is president to inquire into the Conduct of Doctor Jones and reason of his staying from the Regt.

At a Court of inquiry held to inquire into the Conduct of Dr. Timothy Jones whereof Capt. Jonas Ward was President the Court have acquitted him. Regt. Orders Sept. 3d. The Adjutant to warn a ourt Martial to sit to morrow at nine OClock Capt Jonas Ward President to

sit at

the Presidents Quarters for the Tryal of Pris-

oners.

Regt. Orders Connecticut

Parole

C.

Syn

Farms

Sep. 4th, 1781.

(

(

Officer of the Day tomorrow Capt. Samuel Fowler of Cap Wards Company having been tryed by a Court Martial, Whereof Cap Ward was President, for breaking into a House the Charge not

being supported the Court have acquitted him.

S Detail for

Guard

to

morrow

1.

2.

P

C

S .

.

3.

.

39

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR. Regimental Orders Sept.

at

1J7

6th.

The Adjutant to warn a Regt. Court Martial to sit to morrow Nine Clock Capt. Scudder to be President to sit at the Presi-

dents Quarters for the Tryal of Prisoners.

Regimental Orders. Parole

C.

Sign

Camp Farms

Sep.

7.

( (

Officer of the

The

to morrow Capt. Coward. commanding Companies are

Day

to turn out all the of their respective Companies, that are not taught the manual Exercise properly, every morning at 10 oClock to learn it with a Sergeant or Corporal to attend them and the whole to be under the the Order of the 30th of Augt. inspection of the Sergeant Major for turning out a Command Dailey is discontinued. Henry Linington Sergt of Cap Scudders Company having been tryed for absenting himself without leave, by a Court Martial Officers

men

whereof Cap Scudder was President, pleads Guilty and was sentenced to be reduced to the Ranks. Richard Harris of Capt. Craigs Company was tryed by said Court for sleeping on his post, pleads guilty and is sentenced to receive fifteen lashes on the bare Back. The Coll. approves the afforesaid sentences and orders them to be executed this Evening on Parade. Richard Harris abovementioned after being stripped to receive his Punishment,

was pardoned by the

Coll.

Regt. Orders Connec. Farms, Sept.

Parole

Raw don.

8,

1781.

C. Sign.

(Christeen (Jersey Officer of the Day to morrow Capt. Guild. The Adjutant to warn a Court Martial to set this Day for th Tryal of Prisoners. Lieut Williams President

John Clark a soldier in Capt Scudders Comp 'y being tryed for Desertion & Disobedience of Orders was found Guilty and sentenced to receive one Hundred lashes on the bare Back.

The Coll. approves the above sentence and Orders it put in execution this Evening. The afforesaid Jno. Clark After receiving thirty lashes was pardoned the remainder by the Collonel.

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR.

138

Orders of Sept.

9th, 1781.

The Adjutant to warn a Court Martial to sit to morrow morning at nine o 'clock Capt Coward President, for the tryal of Prisoners, to set at the Adjutant's Quarters. Eegt. Orders

Parole

C.

Sign

Camp Farms

Sept. 10, 1781.

(

(

Officer of the

Day

to

morrow Capt. John Scudder

At

a Court Martial held this day Sergt John Cruse was tryed for disobedience of Orders and aiding and assisting in a Mutiny, the first part of the Charge being supported, he was sentenced to appear on the parade and ask Capt. Gilliam's pardon and Return to his Duty.

The Commandt approves of the above Sentence and Orders it executed this Evening. The afforesaid Jno. Croes Sergt in Capt Gillams Company appeared upon the parade and Comply 'd with the Sentence. Regt. Orders Connec. Farms, Sept. 11, 1781.

Parole

C.

Sign

(

(

to Morrow Capt Doremus Henry Fitzgerald Sergt. in Capt Baldwins Comp was tryed for Desertion, and Jeremh. Britton Corp in Capt Scudders Compy, for Disobedience of Orders, by a Court Martial whereof Capt Coward was President, was found Guilty and Sentenced to be reduced to Officer of the

Day

the ranks.

The Commandt. approves of the above sentences and Orders them reduced accordingly. Regt. Orders Sep. 12th, 1781.

Parole

C.

Signs

(

(

morrow Capt Ward. The Guards for the futer, that are to releive those at Tremblers Point, and Eliz. Town, are to have theire packs on and be ready to march of the Parade to Releive their respective guards without halting. The flour Guard to be releived with three men which are allso to march of at the same time. Officer of the

Day

to

OBDEELY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAE.

139

Regt. Orders Sept. 13, 1781.

Parole Stark. C. Signs

(Hathway (Brown

Officer of the

day Capt Gray. The Orders against the Soldiers lodging out of Camp has frequently been read, nevertheless numbers lodge out without leave. The Comt. once more strictly forbids any Soldier staying out of Camp later than Dark for the futer, and any one taken so Offending shall suffer for Disobedience of Orders A fatigue party to Turn out to morrow when the Guards are releived to consist of one Sergt, 10 Privates to attend at the adjutants Quarters. Regt. Orders Connecticut

Parole

C. Sign

Farms 14

Sept. 1781.

( (

morrow Capt. warn a Court Martial to set this Day at 10 Oklock, Capt Scudder president. To set at the Presidents Quarters Officer of the

Day

to

The adjutant

to

for the Tryal of Prisoners.

John Vanoton Corpe in Cap Fremans Compy being tryed by a Court Martial Whereof Capt Scudder was President for abusing and suffering a Party under his Command to abuse Abm Clark Esqr. was found guilty and Sentenced to be reduced to the Ranks. The Coll. aproves the above sentence and he is reduced accordingly.

Camp

Connecticut Farms Sept. 24, 1781.

A Court Martial held this day whereof Capt Ralph Guild was President, for tryal of John Reed, Soldier in Capt Ricke's Company, for Forgery and desertion, the Court found him guilty of both Charges and sentence him to receive Thirty nine lashes on the bare back.

The Coll. approves of the above sentence, and Orders it Executed this Evening at the Usual time of Parade. The Prisoner having Received Thirty four lashes the Commadt pardoned him the remainder. Regt. Orders

Camp Farms

26 Sept. 1781.

The Commandt is unhappy to find that the Soldiers under his Command are frequently Burning rails which is a Wanton Destrucand any soldier considering it The Comdt therefore forbids any such Destruction for the future and any soldier so Offending shall suffer

tion of the inhabitants property,

would certainly know

it.

140

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR.

it is likewise enjoined on the Officer to take notice accordingly that no such Outrages are Committed. And if any Person is caught so offending they are to Confine him that he may be punished.

Sept. 27, 1781. Officers Commanding Companies, are to make returns of the number of men they have from the different Regt. and Countys, in Order to enable the Comdt to make returns to the Governor.

Regt. Orders Camp, 2 Octr. 1781.

Parole

C.

Signs

(

(

to morrow Capt Craig The Light Horseman are to parade on foot every morning and Evening on the Right of the Regt The Adjutant to warn a Court Officer of the

Day

Martial whereof Capt Craig is president to set at the Presidents Quarters to morrow at nine Clock to consist of five members for the tryal of sundry prisoners confined. At a Court martial held this 3d day of Sept. Capt Craig President, James Reed Sergt in Leiut Randolph's Company was tryed for making a false Alarm on the Lines and found Guilty and Sentenced to be Reduced to the Ranks & Receive Fifty lashes on the bare back. Richd Reed Inhabitant was tryed for making a false alarm on the lines and found Guilty and Sentenced to receive fifty lashes on the bare back. John Inyard from Midlesex County being tryed for making a false Alarm on the Lines by a Court Martial was found guilty and sentenced to Receive One Hundred lashes on the bare back. The Commdt Approves the foregoing Sentences and Orders them Executed this Evening at the Usual Time of Parade. James Reed Sergt was reduced and the Commdt Pardoned him his Punishment. Richd Reed Inhabitant being stripped the Coll Pardoned him. John Inyard received his Punishment agreeable to his Sentence.

Camp Farms

5th Octr. 1781.

At a Court Martial held this Day Capt. Scudder President, John Foy Soldier in Capt Freemans Company being tryed for stealing a piece of Linnen from an inhabitant was found Guilty and Sentenced to receive fifty lashes on the bare back.

OBDEBLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAB. Camp Farms

141

6th Octr. 1781.

John Foy Soldier in Capt Freemans Company being tryed by a Court Martial this Day, whereof Capt Guild was President, for stealing several Musquets was found Guilty and Sentenced to reThe Coll approves ceive one hundred lashes on the bare back. of the above sentences and orders them Executed this Evening at the Usual time of Parade. The said Foy received One Hundred and fifty lashes agreeable to his Sentence.

Begt. Orders

Parole

C. Signs

Camp Farms

8th Octr. 1781.

(

(

Officer of the

The

Capt. Guild.

Day

Officers

Commanding Companies of non Commissioned

three months

Men

are

and Privates with the Day of the Month they joined against their Respective Names, to the Commdt. to morrow. A party Consisting of 1 1 1 & 22 to be ready to march to morrow by two OClock P. M. with two Days Provision the Subaltern to be appointed by the Commdt. to return lists of the

.

Begt. Orders

Parole

C.

Sign

.

.

.

.

Officers

.

Camp Farms

9 Octr. 1781.

(

(

to morrow Capt One Sergt and Six Privates to be ready morrow morning at 10 OClock. Officer of the

Day

Begt. Orders

Parole

C.

Sign

Farms

to

go on

Command

to

Oct. 10, 1781.

(

(

Officer of the

Day

to

Morrow

Capt.

One Sub. One Sergt. & twenty Privates to be ready to go on Command to morrow by twelve OClock and the Sub is to attend at the Commdt Quarters when ready to march to receive Orders. Begt. Orders 13 Octr. 1781.

The Adjutant is to warn a Court Martial to set to morrow at oClock. Capt. John Stokes President to set at the Presidents Quarters for the tryal of Prisoners Confined in the Main Guard. Felty Koonts soldier in Capt Israel Rickee's Company having been tryed by a Court Martial whereof Capt John Stokes was

142

OEDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR.

President for stealing a Watch from Robt Wade Esqr. was found Guilty and Sentenced to receive One Hundred lashes on the bare back.

The Commdt Approves the above sentence and Orders it Executed this Evening on Parade. The above Felty Koonts Received his Punishment Agreeable to his Sentence. Garrison Orders, Newark Nov. 3d, 1781.

(Beef (Bread Alarm Post Court House The Ensign takes the earliest Opportunity of informing the soldiers under his Command of the Necessity of Observing the Strictest Dicipline. the precarious situation we are in & the many Charges allready Exibited .against us tender it absolutely Necessary, not only to Retrieve our lost Character, but for the Preservation of the Town & ourselves. He therefore strictly Commands & enjoins it upon the Troops to attend Roll Call exactly morning & any evening, and Obey the Commds of their Superior Officers Person absenting himself from Roll Call without a sufficient Excuse or Previous Permission being Obtained & any Person Disobeying the Commands of any Superior Officer may Depend on being sent to Eliz Town & undergo the Sentence of a Court Martial. Permission will be given to two Persons to be absent at a Time. Countersigns

Garrison Orders

Nov.

4,

1781.

Nath Pierson's Garrison Orders Nov. 5th

1781.

Countersign (Gen. Washington (Gen. Green

Alarm C.

Post.

Sign (Monday (Tuesday

Nath Piersons Alarm Post. The Troops are possitively Commanded not to appear on Parade without Arms for the futer. They are likewise Commanded to be on the Parade exactly at the Time the Troop or Retreat is done that the parade may not be Detained. Those soldiers are to provide themselvs as soon as possible, those that want Repairing are to get them Repaired imediately. And all are to Clean their Arms by Roll Call this Evening.

Beating,

who have no Arms

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAR.

143

Garrison Orders Nov. 6 1781. C.

Sign

( (

Alarm

Post,

the Cross Roads by Andersons

Garrison Orders Nov. C. Signs

7,

1781.

(Wood

(Candles Alarm Post the Academy

The Ensign

is sorry to find that the Orders of the fifth is so attended to which Commanded the Men to have their Arms cleaned by Roll Call. He again Repeats it, and hopes that no person will appear on Parade this Evening, without having his Arms cleaned, & in the best of Order, as they may expect punishment for a breach of this Commd. He has likewise observed that there is such a continual noise on Parade that no Orders can be heard or Commands Executed, he therefore Requests that the Troops will refrain from such an unsoldierlike practize & trusts the soldiers for the futer will observe the strictest silence during Parade.

little

Garrison Orders Nov. 8th 1781 C. Signs

Alarm

(Green

(Lincoln Post, near Coll

Wards

Garrison Orders

Nov

9th 1781

C Signs (Baron (Stuben

Alarm Post on the Height above Capt Nichols Garrison Orders C. Signs

Nov

10th 1781

(Wayne

(Green Alarm Post on the Height by Isaac Allings Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

Nov

11 1781

(Orange

(Pompton

Alarm Post

On

the Height by

Abrm Wards

Garrison Orders N. A. Nov. 12 1781 C. Signs (Cortlandt

(Ward Alarm Post Court House

144

OBDEBLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAB. Nov

Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

13 1781

(Washington (Lincollen

Alarm Post

near Squir Banks

Nov

Garrison Orders N. A.

14 1781

C. Signs (Craig

(Scudder

Alarm Post on the Height by Isaac Allings Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

Nov

15 1781

(Orange

(Providence Alarm Post the Academy

Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

Nov

16

(New (Town

Alarm Post Church Sergt Roberts having engaged a Man to serve as a Soldier in his place. The Ensign has appointed Corp Nathe Bond to serve as a Sergeant & Joseph Shipman as a corporal and the soldiers are hereby Commanded to treat them as such. Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

Nov

17 1781

(London (Paris

Alarm Post near Coll. Wards The Horsemen are Commanded to attend parade exactly Morning & Evening for the futer. Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

Nov

18 1781

(

(

Alarm Post near Capt Nichols's Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

Nov

19 1781

Nov

20 1781

( (

Alarm

Post,

the

Academy

Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

(Ward

(Hays Alarm Post by Andross's

ORDERLY BOOK OF LIEUTENANT JOHN SPEAB. Garrison Orders N. A. C.

Nov

21 1781

Sign (Ely

(Coward Alarm Post by Isaac Allings Garrison Orders N. A.

Nov 22 1781

C.Signs (Stirling (

Alarm Post

Academy.

Garrison Orders N. A. Nov. 23 1781 C. "Signs

(Pumpton

(Harlin Alarm Post Esq. Banks

Garrison Orders N. A.

Nov

24 1781

Nov

25 1781

Nov

26 1781

Nov

27 1781

Nov

28 1781

Nov

29 1781

Nov

30 1781

C. Signs

(Boston (Charlestown Alarm Post Church Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

(Newark (New York

Alarm Post

Court House

Garrison Orders N. A.

C.Signs

(

(

Alarm Post Court House Garrison Orders N. A.

C.Signs

(

(

Alarm Post by Isaac Allings Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

(

(

Alarm Post Church Garrison Orders N. A.

C.Signs (York (Gloucester

Alarm Post Squir Banks Garrison Orders N. A. C. Signs

(Newark (Newberry

Alarm Post Academy

145

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS AT GREENVILLE.

146

Garrison Orders N. A. Dec 1 1781 C.

Sign (Cornwallis (Clinton

Alarm Post Court House Garrison Orders N. A. Dec 2 C. Signs (Charlestown (

Savannah

Alarm Post

Allings

Garrison Orders N. A. Dec 3 1781 C. Signs (Charles

(George

Alarm Post

Church

Garrison Orders N. A. Dec 4 1781 C. Signs

( (

Alarm Post Allings

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS. Old Graveyard, at Greenville, Jersey City, Hudson Co., N. J. Located at the Lehigh Valley R. R. Bridge, over the Morris Canal, opposite E. 52nd St. & Ave. E. Bayonne, N. J.

Copied by John Neafie,

1.

New York

City, July 3rd, 1910.

James Thomson, a Native of Scotland, died March 15 (Dim and uncertain) aged 29 years. Foot stone.

or 1824

1821 J. T.

Ann S. Craig, wife of Phillip E. Muhlenberg, born at New 2. York, Feb. 22 1784 died here. Oct. 6 1830 foot stone, A. S. C. 3. Ephigenia Craig, born Aug. 51780, died Jan. 301866 foot stone 4.

E. C.

Andrew Hamilton, born

land, died at

New

York,

at Greathill near Strathaven, Scot1832 aged 33 years, foot stone

May

A. H. 5.

York, 6.

Mungo

May

1

Currie, born at Strathaven, Scotland, died at 1840, aged 48 yrs. foot stone, M. C.

Robert Thomson, born at Laigh Side near Strathaven, Scot1841 aged 73 years Foot stone, R. T. Barrie Anna, born Mch. 4 1846 died May 11 1851. ''And Jesus called a little child unto him." B. A. Foot stone marked

land, died here, Dee. 24 7.

New

Revolutionary Pension Records of Morris County. (Continued from Page

99.)

JOSEPH KING'S CERTIFICATE. At a Court of General Quarter on

&

Sessions held at Morris town for the County of Morris on the third Tuesday of December

A. D. 1782. Present Benjamin Halsey John Stiles John Brookfield Benj. Lindsly Will Woodhull Stephen Day Ab Kitchel. Application was made to the Court in behalf of Joseph King late Adjutt. of the fourth Jersey Regiment in Service of the United States. & Two Certificates were presented to the Court, the first

was

in the

words

&

figures following

Viz.

The Subscribers at the request of Mr. Jos. King certify that in the year 1777 he held the office of Adjutant to the fourth Jersey Regiment to approbation, that in the action of the Short hills he

was wounded & made prisoner, that in consequence of some severe treatment after he was taken his wound hath tendered him in great measure disqualifyed from active employment, that in consequence of his being wounded & prisoner he was deranged in the Year 1779. The Subscribers do therefore earnestly recommend the Said Mr. Joseph King to an appointment in the Corps of Invalids, if it

should not interfere with the established system

&

regula-

tions of the

Army. Jersey Huts April

2nd. Regt. Jersey.

N

16th. 1782.

Ogden N. Commine

Signed by Elias Dayton Coll. Francis Barber Lt.

Col. 1st. Regt. Lt. Coll. 2nd.

N Jersey Andw. HunJersey Brigade Jer Ballard Captn. Samuel Kendoy

Coll. 1st Regt. J.

ter Chaplain

M

Capt 2nd. Jer Regt. Nathl. Bauman Capt 2d Reg Jer. Wm. Helms Capt. 2nd. Regt. Jer. Saml. Holmes Capt 2nd. Regt. Jer. Abm Appleton Lieut. 2nd. do. Benjn. Osmon Lieut. 2nd. do. T Rhea Lt. 2nd. do. Ab Stout Lt. 2nd. do. Geo. Mead Capt 2d Jer R. John Holmes Capt. 1st. Jer. Regt. Jno. Reed Lieut, do. Eph. Darby Lt. & QrM.

148

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

John Blair Lt. Mate 1st. do.

1st

the 2nd. Certe.

CO.

do Will Shute Ensn. 2nd. do. Jacob Harris Surgn.

was as follows

We

the Subscribers having examined Mr. Joseph King are of opinion that in consequence of a Wound which he received June the 26th. 1777 & subsequent Confinement & treatment while a prisoner that he is thereby disqualifyed from obtaining a liveli-

hood by Laborious employments; that he

is justly intitled to the disabled Officers, & that his present condition therefrom is as bad as the loss of a limb Sign'd John Cockran Director of the Military Hospitals Chas. McKnight Phyn. The Court having considered the Said Certife. are of opinion that the Said Joseph King is entitled to his half pay from the time of his Derangement Viz. the first day of February 1779 and do Order the Clk. to make out a Certificate accordingly

Provision

made for

i

Justices

HIRAM HOWARD'S CERTIFICATE. At a Court

last

mentioned

Application was made to the Court in favour of Hiram Howard a wounded Soldier of Capt Halls Corny of Coll. Spencers Regt. & a certificate was presented in the words & figures following Viz. I do hereby certify that Hiram Howard Served as a Soldier

my Company in Coll Spencers Regt. in the three months Service, and received a wound in his ankle at ash swamp which has rendered him unable to Support his family. Witness my hand this fourth day of November 1782. (Signd)

in

Josiah Hall Capt Also another Certificate in the words & figures following Viz. These may Certify that Hiram Howard Served as a Soldier in Coll. Spencers Regiment of three months men in the Beginning of 1777 & in the 23 day of the month of Feby. in said Year the said Howard received a wound in his Ankle which has rendered him unable for Service and no doubt entitled him to Such relief as is

made & provided

in Such cases. Morris County December 5th. 1782. (Signd) Eleazr Lindsly Lt. Coll. The Court having considered the said Certificates are of opinion

that the said

Hiram Howard

is

justly intitled to his half

pay from

BEVOLUTIONABY PENSION BECOBD8 OF MOBBI8 the Said 23rd. day of Febuary 1777 made by the Clk. accordingly.

&

CO. 14t

do order a Certificate to be

>

Justices

ABIGAIL MINTHORN 'S CERTIFICATE. At a Court of General Quarter Session held in

&

AD

at Morris

Town

for the County of Morris on the Third Tuesday of December

1782 Present as before

Application was again made to the Court in favour of Widow Abigail Minthorn for the half pay of her deceased husband alledging that the Certificates & order Issued from this Court on the Third Tuesday of March last, is lost The following Certificate was presented to the Court Viz I hereby certify that the late Phillip Minthorn died a Serjeant inlisted for the war in the 1st. Jer Regt. dated Bottle Hill December 20th. 1782

Math Ogden N. B.

He

(Signd)

An

Coll.

died 23rd. december 1780.

Affidavit

was

)M Ogden

Col.

also presented to the Court in the

Words and

Personally appeared before me Stephen Day one of the Justices of the peace for the County of Morris George Minthorn and being duly Sworn Saith that the Said Mintfigures following

Viz.

horn was present & Saw Phillip Minthorn deed. Lawfully married to Abigail Minthorn & that She Abigail was his lawfull wife at

and farther Saith not Sworn before me this 20th day of December 1782

his decease

George Minthorn Stephen Day Another Affidavit was also presented to the Court in the words following Viz. Morris County State of N. Jersey. Personally appeared before me William Woodhull one of the Justices of the Peace in & for the Said County of Morris Jacob Minthorn & being duly Sworn deposeth & Saith that Abigail Minthorn is now the widow of Phillip Minthorn who died inlisted for the war in the first Jersey Regt.

Sworn before me the Twentyeth day of December 1782 .

.

Jacob Minthorn

)

C

Signed

Wm.

Woodhull

150

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

The Court having considered the Same are of opinion that She the Said Abigail Min thorn is entitled to the half pay of her deceased Husband & do order the Clerk to make out a Certificate accordingly

JEMIMA RICHARD'S CERTIFICATE. Sessions held at the Court House for the County of Morris on the Twentyeth day of March in the Year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred & eighty three Present

At a Court of General Quarter

in Morris

Town

John Carle David Thompson Benjamin Halsey Jonn. Stiles

in

&

Danl. Cooper

John Brookfield Benj. Lindsly Esqrs. Judges

Abrm. Kitchell Will Woodhull

Joseph Wood Steph Day Jas Minthorn

Application was made to the Court in mima Richards Widow of Samuel Richards

Esqrs. Justices

behalf of Heirs of Jelate a Serjeant of Coll.

and the Oliver Spencers Regt. in Service of the United States following Certificates was presented to the Court. Viz These are to Certify that Samuel Richards Serjeant of my Company in the Standing army was Kiled at the Battle of Brandiwine on the Eleventh of Septemr. in the year one thousand Seven hundred & Seventy Seven as Witness my hand (Signd) David Lyon Capt in Colonel Oliver Spencers Regiment The above named Samuel Richards was a Serjt. in my late Regt. was kiled at the action of Brandiwine September llth. 1777 as above mentioned Oliver Spencer late Coll. Mendham March 19th. 1783 Also an Affidavit was presented to the Court in the words

&

figures following Viz

Personally appeared before me Joseph Wood Justice of the peace for the County of Morris Daniel Cory of full age & made oath on the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God that he Saw Sam Richards & Jemimah Genung Lawfully Married in either November or December in the year one thousand Seven hundred & Seventy Six & enlisted in the Service of the United States in the fore part of the year 1777 (& was kiled in the battle of Brandiwine Septr. llth. in Said year as appears by the Captains Certificate)

BEVOLUTIONAEY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

151

This deponant farther Saith the Said Jemimah lived Samuel Richards widow three Years one month & Eleven days further Saith not Sworn before me this 17.. Day of March 1783 Daniel Cory Joseph Wood The Court having read & Considered the said Certificate & Affi davit are of opinion that the Widow Jemima Richards was enof her Said Deceased Husband for the afore titled to the half

pay

mentioned term of three Years one month

&

Eleven days

SARAH WOODS 'S CERTFICATE. At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of the peace held at the Court house in Morris town in & for the County of Morris on the First Tuesday of July in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred & Eighty three Present Daniel Cooper

John Carle David Thompson Benjn. Halsey Jonn.

John Brookfield Benj. Lindsly Esqrs. Judges

Stiles

Abm. Kitchel William Woodhull

John J. Faish Aaron Kitchel Benj. Howel & Jas. Minton

Esqrs. Justices

Application was made to the Court in behalf of Sarah Wood widow of Isaac wood Deed, for the half pay of her Deceased husband who died a Soldier in the first Jersey Regt. the 27th. of Sepr. 1781 .... and Certificates were presented to the Court in the

words and

figures following

Morris Town Morris County

\ j

Ss

:

We

viz 1st.

the Subscribers Inhabitants of the

Township and County aforesaid do Certify that we were acquainted with a certain Isaac Wood Soldier in the first Regiment of Jersey and that we know him to be a native of this place and an inhabitant thereof at the time of his inlistment

Jonathan

Stiles

Stephen Conkling

January

15th. 1783

John Hinds

I Certify that the above mentioned Isaac Wood Soldier in the first Regt. of Jersey died in the Service of the United States

2nd.

in

Camp

1781.

at Williamsburgh Virginia, on the 27th. day of September I esteemed him as an Honest good Soldier

and that

Ephr Darby January

15th. 1783

Lt.

and Qr. Master

152

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

3rd. This may Certify the within mentioned Isaac

1776 Witness

4th. is

now

my

may concern that I Married Sarah Whitenack in the year hand this 20 day of Jany. 1783 Jonath. Stiles Justice of peace it

to

do hereby certify that Sarah

I

the

whom Wood

CO.

Widow

of the aforesaid Isaac

Wood within mentioned Wood the date above Jona. Stiles

The Court having read & Considered the

sd. Certificates are of opinion that the Said Widow Sarah Wood is intitled to the half pay of her deceased husband from the 27th. day of September 1781 during her widowhood Given under our hands & the Seal of the said Court at Morris town aforesaid this third day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred & eighty three John Carle

Benj. Halsey Ab. Kitchel

RACHEL CHANNEL'S CERTIFICATE. Decemr. 7th 1783. Application was made to the Court of General Quarter Sessions in favour of Rachel Channel widow of John Channel to obtain an adjudication for her Husbands halfpay. .

.

.

Present Danl. Cooper Junr. John Brookfield

David Thomson Benj. Jlalsey Jonath. Stiles Abrah. Kitchel

Esqrs. Judges

William Woodhull

The following Court

Certificates

&

Horton Elijah J Joseph Wood William Ross Jacob Gould

Esqrs. Justice*

Affidavits were presented to the

Viz.

John Channel Said to be deed, was an Capt David Lyons Company in my Regt. for during the War; and that he was taken prisoner by the British between Boundbrook & Brunswick on the 1st. day of June 1777 after making a Gallant Defence under Lt. Martin of my Reg. who was kiled at the Same time and said Channel was said to Remain a Prisprisoner with the Enemy one full year after he was made I do hereby Certify that

inlisted Soldier in

oner.

Camp May 15th. To whom it mav

1780 concern

Oliver Spencer Col.

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

158

We

do Certify that Rachel Channel of the Township of of Morris & State of New Jersey is now living & was the lawfull Wife & we believe is real widow of John Channel Deed. December 13th. 1783 ft Witness that saw them Jacob Doty Overseer of poor married Seth Babbit Justice peace James Wilkisson Will Hulbard 2nd.

Mendham County

3rd. Morris County Ss Personally appeared before me Benjamin Halsey one of the Justices of the peace for said County Benjamin Halberd & being duly sworn Saith that he Saw Rachel Kulberd married to the above named John Channel & that Serjeant Reed of the same Company in which the said John was inlisted told this deponant that the Said John Died in New York about one year after he was taken which this deponant verily believes to be the Case & that the Said Rachel was the lawfull wife and is the real Widow of the Said John Channel. :

Sworn

the 13th. day of

July 1780 before me Benj. Halburd Benj. Hallsey J. P. The Court having considered the s. Certificates & Affidavit are of opinion that the said Rachel Channel is intitled to the half pay of her deceased husband from the first day of June 1777 to this day & do order the Clerk to make out Certificate accordingly

HANNAH PRICE'S

CERTIFICATE.

At a Court of General Quarter Sessions held

at Morris

Town

and for the County of Morris on the Fourth Tuesday of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred &

in

eighty four.

Present

John Carle Benj. Hallsey Jon. Stiles Ab. Kitchell

&

Benjamin Lindsly Joseph 'Esqrs. Judges

Will Woodhull

Wood

John Brookfield Aaron Kitchel & Will Ross

Esqrs. Justices

.

Application was made to the Court in behalf of the Widow of Samuel Price also in behalf of his Child And Certificates was

produced in the words

&

figures following Viz.

1st. This may Certify that Samuel Price a Six months Soldier from the County of Morris belonged to my Company in the first

154

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

Regiment Jersey in the Year 1780 and was drowned in Crossing the North River on our way to Westpoint Some time in October in the above Year Wm. Pratt Late Capt. Sd. Regt. September 28th. 1784

M. Ogden late 1st.

late Col.

Jer Regt.

We

2nd. the Subscribers two of the Justices of the Peace in the County of Morris residing in the Township of Hanover do Certify that Hannah Price was the Lawfull wife of Samuel Price and that she was His real widow untill her Marriage with Thomas Cobb in the beginning of November 1783 and that She hath her legal residence in the Township of Hanover aforesaid and that she had at the time of the Death of the said Samuel Price one Child Hanover September 30, of six months old which is yet living

1784 Morris County

Aaron Kitchel Benjn. Howell The Court having read & Considered the said Certificates do adjudge that the said Hannah Price (now Hannah Cobb) is in titled to the half pay of her Deceased Husband (Samuel Price) from the First day of November one thousand seven hundred & eighty to the first day of November AD. one thousand Seven hundred and eighty three

SARAH HATHEWAY'S CERTIFICATE. December Term 1784 At a Court of General Quarter Sessions held at the Court House in and for the County of Morris on the Third Tuesday of December in the Year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred

&

eighty four.

T>

TT

Present 11

Benin. Hallsey Jonatnn. bUleS wiiim. woodhuii

i

Benjn. Lindsly

John Brookfield fEsqrs. Judges

wn lilm<

P

00

Esqrs. Justices

*?f: Ebenr. Tuttle

Application was made to the Court in behalf of Sarah Hatheof Joseph Hatheway Deed, for the half pay of her Deceased Husband. And the following Certificates & affidavits were produced

way Widow

1st. I

Hereby

certify that in the Beginning of the

Campaign of

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

155

1776 I enlisted Joseph Hatheway of Morris County Bloomer, a Matross in the Corps of Artillery commanded by Captn. Daniel That the said HatheNeil, of which I was Captain Lieutenant way was detached under my immediate command until about the Month of August in the above Year, when he was Seized with a Dissentary, a Disorder then very prevalent in Camp of which he died

that the said

Hatheway

Honest & faithfull Soldier Given under my Hand

whilst in Service behaved as an

November 1784

this 27th. of

(Signd)

Jno Doughty Major Comdt. West Point Personally appeared before me Benjamin Lindsly Justice of the peace in the County of Morris the above John Doughty who being duly Sworn deposeth & Saith that the above Certificate is Just & true in all its contents. & further Saith not. (Signd) John Doughty

Sworn before me this 25th. November 1784

| \

Benj. Lindsly

Hatheway & Sarah Lyon were on the 15th. of November 1753 legally Joined in the Holy Banns of matrimony both being of Morris Town in the County of Morris New Jersey, & before Witness pronounced Man & wife. Testifyed by Timo. Johnes Clk. 2nd.

These

may

Certify that Joseph

Hanover j Morris County Ss: j Personally appeared this day before me Benjamin Hallsey one of the Justices of the Peace for said County Sarah Hatheway who being duly sworn deposeth & Saith that she is now the Widow of Joseph Hatheway Deceased & further Saith not.

Sworn before me

this 23rd.

Decemr. 1784 her

Benjn. Hallsey JP.

X Hatheway mark

Sarah

The Court having taken the Same into consideration do adjudge that the Said Sarah Hatheway Widow of Joseph Hatheway deceased is intitled to the half pay of her Deceased Husband from the thirty first day of August Anno Domini one thousand Seven hundred & Seventy six to thirtyeth day of November one thousand & do order the Clerk of this Seven hundred & Eighty four Court to make out a Certificate for that Purpose Jona. Stiles. Benj. Hallsey Benj. Lindsly

156

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION BECOBDS OF MORRIS

CO.

DEBORAH MINTHORN'S CERTIFICATE. At the Court aforesaid Viz December 1784 Application was made to the Court in behalf of the Deborah Minthorn & the following Certificate & Affidavit was produced Viz I hereby Certify that William Minthorn was an enlisted Soldier for the war in the first J Regt. and that he was killed at th Seige of York Town in October 1781 Elizth.

Town

State of

M

\

Nov. 12th. 84

N Jersey

Ogden

late Col. late 1st.

]

Jer Regt.

|

Morris County Personally appeared before me Seth Babbit j one of the Justices of the peace for said County Capt Libbeus Dodd & being duly sworn deposeth and Saith that he Dod was Present And saw Deborah Dod now Deborah Minthorn Joined in the bands of Marriage to William Minthorn and that the said Deborah is now the Widow of the said Minthorn & farther saith not

Sworn this Twentyeth day of December in the Year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred & eighty four before

me

Libbeus Dodd

Seth Babbit

The Court having Considered the said Certificate & Affidavit are of opinion that she the said Deborah Minthorn is intitled to the half pay of her Deceased Husband Will Minthorn from the time of her Husbands Death Viz. the 18th. day of October AD. one thousand Seven hundred

&

eighty one

MARY

BELL'S CERTIFICATE.

At a Court of General Quarter Sessions held at the Court house in Morris Town in and for the County of Morris Present

Jonath

Stiles,

Abraham

Kitchel, Will Woodhull, I J Faish,

John Starke & Eleazer Lindsly Esquires Application Was made to the Court in favour of Mary Case and the 3. following Certificates Widow of Jabez Bell Junr. an affidavit were presented (& Read) in the words and figures

late

&

following Viz. jist.

This

is to

Certify that Jabez Bell Junr. was a Corporal

BEVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS

CO.

15T

of Militia in Col. John Starkes Battalion and was an Alarm in the County of Bergen on the thirtyeth day of September one thousand Seven hundred and Seventy eight. Given under my hand July first 1786 .... Nathan Luse Captain

my Company

in

killed at

2nd. This is to Certify that Jabez Bell Junr. was killed in Bergen County at an Alarm on the thirtyeth day of September one thousand Seven hundred & Seventy eight. Given under my hand this first day of July 1786 John Starke Lt. Col.

This

3rd.

may

Certify,

whom

it

may

concern, that Jabesh

and Mary Heaton were lawfully Married to each other, by me. As Witness my Hand in the Township of Roxbury, County of Morris and State of New Jersey the 28th. day of June 1786 Wm. Woodhull before me John Morris County ss. Personally appeared Starke one of the Justices for Said County Isaac Heaton being of full age & being duly Sworn deposeth and Saith that Mary Case was the Widow of Jabesh Bell Junr. (who was killed in the County of Bergen about the 30th. day of September 1778) untill the 19th. day of September 1780 when She was married to Samuel

Bell Junr.

Case.

Sworn before me

Isaac Heaton

1786 John Starke

July

1st.

The Court having heard & considered the Said affidavit are of opinion that the

the Said Jabez Bell Junr.

Said

Certificates

Mary Case Was

from the thirtyeth

&

widow of day of September AD. the

one thousand Seven hundred and Seventy eight to the Nineteenth day of September A. D. one thousand Seven hundred and Eighty Viz one year eleven months and twenty days And is intitled to the half pay of her deed. Husband during that time Given under our hand & Seal of the Court this fifth day of July In the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and

Eighty

six.

(Signed) Jona. Stiles Abm. Kitchel *

Will.

Woodhull

SARAH TURNER'S CERTIFICATE. At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of t

Hometown

in

the Peace holden

and for the County of Morris on the Seventeenth

158

EEVOLUTIONAEY PENSION EECOBDS OF MORRIS

CO.

day of December in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and eighty nine Present William Woodhull Silas Condict

Samuel Tuthill David Thompson Alexander Carmicael

>

E

ires

Application being made to the Court in favour of Sarah Turner widow of Jarzel Turner deceased for her late husband's half the following certificates and vouchers were presented & pay read Viz N 1 I
N

2.

This

may

Certify that Jarzel Turner was a Sergeant in

in Col. Oliver Spencers Regiment in the late war died in the service of the United States in July in the year of

my Company and

our Lord seventeen hundred and seventy seven, and behaved himself as a Good Soldier Witness my hand the Sixteenth of June AD 1789 Jonas Ward Capt Morristown December 1789

N 3 I Certify that I returned Jarzel Turner one of the Sergeants in Capt Jonas Ward's company in Col Oliver Spencer's Regiment sick to the Hospital when the Regiment removed from Ramerpough sometime in the last of July in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven, and that he was afterwards reported to the Regiment as having died in the hospital near Pompton Jabez Campfield Surgeon at the time of said Regiment N

4 State of Newjersey Morris County ss. Be it remembered that on this day personally appeared before me Alexander Carmicael Esquire one of the Justices of the peace in and for the County of Morris Nathan Turner of full age and being duly sworn deposeth and saith that he was well acquainted with Jarzel Turner deceased who was this deponents brother that he was a Sergeant in Captain Jonas Wards Company in Col. Oliver Spencers Regiment at the time of his

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS AT HAEEINGTON PARK.

159

that he died when in the service of the United States death on the night preceding the twenty ninth day of July in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and seventy seven and this de-

ponent further saith not

Nathan Turner

Sworn the 27th day of June

AD

1789 before me Alexander Carmicael

State of Newjersey Morris County ss. Be it remembered that day personally appeared before me Alexander Carmicael Esqr. one of the Justices of the Peace for the County of Morris Samuel Turner of full age and being duly sworn deposeth and Saith that about thirty four years ago he was present at the Marriage of Sarah Holmes now the widow Turner to Jarzel Turner who died in the late war in Service of the United States that the said Sarah was married to the said Jarzel Turner by the Reverend Mr. John Parson a Minister of the Gospel that the said Sarah lived with the said Jarzel Turner as his lawfull wife from the marriage aforesaid untill the time of his death And that the said Sarah now remains the widow of the said Jarzel Turner as this deponent verily believed and as it is generally reported and further this deponent saith not

on

this

Samuel Turner

day of July AD 1789 before me Alexander Carmicael

Sworn the

2d.

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS. Perry Cemetery, Harrington Park,

New

(Bergen Co.)

Jersey.

Inscriptions copied by Joe. Elting Sloat in November, 1909.

1.

2.

Henry, son of Jos. & Hanna Perry d. 24 May 1867 ae. 13 yrs. Rachel, dau. of Jos. & Hanna Perry d. 26 Mch. 1870 ae. 3

mos. 3.

Hannah, dau. of David & Catherine Perry

d. 3

Jan. 1871 ae.

371022. 4.

1867 5. 6.

7.

Perry, son of Nicholas ae. 1 yr. 1

&

Catherine

Ann

Cole

d.

4 Sept.

mo.

David Perry d. 22 Apr. 1871 ae. 61 yrs. 5 mos. Catherine Blauvelt his wife d. 23 Aug. 1894 ae. 81 yrs. 5 mos. Rachel Perry d. 9 Aug. 1871 ae. 7 mos. 7 days.

BY JOSEPH

F. FOLSOM.

Two documents

relating to the services of Colonel Peter of New on the Passaic, whose seat opposite Barbadoes Schuyler the present Gouverneur street, Newark, was called Peters-

borough, have been presented to the New Jersey Historical Society by Dr. Robert Watts, of New York City, a descendant. The documents are testimonials to Schuyler, and to the officers

and men of the New Jersey troops, who during the War of the Austrian Succession (1744 1748), sometimes called King George 's War, were stationed at Albany, with an expedition to

Canada

in view.

Schuyler 's appointment to command the New Jersey troops was recommended to President of the Council and Acting Governor John Hamilton by the Council of New Jersey sitting at Perth Amboy, on September 27, 1746, the Governor and four members, Robert H. Morris, Edward Antill, James Hude, John Coxe, being present. As the Governor had asked advice as to making an appointment and the board suggested Schuyler there is little room to doubt the matter was con-

cluded that session.

The minute records that he was "a

gentleman well known to the several members of this board, of good estate and reputation and very proper to be by him (the Governor) commissioned for that purpose. Already by the Assembly on Friday, June 27th, there had been passed an act authorizing the raising of five hundred ' '

as New Jersey's quota of troops, the troops to include freemen or well-affected Indians Officers had gone out to well succeeded that on the and had so "beat up" volunteers, 30 first had been embarked at Newark the August company

men ' '

'

'.

and had sailed down the Passaic the following day, September 1, under the command of Captain Campble Stevens, enroute to Albany. With this company, according to the New York Post

COLONEL PETEE SCHUYLER AT ALBANY,

161

Boy, September 15, 1746, went as private the debonnair Tom Bell, who once impersonated the Rev. John Rowland and caused Rev. William Tennent a trial for perjury.

Two days later at Perth Amboy, September 3, four or fivecompanies set sail for the same destination. So successful had been the beating up that Captain Edward Hart, of Hopewell, N. J., father of John Hart, the "Signer", was found to have a company of one hundred extra men with no provision for their support. Hart had spent "most of his estate" raismen and for a time subsisting them. He appealed for relief and the Council sent him to the Governor of New York

ing the

to offer the

company

to his establishment.

said to have been "the most likely

have been raised.

New above

all

Hart's

men

are

and able-bodied men that

' '

Jersey excelled in patriotic zeal for the King's cause other colonies. She gave a bounty of six pounds to

man

and provided

10,000 to clothe and equip the troops. Unfortunately, if we are to credit the complaint of Alexander Miles, a private writing on November 15, 1746, from Albany, the commissioners provided guns so rusted and

every

enlisting,

' '

rotten as not to be of the value of old iron", cutlasses that

would "bend and stand bent like lead", and "stinking beef twenty barrels whereof were at one time condemned by our ' '

Miles deplored the grafting of the twelve appointed commissioners who received five per cent on all moneys expended, and thought that two persons could better have

officers.

bought the supplies and have been paid a fair amount for

and labor. The date on which Colonel Schuyler assumed command of the New Jersey troops at Albany is not evident, but presumably he departed for Albany at an early date. The Albany testimonial letters show that he, or his troops, were in the neighborhood thirteen months, four of which were spent at Saratoga, which would make their stay from early in September, 1746, to October, 1747. On November 19, 1747, their time

Governor Belcher of New Jersey informed his Council that he had learned that Colonel Schuyler had ordered the disbanding

COLONEL PETER SCHUYLER AT ALBANY.

16L>

of the troops at Albany, which evidence with that of the letters goes to show that the troops returned in October, 1747.

The testimonial letters were written in January, 1748, though dated 1747, the year according to the old style of reckoning ending at April the twenty-fourth. At the end of April, 1747, the New Jersey troops mutinied because of arrears in their pay. Schuyler on April 30, wrote a letter to President of the Council, John Hamilton, which he expressed by the hands of Captains John Dagworthy and Henry Leonard, giving an account of the mutiny. Schuyler

had

offered to pay the troops out of his private fortune, which generosity the New Jersey Council appreciated but thought would have caused also the troops of the other colonies at Albany to mutiny. The Council recommended patience and requested Schuyler to be guided by Governor George Clinton of New York, who was arranging to pay in part, on an equal Undeterred by the advice basis, all the troops at Albany. given Schuyler subsequently paid his men in full and incurred the rebuke of Clinton, who in a letter went on record as be-

lieving the withholding of pay discouraged desertions. Jersey later reimbursed Schuyler at least in part.

New

letters below make an interesting contribution to the of the campaign of 1746 and 1747, especially as to history the New Jersey troops. Evidently the mutiny and Schuyler

The

of six months previously was not remembered against them unfavorably. Later chapters in Schuyler 's soldier life are

known than the one now under consideration, which makes the letters peculiarly valuable. The letters follow

better fact

:

New

May

it

Jersey

January 16th, 1747.

please your Grace

His Majesty having been pleased to Disband the Troops Raised in this Province of New Jersey on The Late Intended Expedition Against Canada, We think it our Duty (In Justice to the Officers thereof that undertook to Serve his Majesty on that Occasion) to Inform your Grace, That Col. Peter Schuyler (who was appointed by this Government to Command those Troops as a Col.) has behaved himself to the Satisfaction of all the Branches of the Legislature here: and has Justly Meritted the Applause of the people of this Province in General. And that many of the other

COLONEL PETER SCHUYLEB AT ALBANY.

163

Officers were in Good Business, and Left the same upon the hopes of being Continued in his Majesties Service; That in the Raising of the Troops, They Showed a becoming Zeal, and Compleated their Companies with Extraordianry Dispatch, and at Very Great Expence to themselves. And while they were posted Near Albany,

and

at Sarraghtoga, they

behaved with Resolution, and were Very

Guarding the Frontiers of the Province of New York, as we Doubt not Mr. Clinton, (the Governor of that Province), will Inform your Grace. assistant in

As we are of his Majesties Council for this Province, And are well acquainted with most of the Officers who Engaged in that Expedition; and with the Zeal and Resolution with which they have we begg leave to Recommend them to Your Grace, for Such marks of His Majesties Royal favour as their Services may be We are thought worthy of May it Please Your Grace Your Grace's Most obedient and most Humble Servts. Jas. Alexander, Robt. H. Morris, Jas. Hude, Andw. Johnston,

acted,

Peter Kemble, Tho. Leonard.

To the Right Honourable His Grace the Duke of New Castle. By Derrick Tenbrook Esqr. Mayor, the aldermen and Common Council of the City of Albany To Peter Schuyler Esqr. and the officers under his Command belonging to the five New Jersey Companys of foot. Greeting do by these presents convey to you and each of you the Hearty and Sincere thanks of this Corporation and the freeholders and freemen of the Same for the faithfull Discharge of your

We

Guarding and Protecting this City from the attempts of the for nine months while you were posted in the neighbourhood of this Town and for your timely notice of the garison at Saraghtoga, and Bravely holding the Same under Great Disadvantages for nigh four months Last Summer And as a publick Testimony of the Gratefull Sense we have of your services to the province of New York in General and to this City in particular we have caused our Publick Seal to be affixed to this Instrument and have hereunto Subscribed our names. The twelfth Day of February 1747/8

Duty

in

Enemy

Dirck Ten Broeck, Jacob Ct. Ten Eyck, Sybrant Goo Van Schaick, Gerret Vanness, John G. Roseboom, Jacob H. Ten Eyck, Jacob Lansing, Junr., Cornelis Macsen, Barent Ten Eyck, Johannes V. Douw, Eghbert Bret.

(Endorsement) Compliment of the Mayor of Albany to Peter Schuyler ficers 12 Feb. 7, 1747/8

&

of-

Caspar Steinmets and his Descendants. BY

P.

H. HOFFMAN.

(Concluded from Page

88.)

Steinmets Genealogy.

From Caspar

Steinmets and Jeannetje Gerritsen, immi(He as early as 1618 to 1620;

grants, both born in Holland. she, probably 1620 to 1625).

Through their son Christoffel, born 1660; and his son Benjamin, born 1696; and his son Benjamin, born about 1725; and his daughter Rachel (Steymets) Fritts, born 1759; and her daughter Margaretta (Fritts) Hoffman, born 1785, to Philip H. Hoffman, born 1827, and his 'descendants to 1910 1st. Gen. married 1652

Caspar Steinmets, born in Holland about 1620, born in Holland about

to Jeannetje Gerritsen,

1625, their son Christoffel, born Dec. 19, 1660, in New Amster1684 married to Jeannetje Gerrits, and married in 1699 dam, to Sarah vanNest, children, (1st wife) Casparus, born 1686; Annetje, born 1688 Jeannetje, born 1691 Gerrit, born 1692 Judith, born 1694; Benjamin, born 1696, Ancestor of P. H. Hoffman. (2nd wife) Elizabeth, born 1700; Joanna, born 1707 Christopher. Children married, Casparus, 1st. Rachel Pieters Powlse

2nd Gen.

;

;

;

;

(widow) June

6,

1713,

and 2nd, Maritje Hendricksen, Aug.

1727.

Casparus VanNoostrand. Jacob Jeannetje, VanNoostrand, Oct.

Annetje,

22, 1720.

Gerrit Judith,

Herman VanRiper, 1st

1721.

Sarah VanStee, 1720 2nd, Sara Bmans,

Benjamin, Ancestor of the Hoffman family.

1730.

;

CASPAR STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

165

Jan Tomas VanRiper, 1730. Joanna -- Garabrandt Garabrantsen, 1731. Christopher, Treintje Coeyeman, June 1735. Elizabeth,

(Historical.)

In 1711 Christoffel Steymets with seven and early settlers, named, Francis

others, relatives, pioneers

Post, Jan Sip, Hermanes Gerritsen, Thomas Van Riper, Cornelius Doremus, Pieter Powlse, and Hessel Pietersen, all of Acquackanonck, bought of the Proprietors for 660 pounds

2800 acres of land, running from the Great Falls to and over the Garret Mountain. The land was divided into tracts or farms of 10 chains in breadth, running from the river up to the Mountain. This was the first settlement in sterling,

Little Falls, N. J.

of Gerrit G.

Christoffel Steymets purchased for himself a plot of land in 1699, in Ac-

Van Waggininge

quackanonck, with all the rights and privileges belonging to it. In 1716 and 1717 he was elected as elder in the Dutch Church at Hackensack and Acquackanonck, 1709, Oct. 22. He was executor of the estate of Abraham Bockee of Acquackanonck. 3rd Gen. Benjamin (son of Christoffel), born 1696, died 1762; married 1st. Sarah Anna VanStee, 1724, (she died soon after), and 2nd. Sara Emans, 1731. Their children, married Rachel Roome. (1) Christopher, born (2) John, born 1727, married, 1st, Elizabeth Taylor, 2d. ,

Anna Van (3)

Riper. Peter, born

,

died 1776; married

Mary Dey,

1725.

and Benjamin, born about 1729; married 1st, 2nd, Margaret VonBoskirck, Aug. 2, 1752. Their children, Rachel, born Dec. 3, 1760, married Frederic Fritts, 1780. Mary, married Richard Hunt of N. Y. Margaret, married Peter Hendricksen of Brooklyn. (Margaret VonBoskirck Steinmets died at Sprice Run, N. J., June 8, 1809, and is buried in the Lutheran Church Cemetery at that place. Head stone at her grave, Age 81 years, 2 (4)

days.) (5) "Williams.

Thomas, born

,

died

,

married Margaret

CASPAR STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

166

Garret, born

(6)

died May, 1804, married

,

Mary

died in battle at the storming of (7) , George, born the heights of Quebec in 1774. Member of the State Militia in Capt. John Lamb 's Co. of N. Y. State Regiment. (8)

Elenore, born

(9) 1768.

Hannah, born

(10) 22, 1753.

Sarah, born

married Cornelius Marschel-

,

luck.

married Cornelius Speir,

May

married Andreas Peters, July

,

Caspar, born

(11)

,

died in infancy.

,

(12) Frederic, born Mar. 7, 1747, married Anna Barre. 4th Gen. Benjamin 2nd, (son of Benjamin 1st), born 1729, died 1806 married Margaret Von Boskirck, their child;

Maria, Helena, Benjamin and Abigail, all died young; Rachel, born 1759 or 1760, married Frederic Fritts; Mary; ren,

Margaret. 5th Gen.

Rachel (daughter of Benj. 2nd.) born Dec. 15, 1821, married Frederic Fritts, their children, Benjamin, born Nov. 11, 1781 William, born Jan. 1783 Frederick 25, S., born Oct. 22, 1786 Margaretta, born Jan. 25, 1785, mother of P. H. Hoffman George, born Oct. 31, 1788 Rachel, born Jan. 24, 1791 Morris, born Jan. 2, 1793 1760, died Apr.

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Thomas, born 1796 Jacob, born Sept. 1799. 6th Gen. Margaretta (daughter of Rachel Steymets Fritts), born Jan. 25, 1785, died Jan. 24, 1830; married Capt. ;

Henry

Hoffman, Dec.

I.

children

22,

1805

he died Dec.

;

14, 1864.

Their

:

Rachel, born Feb. 22, 1807

died Apr. 10, 1877. born Oct. 1808 died T., 4, July 28, 1898. Elizabeth A., born Oct. 22, 1810 died July 20, 1894. Jemima, born Nov. 22, 1812 died Feb. 1911. Henry S., born Jan. 28, 1815 died Oct. 10, 1820. Frederic F., born Feb. 12, 1817 died Oct. 22, 1820. Margaretta, born Apr. 13, 1819 died Nov. 22, 1877. Mary Ann, born Nov. 9, 1821 died Apr. 9, 1875. Jacob D., born Jan. 24, 1824 died Feb. 9, 1910.

John

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

JCASPAE STEINMETZ

167

Philip H., born July 28, 1827. 7th Gen. Philip H. Hoffman, born July 28, 1827, mar12, 1851, to Barbara A. Byram, born March 12, died 1829, July 21, 1897 ; their children, Orlando K., born July 18, 1852 died Mar. 23, 1853.

ried

March

;

Henry

B.,

born Nov. 12, 1854. born Sept. 17, 1857

died Dec. 11, 1893. Joseph R., 8th Gen. Henry Byram Hoffman, born Nov. 12, 1854, married Caroline I. Mulford, Nov. 4, 1880. Their children, Katrine M., born June 22, 1884. Helen B., born June 9, 1887. Joseph Reed Hoffman, born Sept. 17, 1857, died Dec. 11, 1893 married Emma L. Hard, Oct. 7, 1885. Their children, Agnes R., born July 15, 1886, in Morristown. Armin S., born May 27, 1889, in Morristown. ;

;

Will

The

will of Gerrit Gerritsen (brother of Jeannetje Ger-

wife of Caspar Steinmets.) Will of Gerrit Gerritsen, jointly with his wife, Elizabeth Cornelison, given in part ritsen, the

(1)

Bequeath

to their heirs as follows

:

to the children

of the Testator's sister Jeannetje Gerritsen Steynmets, wife of Caspar Steynmets, for their children, 1. Johannes, 2. Gerrit, 3. Antie, 4. Christoffel, 5. Orsolena, 6. Maritje, 7. Benjamin, seven in number, to have one-half of the estate. (2) Bequeaths the other half to his other sister, Jessie

(Gerritsen) Otto, for her daughter Elizabeth Otto. The testator describes himself as sick in body but clear in mind ; and

the testatrix as

"coming and going."

Wickes, Bergen Co. East

New

This will

is

Dated

Jersey. Feb. 20, 1688.

Gerrit Gerritsen, and

Elizabeth (Corneiluson) Gerritsen.

Witness,

Cornelius Durke.

Jans Barents. Glaus Barents.

Will of Johannes Steynmets, (son of Caspar

1st).

CASPAR STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS.-

168

Bequeaths his interest in the West India Cmpany's Annetje (Jacobs Van Winher life time, and at her death to go to kle) Steynmets, during his nephew Jacob Prior, son of his sister Annetje (Steynmets) (1)

farm

in Bergen, N. J., to his wife

Prior.

He

died in 1708

;

and the

will

was probated in New York.

Will.

Will of Peter Steymet Cartmaii, of the City and CounNew York. He makes his brother Benjamin, carpenter, and his brother Christoffel, merchant, his Executors of his last will and testament. Dated Dec. 6, 1766, in the seventh year of the :

ty of

reign of King George 3rd, by the Grace of God. His executors conveyed to Andrew Hopper, of

New

York,

sum

of 300 doHars current money, a house and lot on Division Street, in New York, size of lot 25x77 feet, bound on

for the

by land conveyed to John Steymets by John Winne. In the rear Dirkes Dey lot No. 4 which was released from heirs, and Christopher and Benjamin Steymets, Executors. The same lot was conveyed to Peter Steymets by William Einbrough and Elizabeth his wife in 1761. The Executors, appeared and were qualified in 1766. See Liber 40, page 355, in Surrogate's Office, New York City. Peter Steymets was son of Benjamin Steymets of Graveseast side

end, L.

I.,

and brother

to

Benjamin.

He was

the ancestor of Mrs. Walsh, of Amenia, N. Y. synopsis of the Will of Jacob Steymets of the City of York, occupation, shop-keeper. Dated April, 1759. Be-

A New

queathed to his wife Mary Steymets all his estate during her life time, or widowhood, and at her death or marriage, all to go to the children. 1st.

To

his eldest

Brown (having

daughter Rachel Arden, and

Amey

received a marriage portion) he provided a

smaller portion than to his unmarried daughters Mary and Margaret. He appoints his beloved wife Mary his Executrix, together with his friend Frederic Steymets and his son-in-law

Jacob Arden as Executors.

CASPAR STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS. Nov.

5,

169

Witnesses, B. Romaine.

1789.

John Newcombe. Cornelius Ansulan.

In his lifetime he and his wife conveyed to Matthew "West a house and lot 25 feet front and 77 feet deep on the Northeast side of Dey St., on June 26th, 1789. Liber 41, page 327, in

New York

Clerk's Office.

Witt.

(On

notice of settlement of Estate.)

Frederic Steymets of the City and County of New York, brother of John Peter, Christopher and Benjamin. Occupation, baker.

His wife Anna and Anthony Post were made administrators. Aug. 4, 1796, an order was made by the court to sell the property for expenses &c. Notice had been given and published March 2, 1796. In accordance with the above order the administrators sold and conveyed to William Palmer for $2250., a house and lot with the bake-shop, situate on Nassau Street in New York, 25 ft. front by 96 feet deep, on the westerly side of the street, conveyance was made Jan. 24, 1800. Liber 49, p. 47. Surrogate's Office, New York. Will.

Wood, of the City and York, son of Benjamin and Sarah Steymets of Gravesend, L. I., and brother of Peter, Garret and Benjamin, all of New York. Will made Jan. 7, 1793. I bequeath to Rachel (Roome) Steymets, my be1st. loved wife, all my household furniture and 30 Pound Sterling, Christoffel Steymets; Inspector of

County of

New

also the use

and rents of

to

my

my

real

and personal

estate so long

widow. At her death there shall be paid grandson William Steymets (Tailor) of New York,

as she remains

my

Fifteen Pounds Sterling. And all the rest and residue of my estate to be divided in two parts. The one-half for my grandThe other daughter, Mary, wife of Alexander McDougall. half to

my

grandson William Steymets as above.

My

wife

CASPAR STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

170

Rachel to be

my

Executrix and

my

brothei -in-law Pieter Bogert to be "Witnesses Rachel Brower.

brother Benjamin and my Executors.

my

:

Henry

Sickles, Jr.,

Francis Child.

Will probated

May

21, 1794.

Witt.

Will of Rachel (Roome) Steymets, widow of Christoffel She was of the city and county of New York, but Steymets. after the death of her husband she removed to Hackensack, her old home, where she seemed to have spent part of her time. Will of Rachel (Roome) Steymets. She bequeaths a

and valuable estate partly as follows To her sister-inlaw Rachel Roome, gold rings, bracelets and other jewelry, and silverware. To hef niece Sarah Lewis and her niece Hester Sebring, and to the children of William Steymets and large

:

Mary McDougall,

silver spoons,

valuables.

To John

Witnesses,

Aury

and large quantities of other

Roome, William P. Roome, and Nicholas Roome, Mary VanTuyle, Rachel Brower, Susan Webster, Mary Anthony, Peter and Hester Sebring, to each of these quite a large and valuable estate. The Executors were John P. Roome and Nicholas Anthony. J.

Westervelt,

Jacob P. Westervelt, Rachel Ackerman.

The

was proved and probated

in the Surrogate's Of1807. will is lengthy and Jan. The City, 17, described in full in that office. P. H. H.

fice

in

will

New York

Will of Johannes (John) Steymets, son of Benjamin and Sara Steymets, of Gravesend, L. I., and brother of Benjamin, Garret, Peter, Frederic, of the City and County of New York.

Bequeaths to his beloved grand children, James, Catherine, John, Mary and Lawrence, children of his late daughter Sarah, wife of John Matthews, money, silverware and household goods. 2nd. To his grandchild Abraham King, son of his daughter Leah. 3rd. To my grandchildren, Hendrick, John, Catherine, children of my late son Christopher Steymets; all to be divided and given share and share alike. 1st.

CASPAE STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS.

171

To be given and disposed of by my beloved son Garret Steymets out of my residuary estate given to him. Provided the legacies of $2500. and division of goods made as directed. He appoints his son Garret sole executor. Will made and dated March 26, 1800.

Proved and execut-

ed Sept. 29, 1801. Sylvanus Miller, Surrogate. Witnesses, Frederic Mabic, Samuel Brown, John G. Bates. Signes, Garret Steymets, Executor. Will.

Garret Steymets, son of Benjamin of Gravesend, L. L, and brother to Johannes. He lived and did business in the City and County of New York and died there in May, 1804. In his will dated March 7, 1804, he bequeaths to his wife

Mary all his property of whatever sort and kind, and after her death to go to his two grandchildren John and Elmer Kingsland, children of his deceased daughter, wife of Stephen Kingsland.

He

appoints his son John and his son-in-law

Stephen Kingsland, Executors of his estate, and also trustees and guardians of such minor children as may be interested in the Estate.

The

New

will in full is recorded in the Surrogate's Office of York, and was probated May 22, 1804.

Witnesses, John J. Bates,

Daniel Thorne, Cornelius Bogert. Silvanus Miller, Surrogate. Generation

2.

2.

Marriages.

Annetje Steymets (daughter of Caspar) to Tades Mixheasea, 1679, and to Johannes Heyer, 1709. Orsolena Steymets (daughter of Caspar) to Roelef Lubbertse Westervelt, March, 1688. Joanna Steymets (daughter of Caspar) to Andreas Prior, May, 1688 and to Casparus Van Noorstrand, ;

Oct., 1698. 3.

Casparus Steymets (son of Christoffel), 1st. to Rachel Peter Powlse (widow) Oct., 1713; and 2nd, to Marytje Hendricksen, Aug., 1727. ;

172 4.

4.

CASPAR STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS. Annatje Steymets (daughter of Christoffel) to Jacob VanNoorstrand, Oct., 1715. Judith Steymets (daughter of Christoffel) to Herman

Van

Riper, 1721.

4.

Joannetje Steymets, 1st. to Jacob Van Noorstrand, Oct., 1720 and 2nd, to Johannes Heyer. Elizabeth Steymets to Jan Tomas VanRiper, 1730.

5.

Joanna Steymets (daughter of

4.

;

Christoffel)

to Garra-

brant Garrabrantsen, 1831. 3.

Benjamin Steymets (son of Christoffel) 1st. to Sarah VanStee, 1720 and 2nd, to Sara Emans, 1723.

4.

Christoffel Steymets to Affgee

;

4.

Heermans, Helena Steymets to Isaac Henion, 1726. Annetje Steymets (daughter of Benjamin)

5.

Bulson, 1748. Marrietta Steymets to

5.

5.

4.

4.

4.

Meserole, 1748.

Cornelius Marschelluck, Feb., 1854. Finnettie Steymets to Jan Vander Voort, April, 1755. Christoffel Steymets (son of Benjamin) to Catherine

June, 1755.

Benjamin, (son of Benjamin) to Margaret Von Buskeick, April, 1752. ( She died and is buried in Spruce

Run

cemetery where her grave and headstone can

now be 5.

to Cornelius

Johannes Steymets, to Luberty Newburg, Sept., 1751. Nealtis (Nellie) Steymets (daughter of Benjamin) to

Van Brunt, 4.

Abram

Oct., 1723.

seen, 1910. )

Garret Steymets (son of Benjamin) 1st to Puertitie Tuerse, Nov., 1744; and 2nd. to Sussanna Baldwin, July, 1766.

4.

4. 5.

4.

Christopher Steymets (son of Benjamin) 1st to Marie Ellsworth, 1753; and 2nd. to Altje Remsen. Catharine Steymets to Andreas Hoppe, Jan. 23, 1758.

Peter Steymets, (son of Benj.) to Mary Dey (Dien, Dean, Day) April, 1759. Jacob Steymets (son of Casparus) to Mary Dean, May, 1752.

5. 5.

Rachel Steymets to David Ross, April, 1761. Thomas Steymets (son of Benjamin) to Margaret Williams, March, 1768.

CASPAR STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 5. 5. 5. 5.

5. 5.

Jane Steymets to Adam DeGrhue, March, 1763. Jaspar Steymets to Rachel Banker, March, 1768. Annetje Steymets to David Brown, July, 1763. Mary Steymets (daughter of Casparus, son of Christoffel) to Philip Thompson, March, 1768. Hannah Steymets to Cornelius Spear, May, 1768. William Steinmets to Elizabeth Taylor, 1780. (He was a tailor in N. Y. and published a rule on cutting clothes.

5.

173

One has been used by the writer

years. P. H. H.) Nellie Steymets (daughter of

Benjamin)

for

to

many

Stephen

Kingsland, 1750. 5.

Christopher (son of Christopher) Steymets to Treintie

4.

Leah Steymets (daughter

Coegernoen, June, 1766. of Benjamin, 1st)

to

Hen-

drik King, March, 1761. 4.

Johannes Steymets (son of Benj.

1st) to Catherine Post,

Oct., 1736. 4.

Catherine Steymets to Johannes Post, July 11, 1753.

4.

5.

Anna Steymets to Abraham Bokka, 1748. Abraham Steymets to Rachel VanTassell, 1760. Mary Steymets to Theopholis Ellsworth, June 23,

5.

John Steymets (son of Benj.)

5.

to Elizabeth Taylor,

1778.

July

14, 1781. 5.

Mary Steymets (daughter McDougal, Nov.

5. 5. 6.

2,

of Benj. 2nd.) to

Alexander

1781.

Robert Maer to Catherine Steymets, Feb. 22, 1780. Mary Steymets to Thomas Foster, Jan. 26, 1779. Henry Steymets to Mary Linford (of Hackensack) May 17, 1799.

5.

Rachel Steymets (daughter of Benj. 2nd.) to Frederic Fritts, of N. J., 1780.

5.

Mary Steymets

5.

John Steymets (son of Benj.

5.

Abraham Steymets

to Cornelius Peterson, Sept. 20, 1778. 1st.) to Anna VanRiper,

Oct., 1802.

1.

to Slyntie

Bruyn, 1798.

Baptisms. Caspar Steymets and 1st wife Dorothea Sertsen, July

174

CASPAE STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 2nd. wife Jeannetje Gerritsen, 5, 1655, Alt je; Aug. 27,

Caspar.

14, 1650,

Nov. 1653, Johannes; Oct.

1656, Gerrit; Oct. 30, 1658, Annetje; Dec. 19, 1660,

March 14, 1665, Dec. Jan. Joanna; 28, 1667, Orsolena; 16, 1670, BenChristoffel; Sept. 5, 1663, Caspar;

jamin. 2.

2.

Joanna Steymets and Tades Michaelse, Annetje, Nov. 1, 1682; Johannes, Aug. 1684; Jeannetje, Aug., 1689. Gerrit Steymets and 1st wife Vroutje Claes, 1688 Arien1684; Anna, - - 1686 Annetje, ,

;

1691

;

1696

;

1695 Hermanes, Caspar, 2nd. wife Catrina Gerrits Post, Helena

1698

;

Jeannetje, 1703.

tie,

,

,

;

;

,

,

husband Andrew Prior, Jennakie, 1699; Vroutje, 1712; 2nd. husband, John

2.

Joanna Steymets and

2.

Walter, 1714; Gertrude, 1716. Christo(cel Steymets and 1st. wife Joannetje Gerrits, Casp^rus, 1686; Jeannetje, 1691; Gerrit, 1692; J.

1st.

Ryder,

Judth, 1694; Annetje, 1688; Benjamin, 1698; ChrisElizabeth, topher, 1700. 2nd wife Sarah Vannest,

1707

3.

Joanna, 1696. Jeannetje Steymets (daughter of Christoffel) and Cas;

parus VanVoostrand,

Gerrit,

1718; Jeannetje,

1723; Jacob, 1721. 4.

Johannes Steymets and Jeannetje Lafarge, pher, 1728 Jeannetje, 1746 Isaac, 1753. Hermanes Steymets and Elsie Heermans, ;

4.

Christo-

;

Margaret-

1722; Catharine, 1724; Altje, 1725; Antje, 1731; Gerrit, 1733 Elsie, 1736.

ta,

;

4.

Anna Steymets and William Dey,

Johanna, 1699;

Antje, 1709. 4.

Helena Steymets and Isaac Hennion, 3,

5.

Catharine, Oct.

1737.

Elizabeth Steymets and Jurie

Van

Riper,

Caspar,

1730. 5.

Hester Steymets and Johannes Van Riper, Pieter, 1729; David, 1731; Johannes, 1761; Annetje, 1764; Catharine, 1766; Caspar, 1768.

CASPAE STEINMETZ AND HIS DESCENDANTS. 4.

Annetje Steymets and Cornelius Bulsing,

175

Cornelius,

1750; Annetje, 1752. 4.

Maritje Steymets and

Abram

Jan, 1751;

Meserole,

Maritjie, 1754. 4.

5.

Sara Steymets (daughter of Benj. 1st) and husband, Sara, July 3, 1753. Judith Steymets and Klaes Garrabrantse, Mary, 1824 Jacob, 1828. Jennet je Steymets and Cornelius Webber, Johannes, ;

5.

1763. 5.

Casparus

Steymets

and Hulljie Schutt,

Helene,

1751. 4.

Nealtje Steymets (daughter of Benj. 1st) and Cornelius Marschelleck, Altje, 1759; Sara, 1761.

3.

Benjamin Steymets and Sara Emans, 1751

;

Jeannetje,

Casparus, 1753.

4.

Rachel Steymets and David Ross, Sarah, 1766. Frederic Steymets and Annetie Barre, Rachel, 1784.

5.

Mary Steymets (daughter

4.

of Benj. 2nd,

and

sister of

Rachel Steymets Fritts) and Alexander McDougall,

- Penelope, 1767. 5.

Kingsland, arine, 1806

5.

(daughter of Garret) and Stephen Elizabeth, 1797; Stephen, 1804; Cath-

Nellie Steymets

Henry, 1808. Garret Steymets and Margaretta Jurgens, Nealtie, 1765 Johannes, 1773. Joseph Steymets and Maria Dean (Dien), Margaretta, 1765 Casparus, 1768. Benjamin Steymets and Rachel Fardon, Benjamin, Aug., 1765 Magail, 1767. Peter Steymets (son of Benj. 1st) and 1st wife Maria Dey and 2nd wife, Abbie Barteen, Casparus, 1747 Abagail, 1761 Maria, Feb., 1763 Rachel, Sept. 1764; Pieter, 1766 Johannes, 1768. ;

;

5.

;

5.

;

5.

;

;

;

;

5.

Abraham Steymets and Abbie Bruyne (Brown), Johannes, 1766. Casparus Steymets and Alida Bruyne, Johanna, 1766 Jan, 1768. ;

(Brown)

;

VOLUME IX OF "COLLECTIONS."

176

Peter, Apr., Casparus Steymets and Rachel Bancker, 1772 Frederic, May, 1775. Christoffel Steymets (son of Benj. 1st) and Maria EllsWilliam, Nov. 1766 Effie, Feb. 23, 1765 worth, Christopher, 1768 Affia, 1762 Maria, 1760 Annie, ;

;

;

;

;

;

1770.

Abraham Steymets and Syntyne Van Orden,

Aigee,

Nov., 1765; Johannes, 1766; Pieter, 1769; Rachel, January, 1772 ; Jacob, 1774 ; Edward, 1778.

Catharine Steymets and Andries Hoppe, - - Martin, Sept., 1763; Casparus, 1766; Johannes, 1768; Catharine, 1772; Rachel, 1778. Garret Steymets and Mary

Stephen, April,

,

1804; Eleanor, 1806; John, 1809.

John Steymets (son of Benj. 1st) and Annie VanRiper, John, July" 1803; Henry, Dec., 1804; Catharine, 1806.

William Steymets (who was brother to Benj. 2nd; and great uncle to P. H. Hoifman) and Elizabeth Taylor, - Aggie, Feb., 1785.

Abraham Steymets and

Elizabeth Barrens,

VOLUME IX OF "COLLECTIONS." Collections of the New Jersey Society has been published (September, 1916), and should prove of great interest to members of the Society, and to all other persons and societies interested in early Jerseymen and their descendants. It contains biographical and, usually, genealogical notes of many of the early men and families noted in the 31 volumes of New Jersey Archives. Those possessing or having occasion to consult the Archives know that footnotes were often appended stating some facts about the persons referred to in the body of the text. The late indefatigable Corresponding Secretary of our Society, William Nelson, spent many years in correspondence and labor to add facts to these notes, and this posthumous work, which was executed by him for

Volume IX

of the volumes of

' '

' '

Historical

' '

' '

'

'

the result. will be sent, postpaid, to any address on receipt of the price, $2.00. Address the the Society,

is

The volume

NEW JERSEY

HISTORICAL SOCIETY, New Jersey.

16 West Park Street, Newark,

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

New VOL.

Jersey Historical Society*

NEW

I.

SERIES

No.

1916

The Ballad

of Newark.

Written in the Poetry Competition proposed by the Committee of One Hundred on the 250th Anniversary of Newark.

Glad May was on the marshes when In Achter Koll grave Milford men Their anchor cast; Clear vision of the broad domain, Whose bound was Watchung's azure chain.

Was

got at

last.

Outpoured by Nature's lavish hand, Wild beauty decked their promised land

From

creek to crag;

The mallow blushing showed her face, And song birds trilled a welcome grace Prom reed and flag. Like velvet shone the meadows green, With groves of darker hue between,

And

shining pool

;

Beyond the plain the upland

Where babbled The brooklet

stood, in the darkling wood

cool.

4.

THE BALLAD OF NEWARK.

178

Such pastures green were never known, Like uplands saw they never sown In Milford old; Prophetic

Of when

too, their

their kine

longing gaze,

and sheep should graze

In flocks untold.

The fragrance That

of the west-born breeze, late caressed tall cedar trees,

Their senses caught

So rich the bounty

;

all

around

Their toil to reach the blissful ground Was then as nought.

Lo wondrous light fell on the bay As though were gone the common day And God was near; Awhile they paused in silent mood !

To thank

And

Him

for abounding good,

blessings dear.

Then high resolve to build a town, Nor time nor foe could crumble down, Their souls awoke

On

;

day was writ and pledges fit

deathless scroll that

A solemn oath,

To keep unbroke. In solemn pact they gave assent

To form a Godly government

Amid the wild And they who came to view the land From Branford, and from Guilford strand, Were reconciled. ;

The anchor lifted, and aride The ship winged up Passaic's As homeward bound;

tide

THE BALLAD OF NEWARK. Amid

A

179

the bluffs a cleft was seen

trail led

through the forest screen

To higher ground. There landed bold the pilgrim band To found upon a savage land Their state ideal;

Mid perils dread, and oft distress, To face the stubborn wilderness For woe or weal. e

There noble Treat, from Milford come, And Swaine, who yet his Branford home

Must see again, With other sturdy men that day, Strode up the bank to carve their way

Upon

the main.

But hark from out the forest shade The grudgeful voice of Perro made The pilgrims start; " it from this my land, said, Depart Unbought by any English hand !

' '

' '

!

' '

Depart

depart

!

The cup was dashed, but not

As grieved they

left the

their hope,

pleasant slope,

And

savage threat; Swift bore the tide their vessel To near Elizabeth, the town

Of

down

Carteret.

Before the governor was broke The matter urgent, and he spoke His promise fair; And bade them not to sail away;

But patient

Would

wait.

Another day

chase despair.

THE BALLAD OP NEWAEK.

180

From

Oration, the Hackensack, consent. Then fared they back

Was won

To buy the ground;

Upon

Passaic's bank agreed to the redman's deed,

The paleface

In honor bound.

Ere long the evening shadows fell; The chieftains rose, and said farewell In friendliness;

Then slept the pilgrims. They had won Thus far their way and night drew on The wilderness. The morrow dawned, and Full

many days

of might

in

its

train

and main

For heart and hand; The echoing axe bespoke their toil, The silent spade upturned the soil Of virgin land.

God knew

the sacrifices made,

The lonely hours within the glade The pilgrim spent; Yet from his soul uprose a flame, Nor foe nor fate could lightly tame, Of ravishment. Out of the chaos of the wild

Was

born a village

like a child

Of health and hope; Broad avenues ran up and down, And ample commons gave the town Full civic scope.

Ere long the Branford people came,

And

then the village got

Of Newark dear;

its

name

THE BALLAD OF NEWARK. *

From the fair city on the Trent In England old, where Pierson spent Some hallowed year. /

Soon rose the lenter meeting-house, The drummer tramped his beat to rouse

men to pray; And sentinels kept watch and All

ward, Against the lurking foe to guard,

By

night and day.

The years wore by stern toilsome years That saw hope triumph over fears, '

And

courage win;

With pilgrim That never

Of human

clay

was mixed the

stuff

flinched, nor took rebuff kin.

One day there ran a rumor fleet That made men startle in the street,

And

turn away; Brave Treat beloved must sail again, Back to the far New England main,

Before the May.

Grave faces plead with mute appeal, Sage townsmen urged the common weal

As

over

all; ' '

Yet answered he Nay, I must go For He whose choosing willed it so ;

He ' '

gave the call."

The

' '

' '

he said, their tale have told Since here we fared from Milford old years,

By wind and Then

to the

tide";

townsmen gathered round,

Associates as brothers bound,

He

prophesied

:

181

THE BALLAD OF NEWAEK.

182

"A city rich and fair appears, Advancing with the growing years To nobler

things;

Trade, letters, art and commerce Before her genius gladly fall Like subject kings.

all

' '

seer broke off. The vision bright moment faded from his sight,

The

A

And

all

They

plead,

And

was dark;

"But when shall these things be

shall

our children's children

see,

Ere they embark ?" between," he said, generations shall be dead, As yet unborn;

"Long

decades

lie

"And

'

And And

children of all lands shall come, gratefully, for wealth and home,

Her

life

adorn.

' '

Sad-eyed they watched the vessel fade That bore away the man God made For greater things;

Then bravely to their task again Their wills they bent, and conquered pain

And murmurings. many springs have decked the land Since erstwhile came the pilgrim band

Full

From Milford old; Where once was glade, and

A

princely

city lifts its

velvet mead,

head

In wealth untold. Joseph Fulford Folsom.

Marie-Jean-Paul-Joseph-Roche-Yves-Gilbert

De

Motier, Marquis de Lafayette.

BY RICHARD WAYNE

PARKER.

// it seem impossible to discuss this great life and character in a short address, let its recall the motto that he adopted as his warrant for attempting whatever he deemed right, however it might seem impossible

:

"Cur non ?"

"Why

not f"

On

the sixth day of September, 1757, a son was born to Adrienne, widow of the last Marquis of Lafayette. On July 13th, 1757, less than two months before, her husband had fallen in battle at Minden in Germany. He was then serving as

Colonel of Grenadiers and was a Chevalier of the Order of

When he fell, he was the sole male representative of his line, his brother having been likewise killed in battle. The marquisate hung on the life of this baby boy. No one St. Louis.

dreamed that that boy would bring the marquisate to an end with every title of nobility in France, and the oldest and proudest royalty in Europe. As an only son the young Lafayette was petted and wilHe was red headed and if his picful, but he was a favorite. tures are to be trusted he was not good looking, his head retreating to a lofty dome behind. At 15, he was an officer of

At

he married Adrienne, daughter of the whom he had known from childhood and who loved him devotedly all her life. He refused promotion at the Court when asked to serve in the train of the Count of Provence, (brother of Louis XVI and afthe musketeers.

Duke D'Ayen,

16,

of the house of Noailles,

terwards Louis XVIII), taking an opportunity to give his

LAFAYETTE. Count at a masked ball, and when the Count said he would remember what was said, young Lafayette answered that memory was the wit of fools. In 1776, he was stationed at Metz, and a talk with the Duke of Gloucester as to the American Revolution excited his sympathy so that he determined to go to America. His wife 's uncle and brother wanted to go with him. He asked leave from the Duke of Broglie, who replied, I saw your uncle die and your father. How can I be accessory to the ruin of the last and only representative of your family ? and permission was refused. Meanwhile, he met De Kalb, and arranged with the American Commissioner Silas Deane to obtain rank in the American army. He broke his orders to go to Marseilles, deserted, went to Bayonne, and finally made his way in a slow ship that he had chartered at his own expense, landing in South Carolina, and riding on horseback 900 miles to Philadelphia. It did not look as if much would be done for this runaway lad of 19. Congress had been overwhelmed with applications from foreign soldiers of fortune, and had adopted the plan of not His letters were not read and he listening to any stranger. was told that there was little hope. He replied to Congress in writing "After the sacrifices I have made, I have the One is to serve at my own exright to exact two favors. ultra liberal views to the

' '

' '

:

pense, the other is to serve first as a Volunteer." This letter awakened attention. The dispatches from the envoys were read over, and the boy received the rank of Major General,

leaving to Washington the -right to fix his command if any. Sufficient praise has not been given to Lafayette 's services in the Revolution. When the Conway conspiracy obtained

an order that he should command an expedition from Albany and attack Montreal, he refused -to accept the place, except as subordinate to Washington, whom he toasted at a dinner with the leaders of the conspiracy, and although the expedition never started because troops were not forwarded, he obtained a very valuable treaty with the Indians.

Meanwhile, his chivalry and gallantry had obtained the sympathy of Prance. He became a popular hero, especially

LAFAYETTE.

185

after his gallant conduct at Germantown and the Brandywine. The feeling in favor of an Alliance with America

when Franklin, Deane and Lee had obtained that and a guarantee of America's independence in 1778, treaty their first act after paying their respects to the King, was to call upon Madame Lafayette, and acknowledge their debt to grew, and

her husband.

The

first

news of that treaty came

to

George Washing-

ton through a letter to Lafayette, who ran to the General, embracing him with tears and saying, The King, my Master, ' '

has acknowledged your independence, and formed an alliance with you to secure and establish it."

The united

colonies had a day of Thanksgiving. The cheered the King of France, the friendly European States, and the American states and the gloom of Valley Forge was lighted up by the news.

Army

We know now that the independence of America would never had been achieved without French subsidies and assistand without the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, which came by the aid of the French Navy. We know too that the Alliance meant the downfall of the French Monarchy. The debt incurred in aiding us bankrupted the French treasury, and made the French Revolution possible. Immediately after the news of the alliance, our young ance,

knight errant again did the unexpected. Carlisle, a British Rhode Island, issued a circular in which he spoke

officer in

of the perfidy of the French King. Lafayette sent him a It was of course declined, but such an action in challenge. favor of the King, though irregular, gained him favor at

home. Falling ill in 1779, he went home to France. On the way, he helped put down a dangerous mutiny on ship board. When he arrived, he was put under a formal arrest, but confined at his brother-in-law's palace, the Hotel Noailles. The Queen who had always opposed the Alliance nevertheless honored him.

This boy of 22 onfinement.

He

is still

at the

head of

affairs,

although in

obtains consideration for a projected descent

LAFAYETTE.

186

on England with Paul Jones, and for an expedition to Ireland. He proposed that Sweden furnish ships, and offered to pledge his fortune for any loss sustained by the Government. At last, he secured orders that Rochambeau with 4000 troops should be sent to Rhode Island.

In August, 1779, Congress voted him a sword, which was presented by Franklin. We may say here that afterwards in the reign of terror that sword was buried and the blade rusted away, but when the handle was dug up, a new blade was by the National Guard, made from the bolts and

fitted to it

bars of the Bastille.

In March, 1780, he was able to sail for Boston in a French frigate, with instructions to prepare for the arrival of the French fleet and troops. He visited Washington at Morristown, and Washington sent him to the Congress, writing them, "I am persuaded Congress will participate in the joy I feel in the return of a gentleman who has so singularly distinguished himself in the service of this country. During the

time he has been in France, he has uniformly manifested the

same zeal in our affairs which animated his conduct while he was among us, and he has been on all occasions an essential friend to America. He merits, and I doubt not Congress will give him every mark of consideration in their power."

When Washington services,

spoke of Lafayette's distinguished he had in mind the military ability that he had often At Germantown and the Brandywine, and in an am-

shown. bush near Valley Forge, he had greatly endeared himself to his troops. On the last occasion, he saved a whole regiment from annihilation by a prompt and skillful withdrawal. At the battle of

Monmouth, he had been put

in

command

be-

cause General Charles Lee had refused to push the pursuit of the British. Lee afterward got leave to join in the battle as Lafayette's subordinate, but came as his superior, took the command from him and then retreated. It was all this taken

made Washington so stern with Lee. After his return from Europe in 1780, Lafayette received more consideration and did his chief military work. He urged the French at Newport to join in an attack on New York together that

LAFAYETTE.

187

which unfortunately was not attempted. He was then given an independent command in Virginia. There Benedict Arnold sent him a letter in May, 1881, which he returned unopened saying that he would have no dealings with traitors. His strategy was worthy of Washington himself. His opponent Cornwallis had some 8000 men. Lafayette had less than 3000, and most of these were militia. Cornwallis confi"The boy cannot escape dently and boastfully promised me." Lafayette's movements were cautious but active. He had been trying to save his stores at Richmond, and kept out of the way for a time hoping also that Cornwallis would get entangled in the rivers, and finally he bottled Cornwallis up on :

the peninsula.

A dispatch from "Washington to Lafayette had been captured which showed that an attack was intended on New York, and Cornwallis fortified himself at Yorktown, thinking it was a good place to communicate with New York by sea. This was just what Lafayette wished, because at that moment, Admiral De Grasse arrived in the Chesapeake, with a fleet and an army of 3000 men, who were sent to join Lafayette. The temptation was strong to get the glory of capturing Cornwallis for himself, especially as the Admiral wanted to go north immediately, but Lafayette insisted upon communicating with Washington, persuaded De Grasse to wait until Washington should arrive, served under his old leader in the siege of Yorktown, and led the American assault with a

column, of which Alexander Hamilton and Colonel Laurens headed divisions.

His loyalty to Washington as well as his military genius are equally manifest in this final victory. The war being then practically over he returned to Prance, and was a popular hero.

When

the

Queen heard

of

his arrival she left a party of guests to drive his wife to him.

He was made

a field marshal when only 25 years old. As the friend of America, he went to Spain, then the owner of Florida and Louisiana, and insisted upon the recognition of the

American envoy.

At

this early age,

he was the counsellor of Kings and

LAFAYETTE.

188

He Cabinets, and the Confidential agent of great nations. was planning a descent on the British West Indies, when peace was declared. In 1784 and 1785, after a visit to America, he went to Prussia, where he saw Frederick the Great, then an old man in a slovenly uniform, and was told by that frank monarch that any young man who brought American ideas to Europe would be hanged. We have now completed the first five and twenty years of a life. They were years of unqualified success, for he had been with Washington, whom he adored and whose wisdom and judgment had perhaps moderated Lafayette's sometimes imprudent enterprises. He was now in his own country, and determined to bring the blessings of liberty to his own people. He became the foremost advocate of French liberties for over fifty years. This was a new and different task. America had defended her liberties while France had the problem of creating free government. Lafayette had to contend against French institutions while America was upholding hers. His first efforts were to aid the Protestants. He then was elected to the "Assembly of Notables", although he was under the required age. This assembly had been convoked because of the bankruptcy of the nation, and was an absolute failure, not daring or knowing what to do. It has been called by a French wit who spoke English, the assembly of not-ables. In this gathering of nobles and conservatives, Lafayette immediately moved for an investigation of abuses, such as lettres de cachet, religious persecution, oppressive taxes like the duty "Great disorder," he said, "supsalt, and wastefulness.

on

poses great depredation. The millions that are dissipated are raised by impost, and an impost can only be justified by the

All the millions given up to cupidity or depredation are the fruit of the sweat, the tears, and perhaps the blood of the nation."

real exigences of the state.

He demanded

equality of rights, personal and religious

liberty, and universal representation. and propositions were ordered to be put

When new demands in writing,

it

was he

LAFAYETTE. who

first

entered the

demand

189

for the States General, the an-

cient parliament of France, and finally the States General assembled in its three bodies of nobility, clergy and commons

after a lapse of 173 years. Within a month, he was one of the 47 nobles who took the first revolutionary step and joined

Commons and Clergy in a single assembly, which when refused the use of the parliament room, met in the tennis court, demanded a constitution and swore never to separate, the

and

to assemble

where circumstances should require until the

constitution should be established.

He joined with Mirabeau in demanding the withdrawal of troops, and in passing a declaration of the rights, freedom and equality of man, which asserted his liberty in matters of property, person, work, the use of the the faculties, speech, pursuit of happiness, and resistance of with no limits but the rights of others and no suboppression thought, honor,

life,

:

jection except to such law as may be made by the assent of himself and his representatives and legally enforced.

This was the declaration of liberties of the llth of July, 1789, which Lafayette hung in his room opposite to the American declaration of Independence. When on the 14th of

that same July, the Bastille was demolished by a mob, Lafayette said that when oppression renders revolution necessary,

He was

insurrection becomes the holiest of duties.

with the key of the Bastille, and sent ton. It is now at Mount Vernon.

it

to

presented

George Washing-

Thus Lafayette not only moved for and got a Parliament, but rather against his principles he followed his party in the Revolution that changed that Parliament into a single House and he winked at the riots and the National Assembly, insurrection that followed. popular

But the troops were still with the King and nobility, and in order to destroy their power, Lafayette created the first great popular army of the world. He organized the National

Guard on the model

of the

American

militia

and minute men.

He

paid the arrears of pay of the French Guard out of his own funds and thus persuaded them to become part of the National Guard, of which he was the Commander!

From

that

LAFAYETTE.

190

moment, King and nobility were powerless, and could only fly to foreign soil. Emigration began when Lafayette organized that people's army. He rode at its head when the King went

He refused to be dictator, he stopped his command for a time when order he massacres, resigned was not kept, he made all take an oath to the law, he defeated the movement to remove the King to Metz, he joined in abolishing titles of nobility and he took full charge when the King was brought back. He did not claim to be consistent. He told Gouverneur Morris, ''I am aware that my party is mad, but I will serve it to the death." Mirabeau told him, "You wish to be a Cromwell Grandison, and you will find out where that combination will carry you." But he was always honest and in procession to Paris.

brave.

When

France was invaded, he resigned from the Naand took a place upon the frontier, where the three commanders of the North, Middle and South armies were Lafayette, Rochambeau and Luckner. He was in that command in August, 1892, when the Jacobins turned the National Assembly out, and the reign of terror began, when the palace was sacked and the nation was called to arms. This was the turning point in his career. Until then, he lad never hesitated, though he had made mistakes. It was certainly a mistake to abolish the three orders, and thus put the whole of France in the control of a single assembly withtional Guard,

out check or balance. The greatness of a country is not achieved by abolishing its institutions. The nobility might have been curbed without being destroyed. But thus far, Lafayette had never failed in

any emergency. emergency, he failed, though he had prepared for it. He had changed departments with Rochambeau, so as to be nearer Paris. He had planned with Luckner to get the King out of Paris when his position there became dangerous. He had arrested the Commissioners that brought In

this great

the news of the revolt in Paris, holding that the Legislative assembly had been overawed by a lawless mob, and was not free

when

He had

it decreed the suspension of the royal authority. issued a proclamation against the Jacobins :

LAFAYETTE.

181

"Let the reign of clubs give way to reign of law, their usurpation to firm and independent exercise of the constitutional authorities, their disorganized maxims to the principles of liberty, their insensate fury to the calm and constant courage of a nation that knows its rights and defends them."

Luekner was ready to stand by him. All that he had to do was to march on Paris, restore freedom to the Assembly and succour the King. But he failed in the emergency. He gave no orders to his troops, allowed the commissioners from the assembly to proclaim their own messages, and when the army hesitated and

obey the orders of the assembly he went to Paris to try to influence the leaders of the mob, and failing in this he found himself prescribed, and ran away with his staff finally decided to

and a few others to an advanced post of the Austrian Army. Then the storm fell. The reign of law was replaced by that of the guillotine. His wife and their daughter were put in prison, and her mother, grandmother and sister were guillotined.

Meanwhile Lafayette was kept in confinement in one place after another, but in absolute secrecy. Nothing shows the of man so as that the much every sovereign in Europe power was afraid of him. He was finally imprisoned in Olmutz. He

had been declared a

traitor at home, but he refused the de-

mands

of the enemies of France, to recant his revolutionary views and especially the abolition of nobility. He remained in prison for five years. When George Washington interceded with the Emperor for him, and asked whether imprisonment, the confiscation of his property, and the poverty and scattering of his family, were not such suffering as would ask for pity, the Emperor declared that the existence of Lafa-

was incompatible with the safety of the Governments of Europe. After an unsuccessful attempt to escape, aided by two friends (one of them a Huger of South Carolina) he was kept in close confinement in a cell and chained to the wall. His

yette

wife and young daughters of 16 and 13 finally got leave to share his prison. His wife fell ill, but refused to leave him on the condition that she should not return.

LAFAYETTE.

192

It

was only after nearly

demand But he was the

of Napoleon,

six years that

he was released at

who had conquered

Italy in 1799.

proscribed in France. Napoleon would not permit his return, while General Brune actually objected to his being in Holland. He refused to go to England, a country at

war with

still

his own.

He

protested against having his

name

selected to be specially struck off the list of the proscribed, and urged that France should recall all immigrants not then

Finally, when Napoleon assumed the position of dicpromising free government to France, he took passports under a feigned name to Paris, and asked to see Napoleon. Talleyrand called and threatened him, saying that the First Consul was very much provoked, but he refused to leave France. He was still proscribed and could not vote until March 1, 1800. Napoleon, in his own frank way, said that no one was so hated by the enemies of liberty and of France as

in arms. tator,

Lafayette, and told

him personally

:

"You made

a mistake in wishing to preserve the ancient dynasty, for if you refused it absolute power, the Government could not go on, and if you granted it, it would be employed against you. The problem was incapable of solution."

Meanwhile, he refused to be appointed to the Senate, not believing in that body, and declined to be sent on an embassy to the United States because he was too nearly related to that country to act as a minister of any other. He was now comparatively poor, and lived on his wife's property at La Grange. In 1802, he fell and became lame from mistakes of the surgeons. In December, 1807, his loving wife died of the illness that she had contracted during their imprisonment in Olmutz. It is hard to be the wife of a hero. He remained out of politics during the Empire, for he was never trusted by Napoleon, who said :

' '

Everybody in France

is

corrected but Lafayette. He has He is quiet and calm, but

never drawn back a hair's breadth.

ready to begin again."

When

Napoleon returned from Elba, Lafayette had no and demanded a constitution. He protested against a chamber of peers, but took a place in the Assembly,

faith in him,

LAFAYETTE.

193

which he once asked whether that Assembly were RepresenFrench people, or the Napoleon Club. After Waterloo, he urged Napoleon to abdicate, but scorned the proposition that he should be surrendered, and in

tatives of the

Englishman who asked it "I am astonished that in making

told the

you address yourself

tion,

mutz.

:

to

such an odious proposione of the prisoners of 01-

' '

On

the restoration of the Monarchy, he was four years in private life, and then became a deputy. He was still free in his expressions of opinion, and in 1823 was charged with treason, but not prosecuted.

In 1824, he made his last visit to America, remaining nearly a year. His progress was a triumph. The Newark Sentinal chronicles

made

it

as of national importance.

It gives

him by Judge Story at Salem, August I which wish I had time to read in full. In it Judge Story 31, We to welcome to our homes said, you to our country the address

to

' '

our hearts. We have read the history of your achievements your honours and your sufferings. They are associated with all that is dear to us with the battle grounds consecrated by the blood of our heroes with the tender recollections of our departed statesmen with the affectionate reverence of our surviving patriots. Can we forget that we were poor, and struggling alone in the doubtful contest for Independence, and you crossed the Atlantic at the hazard of fortune and fame, to cheer us in our resistance ? That you re-crossed it to solicit naval and military succours from the Throne of France, and returned with triumphant success ? That your gallantry in the southern campaign checked the inroads of a brave and confident enemy ? That your military labours closed but with the surrender at Yorktown, and thus indissolubly united your name with the proud events of that glorious day. We cannot forget these things, if we would we would not forget them if we could." Here that stern New England audience burst out into a shout, "No, Never", after which Judge Story said, "They will not be forgotten, until America ceases to be a nation."

LAFAYETTE.

194

We may

dwell a

little

on the celebration of

his visit here

in Newark.

In three columns of the Newark Sentinal of Tuesday, September 28, 1824, we find that on the Thursday last, as agreeable to. arrangements made by his Excellency the Governor of this State in concert with the General Committee of this town, General Lafayette and suite, attended by General Morton, the Mayor, Recorder, etc., of New York, on board the

James Kent, reached the Jersey shore at the City of Jersey about 10 A. M., and were waited upon by Gen. J. Dayton, acting as Grand Marshal, Col. Kinney, and Major Kean, of the suite of Governor "Williamson, and conducted to Lyons Hotel.

After a few minutes escorted by a squadron of cavalry and attended by a numerous cavalcade, he set out for Newark.

At Bergen, he paused to be presented with a gold headed apple tree cane. At noon, an artillery salute announced his arrival at Newark Bridge, the streets and bluff being lined with spectators.

At Major Boudinot's house (later the residence of Mr. H. Condict), he alighted and met the judges of the United States and State Courts, the Cincinnati and other gentlemen. The infantry was formed in the two lines of the Common from the flagstaff to the Bower. S.

The procession entered

at the flagstaff

and went

to the

"Bower"

while a choir sang a welcome, the "cadet" band played and they passed under the Civic Arch to the temple.

The crowd prevented the proper presentation from the Bower.

of ladies

The militia from Bergen, Essex and Morris, moved to the usual parade ground, and were formed in two Brigade lines under Generals Dayton and Darcy. "The display of the miwas grand and imposing. About 2000 men in uniforms were on the ground, besides nearly 300 cavalry who had constituted a part of the escort from Jersey City. litia

' '

The orator was Theodore Frelinghuysen. In his oration, he aaid: "The children of the venerated men by whose side

LAFAYETTE.

195

you fought and in whose counsels you ably participated now rise up to hail and bless you. "The story of Brandywine, of Momnouth and of Yorktown. There we learned the triumphs of liberty. In the dungeons of Olmutz, we sympathized with her trials. May I add that never did the spirit of enlightened freedom appear more like herself than when you her worthy son took your stand in front of her excited votaries, and at the hazard of

your life gave the warning voice that the excesses of liberty would only endanger and might extinguish her dearest hopes."

The Bower was erected for the reception 55 feet in diamwith a portico and colonnades 150 feet long on either side, as designed and superintended by William Halsey, Esq., aided by Moses Ward, Architect, and by the ladies for the formation of those wreaths which constitute the frieze moulding and other members of the work and the ornaments which decoeter,

rate

it.

From Newark he went South and

before his return to he saw at France, Joseph Bonaparte Bordentown, and went to the grave of Washington and to Yorktown. Congress voted

him 24,000

When

acres

and $200,000.

back in France the old

1828 and 1829, was

man

in his seventies, in

attacking the abuses of the restored His popularity remained, and reforms. monarchy, urging still

and he was welcomed everywhere with ovations, though several mayors were removed for allowing them to take place. Finally in 1830, the King was mad enough to make a decree dissolving the chambers, reducing the number of deputies and changing the suffrage. Lafayette immediately went to Paris, headed a new revolution, took command of the National Guard, threw up bar-

and put Louis Philippe on the throne. He lived until 1834, long enough to see the abuses that were beginning under that King, and died quietly at his home. We have been considering the life of a hero. He was not always well balanced and was at his best when he was under Washington. But he changed the face of the world. It is ricades,

LAFAYETTE.

196

much to say that his enthusiasm brought the aid of France to our Revolution, and that without him, America would not have been independent. In his own country, he was not so fortunate. He did not know how to use institutions. He failed to act in the very emergency for which he had prepared, when he could have saved the King and Queen and Nation under such conditions as he might choose to impose. The failure meant the destruction of the best blood of France. It reduced him to poverty, and made his country the prey of war, revolution and tyrants for nearly 80 years. Yet it is true also of France that that great republic, whose sons even now show a chivalry and courage worthy of the best days of the France of old, would probably not exist except for the work done by Gilbert de Motier, Marquis de Lafayette. not too

Lafayette in Quaint Verse. The following lines in praise of Lafayette, done in the quaint manner of American verse of the eighteenth century, were written by Margaretta V. Faugeres, the daughter of Ann Eliza Bleeker, the mother having been the daughter of Brandt Schuyler of New The works, consisting of letters, essays and poems, City.

York

of mother and daughter were published in New York in 1793, those The essays and poems of of Bleecker being then posthumous. Mrs. Faugeres occupy the latter portion of the volume, which " Bleecker 's Works". bears the cover title, The title of the poem in which at the close Lafayette is celeOn seeing a Print, exhibiting the Ruins of the Bastile ', brated is '

' '

and the

lines are

whom distant land deplore, And thou, Fayette And now self -banish 'd from thy native shore; Tho' zeal mistaken, may a shadow throw !

Athwart the laurels which adorn thy brow; for in thy generous breast Yet shall they bloom

No

soul like Coriolanus

To Gallia

still

is

confessed

:

thy warmest wishes tend,

And tho' an injured exile, still a friend When grateful nations tell thine acts to Fame !

shall urge her oldest claim, Point to the worthies whom her sons revere, And place Fayette with those she holds most dear.

America

Proceedings of the Society, 1916. Newark, N. J., October 25th, 1916. The Annual Meeting of the New Jersey Historical Society was held to-day at twelve o 'clock, and was called to order by the President, Francis J. Swayze. The invocation was offered by the Recording Secretary.

The minutes of the previous annual meeting, October 27, 1915, were read and approved. The report of the Treasurer, William C. Morton, was read by the Secretary.

approved and

The balance reported was

$832.77.

The report was

is

appended. The President appointed Messrs. Elias Vosseler and Frank Bergen as a committee on nominating trustees for the ensuing year.

The report of the Corresponding Secretary, A. Van Doren Honeyman, was presented and was approved. It is appended in full.

The report of the Board of Trustees was read by Charles M. Lum, and was approved. The committee on nominations returned and presented the following names for trustees to serve three years, Hiram E. Beats, J. Lawrence Boggs, Joseph M. Riker, Charles B. Bradley and Henry G. Atha. There were no other nominations offered and the clerk was instructed to cast a ballot for the five named. The President declared them elected. The report of the work of the Woman's Branch was presented by the President, Miss Altha E. Hatch. It was approved and is appended in full. The report of the Library Committee was presented by Frederick A. Canfield, the chairman, and was approved as appended. The report of the Committee on Membership was presented by J. Lawrence Boggs, the chairman, and was approved as appended. A vote of thanks was given Charles Bradley, chairman of the Society's special committee on the 250th anniversary of the City, and his report to the Board of Trustees, presented last June, was ordered to be spread upon the minutes of the Society to be included in the printed Proceedings.

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES.

198

A recess was taken for luncheon and a social hour, following which at two o'clock the Honorable R. Wayne Parker, delivered a splendid address on " Lafayette ", for which he received the thanks of the Society. The address was requested for printing in the Proceedings. The meeting adjourned. Joseph F. Folsom, Recording Secretary.

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. October 25, 1916.

The Board of Trustees through

various committees during the past year has been active in the administrative affairs of the Society. The monthly meetings have been faithfully attended, and matters that have needed attention have been fully discussed and carefully concluded. 'Since the last annual meeting has been published Volume XXVIII of the Archives, containing newspaper extracts related to New Jersey history during the years 1772 and 1773. Volume 9 of the Collection also has come from the press, prepared by our corresponding secretary, Mr. Honeyman. This volume bears the title New Jersey Biographical and Genealogical Notes" and its author was the late William Nelson, long the corresponding secretary of the Society. Still another volume, namely Volume V of the Second Series of the Archives, may be looked for in the near future, provision having been made by the State for continuing for another year its relationship with the Society in publishing the archives of New Jersey. The Trustees have engaged an assistant to the assistant librarian, and this addition to the attending force increases the facilities for serving our membership and the public in our particular its

' '

work.

The Committee on the 250th Anniversary of the Settlement of Newark, created in December, 1910, by our late President Jona-

W. Roberts, during this anniversary year of 1916, has been active in carrying out the purpose of its appointing. In co-operation with the City's Committee of One Hundred it arranged for a than

reception by the Society for the distinguished delegates invited to to participate on May the first in the opening services of the celebration. Following the reception in this building there were exercises held in the new Proctor's Theatre, on Market street, near

Newark

Halsey. The day has generally been remembered with pleasure, and the Society's share in making it memorable has been generously recognized. To the efficient leadership of Charles Bradley, chairman of this committee, great credit is due.

EEPOBT OF THE TEEASUBER.

199

The board urges upon the membership of the Society a continued active interest and support of all our enterprises. It recognizes with gratitude the unremitting zeal in practical service of the Woman's Branch. Joseph F. Folsom, Recording Secretary.

REPORT OF THE TREASURER. For Year Ending

Sept. 30th, 1916.

Capital Account

Balance to credit of acct. Oct. Received Life Membership

1,

1915

$

900.00 100.00

$1,000.00

Less Investment in Bonds Fire Insurance Cost of repairing and restoring 24 West Park (Fire May, 1916) $2,275.07 Less Insurance received from Newark Fire & Scottish Union 2,000.00 Investment

Bonds purchased each bequest William Nelson

907.69 $

92.31

275.07

to be credited to

2,464.60

Fund

Books purchased in excess of amount subscribed .... Purchased Subscribed

1,796.73

1,772.31

Hadfield F. M. Tichenor Mem'l Fund Balance to credit of Bequest Hadfield F. M. Tichenor Income Interest to credit of acct The David A. Hayes Fund Amount of Bequest 10,000.00 Less amt. invested 7,704.28

24.42

3.75

20.00

2,295.72

The David A. Hayes Fund Income

Amount received Mary A. Ingleton Donation Interest received

.

80.00

150.00

REPORT OF THE TREASURER

200

Indexing Amt. paid for indexing Book and Publishing Acc't. Amt. expended in publishing pro-

288.00

649.91

ceedings Less

Woman's Branch

Contri-

bution

$ 100.00

Royalty Sale of Kendall book

48.38

Smith Bequest Amt. of Bequest

501.53

148.38

L. Cotheal

2,000.00 40.00

Interest received

2,040.00

Amt. Invested

15.89

2,024.11

General Account Balance to credit of acct. October 1, 1915 Received from Rents, Dues, etc. .

.

1,468.17

4,949.83 6,418.00

Less General Expenses,

Salaries,

Re-

pairs, Taxes, etc

4,689.28

1,728.72

$3,553.62 $4,386.39 3,553.62

$ 832.77

Cash in bank Cash paid to printers for work on Vol. 18 New Jersey Archives, to be refunded by State of New Jersey

642.41

190.36

832.77

Oct. 1st, 1916

W.

C.

Morton, Treasurer.

This certifies that

we have audited

the foregoing accounts folios 378379, from Oct. 1st, 1915 to Oct. 1st, 1916. The proofs of balances in Bank to the credit of The New Jersey Historical Society and find them to be correct, that the balance to the credit of the Society to be Eight hundred thirty-two and 77/100 Dollars :

REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S BRANCH. Cash in Merchants Bank Cash due from State of New Jersey

201

$ 642.41 190.36 $ 832.77

Oct. 20th, 1916.

Charles M. J.

Lum

Lawrence Boggs Auditing Committee.

REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S BRANCH. October 25th, 1916.

with pleasure that the Woman's Branch presents to the New Jersey Historical Society its fifteenth Annual Report. During the year the Board of Managers has held nine regular meetings, with good attendance from all parts of the State. Our membership has been increased by the addition of one patron, five contributing members and fifty-one associate members. Death has claimed ten of our number during the past year. At our Annual meeting in May the Treasurer reported receipts, including the balance of the previous year, of $1,350.22, expenditures of $617.58, and a balance of $732.64. The legacy which was left to the Woman's Branch by Miss L. Cotheal Smith has been received, and invested, the interest to be used in the purchase of books. For years the Woman 's Branch has been the Genealogical Committee of the Historical Society, and, as a part of its work, has handed in two volumes of tombstone inscriptions annually, each containing approximately two thousand inscriptions. During the The Book of the Dead present year, we have purchased a copy of of Monmouth," thirty copies of which were published by Mr. George C. Martin. This publication contains about two thousand inscriptions. We also have enough Middlesex County inscriptions to fill a volume, though the copying has not yet been completed. The Library has further been enriched by the following gifts: A pamphlet, presented by Mrs. H. J. Hoerner; two pamphlets, two badges, and a lavender fan, presented by Mrs. A. F. R. Martin; a photograph of Hancock House, presented by Mrs. Joseph P. OsIt is

' '

borne; an old newspaper, "The Daily Citizen," Vicksburg, Miss., dated July 2nd, 1863, presented by Miss Emma Louise Sands; silhouettes of Col. Jacob Ford, Sr. and his wife, Hannah Baldwin, presented by their great, great, great grand daughter, Mrs. William S. Meek; a copy of the Register of the New Jersey Society, Colonial Dames of America, presented by Mrs. Alexander H. Tiers; address by Gen. Chambers on The Battle of Trenton, address by ' '

' '

EEPOET OF THE WOMAN'S BRANCH.

202

Chancellor Walker on The Old Barracks at Trenton " a book and a map of France, presented by Mrs. Mathias Steelman; two curios, presented by Miss Marianna W. Manning, also shell work of the natives of the Bahama Islands, a gift to the donor from a governor's wife, Lady William Robinson, formerly a pupil at Miss Manning's school; historical sketch of St. John's Lutheran Church of Easton, Pa., presented by Miss Katherine N. Stryker; sixty Geographic Magazines, 1911 1915, presented by Miss Mary McKeen; American Book Prices Current, 1915, presented by Miss Ginevra Freeman; portrait and autograph of Vice-President Thomas R. Marshall; portrait of Governor Theodore F. Randolph, presented by his son, Coleman Randolph; records of tombstone inscriptions ' '

;

from

Fairfield Presbyterian Church-yard, Cumberland County, together with a picture of the church, presented by Mrs. Trueman H. Clayton; ''The Records of the East Jersey Proprietors at Perth Amboy, N. J. ', presented by Hon. Adrian Lyon, member and Registrar of the Board of Proprietors of East Jersey a paper read by the Hon. Adrian Lyon; a paper, "Some Phases of Newark's His- a book tory," by Mrs. Sidrfey N. Ogden; "Old Bergen" oy Daniel VanWinkle; Book on Henry E. Pitney, Vice-Chancellor of '

New

Jersey,

18891907, Who's Who

in

America, 19141915,

and Men of New Jersey in Wars from 1791 to 1815," presented by Mrs. Charles W. Parker; picture of the interior of the Old Meeting House at Parsippany, N. J., presented by Miss Maria D. Green; collection of pamphlets, presented by Miss Altha E. Hatch portrait of Judge David A. Depue, presented by his daughter, Mrs. Sydney Norris Ogden a piece of the original frame of the first meeting house in Orange, erected by the Mountain Society in 1716, presented by Miss Ginevra Freeman; "An authentic narrative of the loss of the American Brig Commerce ', wrecked on the northern coast of Africa in 1815," presented by Miss Ginevra Freeman; oil painting of Henry Clay, presented by Mrs. Arthur H. Mackie; model of field carriage, gun and horses, made by Nelson Wright during the Civil War, presented by his grandson, Nelson Wright Mackie; package of genealogical clippings, presented by Miss Dora Smith.

"Records of

Officers

;

;

'

The following purchases were made during the year Manuscripts Three early Dutch manuscripts; documents relating to Acquackanonk, New Jersey, 1693 1723; Three letters of Elisha Boudinot, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. Letters written by the Rev. James Caldwell, the "Fighting Parson" of the American Revolution also a document signed by him and :

:

six manuscripts relating to his death.

ship of Saddle River, N.

J.,

Public records of the Town-

from 17891836.

EEPOET OF THE WOMAN'S BEANCH.

203

Books The Baskerville Family, by P. H. Baskerville. Doremus Genealogy, by William Nelson. The Schuremans of New The Stryker Family, by William Jersey, by Richard Wynkoop. :

S. Stryker. Washington's Life Guard, by Dr. Carlos E. Godfrey. Military and Civil History of Essex County, N. J., by W. C. Watson. Book of the Dead of Monmouth, compiled by George C. Martin. Genealogical Records of the Boggs Family, by W. E. Boggs. filing case for use in the Library was also purchased. During the year there have been bound New Jersey Historical Society Proceedings, 31 volumes. Volumes 1 to 6 of the Connecticut Quarterly. Volume 51 of the Essex Institute's Historical Collections. Minutes of the Newark Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 18861909, 3 volumes. Volume 69 of the New England Historical and Genealogical

A

:

Register.

Volumes 1 to 6 of the New Hampshire Genealogical Record. Protestant Episcopal Church, Journal of Proceeding of Conventions of the New Jersey Diocese, 1865 1876, 3 volumes.

Synod of New Jersey Minutes, 1879 1912, 6 volumes. Volume 23 of the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography.

Volume 39 of the Pennsylvania Magazine

of History and Bi-

ography.

The Mid- winter meeting held in February, in the "Old Barracks" in Trenton, was a great success. Every detail of the arrangements, under the able management of Mrs. John Bruyere and her splendid committee, was so carefully planned and carried out, that those who attended the meeting had a day of very real pleasure the auto rides about the city, the luncheon, and then the addresses by Gen. Chambers, Chancellor Walker, and Justice Swayze,

all

contributing to the enjoyment of the day.

We

held our Annual Meeting in May with an unusually large Mrs. Sydney N. Ogden reading a paper on Some Phases of Newark's History" and the Hon. Adrian Lyon speaking on "The Proprietors of East Jersey."

number

' '

present.

All this has been accomplished in the last year of the preceding administration. With the change in the Presidency of the Woman's Branch, it seems rather doubtful if this record of achievement can be kept up, for the present incumbent is not so efficient a worker as her predecessor, and the only way it can be done is through a greater and more untiring activity on the part of committees and individu-

204 al

EEPORT OF THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

members, and for

may

this the President asks, in order that the

work

continue unabated.

Respectfully submitted,

Altha E. Hatch, President.

REPORT OF THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. October 25th, 1916. There have been received by your Corresponding Secretary during the past year 133 letters, and 179 letters have been written, most of which were in reply to genealogical or historical questions, while the balance concern other matters relating to the work of the Society. Various other letters received at the Library were directly answered by the assistant librarian, Miss Johnson.

By resolution of the Board of Trustees, your Corresponding Secretary completed the printing of what is known as "Collec' ' Vol. IX, of the Society, consisting of New Jersey genealogitions, and biographical notes, wholly prepared and partly printed by the late Mr. Nelson, and indexed the same. This volume should prove of great importance and interest to all those members of the

cal

Society who need, at times, to refer to life sketches and lines of descent of many of the earlier settlers of this State. The basis of the various articles, numbering in the whole 221, was the footnotes to our volumes of ' Archives, which Mr. Nelson greatly expanded, he having been engaged in securing additional data through correspondence extending over eighteen years. The volume can be procured here to-day at a cost of $2. The Society has no fund for printing its "Collections," and it is hoped the sale may at least reimburse the Society for its outlay. During the year past your Corresponding Secretary has also indexed, and had completed, ready for binding, Vol. XXVIII of the New Jersey "Archives," First Series, the printing of which was practically finished by Mr. Nelson, and which, under a recent appropriation of the Legislature, may be soon ready for distribution under the law. The next volume of Archives, ' also partly printed during the lifetime of Mr. Nelson, the Society expects to issue during the year, to be known as Vol. V of the Second Series. When this is completed the newspaper extracts relating to matters in New Jersey will be almost complete from the years 1704 to 1780 inclusive. There is also Mss. matter for a succeeding vol'

' '

' '

'

ume. I might also note that the New Jersey Society of Colonial Wars, through Dr. Arthur Adams, of Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., chairman of its committee on printing, has offered to print and publish the "New Jersey Civil List," from manuscripts pre-

REPORT OF THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

205

pared under the direction of Mr. Nelson, a publication which must prove of real service to our Society and to the State. Among the genealogical and family inquiries received were the following:

Mrs. M. J. Patsel, 379 Allison Ave., S. W., Roanoke, Va., asked cencerning her great-great-grandfather Samuel Leonard, of New Jersey, and his daughter Elizabeth Leonard, and was referred to Mr. 0. B. Leonard, of Plainfield, the only known authority on the Leonard family.

Mr. Ernest Spofford, assistant Librarian of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, inquired if the work on the Shippen family, by Dr. George S. Bangert, of East Orange, was published, and the answer was given that the material is still being prepared and the book is still unpublished. Mr. Joseph F. Sabin, 22 Pine street, New York City, desired the name of the wife of "S. Stockton, of Revolutionary date, or before 1776." Assuming he referred to Samuel S. Stockton, one of the famous Stockton family of Princeton, he was referred to two. separate works on the Stockton family, and was also informed there was a Samuel Stockton, of Burlington county, who, on June 11, 1784, married Hannah Gardiner. Mr. J. B. Sammis, of New Brunswick, desired to learn of the ancestry of the Sammis family which settled on Long Island and to

know

probably came from England. Mrs. A. R. Thomas, of 122 S. 9th street, (Lafayette, Indiana, wished to know if our early records mentioned the Fenton family of New Jersey, and whether Eleazer was the first immigrant, and

was given some facts as to the will of Eleazer, of Burlington county, whose will was proved in 1728, and who is supposed to have come over from England. She also inquired concerning Harmanus King, of Burlington, who came to New Jersey in 1710, from Flushing, L. L, and whose ancestors are believed to have been William and Dorothy King, who came from England in 1635. She was referred to one of our approved genealogists. Mr. A. M. Williams, of Petosky, Mich., desired to learn the ancestor of Zenas Williams, born at Orange about 1800, removed to Port Burwell, Ontario, between 1818 and 1825, where he married Maria Merrill in 1826, and died 1842, leaving six sons, all of whom removed to Michigan. Information on this point could not be given, although the Society has some printed records concerning the Williams family, an early member of which, Amos Williams, of the Orange locality, born 1690, died 1754, married Sarah Pruden, who might have been the ancestor or of the same family. Mr. John C. Williamson, of 2419 Eighteenth street, N. W., Washington, D. C., desired a genealogical table, if any could be

206

EEPOBT OF THE COREESPONDING SECRETARY.

found, of the descendants of Gen. Matthias Williamson, of Elizawho died in 1807. He was referred to Mr. Frederick B. Williamson of Elizabeth. Mr. Thomas Longworth Moore, of 2032 Bathgate avenue, Bronx, New York City, wished to know the parents of his greatgrandparents, Dr. John Wheeler and Elizabeth Longworth, stating that this Elizabeth Wheeler and Mary and Caroline Longworth were banished from Essex county in the early days of the Revolution for being children and wives of Tories; but that Dr. Wheeler was a surgeon in the Patriot Army. beth,

Mr. Robert J. F. McCowan, of 35 N. Pearl street, Bridgeton, asked for records of the barracks and army hospital at Elizabeth, or any other document which would throw light on the cause of death of Constant Peck, First Lieutenant in Capt. Bloomfield's 7th company, of Col. Elias Dayton's Third Regiment Continental Line,

who

died or was killed at Elizabeth, March 3, 1776. Dr. W. P. Kelley, of 1027 Fifth street, San Diego, CaL, asked for data in regard to the 'Kelley, Kelley and Kelly families, which came to America during the Colonial period. Mrs. W. L. Kayser, of Sayler Park, Cincinnati, Ohio, sought the name of the father of Thomas Ewing, Revolutionary soldier,

born 1743 at Greenwich, Cumberland county, who married Mary Leefer in 1781, at Harrisburg, Pa., and removed to Ohio in 1802. She added that his grandfather, Thomas Ewing, came to the vicinity of Greenwich in 1718 and married Mary Maskell, and had a son Maskell who became sheriff in 1757, and surrogate. She supposed Maskell might have been the father of the first named Thomas. Mrs. Helen S. Henderson, of 523 Clay street, Lynchburg, Va., desired the parentage of Deborah Montgomery, who married Col. Robert Hepburn of the Revolutionary War, stating that she thought the Hepburn and Montgomery families were Trenton

Ann

families.

Mr. H. L. Everett, of 424 Walnut street, Philadelphia, asked was any publication concerning the Hartshorne family of Monmouth county. His grandfather was Hartshorne Lawrence, born near Middletown, who died 1827. He was referred to Stillwell's "Historical and Genealogical Miscellany," Vol. 3, which contains 22 pages on that family. Mr. W. H. Cahoon, of 69 Gladstone avenue, Detroit, Mich., wished facts concerning Samuel Cahoon, of Gloucester, who married Hannah Davis, May 9, 1770, and of Jacob Cahoon, a New Jerif there

sey soldier in the Revolution. Mr. Russell B. Rankin, 132 Quitman street, Newark, made inquiries concerning the Brouwer and Drake families of Somerset

EEPORT OF THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

207

county, and was furnished with some information. He has made a large collection of notes, especially concerning the Drake family, of Piscataway, Middlesex county. Mr. Merlin Wiley, of Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., desired to learn particulars of the descendants of John Hart, the signer of the Declaration of Independence. He was told that the ''Pioneers of Old Hopewell, by the late Mr. Ralph Ege, gave more particulars of the family of John Hart than any work of which the writer knew. ' '

As

to other matters of interest in correspondence I note 111., a member of the Illinois :

Mr. Ensley Moore, of Jacksonville,

who

is writing in the Jacksonville "Daily on prominent men and families of that part of the State, has forwarded several; for example, concerning Col. William Kinman, who married, in 1833, Ann Shinn, of Camden, daughter of John and Rebecca Shinn, and the Kinman family. Col. Kinman took part in the Black Hawk and Mormon wars. The Also article gives the Kinman ancestry, which was Scotch-Irish. an article on Capt. J. W. Zabriskie, of the Mexican war, believed to have been a resident of New Jersey in early life. The late Professor Edward Wall, of South Orange, wrote that, early in 1914, he placed in the hands of Mr. Nelson, with a view to publication, a manuscript, entitled "Cavalry Raids in Southwestern Virginia, Fifty Years Ago;" that there were two manuscripts, the second containing an account of the first attack on Petersburg after Grant's campaign of '64, and asked for the re-

State Historical Society,

Journal" valuable

articles

turn of the manuscripts, stating that "it is probable that many years will elapse before the world is sufficiently settled to warrant the publication." Prof. Wall died December 19, and his daughter repeated the request. Unfortunately the manuscript has not been found among the papers of Mr. Nelson. Mr. H. R. Mcllwaine, State Librarian of the Virginia State Library, Richmond, requested particulars about the publication, or likelihood of publication, of further volumes of the New Jersey "Archives," desiring to incorporate the fact in the annual report of the Public Archives Committee of the National Association of State Libraries. Mr. William A. Wetzel, Principal of the High School in Trenton, stated that the school proposed to erect a bronze tablet in honor of Mr. Jacob L. Swayze, of Newton, father of the esteemed President of our Society, as probably the most prominent man responsible for the clause in our State Constitution guaranteeing a system of free public schools to all children of the State, and hoped that the Society had some matter, printed or otherwise, throwing light upon Mr. Swayze 's connection with the matter. The

EEPOET OF THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

208 tablet

was subsequently erected and our President was one of the

speakers.

Mrs. James Parker wrote from Fort

Sam

Houston, San An-

tonio, Texas, if during the anniversary celebration in had come to light any paintings or other portraits of Col.

Newark

there

Robert Treat,

Samuel Swaine, John Ogden or Jasper Crane. The reply was

in

the negative.

Considerable correspondence was had with Mr. Freeman Loomis, of 60 Wall street, New York City, especially in reference to the exact location of Portland Point, where Richard Hartshorne, the English Quaker and an important man in our State 's early history, settled about May, 1666, and which was not an infrequent gathering place for early Courts and other assemblages. He knew generally it was located in the Atlantic Highlands vicinity. Your Secretary got into communication with Mrs. Edward Livingston, of 325 Pennington street, Elizabeth, a Hartshorne family descendant, whose satisfactory reply was as follows:

"What I know of Portland Point has been tradition in the family since the time of Richard Hartshorne, the first of the name in America. When Richard Hartshorne left his residence on Wakake Creek, and decided to live at the Highlands of Navesink, he selected a very desirable location on the banks of the Navesink river. This spot had a home on it owned by an Englishman named Portland, who was a fisherman. Richard Hartshorne had acquired much land from the original Proprietors, but the Highland property he bought outright from the Indians. He bought the Portland house, probably lived there while erecting his own, near that one, and called that portion of his large estate the Portland Place, simply because he liked the name. That Portland Place he gave to his son William in 1702, who was born at Wakake, and William gave that part of the estate, about 200 acres, to his son Thomas, son of his second wife, Helena Willett. It has subsequently been owned by Thomas Hartshorne, wife Sarah Biles, and their daughSarah and Mary Hartshorne, who lived there all their lives. Portland Place, the small portion where the house stands, is now owned by Mary Hartshorne Ward, a daughter of the late Benjamin Hartshorne, whose family estate is next to the Portland Place. I believe the Benjamin Hartshorne estate, now owned by his son Robert, has always been called 'Portland.' ters

"The

is about three hundred feet children we were always told that the first Hartshorne house on that property was built about 1678, but that the Portland house, which stood at the east end of the garden, was much older. The land was much more of a Point then than it is

site of the

east of the house.

Portland house

As

'

'

REPORT OF THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.

209

This information I had from my father's sister Sarah, who was born 1794, and died 1884." The descent of Mrs. Livingston from Richard Hartshorne is as 2. William Hartsfollows 1. Richard Hartshorne and Mary Carr. horne and Helena Willett. 3. Thomas Hartshorne and Mary Smith. 4. Thomas Hartshorne and Sarah Biles. 5. Richard Thomas Hartshorne and Katharine Jenkins. 6. Helena K. Hartshorne, who mar-

now.

:

ried

Edward

Livingston.

Rear Admiral C. F. Goodrich, of the U. S. Navy, writing from Napanoch, N. Y., stated he was securing facts concerning the life of Lieutenant Charles G. Hunter, U. S. Navy, who, in the war with Mexico in 1847, performed one of the most notable acts in our naval history, being known thereafter as "Albarado" Hunter. The Admiral said he was variously stated to have been born in 1809 or 1812, and he had been informed that Trenton was his native Whether he was married, and, if so, place. He died in 1856. whether he left children, and where they may be found, were among the subjects of his inquiry. He added "My object is to do justice to the memory of a gallant officer who was sadly and harshly treated. His faults were many, but his example in courage and determination ought not to be forgotten." As the Admiral suggested a visit to our Library, he was urged to come and make an investigation in our newspaper files of 1856 and other sources of information. Learning that the Rah way Public Library was the owner of a bound file of an Elizabeth newspaper, from 1835 to 1837, a suggestion was made to those in its charge that the volume be presented to our Society, or, if not, that it should be loaned, to be kept :

in the Society's fireproof vaults, as there are frequent applications relating to matters occurring in Elizabeth during that period. The

was not acceded to. The librarian of the Bayonne Free Public Library wished to know the date and place of publication of the "Bloomfield Manurequest

' '

but your Secretary sought in vain for the information, finding no publication concerning Gov. Bloomfield to refer to the points named. Mr. Frank W. Bayley, of the Copley Gallery, Boston, wished to have a list of portraits belonging to our Society, with subject and artist. The answer was given that it was not possible to immediately make up such a list, especially as the artists of many of our painted portraits are unknown, and the engraved portraits are extremely numerous. mission Cases,

Mr. Charles F. Johnson, of 69 Vernon street, Hartford, Conn., sent the photograph of a painting found in a Johnson house at Stratford, Conn., in the attic, stating that his father, as a child,.

REPORT ON THE NEWARK CELEBRATION.

210

lived in the house of his uncle, Samuel William Johnson, about the year 1806, his parents having died; that his mother was Catharine

Anne Bayard, daughter

of Nicholas Bayard and Catharine LivingVan Brugh Livingston.

ston, the latter being the daughter of Peter "It occurs to me," wrote Mr. Johnson,

"that this may be a Bayards lived in New Jersey. The picture is evidently a fine one, solidly painted, and may be a Raeburn. " The painting was on canvas about 25x31 inches. The

Bayard

picture,

and

I believe the

photograph was sent to Prof. E. E. Richardson, of our Society, Librarian of Princeton University, who consulted with Prof. V. L. Collins, the University's best authority on local antiquities, and with Mrs. Bayard Stockton, but without results, except the suggestion that, if it were a Bayard portrait, it probably belonged to the New York rather than to the New Jersey branch of the family, and Mr. Johnson was referred to Mrs. Thomas H. Barker, Southampton, L. I., as a descendant of the New York Bayards. Mr. Milledge L. Bonham, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer of the Historical Society of East and West Baton Rouge, La., in correspondence concerning another subject, stated that Nicholas Bonham, an earlier settler of Bonhamton, in Piscataway township, Middlesex county, was his ancestor; that one of the descendants of Nicholas, James Bonham, went to Colleton county, South Carolina, shortly after the Revolution,

and that the writer was

his great-grand-

child.

Miss Sarah B. Askew, of the Public Library Commission, Trenton, desired to know if our Library contained any material on the "Jersey Devil." I had to admit ignorance as to any particulars of this descendant of his Satanic Majesty. Respectfully submitted,

A.

Van Doren Honeyman, Corresponding Secretary.

REPORT ON THE NEWARK CELEBRATION. Newark, N. Gentlemen of

J.,

May

4th, 1916.

:

Your Committee on the 250th Anniversary of the Settlement Newark herewith present their report and ask your approval of

our action.

Having been created in December, 1910, consideration was what was the most desirable action for them to take

-given as to

and these considerations resulted in

their practically being the first to bring the matter to the attention of the city authorities, and they gave their aid in furthering the large plans for the celebration,

which consisted in part of consultations with the Mayor and City Counsel as to the proposed act of the Legislature creating the Com-

REPORT ON THE NEWARK CELEBRATION. mittee of One

Hundred and

We

211

in facilitating its passage through the

also deemed it our duty to make suggestions to the Legislature. Mayor as to the appointment of a representative body of our Society on the Committee of One Hundred, and we obtained the nam-

ing of twenty members on the Committee. Furthermore, the Chairman of your Committee was enabled by his membership on the Executive Committee to secure the selection of our President, the Hon. Francis J. Swayze, as the orator of the day at the historic exercises on May first. As a result of the deliberation of the Executive Committee, it was finally decided to ask the New Jersey Historical Society to issue invitations to the various historical societies of the country, as well as literary, scientific and educational bodies to send delegates to the opening ceremonies, and the Committee of One Hundred furnished us, without cost, invitations for that purpose, copy of which is attached. Your Committee made such arrangements as they deemed proper to receive the delegates and entertain them at luncheon at our rooms, in accordance with the direction of the Trustees at their meeting March sixth. were much gratified at the responses, over 200 delegates having been appointed and accepted our invitation, and we were able to obtain the registration of the names of 146 on their arrival. Unfortunately, owing to the lack of time and the suggestions of some members of the Trustees who wished to hurry the proceedings, we failed to obtain the names of all those present; but we have every reason to believe there were over 200 guests present, and we were enabled through the courtesy of the Committee of One Hundred to furnish them with reserved seats at the exercises on May first. have endeavored to preserve copies of all the invitations and papers incident to the Celebration for filing in our library, and we believe that the guests were received in a dignified manner and every comfort and convenience properly provided for them.

We

We

We

wish to extend our appreciation of the valuable aid given

Woman 's Branch of the Historical Society who decorated the rooms and generally supervised the luncheon and assisted in receiving the lady guests who were present. further beg to enclose a communication from the Hon.

us by the

We

Franklin Murphy, Chairman of the Committee of One Hundred, suggesting that the names of all our guests be sent to him in order that copies of any pamphlets, speeches or other documents be sent to them, and recommend that the same be done. We assume that our active duties are discharged, but we recommend that the Librarian should endeavor to obtain all the records, programmes, orations and other data relating to the Celebration, and incorporate them in a portfolio or other suitable form for preservation.

REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE.

212

We

also herewith submit our accounts amounting to $182.80 for the expenses incurred and request their payment be authorized, all of which is respectfully submitted. Charles Bradley, Chairman Charles M. Lum George R. Howe

Morton Disbrow Joseph P. Folsom Joseph M. Riker William William

C.

S.

REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE. October 25th, 1916.

The

number of purchases ever made by the Society year were made during the past year, chiefly at the

largest

in a single Nelson sale of last

November. There can have been few, if any, years in which so large and important additions were made to our collections. We are indebted to Mrs. Louis Pennington for the larger part of the items purchased at the Nelson sale, but there were many other subscribers to the fund collected for the Society 's use, at that time, and their names will be printed at the end of this Our purchases at this sale included 239 volumes, 511 report. pamphlets, 914 manuscripts, and 96 prints, altogether 1760 pieces. Many of the items secured are of great rarity and value, and most of them have a direct bearing upon the history of our state. We have also received a larger sum in legacies than during any preceding year, as the bequest of ten thousand dollars, left to us by Miss Alice W. Hayes, and Miss L. Cotheal Smith's bequest of two thousand dollars, received through the Woman's Branch, have both been paid in during the year. The total accessions for the year amount to 827 volumes, 825 pamphlets, 1513 manuscripts, and 205 miscellaneous, making a grand total of 3370 items. The unusually large number of manuAnother scripts is due to the purchases made at the Nelson sale. considerable collection of manuscripts was a gift from Dr. L. D. Carman, of Washington, consisting of the papers of his father, the late General E. A. Carman, of Washington, who was living in this city at the time he entered the Union army, as Colonel of the ThirThis regiment was teenth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers. mustered in at Camp Frelinghuysen near Newark, in August, 1862.

Among the papers presented is Col. Carman's orderly book, beginning with the first day of the enlistment. Another manuscript collection received during the year was presented by Mr. Frank A. Lebkuecher, through Dr. Disbrow, and includes between five and Roosevelt 'a Rough six hundred letters and postal cards written by ' '

EEPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE.

213;

Riders" at the time of the Spanish- American war. We have also received from the heirs of the late Walter Beach Plume, of Orange, a second collection of genealogical records compiled by him, relating chiefly to the Beach and Plume families. Twenty-six genealogical works have been received since last October. They are Baskerville, Boggs, Brett, Clemens, Codding-, :

Dunning, Fatout, Fenwick, Field, Hawes, Hoffman, Hord, Huntting, Morrell, Morris, Peshine, Prime, Ryer-i son, Schureman, Stockton, Strycker, Streets and Tyler. The Orange Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution has presented to us a bound set of the National Year Book of that ton, Conkling, Cox, Grill,

Society, complete

up

to the present time.

Mr. William C. Morton has presented a collection of South American curios gathered by his sister, Miss Mary B. Morton, illustrating the life of the Indians of Bolivia. From the American Antiquarian Society

we have received, as an exchange, several New Jersey Almanacs of which we had no The New Jersey Almanac, 1779, 1783, 1796, 1827; copies, namely The New Jersey and Pennsylvania Almanac, 1805, 1815, 1816, 1817 Stewart's East and West Jersey Almanac, 1811; Smith & Forman's New York and New Jersey Almanac, 1815; Hutchin's Improved Almanac, 1844. Mr. Clarence S. Brigham, the Librarian of the American Anti:

;

quarian Society, is now preparing a Bibliography of New Jersey Newspapers before 1820. He expects to give 'a historical sketch of every New Jersey newspaper and { to locate all files found in the various libraries of the country." Mr. Brigham has had the use of a great deal of material prepared by Mr. Nelson and has listed the newspapers in most of the larger libraries of the state; he would be glad to list also the early New Jersey newspapers in the hands of private owners and would appreciate any assistance that may be given him in locating such files. Three numbers of Proceedings and one volume of Collections have been published this year, and two volumes of Archives will be issued soon. We have in the library material for five more volumes which it would seem advisable to print as soon as circumstances will permit. '

'

The attendance for the year was 5791. The unusually large number was due, in part, to the celebration of Newark's 250th anniversary, which led many persons to make historical investigations and brought to the attention of a somewhat larger public the an institution as ours. Over five hundred letters were received during the year, most of them asking for historical or genealogical information, which significence of such

very often could not be supplied without a great deal of search-

BEPOET OF THE MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE.

214

In many cases it has been found impossible to find time to ing. reply satisfactorily to our correspondents. So it has been decided, the cataloguing and other work in the library being also in arrears,

employ an assistant. Like most of the libraries, we are suffering for lack of shelf room and filing space, and we particularly need more shelving for newspapers. Our building is large enough, fortunately, to meet our needs for some time to come, the problem being how to provide suitable shelving and to arrange it in such a manner as to avoid to

injuring the appearance of our rooms. Contributors to the fund for the purchase of books at the

Nelson

sale, November, 1915 Samuel Baldwin Louis Bamberger Frank Bergen

W

:

Charles Bradley John L. 'Connet Edward A. Day

William

T.

'

Day

Frelmghuysen

u , i. E. Hatch Miss Altha

r'J^Tf^. R. Hardm John James S. Higbie James E. Howell Dr. Edward J I J. William Johnson William M. Johnson

Charleg

M

wmiam

j Mj

Lum

^

e

AHan Marquand Alfred E MiUg Franklin Murphy

Forrest F. Dryden

G

Wilbur g Johnson

Franklin Murphy, Jr. Cortlandt Parker B. Wayne Parker Mrs Louis Pennington Mrg E G p utna m Jose P h Riker Wallace M. Scudder Praneig j^ gwayze '

M

-

y Sutpnen Wisner Thorn Marcug L Ward

Dr Theron

G

_

Respectfully submitted, Frederick A. Canfield, Chairman of the Library Committee.

REPORT OF THE MEMBERSHIP SOMMITTEE. October 25th, 1916.

With profound sorrow we record the deaths of many of our members since our last meeting. Their loyalty to and interest in the Society has been of great assistance to the Board of Trustees, and our sincere sympathy is extended to the members of their families.

Life

Members

Theodore C. E. Blanchard, Red Bank John D. Buckelew, Jamesburg Mrs. Samuel R. Bucknell, Scotch Plains

Died Elected 1890 Aug. 4, 1916 1860 Feb. 17, 1916 1900 Jan. 8, 1904

EEPOET OF THE MEMBEESHIP COMMITTEE. Life

Members

John Carpenter, Jr., Clinton Mrs. John F. Dryden, Bernardsville Rev. Daniel R. Foster, D. D., Trenton Rev. David R. Frazer, D. D., Newark

James

L.

Hays, Newark

Hugh M.

Herrick, Paterson Hon. James E. Howell, Newark

William T. Hunt, Newark Mrs. A. F. R. Martin, Newark Stephen J. Meeker, Orange Mrs. Stephen J. Meeker, Orange Mrs. Oscar B. Mockridge, Newark Matthias Plum, Madison

George B. Raymond, Morristown W. Runyon, Plainfleld Rev. William Hayes Ward, D. D., Newark

F.

Contributing

.

Elected 1896 1901 1875 1888 1887 1896 1874 1896 1895 1886 1895 1897 1896 1890 1896 .1901

.

215

Died Jan. 16, 1916 Oct. 25, 1915

Jan. 23, 1916

June 1, 1916 Apr. 30, 1916 Sept. 26, 1916 May 22, 1916 Feb. 9, 1916 Sept. 28, 1916 Dec. 20, 1915 July 27, 1916 Feb. 13, 1916 Jan. 16, 1916 May 14, 1912 Aug. 28, 1916

Members

William F. Allen, South Orange

Andrew W. Bray, Newark Melvin S. Condit, Boonton Alfred N. Dalrymple, Newark Martin Dennis, Newark Col. Edward L. Dobbins, Morristown

Hon. John Runkle Emery, Morristown William E. Gordon, Newark William Lyall, Summit Oscar Michael, Orange

Edwin J. Ross, Wharton Dr. Henry Genet Taylor, Camden Henry H. Truman, Orange New Members

1901 Nov. 9, 1915 1903 Apr. 19, 1916 1907 Dec. 22, 1913 1912 May 21, 1916 1911 Feb. 6, 1916 1885 June 6, 1916 1873 Jan. 30, 1916 1910 Feb. 28, 1916 1913 Jan. 13, 1916 1909 June 11, 1916 1907 Aug. 21, 1915 1895 Jan. 14, 1916 1901 Mar. 30, 1916

Patron Mrs. Louis Pennington, Washington, D. C Life Members G. Atha, Newark Dr. William H. S. Demarest, New Brunswick Dr. Britton D. Evans, Greystone Park

Henry

Arthur S. Kimball, East Orange Hon. James F. Minturn, Hoboken Capt. John J. Phelps, Hackensack

Ambrose E. Vanderpoel, Chatham Contributing Members Miss Sarah Condit, Newark John A. Craig, Paterson

Dec.

6,

1915

Oct. 25, 1916

1915 1916 Oct. 25, 1916 Oct. 25, 1916 Oct. 2, 1916 Oct. 25, 1916

Dec.

6,

June

5,

Feb.

7,

Oct.

2,

1916 1916

LIST OF DONORS.

216

Hon. Cornelius Doremus, Ridgewood J. Grassman, Elizabeth Mrs. Ainsworth J. Hague, Newark Morris Katzin, Newark John Walden King, Jersey City

Dec.

6,

Francis La Bau, Tarrytown, N.

June

5,

Edward

Mar.

6,

Dec.

6,

Oct. 25,

June

Y

Samuel F. Leber, Newark Mrs. Frederick R. Lehlbach, Newark David McGregor, East Orange

July

5,

10,

Oct. 25,

Sidney H. Moore, Ridgewood Dr. Frederick W. Owen, Morristown Mrs. Henry G. Pilch, Madison William W. Scott, Passaic Rev. Charles H. Stewart, D. D., Newark John P. Wall, New Brunswick Miss Mary Louise Wheeler, Newark Mrs. Florence E. Youngs, New York City

Mar.

6,

Oct.

2,

Apr. 3, July 10, Oct. 25,

May May

8,

Feb.

7,

8,

Oct. 25,

1916 1915 1916 1916 1915 1916 1916 1916 1916 1916 1916 1916 1916 1916 1916 1916 1916

Resignations acre as follows John V. Bacot, Utica, New York. John A. Bergen, Trenton. Palmer Campbell, Hoboken. John M. Connor, Jr., Metuchen. Samuel Freeman, Morristown. :

,

Respectfully submitted, J. Lawrence Boggs,

Chairman Membership Committee.

LIST OF DONORS, 19151916.. Donors Abel Miss Annie H. Alston, Theodore W. Andrae, Percy Andrews, Frank D. Applegate, Maxcy Bangert, Dr. George S. Barratt, Hon. Norris Barry, William E. Baruch, Dr. Simon Biddle, Richard Black, William Boggs, J. Lawrence Bradley, Charles Broadwell, William H. Brown, Rev. Josiah J.

Vols.

Pamph.

Misc. Mas.

1 1 1 3

4 1 S.

1

2 1 1

122

147

25 21

6

1

8

1

4

LIST OF DONOES.

217

Vols.

Misc. Mas.

Donors Buchanan,

J.

Pamph. 1

Hervey

Canfield, Frederick A. Carman, Dr. L. D.

3

7 Chambers, Gen. Thomas S. (Woman's Branch) Chandler, Walter 2 Christian, Mrs. Charles A. Clark, Dr. J.

Henry

Clemens, William M. Coddington, Rev. Herbert G. Coles, Dr. J.

1

1 1 1

Ackerman

Conkling, Ira B. Conkling, William J. Connett, Mrs. William C. Crowell, Horace E. Deats, Hiram E. De Mott, Rev. George C.

1

1 1

Demnan, Miss Mathilde Scudder Dennis, Alfred Lewis Dickerson, Edward N. Disbrow, Dr. William S. Dunning, M. B.

1

59 3

Farrand, Wilson Fatout, Henry B. Fettinger, Theodore 'S. Fidelity Trust Company (Mr. Allen) Fisher, Mrs. James C.

William Z. Freeman, Miss Ginevra (Woman's Br.) Free Public Library, of Newark

1

6

1 1

Flitcraft,

Freyer, Thomas D. Golding, Mrs. Emma Green, Miss Maria D.

61 1 1 1

2

8 1

(Woman's Branch)

Haggerty, Warren Dunning Hall, Granville D. Halsey, Mrs. Edmund D. Harrison, Miss Emily G. Hasse, Miss Adelaide R.

1 1 1

1 Headley, Elroy 2 Higgins, Miss Mary E. Hoerner, Mrs. Harry J. (Woman's Branch) 3 Hoffman, Samuel V.

Holland Society of

New York Honeyman, A. Van Doren

4

Hord, Rev. A. H. Howell, Hon. James E.

1

1 1

2 3

13

11

LIST OF DONORS.

218

Donors

Vols. J.

H.

Misc. Mss. 1

Ill

Huntington, Huntting, T. D. Jones, Chester N. Katzin, Morris Kendall, Dr. Calvin N. Ladd, Rev. Henry M. Lebkuecher, Frank A. Lewis, Marion L. Lines, Rt. Rev. Edwin

Famph. 2 1

1

11 1

541

2

S.,

D. D.

Lum, Edward H. Lyon, Adrian (Woman's Branch)

21

Mundy, J. Crowell Murphy, Franklin, Jr. Neafie, John New York Society Library Newark Committee of One Hundred Newark Evening News

1

1 1 1 2

34 1

1 1 1

191 1

20 1

3 3

1

11

1

1

1

1 2 1

Norton, Oliver Wilcox Ogden, Mrs. Sydney N. (Woman's Branch) 1 Oliver, Mrs. Paul Q. 13 Orange Chapter, N. J. Soc., S. A. R. Osborne, Mrs. Joseph A. Osborne, William Hamilton Parker, Hon. Charles W. Parker, Mrs. Charles W. (Woman's Br.) Parker, Sir Gilbert Parker, Hon. Richard Wayne Parvin, Newton R.

1

1

McGregor, D. McKeen, Miss Mary Mac Kie, Mrs. Arthur H. (Woman's Branch) Mac Kie, Master Nelson Wright W. Manning, Miss Marianna * 1 Martin, Mrs. A. F. R. Martin, Miss May Axford 1 Maxim, Hudson Meek, Mrs. William S. (Woman's Branch) Moore, Sidney H. 1 Morrell, F. V. Morris, Miss Augusta A. Morris, Miss Lucy N. Morton, William C. Mortan, Miss Mary B. 1 Muchmore, William K.

1 4 2 6 1

1

1 1 1 8

LIST OF DONOBS. Donors

Vols.

Peshine, Major John Henry Hobart Platt, Charles D. Plume, Mrs. Isaac E. P.

1 1 3

Plume, William F. Plume, Mrs. Hannah A. Plume, Miss Edith M. Mills, Mrs. W. Fred Plumb, W. D.

6

219

Pamph.

19

10

6

Boeder, Adolph Sands, Miss Emma Louise (Woman's Branch) 1 Sellers, Edwin Jacquett Skinner, Mrs. Charles H. 3 Slade, Mrs. J. M. Smith, Miss Dora (Woman's Branch) Smith, George D. 1 Society Sons of the Bev., State of Cal. Steelman, Mrs. Matthias (Woman's Br.) 1 1 StiUwell, Dr. John E. Stoutenburgh, Henry A. 1 Streets, Dr. Thomas Hale Strobell, Mrs. George Stryker, Miss Katherine N. (Woman's Branch) Sutphen, Dr. Theron Y.

1 1 6 6

1 1 1 1

1

3

1 1 1

1 1 4 1

Twining, Mrs. Kinsley University of Chicago Urquhart, Frank J. Walker, Edwin B. (Woman's Branch) 2 Walton, Perry Westervelt, Mrs. Wm. H. (Woman's Br.) 1 1 Williams, Dr. Edward H. Woman's Branch N. J. H. S. (binding 39 vols.) 44 Woodruff, Mrs. Caleb L.

Woodward, William W. Wren, Christopher

25

MM.

1 1

Bobbins, Leonard H. Bobatham, Cheslar

Symmes, J. G. Thompson, David A. Tiers, Mrs. Alex. H. (Woman's Branch)

Misc.

1 1

4

1 1 1

3

Wright, Miss G. B. 2 Wrightson, Dr. James T. 1 Young, David This list does not include the names of Societies with which we

exchange publications.

Additions and Corrections. To the bibliography of the celebration of Newark's two hundred and fiftieth anniversary printed on page 126 and following of this volume may be added these items ;

"The Pelican" for May, 1916, published by the Mutual BeneLife Insurance Company of Newark, containing historical material especially related to the Company, with pictures of its successive home buildings and an illustrated cover. Twelve pages. fit

*

Town Talk for May 6, 1916, published at Newark, appearing as a special anniversary number, with extended account of '

' '

dinner to Hon. FrankHn Murphy on April 30, 1916, and pictures of prominent speakers and guests, and a birds-eye view of the banquet. (Sixteen pages.

"The Worker, Newark's

250th Anniversary Number", pubNew Jersey, containing a variety of brief sketches of features of Newark 's history with illustrations. Twenty pages and cover. lished

by the Boy's Industrial School, Newark,

A

correction should be made in the date given on page 113 of volume for the appointing of the iSociety's committee on the 250th Anniversary of Newark. The committee was appointed by President Jonathan W. Roberts on December 5, 1910. A typographical error makes it 1916. this

TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS. Cemetery, Market St., Opposite Seeley St., Paterson, N. J. Lucinda Redman, wife of Charles S. Kinsey, d. Sept. 10 1856 aged 55 years. Mary L. Infant daughter of Charles V. and Jane C. Kinsey. d. June 10 1857 aged 3 months.

NEW JERSEY

HISTORICAL SOCIETY. OFFICERS FOR 191516. President

FRANCIS J. SWAYZE Vice Presidents

CHARLES

LUM

M.

GEORGE

HOWE

R.

CHARLES BRADLEY

Corresponding Secretary A. V. D.

HONEYMAN Treasurer

Recording Secretary

JOSEPH

WILLIAM

FOLSOM

F.

C.

MORTON

Librarian

JOSEPH

FOLSOM

F.

Trustees Term expires, 1916 Edwin B. Goodell Hiram E. Beats J.

Term

Lawrence Boggs

Joseph M.

James J. Bergen Frank Bergen

Riker

Term

1917

expires,

Edwin S. Lines Austin Scott Wallace M. Scudder

expires,

1918

Frederick A. Canfield William S. Disbrow Charles W. Parker William J. Magie Edwin R. Walker

COMMITTEES, 191516 Finance and Building Charles M. Lum, Chairman Charles Bradley

William

J.

J.

Edwin B.

Magie Goodell

Joseph M. Riker .James J. Bergen

Wallace M. Scudder

Lawrence Boggs

Library Charles W. Parker Miss Mary McKeen Edwin R. Walker Frank Bergen

Frederick A. Canfield, Chairman Joseph F. Folsom, Librarian William S. Disbrow J.

Lawrence Boggs .

George R.

Cabinet and

Howe

Museum Hiram E. Deats Miss Mary McKeen

William S. Disbrow, Chairman Frederick A. Canfield

Membership J.

Lawrence Boggs, Chairman J. Magie

Charles

Edwin

S.

W. Parker

Edwin R. Walker Frank Bergen

William

Lines

Austin Scott

Printing A.

Van Doren Honeyman, Chairman Joseph

F.

Frank Bergen Folsom

Genealogy and Statistics The Woman's Branch Colonial Documents Austin Scott, Chairman Joseph F. Folsom A. Van Doren Honeyman Ernest C. Richardson James

J.

Bergen

Editorial Edwin R. Walker Joseph F. Folsom, Chairman Wallace M. Scudder William J. Magie Austin Scott

250th Anniversary of William

S.

Disbrow

Newark (Committee)

George R. Howe Joseph F. Folsom William C. Morton Joseph M. Riker

Charles Bradley, Chairman Charles M. Lum

INDEX. Abel. Miss Anne H., 216 Abrahamsie, Cornelius, 82 Achter Koll, 177 Garret, 110 Rachel, 170 Acquackanonk, 202 Adams, Dr. Arthur, 204 Benjamin, 115 Charles T., 116 Elizabeth, 48 Frederic, 124 Addresses Delivered at a Banquet, Newark, April 29, 1916, 127 Aertsons, 13 Aertson, Cornelius, 79, 80 Dorothea, 14, 84, 87 Agens, Jonas, 69

Ackerman,

William, 69 Ahasimus, 20 Allaben, Frank, 117 Aldrich, Mrs. Richard, 102 Allen, Jacob, 133 Rev. Dr. Lyman Whitney, 114, 127 William F.. 215 Ailing, Charles, 69 John, 69 Allings, Isaac, 145 Allison, Eliza Riker, 109 Henry M., 109 Allison, W. O., 115 Almanacs, New Jersey, 213 Alston, Theodore W., 117, 216 American Academy of Arts and Letters. 114

American Academy of Political and Social Science, 114 American Antiquarian Society, 121 American Bible Society, 114 American Book Prices Current for 1916, 202 American Geographical Society, 121 American Historical Association, 114 American Jewish Historical Society, 115 American Library Association, 115 American Newspaper Publishers Association,

121

American Philosophical Society, 115 American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, 115 Anderson, Edwin H., 115 Andrea, Percy, 216 Andrews, Frank D., 216 Governor, 25 Andruss, George Henry, 115 Angell, George William. 40 Angevine, Chariot Mary, 111 David, 111 John Lawrence, 111 Rachel, 111 William Henry, 111 Ansulam, Cornelius, 169 Anthony, Cornelia, 110 John, 110

Letitia

Ver Valer, 110

110. 170 Peter, 110 Antill, Edward, 160 Applegate, Maxcy, 216 Appleton, Abm., 147 Arden, Jacob, 168 Rachel, 168

Mary,

Arnett, Isaac, 3 Arnold, Benedict, 187

Ashburner, Maria, 106 Askew, Miss Sarah B., 210 Atha, Albert H.. 121 Henry G., 197, 215 Axford, Martha, 32, 37 Ayen, Adrienne de, 183 de, Duke, 183 Ay res, Emily, 38 Babbet, Seth, 97 Babbit, Daniel, 69 Seth, 153, 156 Sether, 98 Bacot, John V., 210 Bailey. S. D. Day & Bailey, 69 Baker, Katharine, 125

Baldwin, C. D., 69 Miss Emma V., 115 E. F., 70 Isaac, 63 Hannah, 201 R. D., 69 Samuel W., 214 Ballad of Newark, by Joseph Fulford Folsom, 177 Ballard, Jer., 147 Bamberger, Louis. 214 Bamper, Ann, 29 Jacob, 29 Bancker, Rachel, 176 Bangert, George Schuyler, author The New Jersey Shippens, 30, S3, 205, 216 Bangert, Helen Elizabeth, Leslie Louis, 33, Louis, 33, 40

Raymond, 33 Bangor Historical

34

40

Society,

115

Banker, Rachel, 173 Banks, Squire, 144 Banta, Eppa, 81 Henry, 29 Lavinia, 29 Barber, L. Coll. F., 93, 96, 147 Bard, Eve, 88

Bardon, Fred A., 60 Barclay, John, 73 Robert of Urie, 73 Barents, Claus, 167 Jans, 167 Barker, Thomas, 74 Mrs. Thomas H., 210 Barney Ferdon farm, tombstone scriptions,

56

im-

INDEX.

224 Barr, Simon, 125 Barracks, Old at Trenton, Edwin Walker, 49 Barratt, Norris S., 216 Barre, Anne, 166 Annetie, 175 Barriclo, William R., 120 Barrie,

by Robert

Anna, 146

Barry, William E., 216 Barteen, Abbie, 175 Baruch, Dr. Simon, 216 Baskerville Family, 203, 213

P. H., 203 Bates. John G., 171 Batten, George, 120 Mrs. George, 118 Bauman, Nathl, 147 Baxter, George, 17 Bayard, Bathasar, 22, 80 Catherine Anne, 210 Nicholas, 210 Bayley, Frank W., 209

Bayonne, tombstone inscriptions. 146 Beamont, Hannah, 76 Beach, Major Ephraim, 60 Beeys, Pieter Jacobsen, 78 Beginnings of the Morris & Essex Railroad, by Joseph F. Folsom, 60 Belcher, Governor, 161 Bell, Jabez, 156 Mary, 156 Tom, 161 Wiman, 110 Benckes. Jacob, 81 Benedict, James, 119 Henry Harper, 115 Bening, H., 109 Bennet, James, 117 Benson, John, 88 Mary, 88 Polly, 88 Bergen County Historical Society, 115 Bergen County tombstone inscriptions, 29, 56, 88. 108 Englewood, Nordhoff, 88 Demarest, 108 Ramseys, 112 Bergen, Frank, 118, 197, 214, 221 James J., 118, 221 John A., 216 Biddle, Nicholas. 70 Richard, 216 Biles, Sarah, 208, 209 Black, William, 216 Blackburn, John, 69 Blackledge, Andrew, 109 Benjamin, 108 Cornelius, 110 George, 108 James P.. 108 Lydia, 110 Maria, 108 Rachel, 110 Blacklidge, Benjamin, 108 Cathalinetye, 108 Isaac, 108 Jacobus, 108 Peter, 108 Maria, 108 " Blair, John, 147 Rev. Samuel, 37 Blaricom, Captain N., 135 Blanchard. Theodore C. E., 214 Blauvelt, Catherine, 159 Cornelia, 112

Jane Parcela, Joannis, 109 George Bleeker,

A.,

109

119

Ann

196

Eliza,

Captain, 206 Manumission Cases, 209 Bockee, Abraham. 83, 165 Bogert, Cornelius, 171 Boggs family, genealogical records, 203. 213 W. E., 203 J. Lawrence, 118, 197, 201, 216, 221 Bogart, Catherine Westervelt. 109 Bogardus, Dominie Everardus, 14 Bloonfield,

Bogart, Albert, 109 Bogert, Albert M., 109 Cornelius V. R., 115 David, 112 Henry Ver Valen, 109 Jacob M.. 109 Lydia, 112 Maria, 109

Matthew, 112

Matthew M., 109 Pieter,

170

Polly Demarest, 112 Samuel M., 112

Sarah, 109 Sophia, 109 Willempy Haring, 109 Bokka. Abram, 173 Bond, Benjamin, 135 Bonham, James, 210 Milledge L., Jr., 210 Nicholas, 210 Bonnell, John C., 69 Borglum. Gutzon, 125 Boody, David A., 115 Borcherling,

Charles,

obituary

notic*

105

of,

Bother, Jan, 78 Boudinot, Elisha, 202 Bowen. Clarence W., 116 Bowers, Stephen, 97 Elizabeth, 97 Historical Society, 121

Bradford

and Antiquarian

Bradford, Mrs. Willard H., 117 Bradley, Charles, 113, 118. 127, 198, 212, 214, 216, 221 Charles B., 197 Brayley, Burton, 125 Brann, Rt. Rev. Henry A.. 121 Bray, Andrew W., 215 Bredienville, Richard, 78 Breet genealogy, 213 Bret, Eghbert, 163 Brigham, Clarence S., 213 Br inker hoff, William, 116 Britten,

W., Brittin,

W.,

A.,

69

69

Abraham, 60 60

Britton, Jeremh., 138 Broadwell, William H., 216 Brockett, Edward J., 116 Broglie, Duke of, 184 Brookfield, John, 97, 147, 150 Brooklyn Public Library, 115 Brooks, Josiah, 76

Brower, Rachel, 170 Brown, Abbie, 175 Alida, 175 Rev. of,

Dr.

106

Allen

H.,

obituary notie*

INDEX. Amey, 168 David, 173

Ceremonies

Jacob Steinmets, Rev. Josiah Dr. George

J.,

C.,

at the Unveiling of the Colleoni Equestrian Statue, 128

88

216 101

T., 88 Samuel, 26, 88, 171 William Henry, 39

family,

206

Brueyere, Mrs. John, 203 Brush, Jesse, 111

John H., Ill Lydia Haring, 110 Peter, 110 Rachel, 111 Bruyne, Abbie. 175 Alida, 175 Bruyn, Slyntie, 173 Bryant, John J., 63 Budwith, Dorothy, 30

William Astor, 102 Channel, John, 152 Rachel, 152 Chapman, William, 34 Charlston, Benjamin, 56

James, 56 Phebe, 56 Chicago University, 219

170

Child, Francis,

Choate. Joseph H.,

116,

Chrisman, Isaac, 38 Christian, Mrs. Charles '

Richard, 30 Thomas, 30 Walter, 30 Buchanan, J. Harvey, 217 Buckelew, John D., 214 Bucknell, Mrs. Samuel R., 214 Buffalo Historical Society, 121 Bulsing, Cornelius, 175 Bulson. Cornelius, 172 Burdett, Cyril H., 117 Burgess, Helen Stewart, 107 Burnet, Josiah, 92 Matts, 93 William, 6 69 G., Burr, Rev. Aaron, 2 Bush, Elizabeth, 33 John, 33 Maria, 33 Butler, Richard, 91

Burnham,

A., 167 Cahoon. Jacob, 206 Samuel, 206 W. H., 206 Caldwell, Chaplain James, Manuscript Death of, by Joseph F. Light on Folsom, 1, 202 California Genealogical Society, 115 Campbell, H. B., 69 Nancy, 86 Palmer, 216 Rev. Thomas J., 121 Campfleld. C. B., 69 Jabez, 97, 158 Canfield. Frederick A., 118, 197. 214, 217, 221 Carle, John, 150 Carman, Abigail, 97 Carman, General E. A., 212 Dr. L. D., 212, 217 Moses, 97 Carmichael, Alexander, 158 Carpenter, John, Jr., 215 Samuel, 38 Carr, Lovell H., 120 Mary. 209 Carter, Nancy, 33, 40 William, 33 Carteret, Philip, 20, 100 Case, George W., 116 Mary, 156 Caspar Steymets and His Descendants, by P. H. Hoffman, 13, 77, 164 Cataline, Hiram, 135 Cayuga County Historical Society, 115

Byram, Barbara

Gen. Thomas S., 59 120, 201, 203, 217 Chandler, Walter, 119, 217 Chanler, Margaret Stuyvesant, 102

Chambers,

Mary

Brouwer

225

Claes, Vroutje, 85,

A.,

217

174

Abm., 139 Dr. J. Henry, 217 John, 137 Ketura, 32 Mrs. Mary S., 116 William, 3, 133 Clarks, Rev. Dr. L., 117 Clay, Henry. 202 Clayton, Mrs. T., 117 Clemens genealogy, 213 William M., 217 Clerkson, Mrs. Philip S., 121 Cleveland, Grover, 44 Clinton, Governor, 162 Clinton Hill Year Book, 128 Clough, William P., 117 Cobb, Duane P., 119 Hannah, 154 Cochran, John, Surgoen General, 90> Cockran, John, 148 Coddington genealogy, 213 Rev. Herbert G., 217 Coegernoen, Treintje, 173 Coeyeman, Treintje, 165 Clayton, Mrs. Trueman H., 202. Coe, Dr. Thomas Upham, 115 Sayres, 125 Cole, Daniel W., 112 John, 110 Nicholas, 159 Perry, 159 Sophronia, 111 Vatherine Anna, 159 Coles. Dr. J. Ackerman, 217 Collections, Vol. IX., 176 Collins, Gilbert, 120 Prof. V. L., 210 Colonel Peter Sclmyler at Albany, by Joseph F. Folsom, 160 Colonial Dames of America, General Society, 115, 121, 201 Colve, Capt. Anthony, 81 Comegys, Miss Harriet C., 117 Commerce, American brig. 202 Commine. Lieut. -Col. J. N., 147 Commimipan. 19 Condict. Israel D., 63 Mrs. John H. N., 106 Lewis, 70 Silas, 158 Clark, Clark,

;

Condit,

Aaron Peck, obituary

102

Edward, 69 W., 69 Lewis, 69

J.

Melvin

S.,

215

notice

of.

INDEX.

226 Miss Sarah, 215 Miss S. F., 118 70 S., Silas, 69 Silas B., 69 Congar, Miss Florence, 118 Conklin, Ira B., 217 Conkling, genealogy, 213 Stephen, 151 William J., 217 Connecticut Farms, 3 Connecticut Historical Society, Connet, John L., 214 Mrs. William C., 217 Connor, John M., Jr., 216 Consalle, Orry, 133 conspiracy, 184 Cook, George, 25 James, 63 Joseph, 135 Cooper, Daniel, 150 Corbin. William Horace,

116

D. & D. & Stephen, William,

obituary no-

102

for

Va.,

197,

32,

Polly.

38

DeGrasse, 187 DeGrhue, Adam, 173 DeHart, William, 2 DeKalb, Baron, 184 DeMandeville,

Demarest David Dr.

obitu-

32 Maria, 111

Elsie,

Anna Ill

S.,

W. H.

S.,

119, 215

Joseph S., Ill Margaret Parsel, 112 Nancy A., Ill Polly, 112 Sarah Catherine, 111 Stephen D., 112 Stephen S., Ill Demarest, tombstone inscriptions, DeMott, Matthyis, 27 DeMott, Rev. George C., 217 Dennis, Alfred Lewis, Martin, 215

108

128. 217

Denman, Miss Mathilde Scudder, 217

of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 116

Descendants

Depue, David A., 202 DeWitt, Anthony, 79 Dey, Johanna, 174 Mary, 165. 172 William, 174 Dickerson, Edward N., 217 Dickinson, Major-General. 11 Mrs. S. Meredith, 115 Diederick, Hans, 23 Dien, Mary, 172

114

Dagworthy, Captain John, 162 Dallas, Capt. Archibald, 95 Rachel, 95 Dana, John Cotton, 115, 126 Dailey, Harry, 120 Daily Citizen, of Vicksburg, 201 Dalrymple, Alfred N., isiw Danielson. David, 27 Darby. Eph., 147, 151 Daughters of the Revolution,

121,

Lawrence, 32

Cundari.

Churchill H.,

118,

E.,

221

DeBrack'en, Hendricke, 83 DeCamp, Aaron, 32 John, 32

Mary

2

A., 128 Mungo, 146

147, 206

Debevoise, James, 109, 111 John, 109, 111 Sarah Ann, 109, 111 Dederick, Hans, 81

103 Margaretta T., 103 Crill genealogy, 213 Croes, John, 138 Crossfleld, Effam, 30 Crowell, Horace E., 217 Currie, Cutting,

2,

Hiram

217

E.,

Cub Creek,

149, 150

184

Silas,

Deats,

Coult,

John

69

Co.,

98 William T., 214 Jonathan Dayton, J.. 3 Jonathan I., 4 Deane,

Miss Margaret, 124 Counover, Eve Bard, 88 Samuel, 88 Courter, Josiah, 39 Cory, David, 95 Daniel, 95 Rachel. 95 Coward, Captain, 138 Cowenhoven, Jacob, 77 Cownover, Peter, 88 Cox genealogy, 213 Coxe, John, 160 Craig, Ann S., 146 Captain, 131 Ephigenia, 146 John A., 215 Crane, Bethuel, 69 Miss Elise S., 119 Jasper, 208 Crane & Little, 69 Crane. Matthias, 3

132, 127

J.,

69

Bailey, 94,

Colonel Elias,

Cornelison, Boeloff, 14, 84 Corneliusons, 13 Cornelius, Michael, 135 Cornwallis, 187 Corresponding Secretary, report 1916, 204

William, 3 Craven, Rev. Charles I., 103 Rev. Dr., Elijah Richardson, ary notice of, 103 Evelina Green, 103

117

Levi, 133 Dawson, Rev. Dr. William Dean, Abigail. 97 Maria, 175 Mary, 172 Mary, (Dey) 88 Day, Benjamin, 94 Edward A., 214 Mary, 172 M. H., 69 Stephen, 97, 147 S. S.

Conway

tice of,

116 William B.,

Jersey,

Davenport,

Davies, Rev. Samuel, 2 Davis, Hannah, 206

Dill,

Justic,

Disbrow, 212,

Jr.,

Ill

Dr. William 217, 221

Dix, William F..

Dobbins, Col.

'New

Edward

Dobbs Ferry. 129 Dodd, Ira, 69

S.,

113,

119 L.,

215

118,

INDEX. Libbeus, 156 M. W., 69 Parmenas, 98 Domineus, Reiner, 17 Donne, Robert, 76 list of for 1916, 216 Cornelius. 120, 165, 216 Genealogy, 203 112 Leah, Dorrien, Johanna Frederica Elizabeth,

Donors,

Doremus,

104 Doughty, John, 155 Dougin, Gov., 80 Douw, Johannes V., 163 Doty, Jacob, 153 Downs, S. Carl, 120

Drake family, 206 Dray ton. Mrs. S., 117 Dryden, Forrest F., 214 Mrs. John F., 215 Dubois, Abraham, 111 Aaron, 111 Catherine, 111 Elizabeth Jordan,

Henry,

Fielding, William, 7 Fillarton, James, 76

111

Fiscal,

111

Louis, 93 Pitts, Mrs. Henry D., 116 Fitzgerald, Henry, 138 Flitcraft, William Z., 217 of Folsom, Joseph Fulford, author Manuscript Light on Chaplain

James Caldwell's Death, 1 author of The Beginnings of

217

Durke, Cornelius, 167

Celebration,

Duryee, Louis, 93 Dutcher, John Henry, 111 Dyer, Frank L., 120 Earl, Elsie. 86 East Jersey Proprietors, Records at Perth Amboy, 202 Easton, St. John's Lutheran Church

202

Edge, Nelson J. H., 120 Edsall, Samuel, 24 Edwartse, Herman, 83 Ege, Ralph, 207 Elizabethtown Point, 1 Elliot, Mrs. Robert W.. 102 Ellsworth, Maria, 176

Faish, John Faitoute,

W.

J.,

S.,

151 69

177 Folsom, Joseph Fulford, 113, 118, 127, 198 199, 212, 221 Foote, Mrs. Will Howe, 106 Forbes, John, 73 Ford, Col. Jacob, 201 Colonel Jacob, Jr., 89

Hannah, 92 Worthington

C.,

117

Forrest, Captain, 51, 58 Foster, Mrs. Antoine L.,

175 Embrough, Elizabeth, 168 William, 168 Emery, John Runkle, 215 Englewood, tombstone inscriptions, 88 Ernest, John, 56 Essex County, Military and Civil History, 203 Essex Institute, 116 Evans, Dr. Britton D., 215 Everett, H. L., 206 Evertsen, Cornelius, Jr., 81 Ewing. Thomas, 206 Fairchild, Mrs. Ruth E., 118 Cumberland County, tombFairfield, stone inscriptions, 202 Presbyterian Church, berland County, 202

113

author of Colonel Peter Schuyler at Albany, 160 author of "The Ballad of Newark,"

Theodosia, 89 G. L., 69

Marie, 172 Theopholis, 173 Emans, Sara, 164,

Fairfield

the

Morris & Essex Railroad, 60 author Newark's 250th Anniversary

Dunning genealogy, 213

of,

217

John. 93

Sarah Ellen, 111 Thomas, 111 Dudley. Governor, 102 Duggan, Governor, 26 Dunham, Lewis, 91 B.,

Councilman, 82

Fish, Stuyvesant, 119 Fisher, Mrs. James C.,

Isaac H., Ill John, 111 Maria, 111 Rinear, 111 Sarah, 111

M.

227

Fardpn, Rachel, 175 Fargis, Joseph H., 121 Farrand, Wilson, 128, 217 Farrelly, Stephen, 121 Fatout genealogy, 213 Fatout, Henry B.. 217 Faugeres, Magaretta V., author of "Lafayette in Quaint Verse," lo Feigenspan, Christian W., 125, 128 Fendin, Lt., 131 Fenton, Eleazar, 205 Fenton family, 205 Fenwick genealogy, 213 Fenwick, John, 48 Ferdon, Barney, farm, tombstone inscriptions, 56 Fettinger, Theodore S.. 217 Fidelity Trust Company, 127, 217 Field genealogy, 213 Fielder, James F., 114, 122, 127, 128 Mrs. James F., 116

Cum-

117 Rabbi Solomon, 115, 122 Rev. Dr. Daniel R.. 215 Thomas, 173 Fowler, Samuel, 136 Fox Chase tavern, 58 Foy, John, 140 Franklin, Benjamin, 185 Franklin Institute, 116 Frazer, Rev. Dr. David R., 21t> Frederick the Great, 188 Fredericks, Thomas, 82 Free Public Library, Newark, 217 Freeman, Captain, 140 Miss Ginevra. 118, 202, 217 Katherine Myers, obituary notic of, 106 Rachel, 94 Samuel, 216 Wilberforce, 106 Freling, William, 10 Frelinghuysen, George G., 214 (

INDEX.

228 Joseph, 120 Theodore, 194 Freyer, Thomas D., 217 Friedenberg, Albert M., 115 Fritts, Frederic, 165, 173 Bachel Steymets. 164 Frost, Mary E. Harrison, 33, 40

Samuel,

95

Fulertoun, John, Robert, 75

75

Thomas, 75 Fullard, John P., 118 Fullarton, by Edith H. Mather, 72 Fullarton, John, 73 Fullarton of Kennebar, 72 Fullarton, Reginald, 72 Robert, 73 Robert F., 73 Sir Adam. 72 Thomas, 73 Fullerton, John, 74 Goldfridus, 72 Katherine, 74 Thomas, 73 Garabrantsen, Garrabrant, 165 Gardiner, Hannah, 205 Garland, William, 69 Garrabrantse, Claes, 175 Jacob, 175 Mary, 175 Garrabrant, Cleason, 86 Garretsons, 13 Garrison. Theodosia, 124 Garthwate, J. C., 69 Geary, Honorable Mr., 10 Gecox, Maria, 109 Gedney, Mrs. George W., 116 Genung, Harvey J., 120 Jemima, 150 Georgia Historical Society, 121 Geomonepen, 19 Gerrits, Jeannetje, 87 Gerritsen, Hermanus, 165 Jeannetje, 87, 164, 174 Gerritson, Gerrit, 14, 18, 82 Jeannetje. 14 Gibson, Edward, 39

John

A.,

Mrs. E.

T.,

Giffiord, Gill,

George

Gillespie,

Lawrence Gillette,

L.,

214 116 C.,

116

119

Harriet D., 101

Gilliam, Captain, Gloucester, Duke

138 of.

184

Godfrey, Dr. Carlos E., 203 Golding, Mrs. Emma, 217 Goodell, Edwin B., 118, 221 Philip,

120

Goodrich, Rear Admiral C. F., 209 Goodwin, Rev. Hannibal, 100

Jemima, 96 Robert, 74 Thomas. 74 William, 96 William E., 215 Gould, Jacob, 152 Gouldtown, by William

Gordon,

Rev.

Theophilus J.,

59

Richard H., 118 tombstone inscriptions, 146 Bertha Woodruff, 40 Gross, Abigail, 31 Clement, 31 Mary, 31 Thomas, 31 Grover, Rev. Joseph, 95 Guild, Captain Ralph, 131 Hack, Harold W., 119 Hagens, Martin. 109 Haggerty, Warren Dunning, 217 Hague, Mrs. Ainsworth J., 216 James, 69 Oliver J., 69 William, 69 Halberd, Benjamin, 153 Hall, Granville D., 217 Miss Charlotte C., 119 Josiah, 148

Greenville, Griffith,

Halley, William, 6 Halsey, Benjn, 92, 96

132 Benjamin, 147,

Adjt.,

Mrs. John,

Edmund

133 Halsted, Louis

150 217

D.,

F.,

120

Matthias, 5

Hamilton,

Alexander,

187

Andrew, 146 Captain, 58 Governor John, 160 Hancock House, 201

Hangens, Sarah Bogert, 109 Hardin, John R.. 214 Harden, Henry W., 118 Haring. Eliza, 109 James D., 112 Lydia, 110 Margaret, 109 Maria, 110 Peter D., 110 Sally, 109 Samuel, 109 Sophia, 110 Willempy, 109 Harmenson, Peter, 17 Harrens, Elizabeth, 176 Harrington Park, tombstone tions, 159 Harris, Jacob, 148 Richard, 137

inscrip-

Harrison, Captain. 5 Mrs. Charles C., 117

Miss Emily G., 217 Susanna, 32, 37 Hart, Edward, 161 Hart, John, 161, 207 Rev. Samuel, 116

Gordon, Charles, 74 Dr. John, 73

Grassman, Edward Gray, Captain, 139

Mrs. Elmer Ewing, Greene, General, 58 Richard, 120 Mrs. Richard. 120

G.

Stewart and Steward, 48

216

E., 69 Theodore, 117 Green, Miss Maria D., 202, 217

Thomas. 74 Hartford Theological Seminary, 121 Hartlock, Robert, 135 Hartshorne, Benjamin, 208 Hartshorne family, 206 Hartshorne, Helena K.. 209 Mary, 208 Richard Thomas, 209 Richard, 208, 209 Robert. 208 Hasse, Miss Adelaide R, 217 Hatch, Altha E., 204

INDEX. Miss Altha E., 121, 197, 202, 214 Rev. Edwin P., 2

Hatfield,

Hathaway, Martha, 92 Shadrach, 92 Hatheway, Joseph, 154 Sarah. 154 Haubenestle, Captain, 41 Haubner, Theodore, 41 Haussling, Jacob, 113 Haviland, Frederick M., 120 Hawes genealogy, 213 Hawke, Dr. William W., 117 Hawkins, Joseph, 3 Hays, James L., 215 Hay, J. Lewis, 214 Hayes, Miss Alice W., 212 Mrs. Charles Ellis, 57 H. & Redfield. 69 Headley, Elroy, 128, 217 Heaton, Isaac, 157 Mary, 157 Heck, John W., 116 Hedden, Jotham, 107 Katherine, 107 Heermans, Affgee, 172 Elsie, 174 Helms, William, 147 Henderson, Mrs. Helen S., 206 James, 69 Hendriecks, Jan, 78 Hendrick. Jans, 19 Hendricks, Francis, obituary notice (Steymets),

Margaretta

H.. author of Caspar Steymets and His Descendants, 13, 77, 164 H., 166, 167 Hohokus, Tombstone Inscriptions, copied by John Neafie, 29 Holbrook, Levi, 118 P.

William, 7

of,

79

Aaron, 3 Moses, 3 Heyer, Johannes, 171 Hicks, S. C., 120 Higbie, James S., 214 Higgins, Miss Mary E.. 217

115

Hinds, John, 151 Historic Ceremonies and Exercises, 127 Historic Newark, 127 History of the Newark Academy, 128 Historical Society of Burlington, 116 Historical Society of Hudson County,

116 Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 116

Hoerner, Mrs. H. J., 201 Mrs. Harry J., 217 Mrs. Henry J., 117 Hoffman, Armin S., 167 Agues R., 167 Captain Henry I.. 166 Elizabeth A., 166 Frederic F., 166 Frederick L., 114 Hoffman genealogy, 213 Hoffman, Helen B., 167 Henry B., 167 Henry S., 166 Jacob D., 166 Jemima, 166

164

Philip

Hetfield,

P.,

Fritts,

Orlando K., 167 Rachel, 166 Samuel V., 217

Isaac, 174 Hepburn, Robert, 206 Hermansen, Dunne. 82 Douwe, 80 Hermsden, Deavoue, 79 Hermson, Don, 20 Herrick, Hugh M., 215

Prank

T., 166 Joseph R., 167 Joseph Reed, 167 Katrine M., 167

Mary Ann, 166

Hendricksen, Maritje, 88, 164 Marytse, 171 Peter, 165 Hennion, David, 27

Hill,

John

Margaretta, .166

107 Gertie

229

Holcomb, Marcus H., 122 Holden, Asa, 106 Dr. Edgar, obituary notice of, 106 Horace, 120 John 107 Holland Society of New York, 116, 217 Holmes, George, 15 John, 147 Samuel, 147 Sarah, 159 Honeyman, A. Van Doren, 118, 197, 210 217 221 Hope-well, Pioneers of Old, 207 Hoppe, Andreas, 172 176 Andries, 79 Hopper, Andrew, 168 Elsey, 29 Garret, 29 Hord genealogy, 213 Hord, Rev. A. H., 217 Hornblower, Emily N. Read, 104 Erastus F., 104 Horton, Elijah, 152 Elizabeth, 90 Jonathan, Dr., 90 Howe. George R., 113, 118, 212, 221 Howard, Hiram, 148 Howell, Benj., 151 James E., 214, 215, 217 Hude, James, 160 Huger, 191 Hulbard, Will, 153 Hulberd, Rachel, 153 Hume, Miss Jessie, 115 Humphreys, Alexander C., 116 Hunner, Leon, 115 Hunt. Abraham, 59 Miss Clara, 115 William S., 124 William T., 113, 215 Richard, 165 Hunterdon County Historical Society, 116 Hunter, Andrew, 147 Lieut. Charles G., 209 Huntington, J. H., 218 Huntting, T. D., 218 Huntting genealogy, 213 Hyde Park Historical Society, 121 Hyer, Johannes (Hiborn), 85 Dr. Edward J., 214 111, Indiana Historical Society, 121 Ingham, Rev. Dr. John A., 117 Innes, J. H., 15 Inyard, John, 140 Iowa State Historical Society, 122 Jacobs, Triente, 27, 83 Walling, 82

INDEX.

230 James,

Esther Wilcox,

31

Kissam, Henry

S.,

119

Jans, Annake, 14 Jansen, Henry, 14

Kitchel, Kitchell

Machgryse, 18 Jaroleman, Margaret, 129 Jay, Anna Maria, 102 Jenkins. Catherine, 209 Jennings, Miss Annie B., 117

Kneass, Carl M., 116 Knox, H., Bridgadier-General, Knyfte, Councilman, 82 Koonts, Felty, 141 Kunz, George P., 115

Jensen,

Charles,

Timy, 92 Johns Hopkins University, 121 Johnson, Rev. Edward P., 119 Charles, 69

Charles F., 209 J. William, 214

Maud E., 118, 204 Samuel William, 210 Wilbur S., 214 William M., 120, 214 Johnston, Andrew, 163 Johnstone, John, 74 Miss

107

Kimball, Arthur S., 215 King, Abraham, 170 Constant, 90

90

Harmanus, 205 173

Joseph, 147 Leah, 170

Stephen,

110 Mary, 110 Lydia,

Lehlbach, Mrs. Frederick R., Leighton, George B., 118 Leonard, Elizabeth, 205

Henry,

121

171, 173 William, 207 C.,

220

Charles S., 220 Charles V., 220

Lucinda Redman, 220 L., 220

Mary

Kip, Hendrick H., 20, 79 Kirk, William T., Jr., 116 Kirtland, John. 106

216

162

O. B., 205

Samuel, 205 Letschew, David, 17 Lewis, Marion L., 218 Sarah, 170 Leybourne, Rev., 34 Libbey, William, 119. 120 Mrs. William, 115 Library Committee, report

for

1916,

212 Library Company, 121 Linch, Henry, 6 Lindsly, Benjn, 92, 147 Benj., 150 Eleazr. 148 Lindsley, John M., 69

Crane & Little, 69 Catherine, 210 Edward, 209 Governor William, 2 Henry, 137 Mrs. Edward. 208 Peter Van Burgh, 210 Lockhart, Ephraim, 76 Loderwicke, Hans, 17 Logan, John H., 118, 119 Little,

Col.

Kinsey, Jane

101 110

Livingston,

John Walden, 216 Kingsland, Elmer, 171 John, 171

Kinman,

Mary Ann, 206

Lines, Rt. Rev. Dr. Edwin 118, 218, 221 Linford, Mary, 173 Lippincott, William, 116

Dorothy, 205 Frederick, 90

Hendrik,

212, 218

Samuel, 3 Leefer,

Lette, William, Lefferts, John, John B.. 110

Kansas State Historical Society, 121 Katzin, Morris, 216, 218 Kayser, W. L., 206

Kelley, Dr. W. P., 206 163 Kemble, Peter Kendall, Dr. Calvin N., 218 Kendoy, Samuel, 147 Kenyon, Adelbert A., 120

A.,

186

Charles,

175

Kearney, Mary, 36 Keasbey, Edward Q., 120, Kelby, Robert H., 119

183 Lam, Captain John, 166 Langdon, Woodbury G., 118 Lansing, Jacob, Jr., 163 LaRowe, Henry C., 120 Laurencs. Colonel, 187 Lean, Richard, 69 Leary, Mrs. Eliza T., 117 Leber, Samuel F., 216 Lebkuecher, Frank Alice, 37 Benjamin F., 48

Jones, Chester N., 218 Doctor, 136 Paul, 186 Jordan, Joseph, 110 Elizabeth, 111 Elsey Parsels, 110 Joy. Edmund S. F., 117

C. Victor,

90

Lee,

Johnstone of Spotswood, 73 Catherine Blauvelt, 70 Jolly,

C.,

147, 150

Lafayette in Quaint Verse, by Margaret te V. Faugeres, 196 Lafayette, Marie - Jean - Paul - JosephRoche-Yves Gilbert de Motier,Mrquis de, by Richard Wayne Parker,

Jersey Devil, 210 Johnes, Timo., 155

Mary

96,

LaBau. Francis, 216 Ladd, Rev. Henry M., 218 Lafarge, Jeannetje, 174

27

82 Claude, 81 Herman, 17 Michael, 19 Michel, 21 Rutger, 79 Claes,

Jurgens, Margaretta, Kalb, Baron de, 184

Abraham, 94, & Ward, 69

William, 76 Loomis, Seymour C., 118 Long, Daniel, 125 Elizabeth, 33 Sarah Elizabeth,

33

S.,

114,

INDEX. Long

Island Historical Society, 117

Longworth,

Caroline,

206

Elizabeth, 206 Mary, 206 Loomis. Freeman, 208

Lorton, Alfred Hathaway, Lewis, 86 Louis Philippe, 195

86

Louis XVI., 183 Louis XVIII., 183 Louisiana Historical Society, 117 Lovejoy, Frederick B., 120 Low, Seth, 116 Lowthrop, Mrs. Francis C., 119 Lum, Charles M., 113, 118, 197, 201, 212, 214. 221

Edward

H.,

218

Luse, Nathan, 157 Lutolph, Ernest Hugo, 105 Lyall, William, 215

Lybrand, Elizabeth, 31 Lynch, Henry, 7 Lyon, Adrian, 203, 218 David, 3, 150, 152 Sarah, 155 Mabbatt, Alina Fernandina, 105 Frederick Sprainger. 105 Mabic, Frederic, 171 Macellison, Pieter, 82 McDougall, Alexander, 169 Maer, Robert, 173

MacKie, Arthur H., 107, 118, 202, 218 Nelson Wright, 202, 218 MacKay, Rev. Dr. Donald Sage, obituary notice of, 105 Macsen, Cornells, 163 Magelse. Tadeas, 85 Magie, David, 69 William J., 118, 214, 221 Manning, Miss Marianna W., 202, 218 Manuscript Light on Chaplain James Caldwell's Death, by Joseph F. Folsom, 1

Marquand, Allan, 214

Marschelleck, Altje, 175 Marschelluck, Cornelius, 166, 172 Sara, 175 Cornelius, 166, 172 Marshall, Vice President Thomas

R.,

202 Marsh. Ephraim, 69 John, 69 Ralph, 69 Maskell,

Mary,

206

Massachusetts Historical Society, Masson, Thomas L., 124 Martin, Ephraim, Coll., 92

George

C.,

117

201, 203

Johnson, 69 Miss May Axford, 218 Moses B., 69 Mrs. A. F. R., 201, 215, 218 Mather, Edith H., author of Fullarton. 72 Matthews, Catherine, 170 James, 170 John, 170 Lawrence, 170 Mary, 170 Noah, 69 Mathewson, Albert McC., 116, 118

Maxim, Hudson, 218 Maxwell, Henry D., 120 McCarter, Uzal, 127 McCleary, James T., 117

231

McOonkey's ferry. 59 McCowan, Robert J. F., 206 McDougal, Alexander, 173 McDougall, Mary, 169 McFaul, Bishop, 59 McGregor, D., 218 David, 216 Graham B., 119 McHugo, Edward, 9 Mcllwaine, Miss Anne, 116 Mcllwaine, H. R., 207 McKeen, Miss Mary, 57. 59, 118, 202, 218, 221 McKnight, Chas., 148 McMurtrie, John, 38 McMurtry, Frances A., obituary notice of, 105 McTeir. James, 38 Meabe, Maria, 110 Mead, Adrian, 33 Geo., 147 Sarah, 33, 39 Meek, Mrs. William S.. 201, 218 Meeker, C. C., 69 Jonathan, Jr., 11 Oba, 69 Stephen J., 215 Meierhoff, Meta, 109 Mekers, Captain, 94

Membership Committee, report for 1916, 214 Memorial Cyclopedia of New Jersey, by Mary Depue Ogden, 100 Merrell, Mrs. Frederick W., 119 John L., 119 Maria, 205 Merriman, R. B.. 119 Merit, Phebe, 94 Meserole, Abram, 172, 175 Jan, 175 Maritjie, 175 Messerschmidt, Miss, 59 Meyer, Dr. Nicholas, 104 Ernest Lutolph, obituary notice 104 Charles L., 120 Mezquida, Anna B., 124 Michael, Oscar. 215 Michaels, Elias, 21 Michaelse, Elias, 82 Tades, 174 Mifflin, General, 10 Miles, Alexander, 161 Military Order of the Loyal Legion the United States, 117 Miller, Daniel, 97 Elizabeth, 97

Melyn, 4 Mellyn, 3 Sylvanus, 171 Mills, Alfred E., 121, 214 Minnesota Historical Society. 117 Minnisink Historical Society, 117 Minthorn, Abigail, 99, 148 Deborah, 98, 156 George, 99, 149

James,

150

Philip,

99,

Will.,

149

156

William,

98

Minturn, James F., 215 Mirabeau, 189 Misner, Michael, 13, 84 Missouri Historical Society. Mixheasea, Tades, 171

122

of,

of

INDEX.

232 Mockridge, Mrs. Oscar B., 215

Lambert H., 79 Fryston, 30 Monmouth, Book of the dead George C. Martin, 201 Monmouth, Dead of, 203 Monmouth Society, 202 Monnette, Orra E., 115 Montgomery, Deborah. 206 James M., 120 Moll,

Monk

of,

by

Moore, Elizabeth. 31 Morgan, Coll., 91 James, 1 Moore, Bishop, 103 Carroll,

115

218

206

Van Ransselear, 103 Morrell, F. V., 218 Morrell genealogy, 213 Morris & Essex Railroad, Beginnings of, br Joseph F. Folsom, 60 Morris Countjs, Revolutionary Pension Records, 89, 147 Morris genealogy, 213 Morris, Hannah, 91 Joseph, 91 Lewis, 102 Miss Augusta A., 218 Miss Lucy N., 218 Robert H., 160 Morrissey, Lawrence, 41 Morrow, W. H., 120 Morton, Alice, 102 Miss Mary B., 213, 218 William C.. 113, 118, 197, 212, 213, 218, 221 Mount Vernon Ladies Association of the Union, 117 Muchmore, William K., 218 Muhlenberg, Philip E., 146 Mulford, Caroline I., 167 Sarah Howard, 86 Munn, Jepthah B., 63

Mundy,

J.

Munsell,

Crowell,

Henry, B.,

218 69

Murphy, Franklin, 114, 122, 127. 128, 211, 214, 220 Franklin Jr., 214, 218 Murray, Beulah, 3 Miss, 8 Nicholas, Rev., 2 Music of the Christian Church, is7 Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Com-

ex-

New

New New

New

146 Tombstone Inscriptions, Ramseys, Bergen County, 112 Xeafie, John, and Van Alstyne, W. B.. Tombstone Inscriptions, Demarest, Bergen County, 108

E.

pany. 126 Newark's History, Some Phases of, by Mrs. Sidney N. Ogden. 202 Newark, The Ballad of, by Joseph Fulford Folsom, 177 Newark, 250 old, 127 Newark's 250th Anniversary Celebration, 127 Newark's 250th Anniversary Celebration, report on, 210 Newark's 250th Anniversary Celebration, by Joseph F. Folsom, 113 Newark's 250th Anniversary Celebration appointment of Historical Society Committee, 220 Newburg, Luberty. 172 New Brunswick Historical Club, 117 Newcastle, Duke of, 163 Newcomb, Bethuel M., 115 Newcombe, John, 169 New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 203 New England Historic Genealogical Society, 118 New Hampshire Genealogical Record. 203 New Hampshire Historical Society, 118 New Haven Historical Society, 118 New Jersey Almanacs, 213 New Jersey Civil List, 204 New Jersey Historical Society. 118

Nafle, Smith, 39 National Historical Society, 117 National of United States Society Daughters of 1812, 117 Naval History Society. 117 Neafie, John, 218 Tombstone Inscriptions on John,

Barney Ferdon Place, Norwood, Bergen County, 56 Hohokus Tombstone Inscriptions, 29 Tombstone Inscriptions, Englewood, Nordhoff, Bergen County, 88 Tombstone Inscriptions, Greenville,

M.

Newark Directory, 126 Newark Evening News, 218 Newark Free Public Library, 217 Newark Sales and Advertising Com-

New

of

Industrial

Newark Bank, 69 Newark Boys' Industrial School, 220 Newark Committee of One Hundred.

Newark, 220

pany

213

Conference of the Church, Minutes of, 203

216,

L.,

207,

218

Sidney,

H.,

204,

Nov.-ark's Anniversary position, 126

Newark

Ensley, 207 Miss Annie

Thomas,

Nearpass, William H., 117 Neeser, Robert W., 117 Nelson sale, 212 Nelson sale contributors, 214 Nelson, William, 1, 70, 176, 198, 203

Jersey Historical Society. Proceedings for 1916, 197 Jersey, Memorial Cyclopedia of,

by Mary Depue Ogden, 100 Jersey Railroad

& Transportation

Company, 62

Records of Officers and Men in Wars from 1791-1815, 202 New Jersey Shippens, by George Schuyler Bangert, 30 New Jersey State Library, 118 New Maisland, 82 Newport Historical Society, 119 Jersey,

Series of

Proceedings,

Newton, Brian, 17

12

New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, 118 New York State Historical Association, 119 New York Historical Society, 119 New York Society Library, 218 Nichols Captain, 144 Col. Richard. 76 Nicholls, Governor,

25,

Nodine, Andrew. 109

Maria A.

Pullis,

109

82

INDEX. Nordhoff, tombstone inscriptions, Xorton, Oliver Wilcox, 218

Norwood,

Bergen

inscriptions,

County,

98

tombstone

56

Numismatic and Antiquarian 122 Nunnes, Ann, 30 Dorothea, 30 Edward, 30 Mary. 30

Society,

Robert, 30 William, 30

O'Connor, Rt. Rev. Dr. John Ogden, Coll., 91

J.,

114

147 John, 208 Mary Depue, Col.

M.,

author of Memorial Cyclopedia of New Jersey, 100 Mrs. Sidney N., 202, 203, 218 Old Barracks at Trenton, by Robert Edwin Walker, 49 Old Bergen, by Danield Van Winkle,

202 Old Colony Historical Society, 119 Old Pomfre, 30 Olendorf. Mrs. John, 120 Oliver, Mrs. Paul G., 218 Oneida Historical Society, 121 Orange Bank, 69 Orange Chapter, Sons of the American Revolution, 213, 218 Order of the Descendants of Colonial Governors, 119 Order of Pounders and Patriots, New Jersey Society, 119 Order of the Founders and Patriots of America, 119 Book of Lieutenant John Orderly Spear, 129 Osborne, Algernon A., 106 Elizabeth C., 106 Helen, 106 Mrs. Horace S.. 116 Mrs. Joseph A., 218 Rev. Dr. Louis Shreve, obituary notice of, 106 William Hamilton, 218 Osmon, Benjamin, 147 Oswald, Fernandina, 105 O'Toole, John L., 122 Owen, Dr. Frederick W., 216 Pageant of Newark, 126 Pangburn, Jeremiah, 109 Sheldon Leavitt, 109 Susan, 109 Palmer, Anthony, 4 Judge, 26 William. 169 Parcell, Jacob, 112 Parcels, Jane, 109 Parker, Charles W., 218, 221 Cortlandt,

214

Mrs. Charles W., 59, 118, 202, 218 Mrs. James, 208 Richard Wayne, author of "Mariede Jean-Paul-Roche-Yves-Gilbert Metier, de Lafayette," 183 R. Wayne, 214, 218 Sir Gilbert, 218

Parkhurst, Ezekiel, 92 Jonathan, 70 Parsel, Margaret, 112 Walter, 112 Parsels, Eley, 110 Parsells, Cornelia Blauvelt,

112

233

Jacob, 112

Parsippany, old meeting house, 202 Parson, John, 159 Perry cemetery, tombstone inscriptions. 159 Parvin, Newton R., 218 Paterson, Captain, 93 Paterson, tombstone inscriptions, 220 Patsel, Mrs. M. J., 205 Patriotic Essays, 128 Paul, Oswald Lincoln, 105 Peck, Constant, 206 Pelican, The, for May, 1916, 220

Penn. Thomas, 131 Pennington, Mrs. Louis, 118, 212, 214, 215 William, 120 of Pension Records, Revolutionary, Morris County, 89, 147 Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, 203 Pepper, Rev. Mr., 93 Ann Westervelt, 112 Percil, Walter, 112 Perkins, Merritt, G., 119 Perry, Catherine. 159 Catherine Blauvelt, 159 David, 159 Frances W., 29 Hanna, 159 Hannah. 159 Henry, 159 James H., 29 Joseph, 159 Rachel, 159 Perth Amboy, Records of East Jersey Proprietors, at, 202 Peshine genealogy, 213 Peshine, John H. H., 219 Peters, Andreas, 166 Petersen. Claves. 79 Cornelius, 173 Phelps, John J., 215 Philips, N. Taylor, 115 Phoenix, J. P., 70 Pierrepont, Henry Evelyn, 102 John J., 117 Mary Rutherford, 102 Pierson, Albert, 69 Charles, 39 Pieterson, Hessel, 165 Pilch Mrs. Henry G., 216 Pitney, Henry C., 121

Henry

E.,

202

Charles D., 219 Plum, Matthias, 215

Platt,

Plumb, W. D., 219 Plume, Joseph W., 117 Miss Edith M., 219 Mrs. Hannah A., 219 Mrs. Isaac E. P., 219 Mrs. W. Fred. 219 Walter Beach, 213 William F., 219 Plumley, Sarah, 36 Rose Budd McWilliams, 31 Pool, Alvin H., 39 & J. W. C., 69 Pos, Loedervicke, 79 Post, Adrian, 19, 81 Anthony, 169 Catherine, 173 Catherine Rough, 112 Catrinn, (Gerrits), 85 Francis, 165

INDEX.

234 173 112 112 Leah, Doremus, 112 Peter G., 112 Peter I., 112

202

Johannes,

John Leah

Potter,

H. & Redfleld, 69 Redman, Lucinda, 220

P.,

Redfield,

D.,

Reed, James, 140 John, 139, 147 Richard, 140 Register of the New

John, 3

John

3rd, 4 Stacy, 59 Pound, Ezra, 125 Powlse, Rachel (Pieter), Rachel (Pieters), 87 Rachel Peter, 171 Rachel Pieters, 164 Pieter, 165 Prael, Mary, 32 Pratt, William,

Bointen,

Eliza,

Minnie

Cum-

J.,

121

70 J.,

125

Moses, 70 Rhea, T.. 147 Rhind, J. Massey, 125 Richards, Dr. George H.,

120

Prof. E. E., 210 C., 119 Rebecca Howard, 31 Rickee, Captain Israel, 141 Rickey, Capt. Israel, 131 Rider, John J., 85 Righter, Rev. S. Ward, 120 Rightmire, Dr. Franklin, 120 Riker, Abraham I., 109 Eliza, 109 Hannah, 109 Joseph M., 113, 118, 197, 214 Robatham, Cheslar, 219 Robert the Bruce, 72 Robert II., King, 72 Roberts, Jonathan W., 100, 113, 198, 220 Robbins, Leonard H., 123, 219 Robinson, Lady William, 202 Roeder, Adolph, 219 Rogers, Alexander W., 70 Mrs. Henry W., 117 Romaine, B., 169 Roome, John J., 170 Nicholas, 170 Rachel, 169 William P., 170 Roseboom, John G., 163 Ross, David, 172. 175 Edwin F., 215 William, 96, 152 Rossell, Elizabeth, 101 Rough, Catherine, 112 Rouse, Alice R., 125 Rowand, Mrs. Augustus, 117 Rowland, Rev. John, 161 Royal Historical Society, u.9 Rudyard, Thomas, 75 Runyan, F. W., 215 Rutgers College, 119 Rutherford, Lewis Morris, 102 Stuyvesant, 102 Winthrop, 102 Ryder, Gertrude, 174

Dr. Ernest

Andrew, 174 Joanna, 85 Jennakie, 174 Vroutje, 174

1916,

Proprietors of East Jersey, 203 Protestant Episcopal Church, Ne\r Jersey Diocese, proceedings, 203 Provence,. Count of, 183 Pruden, Sarah, 205 Pryer, Andreas, 86

110

Jacob, 110

110 Maria A., 109 N., 110

James,

C., 118 Purmarent, C. J., 25 Mrs. E. Putnam, G., 214 Quackenbush, Benjamin E., 86 86 Mrs., Mrs. B. E., 86 Quigley, Thomas, 3 Quimby, Jonas S., 70 Quinby, Anna E., 107 James M., 107 Phebe Sweasy, 107 Rail, Colonel, 59 Ramseys, Tombstone Inscriptions, 112 Rankin, Russell B., 206 William, 70 Randolph, Coleman, 202 Joseph F., 114 Lieut., 140 Theodore F., 202 Rathbone, Mrs. E. B. A., 117 Raymond, George B., 215 Raven, Mrs. John H., 118 Raymond, Thomas F., 127, 128 Thomas L., 114, 122, 124 Reckless, William McK., 120 Records of Officers and Men of New Jersey in Wars from 1791-1815,

Pumpelly, Josiah

3

Jemima, 150 Samuel, 150 Richardson, Frank W., 115

Prince, J. Dyneley, 115 Princeton University, 119 Prime genealogy, 213 Printz, John, 17 Prior, Andreas, 86, 171

C.,

Jersey Society, America, 201

Revolutionary Pension Records of Morris County, 89, 147 Reynolds, D. D., 70

154

Proceedings of the Society for

of

172

Remy, Arthur F.

Hannah, 153 Lee & Company, 126 Samuel, 153

Pullis,

Altje,

Boynton, 4

85

Presbyterian Church, Fairfield, berland County, 202 Preyor, Jacob, 27 Johanna, 27 Leah, 27 Price, George, 3

197

Dames

Colonial

Remsen,

Potts,

John J., 174 Walter, 174 Ryerson genealogy, 213 Sabing, Joseph F., 205 Sachse, Julius F., 115 Saddle River, 202 Sale, Daniel,

4

INDEX. Salter,

Benjamin, 94 J.

205

B.,

Sands, Miss Emma Louise, 201, 219 Mrs. Charles Le, 117 Sayre, James R., 70 Moses, 70 Schult, Claude Arientie, 82

Sassier,

Schureman genealogy, 213 Schuremans of New Jersey, 20o Schutt, Hilljie, 175 Schuyler, Brandt, 196 Colonel Peter, at Albany, Sciven, John, 108 Scot, George of Pitlochie, Scott, Austin, 221

160

74

Dr. Austin, 118, 119 William W., 216 Scudder, Captain, 137 John, 138 Wallace M., 118, 214, 221 Searle, Daniel, 3

Sebring, Hester, 170 Peter, 170 Seely, Coll., 130 Silvs, Sellers,

Coll.,

Edwin

92 J.,

219

111

Jacob, 111 Joseph, 111 Sherwood, Louis, Shinn, Ann, 207

116

John, 207 Rebecca, 207 Shipman, Ellen E., 70 Shippen, Ann, 31, 34 Benjamin DeCamp, 33 Carlton Arquet, Dorathe, 34 Edward, 31 Elizabeth, 31

Clayton, 33 Eveline Constance Taylor, 33

Cincinnati

the

New of the

Jersey,

War

in

the

State

of

120

New

Jersey, 120 Historical Society, 120

of 1812,

Somerset County S. A. R., Montclair Chapter, 120 Morris County Chapter, 120 Orange Chapter, 120, 213 Paramus Chapter, 120 Sons of the Revolution, 120 New Jersey Society, 120 Spafford, Dr. Isaac, 90 Spear, Cornelius, 173 Lieutenant John, Orderly Book, 129 Speir, Cornelius, 166

202,

219

family, 205 Frances, 31 Ida Augusta, 33 Ithamar Carpenter, 41 John, 30, 31 John Blair, 32 Joseph, 31 Joseph William, 32

Steenhuysen, Englebert, 18, Englebert, Jr., 82 Steenvycke, Councilman, 82 Steinmets, Amey. 88 13, 77 Christoffel, 83,

Caspar,

164

Margaretta, 164 Stevens, Captain Campble, Thomas W., 123

Mary, 31, 34 Sarah Elizabeth, 33 Samuel Carpenter, 33 Samuel Clifford, 33 Siisanna, 32 William, 30, 31 Rev. William, 34 William I., 32

82

164

Benjamin,

Lucretia, 33

Henry, Jr., 170 Simpson, Miss Mabel, 119

Eugene, 41 Fitch, 70 George D., 219 Gregory, 105 Hanford, 70 Helen L., 105 Martha Ann, 102 Miss Dora, 119, 202, 219 Miss L. Cotheal, 212 Mrs. Elizabeth Alford, 115 Samuel, 3, 70 Thomas L., 70 Society Sons of the Rev., State of Cal., 219 of Colonial Wars, 119 of Daughters of Holland Dames, 119 of Mayflower Descendants, 119

Spooner, Mrs. Alban, 121 Stackhouse, Dr. Asa M., 116 Stanford, Stephen Patrick, 41 Starke, John, 156 117, Steelman, Mrs. Matthias,

33

Emma

Sickles,

inscrip-

Harrington Park, 159

Smalley, Mrs. William W., 120 Smith, Caleb, 70 Ezekiel B., 70

Spencer, Coll. Oliver, 95, 97 Oliver, 150 Spier, Hendrick Jamsen, 129 Spofford, Ernest. 205

,

New Jersey, by Shippens, Schuyler Bangert, 30 Shores, Pelick, 94 Rachel, 94 Shute, Will, 148

Sloane, William M., 114, 115 Elting, tombstone

Sloat, Joe. tions,

of

Sergeant, John, 71 Sertsen, Dorothea, 173 Shailer, Alice Christina, 105 Sharp, George W., 70 Sheldon, David, 39 Sherrerd, Mrs. William D., 116 Shevrotier, Anna Maria Demarest, 111 Brazil,

Jan, 165 Skilman, Thomas, 131 Skinner, Mrs. Charles H., 219 Slade, Mrs. J. M., 219 Sip,

John, 94 Phebe, 93

Sammis,

235

160

Thomas Wood, 126

Stewart, Rev. Dr. Charles H., 216 Stewart, Rev. Theophilus G., author of

Gouldtown, 48

George

William, author of Gouldtown, 48 Steymets, Caspar and His Descendants, by P. H. Hoffman, 13, 77 Steymets, Aigee, 176 Altje,

16 16

Annetje,

16 16 16 172 Finnette, Benjamin, Caspar,

Jr.,

Christoffel,

INDEX.

236 16 Joanna, 16

Tichenor, James H., 108 Julia H., obituary notice

Joannetje, 16 Johannes, 16

Tiers,

Gerrit,

Orsolena, 16 Rachel, 164 Stiles, John, 96, Jonath., 152

147,

150

Jonathan, 151 Stillwell, Dr. John E., 219 Mrs. A. L., 120 St. John's Lutheran Church of Easton,

202 Stockton, Mrs. Bayard, 210 Dr. Charles S., obituary

notice

of,

101 Dr. Frank O., 102 Elizabeth (Rossell), genealogy, 213 Richard, 101 Mrs. Robert, 119 S.,

101

56 173 Susan, 56 Thorn. G. Wisner, 214 Thome, Daniel, 171 Thurston, Dorothy P., 108 Philip,

205

Stacy, 101 Stoffelson, Jacob, 23, 80, 83 Stokes, Captain John, 141 Stone, Charles Francis, 119

Margaret Elizabeth, 108 Richard Townley, 108 Samuel H., 107

Douglas, 101 Francis Wayland, 101*

Susanne M., 101 William Leete, obituary notice 101 William M., 101 Thomas, 35 Stout, Ab., 147 Stoutenburgh. Henry A., 219 Streets, Dr. Thomas Hale, 219 genealogy, 213 Strobell, Mrs. George, 219 Strycker genealogy, 213 Stryker family, 203 Miss Katherine N., 202, 219 Mrs. William S., 59, 203 Sturgis, Frank K., 119 Stuyvesant, Governor, 17 Peter,

17,

102,

of,

201

Peter Gerard, 102 Rutherford, obituary notice of, 102 Sullivan, General, 58 Sussex County Historical Society, 120 Sutphen, Dr. Theron Y., 214, 219 Swaine, Col. Samuel, 208 Swavze, Francis J., 59, 113, 114, 118, '127, 128, 197, 203, 211, 221

Jacob L., 207 Sweedman, Harman, 18 Sweeman, Herman, 82 Synod of New Jersey Minutes, 203 Symmes, J. G., 219 Tadef.

Michael,

Talema, Douwe, Tamo oaugh, 17

25

110

Taylor, Elizabeth, 165, 173 Dr. Henry Genet, 215

Edward X., 125 Ten Broeck, Dirck, 163

Teall.

Tenbrook, Derrick, 163 Ten Eyck, Barent, 163 Jacob Ct., 163 Jacob H., 163 Tennent, Rev. William, 161 Terry, Rev. E. B., 120 Miss Marion J., 120 Rev. Dr. Roderick, 119

The Worker, 220 Thomas, Mrs. A. R., 205 Thomas, Edward, 3 Thomson, James, 146 Robert, 146 Thompson, David A., 219 David, 96, 150 George, 88 Georgia, 88 Mary, 56 Nicholas,

205

Samuel,

108

Mrs. Alex. H., 201, 219 Tingey, Commodore, 103 Titus, Mrs. J. Welling, 59 The Ballad of Newark, by Joseph Fulford Folsom, 177

172

Nealtis,

of,

Lydia Nuttman, 108

M. D. Wheeler, obituary notice of. 107 Tombstone inscriptions, Fairfleld, Cumberland County, 202 inscriptions, Hohokus, by John Neafle, 29 inscriptions, Norwood, by John Nefie, 56 inscriptions, Paterson, 220 Tours, Claas Arentse, Claes Arentson, 28

Town

80

Talk, May 6, 1916, 220 Townsend, Miss Amy, 117 Miss Treat, Gail, 119 Robert, 179, 208 Treasurer, Report for 1916, 199 Trenton, Battle of, 201 Trenton, Old Barracks at, by Robert Edwin Walker, 49 Trembly, Albert E., 124 Truman, Henry H., 215 Trustees, Report of Board for 1916, 198 Tuckley, James H., 125 Tuerse, Puetitie, 172 Turner, Jarzel, 158 Nathan, 158 Sarah, 157 Tuthill, Samuel, 158 Tuttle, Ebner, 154 Twining, Mrs. Kinsley, 219 Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of Newark, 128 Tyler genealogy, 213 University of Chicago, 219 United States Catholic Historical So121 ciety, Urquhart, Frank J., 219 Vail, Alfred, 70 Carl M., 120 George, 70 Mary A., 70 Stephen, 70 Van Alstyne, W. B., and John Neafie, Tombstone Inscriptions, Demarest, Bergen County, 108 Van Antwerp, C., 70 Van Blarcom, Magdalena, 87 for

INDEX. Van Van Van

Boskirk, Margaret, 165 Brunt, Catherine, 172 Buskieck, Benjamin, 172 Margaret, 172 Van Curler, Jacob, 19 Vanderspeyden, Anna Francina, 35 Vander Beek, Frank I., 116 Vanderpoel, Ambrose E., 215

James, 70 121 Van-Der-Veer, Pieter Cornelison, 77 Vander Voort, Jan, 172 Van Dyke, Edward, 86 Vanderpool,

Wynant

John

D.,

124

C.,

Van Hoorns, Jacob Treintje,

Wallinger, 24

24

Van Horhase, Caty, 29 Van Home, Dr. Byron G., 115 Van Houten, Mrs. A. G., 117 Jessie Roelofs, 87 Vanness, Gerret, 163 Vannest, Sarah Ann, 85, 87 Van Noorstrand, Casparus, 171

Jacob,

164

Van

Noostrand, Caspar, 86 Casparus, 164 Jacob, 86 Van Orden, Syntyne, 176 Vanoten, John, 139 Vanderpool, Beach, 70

Van

Sciven, Daniel, 108 Maria Blacklidge, 108

Van Van Van Van Van

Stee,

Sarah, 86

Tassel, Rachel, 173 Tight, Dirke Gerritsen,

80

Tuyle, Mary, 170 Valen, Jacob, 110

John, 110

Nancy,

110

Tilman,

18

Van

Valer, Cornelius, 108 Elizabeth Blacklidge, 108 Van Vleck, Schout, 18

Van Van

Vleeck, Tilman, 80 Riper, Anna, 165, 173

Annie, 176 Annetje, 174 Catherine, 174 Caspar, 174 Cornelius, 17 David, 174

Herman, 86 Jan Tomas, 165 Johannes, 174 86 174 174 Thomas, 165 Van Schaick, Sybrant Goo, 163 Van Stee, Sarah, 164, 172 Van Vleeck, Tyrnament, 82 Van Voorst, Cornelius, 23 Ide, 24, 81 Van Waganingen, Garret, 83 Van Waggininge, Gerrit G., 165 Van Winkle, Annetje, 28 Annetje (Jacobs), 82 Daniel, author of "Old Bergen," 202 Daniel, 116 Edward, 116 Verlath, Captain, 77 Judike, 20 Nicholas, 21, 83 Verdon, Thomas, 79 Vermilye, J. D., 70 Jurrie, Jurie, Peter,

237

Ver Valer,

Lettitia,

110

Vicksburg, The Daily Citizen, 201 Raid on SouthCavalry Virginia, western, 207 Virginia Historical Society, 121 Magazine of History and Virginia Biography, 203 Vineland Historical and Antiquarian

122

Society,

Vinton, Dr. Charles H., 119 Von Geile, Maximilian, 14 Von Knyphausen's regiment, 57 Voorhis, John F. & Co., 70 Vosseler, Elias, 197 Vosseeler, Elias, 117 Wack, Henry W., 123,

126, 127

Wade, Robert. 142

Waid, Capt. Noadiah, 92 Wakake, 208 Wakefield, Elizabeth, 30 Waldron, Albert, 112 Rachel, 112 Walker, Mrs. Cyrus, 115 Robert Edwin, author of Old Barracks at Trenton, 49 Edwin R., 118, 202, 203, 219, 221 Mrs. Robert Edwin, 59, 202 Wall, Edward, 207 John P., 216 Wallace, Colonel, 10 Walling, Jacob, 28 Trientie, 83 Wallinger, Trientie (Jacobs) 81 Walsh, Charles, 88 Georgina, 87 Mrs. C., 85 Walton, Perry, 219 Rev. John, 94 Walton Printing and Advertising Company, 127 Wappenghrezewan, 17 Ward, Captain Jonas, 133 Mrs. Edmund, 115 Jonas, 158 Kitchell

& Ward,

Marcus

L.,

69

214

Mary Hartshorne, 208 Rev. Dr. William Hayes, 215 Washington Association 121

of

New

Washington. Washington's Life Guard, 203 Wassanaer, Mathilde de, 102 Watkins, Ellen, 30 Watson, W. C., 203 Watts, Dr. Robert, 160 Webber, Cornelius, }75 Johannes, 175 Webster, Susan, 170 Weeks, Mrs. John R., 116 Weller, Mrs. John I., 116 Wells, Miss Jeanette Miller, 59 West Matthew, 169 Westervelt, Ann, 112 Aury, 170 Catherine, 109 Jacob P., 170 Lubbertson, 87 Mrs. F. A., 115 Mrs. William H., 219 Orsolena, 86 Roelef Lubbertse, 86, 171 Sophia Bogert, 109 Wiert, 109 William, 87

Jersey,

George, 51, 57, 58, 89,

91

238

INDEX.

Weston, Edward, 116 Wetzel, Wuliam A., 207 What mean these Stones? 127 Wheeler, Elizabeth, 206 John, 206 Miss Mary Louise, 118 Whelan, Rt. Rev. Dr. Isaac P., 114 White, Cornelia, 111 David, 111 Mrs. Henry, 102 Mrs. Henry S., 118 Whitenack, Sarah, 152 Wicoff, John V. B., 120 Wight, John B., 119, 120 Wiley, Merlin, 207 Wilkisson, James, 153 Willett, Helena, 208, 209 Williams, Amos, 205 A. M., 205 Charles, 70 Dr. Edward H., 219 James A., 70 Margaret, 70, 165, 172 Maria, 70 Thomas W., 120 Zenas, 205 Williamson, Benjamin, 104 Emily B. Hornblower, obituary notice of, 104 Frederick B., 206 John C., 205 General Mathias, 206 Willing, Charles, 36 Willocks, George, 76 Margaret, 76 Wilson, Rev. Joseph, 46 Richard T., 120 Robert T., 115 Winans, Benjamin, 3 Winds, Brigadier-General William, 94 William, 94 Winkelee, 28 Winne, John, 168 Winser, Miss Beatrice, 115

Wisconsin State Historical Society, 121 Wirz, Eugenia Mathilda, 105 Rev. Johann Carl Furchgott, 105 Woman's Branch, 219

of the New Society, 118

Woman's Branch Historical

Jersey

Woman's Branch, Report for 1916, 201 Woman's Burlington County Historical Society, 121 Wood, Clement, 124

151 James, 70 Joseph, 150 Isaac,

Thomas WUliam

T.,

70

N.,

63,

70

Woodhull, Will, 96, 147, 150 William, 149

Woodruff, David, 8 Isaac,

1

Mrs. Caleb L., 219 Samuel, 3 Woods, Sarah, 151 Woodward, W. W., 120 WUliam W., 219

Wren, Christopher, 219 Wright,

Anna

E.,

obituary notice

107 Benjamin, 61 Miss G. R., 219 Nelson, 107, 202 WUliam, 70 Wrightson, Dr. James T., 219 Wynkoop, Richard, 203 Yager picket post, 58 Yale University, 121 Yard, Isaac, 59 Yorkshire, England, 30 Young, David, 100, 219 Youngs, Miss Florence E., 216 Zabriskie, Capt. J. W., 207 Garret, 29 Garret H., 29 H., 29 Henry, 29 Henry H., 29 Henry, Jr., 29 Mary, 29 SaUy, 29 Zeeland, 13 Zuider-Zee, 13 Zutphin, 13

of.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

NEW JERSEY HISTORICAL SOCIETY A MAGAZINE OF HISTORY, BIOGRAPHY

AND GENEALOGY

NEW

SERIES

Volume

.9.7

II.

i ,

'

CONTENTS JANUARY, I.

A RED ROSE '

2..

SPRINGFIELD, 1780 '

'

4 5.

AND AFTER, by William Nelson

....-.IN NEWARK.

'

NEW

-

-

-

"-

'-

7

JERSEY HISTORICAL SOCIETY COMMITTEES FOR 1917

WAR 'OF

-

1812

'-

-

-'

'-

-

19

25

INQUIRY RELATIVE TO PORTRAITS OF UNITED STATES SEN-

ATORS

-.-

-

-

-

-.-

-

-

6.

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS COUNTY

7.

RECORDS OF A HACKENSACK BIBLE

8.

BOOK NOTICE

"

-

-

-'-

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK '

.

-

".26

-

-

27

''-

"-

33

-

-

-

'-"

-

-

-

-"'--'34

-----r

.g,

,

'

REMINISCENCES OF THE

AN

Hart

*

*

'

E

i "

!

THE REFORMED PROTESTANT DUTCH CHURCH by Rev. Dr. Charles

3.

1917.

.

'

.-

'

.

,'

.

.

''

-

i

!-'<

~ 35

10.

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

54

11.

MINUTE ON THE DEATH

64

OF

WILLIAM

C.

MSRTON

CONTENTS APRIL, 1.

1917.

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY IN THE HISTORY OF ELIZABETHTOWN, by William J. Magie

NEW

VOLUME

SECOND SERIES

-

87

JERSEY," by Joseph S. Frclinghuysen

-

88

-

97

2.

ARCHIVES OF

3.

"THE STATE

4.

NEW

5.

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS OF MORRIS COUNTY (Con-

OF

JERSEY,

NEW

FIVE,

JERSEY REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS BURIED IN OHIO

tinued)

-

-----

98 -

<.

JemoiAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK (Continued)

7.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOCIETY: MINUTES OF THE BOARD OF

TRUSTEES

A

THE OLE

65

-

118

----------

124

STYLE DEFINITE ARTICLE "YE"

-

-

128

CONTENTS JULY, 1.

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY IN THE HISTORY OF

ELIZABETH, by William 2.

1917-

THE CHALICE

OF

J.

Mag'ie (Concluded)

-

129

-----

QUEEN ANNE, by Rev. W. Northey

M. A. 3.

NEWARK FOUNDERS DAY

4.

BERGEN

Jones,

.------

152

162

COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS: Van Buskirk Hopper Burial Ground; Old Graveyard

Burial Ground; at

New

Burial

-------------------------

Milford;

Voorhis

Burial

5.

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK (Continued)

6.

MINUTES OF TRUSTEES

7.

MINUTE RELATING J.

Garrison

Ground;

Ground

MAGIE

TO

-

-

-

164

170

188

DEATH OF EX-CHANCELLOR WILLIAM

192

CONTENTS OCTOBER, THE LENNI LENAPE

1.

OR

1917.

DELAWARE INDIANS, by Edwin Robert

Walker

-193

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SOCIETY

2.

:

Minutes, 219

;

Report of the

Board of Trustees, 220 Report of the Corresponding Secretary, 221 Report of the Woman's Branch, 225 Report of the Membership Committee, 229; Report of the Library ;

;

.

;

Committee, 232; Report of the Treasurer, 234. 3.

MINUTES OF THE TRUSTEES

4.

INDEX TO VOLUME

II.

NEW

...---'. SERIES

-----

237 241

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

New VOL.

A

Jersey Historical Society*

NEW

II.

SERIES

No.

1.

1917

Red RoseBy

Springfield,

1780- And After.

the late William Nelson.

For the facts underlying this essay in the field of Editorial Note. romance Mr. Nelson was indebted to two very rare pamphlets of the eighteenth century, now, since the Nelson sale, the property of the New The Trial of Lieut. Col. Thoma.i, Jersey Historical Society. They are of the First Regiment of Foot-Guards on a Charge exhibited by Lieut. Col. Cosmo Gordon, for Aspersing his Character", London, 1780; and "The Trial of the Hon. Col. Cosmo Gordon, of the Third Regiment of Foot-Guards for Neglect of Duty before the Enemy, On the 23d of June, 1780, Near Springfield, in the Jerseys." London, 1783. '

'

This is the story of a Red, Red Rose, an incident of the Battle of Springfield, 1780, and after. There is nothing in it of the battle itself. And yet this story hinges upon that dashing raid of Gen. Knyphausen on June 23d, 1780, from Staten Island toward Morristown, whose audacious aim it was to surprise Washington, crush his little army, and capture the paltry stores of his starving men. What need to remind you how the beacon fires leaped luridly and the "Old Sow"

sounded the rude alarm from Short country, and their

Hills,

arousing the

the sturdy militia to the defence of their dear ones ? Nor need is there to speak

summoning

homes and

and the Jersey Blues as they checked the British advance across one bridge, and then another, until the baffled Hessians and redcoats, enraged at the unexpected halt, vented their mad rage and lust for booty in the burning of the church and nearly every house

of the stubborn resistance of the Continentals

in the little village,

and

finally, crestfallen,

beat an ignomini-

A RED ROSE SPRINGFIELD

2

ous retreat before the foe they had so rashly despised in the morning, and were fain to hurry back by night across the sullen waters to Staten Island. Of all this you have read,

and of how Parson Caldwell,

still crazed with grief over the dastardly shooting of his wife at Connecticut Farms (Union), by these same alien soldiery but two weeks before, rushed in-

burning church at a critical moment and gathering up an armful of hymn books ran out among the patriot troops and Put Watts into 'em". cried, "Put Watts into 'em, boys.

to the

But

all this

has naught to do with this story of a Red,

Ked

Rose.

Among the officers who participated in the affair at Springfield was one Colonel Cosmo Gordon. He was of a noble Scottish family, a brother of the Duke of Gordon, and had served as a Lieuterfant in the 78th Regiment, in America, and elsewhere, for eighteen years.* As a Scotchman he naturally felt that blood was thicker than water, and when the winsome Kitty Alexander went on a lark to New York, Col. Gordon assiduously sought her acquaintance on account of her father, the doughty American Major General, who laid claim to the title of Earl of Stirling in the Scottish peerage. At least that is what Kitty dutifully wrote to her father.

We may

well believe that the gallant

differently to her, with lips and eyes. will recollect that Kitty Alexander was a cousin of Now, you Gov. William Livingston's daughters. Is it to be supposed

Scottish Colonel put

it

when she returned from that famous frolic in New York home at Baskingridge, where Mrs. Livingston and her two unmarried daughters spent much of the time, she

that

to her quiet

did not

tell her cousins all about the gallant Scottish Colonel ? Nay, when the Livingstons returned to Liberty Hall, only a

*He was on service early iii the Revolution, and when Light Horse Harry Lee made his daring capture of the Block House at Paulus Hook, on August 22, 1779, the British immediately sent over reinforcements, with artillery, under Gordon N. Y. Hist. Soc. Coll. for 1875, p. 101, On March 25, 1780, he was appointed on the part of 165, 252, 254. Great Britain to meet with the American commissioners (Maj. Gen. St. Clair, Lieut. Col. Alexander Hamilton and Lieut. Col. Carrington), at Perth Amboy, to settle a cartel for a general exchange of prisoners. Ib. 165.

A BED ROSE SPRINGFIELD

3

mile or two out of Elizabethtown, would it be strange if in the racing to and fro the curious Scotchman made a polite call at

yon hospitable mansion to inquire after the fair young maid he had met in New York ? And so it came to pass that when Gen. Knyphausen's troops began their march on the morning of June 23, 1780, Col. Gordon joined his command of the First Battalion of the Guards at three o'clock, and went with them until they were within a quarter of a mile of Livingston's house. Solicitous for the safety of the fair inmates he cantered on ahead with three fellow-officers, and made an unceremonious call upon the ladies there. The stay was brief, but five minutes, he says,

but the ladies were evidently on the qui vive, for Miss Susan Livingston bargained with him for a written safeguard to protect the premises from the rude soldiery. And with what, do you suppose, did she buy this precious document? Why, r forsooth, with a Red, Red Rose Moreover, this w as to be his !

protection against any prowling patriot, in his venturesome foray amid a hostile populace. Surely that fair Jersey girl

must have exercised no common witchery over this quartette of British officers, to wheedle out of them so valuable a bit of paper, and all for a paltry Rose!* But was Gordon not equally sucessful, in winning from her not only a Red, Red Rose, but the symbol therein, that he was a friend to certain Morefair Americans, despite his cruel, avowed mission? over, he says he received from the ladies "the intelligence wished for", whereupon the officers made their bow, and rejoined their column, that by this time was passing nearly opposite the house.

In the meantime the Brigade of Guards had marched from Elizabethtown, and reached Springfield at or before daybreak. *Just three months later there appeared in Rivington's New York ' Gazette the third and last canto of Andre 's famous Cow Chace ', wherein that connoisseur of female beauty paid his tribute to this same winning maid, predicting '

"And

the land around shall glory Frenchman caper, And pretty Susan tell the story In the next Chatham paper."

To

all

see the

'

A BED ROSE SPRINGFIELD

4

The Brigade was under command of Col. Howard; the commanded by Col. Cosmo Gordon, whose Company was under Lieut. Col. Frederick Thomas. company led the column when the flanking companies

Battalion was

First

First

This

were

sent detached, as they were during the greater of the day, so that this company remained under arms and under the fire

American troops until the latter retreated. When he had won the heights, Thomas sent to Col. Gordon for further orders, but the gallant and susceptible Colonel was not to be found. An hour or two after the firing had ceased he rode up the hill, with the Red Rose flaunting its beauty on his breast, where dainty hands had pinned it before daylight that morning. Lieut. Col. Thomas hotly asked where he had been, and declared that he had commanded the Guards during the It is easy to. imagine the jealousy and the scorn fighting. with which he pointed at the Red, Red Rose of him who had been more fortunate on another field than that of Mars a This would field where not improbably they had been rivals. of the

explain Gordon's declaration that the charge of cowardice

subsequently brought against him had proceeded from "the bitter fountain of rancor and private animosity."

On

the retreat that night, in the darkness the brilliancy Red Rose was obscured. It no longer served as a talisfor the protection of the wearer, and he was struck by a

of the

man

stray bullet. By a curious coincidence this befel just in front of the Livingston house, and there the stricken Colonel tumbled from his horse. Did he hope that the fair maid who

had smiled upon him in the morning would take compassion on his plight in this dire mishap ? And did he see before him visions of tender nursing in that hospitable mansion? Alas! when he was disabled his scornful junior, Col. Thomas, assumed the command, just as he had in the fighting, and Gordon was carried on to the British camp. He was laid up for a month or more. When he reappeared for duty he saw that there was a coldness toward him in his mess. He soon learned that Col. Thomas had been repeating what he had said to his face at Springfield that he had commanded the Guards when the Heights were taken.

His fellow

officers

refused to

' '

roll

'

'

A RED EOSE SPRINGFIELD

S

with him. He was sent to Coventry. There was nothing for him to do but prefer charges against Thomas. This he did, accusing him of "secretly and scandalously aspersing his manner unlike an officer and a gentleman. ' '

character, in a

A

general court martial was held in New York, September 15-25, Thomas proved that he had charged 1780, to try the accused.

Gordon

to his face,

on the

field of battle,

with having neglect-

that he had repeated the declaration openly and often, and* that on August 2, 1780, a day or two after Gordon had resumed duty, he had, in the presence of a meeting of the

ed his duty

;

officers of the

Brigade of Guards, assembled in the camp on

the Heights of Fordham, openly accused Gordon of "not doAs ing his duty before the enemy on the 23d of June, 1780. the charge against Thomas was that he had secretly aspersed ' '

and as it appeared beyond question that his had been made in the most public manner, he was aspersions But Col. Cosmo Gordon still had at least the acquitted. his

Colonel,

of that stolen interview before daybreak with the witching little Rebel, and there lingered yet in his recollection the intoxicating perfume of that Bed Rose.

memory

On

the other hand, there was the stinging denunciation

of the contumacious Thomas, and the ill-concealed contempt of the mess. His accuser had sailed for England, without

waiting for the verdict of the court martial. Thither Gordon followed him, and challenged him to mortal combat. Thomas declined his challenge, on the ground that he did not stand in a proper situation to be answered. At last, two years later, Col. Gordon sought the vindication of another Court Martial, sat in New York, August 22, to September 4, 1782, to him on the charge of "not having done his duty before the try on the 23d of June, 1780." In other words, he was enemy with cowardice, meaning that he had preferred to encharged counter the shafts from the eyes of a certain fair girl at the Livingston house, to the bullets of the soldiery on the heights of Springfield. That he preferred a Red Rose from Beauty's bower, to the gory battle field. The Court found him not guilty and two months later the finding was approved by the

which

King.

A BED ROSE SPRINGFIELD

6

He

anew a meeting with his accuser, Lieut. That gentleman still considered him attainted, and avoided an encounter, even ordering his servants not to deliver to him any letters from Col. Gordon. Finally, a challenge Avas smuggled into the house and reached the hands of Col. Thomas. It was in the most violent terms, and declared Col.

at once sought

Thomas.

he did not agree to give him the satisfaction of a genCol. Thomas tleman, he would attack him wherever they met. with great reluctance accepted the cartel. He made his will that

if

that same night, committing his soul to Almighty God, ''in hopes," he said, "of mercy and pardon for the irreligious step I now (in compliance with the unwarrantable customs of the wicked world) put myself under the necessity of taking."

He had no

wife nor children, and so left a legacy to his

servant, and the

rest

ofhis modest estate to his brother.

As

he wrote, this farewell to the world his mind naturally reverted to that

day

at Springfield, three years before, when his superon the field, after the fighting, jauntily

ior officer arrived

wearing a Red Rose.

And who

can say what thoughts were

his of that captivating maiden who unwittingly had been the cause of this fatal bitterness between brother officers?

The two men met

on the following morning, Thursday, September Hyde Park, London. The lush grass was still besprinkled with dew, that sparkled like The soaring larks were yet warbling jewels from heaven. their sweet melody in the sky. The rays of the early sun shone pure and bright through the foliage, as though murder had never entered the hearts of men. In a few minutes it was all over. The "rancor and private animosity" of Col. Thomas was expiated in his heart's blood. Col. Gordon fled the field and the country, an outcast, accused by the coroner 's jury of "wilful murder." The Red Rose had become the at six o 'clock 4, 1783, in

Mark

of Cain.

Col.

Thomas

lingered for just twenty-four

Death was kinder to him than life, for as the rosy dawn looked in upon him the next morning it touched his pallid countenance with a crimson tinge, and as he expired his hand moved over his wound, the blood welled forth, and lo, he hours.

clasped a Red,

Red Rose

!

The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in

BY

Newark.

REV. CHARLES E. HART, D. D.

Late Professor at Rutgers College.

It might well be asked why the Protestant Reformed Dutch Church should be given a place in the 250th Anniversary of this old "New England" Town, when not until 1833, one hundred and sixty seven years after the town's foundation was the Dutch Church organized in Newark. But it must not be forgotten that the Hollanders were the first settlers and rulers of the country; that from New England to the Delaware, the country was New Netherlands that the church established was the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church that the old Church in the mill loft of the Fort in New Amsterdam, under the lay readers, Croll and Heyck, and afterwards of Michaelius, was the first Protestant Church of America, and that the old Church of Bergen, though for 90 ;

;

years without a pastor, is the oldest church in New Jersey; though it yields the distinction of a completely organized church to the First Presbyterian Church of Newark. Almost all of the oldest of the Dutch churches have already celebrated their 200th Anniversary, and the Church as a whole is

rapidly approaching

its

300th,

awaiting

its

celebration in

1917.

Beginning with their

first

agricultural settlement at

Man-

hattan in 1623, the Dutch followed the Hudson to Fort Orange, now Albany, taking up grants of largs tracts of land

under an almost feudal tenure as patroons. to

New

and Passaic,

Passing over in-

up and settled upon the Raritan, and Hackensack rivers. The Dutch jurisdiction

Jersey, they sailed

8

REFORMED PROT. DUTCH CHURCH IN NEWARK

extended from New England to the Delaware. The settlements were made under the Dutch West India Co. Though their object was purely commercial, and not freedom of conscience and worship, they were squired by their charter to provide their settlements with ministers, churches and schools. The established church of Holland was a Reformed Protestant church and like the Reformed Church of Scotland, it was Calvinistic in creed, Presbyterian in its government, a governelders and deacons constituting a consistory, subordinate to the higher courts of classis and Synod the classis

ment by

:

of

Amsterdam and

the

Synod

The Dutch, from the

when they surrendered possession of the stratum in social

New

of North Holland.

first

settlement in 1623 to 1664, were for forty years in

to the English,

Netherlands, laying a substantial sub-

and ecclesiastical customs and life for the Colonial period. The surrender to the English did not banish the Dutch language or customs or institutions. The Dutch were secure in their charter of liberties. The immigration from Holland was, however, checked, and gave way to that of other nationalities. With the English migration came the Episcopal Church, but with it came also toleration, so that the English shared with the Dutch in the use of the church in. the Fort and on occasion joined in the same services. The Dutch obstinately and affectionately adhering to their own tongue sent the younger generations into the Episcopal Church in which we find to this day a multitude of names

Dutch families. The language also kept ou^ the Scotch Presbyterians who otherwise would have found their way into a denomination akin to their own. But the English conquest did not affect the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the of the best

Classis of

Amsterdam over

the churches in the provinces of

New York and New

The education, ordination and Jersey. discipline of their ministers was still maintained in the Dutch universities and the Dutch Classis, with the disadvantages of great and dangerous distance. The Dominies Michaelius, Bogardus, Megalopolensis, Frelinghuysen and others from Holland were inadequate to the supply of the increasing settlements. Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen from Embden

REFORMED PEOT. DUTCH CHURCH IN NEWARK

9

came to the Raritan in New Jersey in 1720, where he ministered to a parish 200 miles square, now the counties of Somerset and Middlesex. He was a man of great learning, indomitable energy and great piety, as described by Whitfield and Edwards in the great revival in which he was concerned with them. To meet the demands he created an order of "helpers." Many of the churches had depended upon lay readers, or as the Dutch called them, "comforters " voorlesers. " With this aid he was able of the sick" and to cover his vast circuit, and to make it as it was called "the garden of the Dutch Church." The demand for an educated and learned ministry, and an administration independent of that of the mother country became the pressing question and disturbed the peace and unity of the Church. A body in America called the Coetus was formed, but with only advisory power, which was met with the formation of an opposing party called the Conf erentie the Coetus sought the establishment of a college with a theological professorship, independent of Princeton (Presbyterian) on the one side, and of King's College (Episcopal) on the other. A charter for an institution at New Brunswick, in 1766, renewed in 1770, was in East Friesland

;

named Queens

after the queen of George the Third, changed to Rutgers) which celebrates this year, In this measure, the Rev. Jno. 1916, its 150th Anniversary. Frelinghuysen was the most active leader. But the opposi-

procured,

(since 1825,

At this critical tion of the conservative party still continued. Divine juncture, the Mediator, under providence, came forward to restore unity and harmony and to give independence and autonomy to the distracted church and save it for its place and work in the Christian world. This distinction belongs to John H. Livingston, the great grandson of Robert Livingston, to whom the patent for .the Manor of Livingston was granted in 1684. Having, on his graduation from Yale College, decided to study for the ministry in the Dutch Church, he went to Holland and entered the University of Utrecht.

Church

Deeply concerned over the unhappy state of the

at home, he conferred with the members of the Classis of Amsterdam, and gained their approval of a plan of union

10

REFORMED PROT. DUTCH CHURCH IN NEWARK

and organization.

On

his return to

New York

to accept a call

to the Collegiate Church, to preach in English, he laid before the ministers the plan he had developed in conference with

Amsterdam and gained

their consent to a Conwhich the plans were presented and approved. Another Convention was held in 1773 at which the organization of the superior judicatories was effected, and again in 1775, at which the appointment of a theological professorship was agreed upon. The American Revolution breaking out at this time, interrupted further action, and not till after the war in 1784 was

the classis of

vention, held in 1771, at

Dr. Livingston appointed to the professorship of Theology, afterwards in 1810 attached to Queens College, making it the oldest theological seminary in America. In 1792, the organization and constitution were finally ratified and confirmed, and its articles of fait^i and rules of worship and liturgy

the adopted, giving independence and autonomy to denomination. The Dutch language, which was the great barrier to the extension of the church, was gradually dropped.

The Reformed Dutch Church was now in a condition to take place among the American Churches, and to enter upon expansion within its own historic limits and in missions at home and in the foreign field.

its

was at this period that we place the entrance of the Reformed Church into Newark. Newark was surrounded by Dutch churches. It was itself within the bounds of the old classis of Bergen. The population was moving from the surDutch town and communities to this center, and the rounding desire was awakened in hearts of those in Newark who had communed in the old Dutch church of Belleville, to establish a church in Newark. The New England settlers, originally had become Presbyterian; had come nearer Congregational, to the Reformed order, and as the Dutch had cherished them in Delft in Holland for 27 years, it was for them to receive the Dutch in their common field of Christian service. The church at Belleville in the old Classis of Bergen, which embraced the It

county of Essex, is the link of connection between the present and the past. "We have evidence it was founded before 1700.

REFOEMED PEOT. DUTCH CHUBCH IN NEWAEK

11

In 1726 Henricus Coens became pastor. After a period of struggle and contention it was, in 1790, incorporated, and on the 28th of June was placed under the care of Rev. Peter Stryker. Up to this year, the preaching was in Dutch, but now the Dutch gave way to English. In 1807 a new stone church was erected, and replaced in 1850 by another church, which was dedicated in 1853. The present pastor is Rev. J.

who reports 154 communicants, 213 Sunday and $2,156.00 for congregational expenses. From the church there have been planted two churches in G.

Hamner,

Jr.,

school scholars

bounds the church at Franklin-Nutley, in 1853, now under the care of Rev. Harold W. Schenck and in 1801 at Stone

its

;

;

House

Plains, Brookdale, Essex County,

under the care of

Rev. Charles E. Waldron, pastor. First Reformed

Dutch Church of Newark.

In April, 1833, a committee was appointed by Classis of Bergen, Rev. B. C. Taylor and Gustavus Abeel, to inquire into the propriety of constituting a Reformed Dutch Church in Newark based upon the fact that some of the members of

the Reformed Dutch Church at Belleville had become resi-

dents of Newark.

A

church of our faith and order should

be planted. The Union Academy was secured for meetings, and the First and Third Presbyterian Churches were placed at their disposal, showing the sympathy and co-operation of their sister Presbyterians. Application was made on the 10th of September, 1833, to the Classis of Bergen. The members

communion

and other and forms of government of the Reformed Dutch Church, and living in the town of in the full

of the church at Belleville

churches, adhering to the doctrines

Newark

in Essex County, are desirous of being organized into known and distinguished as the First Re-

a church to be

formed Church of Newark. On the 26th of September, 1833, the petitioners met for organization in the Fourth Presbyterian Church, and Rev. Ransford Wells, who had been laboring among, them, was called to the pastorate. In May, 1835, the church edifice on Market Street having been completed, was dedicated. The funds were collected from themselves

REFORMED PROT. DUTCH CHURCH IN NEWARK

12

and from

citizens of Newark. The period of financial defrom 1836 to 1838, was met by self-sacrificing subRev. Mr. Wells, accepting a call elsewhere, left scriptions. in September, 1842, and in 1843 Rev. Jas. Scott, D. D., was called, and an effort was made, with the help of the Collegiate Church, New York, to remove the debt, accomplished now after seventeen years. They were able to report 513 communicants. Under Rev. Dr. Edward Payson Terhune's able and

pression,

zealous ministration the church reached

its

highest efficiency,

and besides its own self support, it sent forth three colonies. The invasion of business into the centre of the town compelled the church to remove in 1893, under the Rev. T. J. Lee, to the southern part of the city.

From

the sale of

property it erected its present handsome of Clinton Avenue and Johnson Street. Trousdale is the present pastor.

its

valuable

edifice at the

corner

The Rev. Otis M.

Irvington Church.

f

The next church to be organized in Newark was in the suburb of Clintonville, now Irvington, in 1840, when 67 petitij/iiers, not connected with any other church, asked for organization under the ministry of Rev. Mr. Chapman. Seven years after, the church erected a new edifice. This was the church in which Rev. Mr. Vehslage was pastor for 33 years. The present pastor is Rev. Uriah Me Clinchie. The Second,

Now

Avenue Church,

the N. T.

originated in the establishment of a railroad station in Market Street.

School, east of the the 28th of April the

Sunday

On

28 persons were received from the 1st Church. was dedicated May 8, 1849. Rev. Mr. Williamson, who had acted as minister, declined the call on account of ill health, and Rev. Dr. Gustavus Abeel was made It was served by a succession of able men, Dr. Brett, pastor.

certificates of

The church

Dr.

edifice

Van Vranken,

moved

to

Prof. Mat. B. Riddle.

New York

Avenue, and

care of Rev. E. E. Davis.

On

The

edifice

was

re-

now under

the pastoral the same meeting of Classis, is

a German Evangelical Church was

received,

known

as the

EEFOEMED PROT. DUTCH CHURCH IN NEWARK

13

Third Reformed Church, under Rev. Francis M. Serenbetz, succeeded by Rev. F. Lehlbach, of the Grand Duchy of Baden, first as a stated supply, and then, as minister, from 1850 to The 1861, when on his suspension the church was abandoned. received was that of the West under the Rev. John Wenish in Blum

German church

only other

Newark Church Street. The present pastor in 1866

is

Rev. Carl Girtanner.

North Church.

The northern

section of the city

a church of the Reformed order.

now seemed

A Sunday

to call for

School under the

patronage of the First Dutch Church had been fostered under the superintendence of John A. Miller, which prepared the way for a new church enterprise. On the 25th day of

November, 1856, an application was presented to the Classis of Bergen, praying that the Classis would take steps for organizing a church in the northern part of the city to be called the North Church of Newark. The new church met December house of Justice Joseph P. Bradley. Thirtypersons presented certificates from the 1st and 2nd Reformed Churches of Newark and the 1st Reformed Church of 17, 1856, at the

five

New

Brunswick.

The work was begun on the church

edifice

early in 1857. It was to be of stone, of Gothic design, a duplicate of the University Place Church of New York, designed by Upjohn. The congregation meanwhile held worship in

Oraton Hall. A call was made upon Rev. Dr. Abraham Polhemus of Hopewell, which being accepted he was installed

May

Before the completion of the edifice Dr. Polnever preached in the church edifice built The church remained vacant until the Rev. H. Du-

1857.

3,

hemus

died.

for him.

He

Seminary of New Brunswick, was There have been eight pastors, inthe Rev. Dr. Charles H. Stewart, from Cancluding present, ada: Dr. Polhemus, 57-59; Mr. Dubois, 59-61; Dr. J. Dema-

bois,

of the Theological

called to the pastorate.

rest,

63-66

;

Dr. Hart, 66-80

;

Dr. Waters, 81-93

;

Dr. Mackay,

94-99; Dr. Vance, 1900-1911; Dr. Stewart, 1913. The church has celebrated its semi-centennial. The report for 1915 is

950 families, 1591 communicants, 4 Sunday Schools, 1900

14

REFORMED PROT. DUTCH CHURCH IN NEWARK

benevolent contributions $17,000, congregational expenses $19,078.00, second only to the Collegiate Church of New York. The contributions of the church have amounted

scholars

;

to $1,009,245.00.

The Sunday Schools were organized under

the presidency of Hon. F. T. Frelinghuysen, who had conducted a Bible class in the First Reformed Church, which

drew young men from all parts of the city and under a staff of most able and faithful teachers and officers it became famous and when the old chapel gave place in 1883 to a more spacious one built as a memorial of Mrs. Eliza A. Crane, who left a large bequest to the church, and under the superintendence of Mr. Fred K. Frelinghuysen, it became the largest

and best organized Sunday School in the city. He was succeeded, a few years ago, by Mr. Jas. Polhemus, son of the first pastor. The morning infant school, still held after a of most devoted and efficient service by Mrs. long period Kobert F. Ballantine, numbers 600. The afternoon school, for a long period, was under the faithful instruction of Miss Mary Duryee. A fine parsonage opposite the church on Washington Park was presented to the church on the incumbency of Rev. D. Mackay, by Mr. Robert F. Ballantine. A mission was sustained for many years in Belleville Avenue in a chapel provided by Mr. William Clark. Another institutional mission, is carried on in a chapel erected in East Newark. There have gone from the Church three ministers, Rev. Hyer Polhemus, son of the first pastor and Prof. Wm. R. Duryee, D. D. and Dr. Joseph R. Duryee, D. D., sons of Peter S. Duryee, one of the founders of the church and one of the founders of the industrial prosperity of Newark.

CUnton Avenue Church. In 1868 a movement was made in the first church in Market Street, under the special leadership of Mr. S. R. W. Heath and Mr. Orson Wilson, to establish a Dutch church in the southern part of the City on Clinton Avenue. The church was organized, and services were held in a hall until the erecRev. W. J. R. Taylor, D. D., Secretary tion of the church. of the Bible Society, served as a stated supply, until called to

REFORMED PROT. DUTCH CHURCH IN NEWARK become its pastor. and largest in the city.

The church was one

15

of the handsomest

city, located in the residential part of the Rev. Dr. Taylor remained in the pastorate 21 years un-

his resignation in 1890 when he was succeeded by Rev. D. H. Martin who after a fruitful ministry was succeeded by Rev. Albertus T. Broeck, now in charge. The report of 1915

til

shows: families, 400; communicants, 799; Sunday School scholars, 547; benevolent contributions $4,400.00; congregational expenses $11,445.00.

Trinity Church.

The

east

in East Ferry Street, was In 1859 a mission maintained in Reformed Church removed to a lot

Reformed Church

organized Oct. 27, 1869. the old chapel of the 2nd

given by Miss Elizabeth Richards, the site of the present Trinity Church. In 1869 morning service was begun in the

In 1871 a new stone edifice was dedicated, the chapel having been removed in 1870. The name was changed to Trinity Reformed Church. In 1901 a new chapel was dedicated and, in 1908, the church was re-dedicated after repairs and renovation. The Rev. Isaac P. Brokaw, D. D. was first pastor from 1869 to 1871. The Rev. Charles B. Condit, Sec-

chapel.

retary of Classis of Newark, cants, 387 scholars, 408.

is

the present pastor.

Communi-

;

Christ Church.

In 1871 the Woodside Church in Belleville Avenue was organized. From 1872 to 1880 it was in charge of Rev. J. M. Macauley, D. D. In 1900 the Rev. Henry M. Mellen became pastor and remained until a few years ago, when he resigned. It is

now reported

vacant.

Linden Church. After services held by Rev. Oscar Gesner, with co-operamembers of the Classis of Bergen, and with financial assistance of Mr. Blancke, the chuch was organized under the Rev. Mr. Gesner 's pastoral care and received into the Classis of Newark on its organization in 1871. It is now under the care of Rev. A. C. Van Raalte.

tion of

EEFORMED PEOT. DUTCH CHUECH IN NEWAEK

16

The growth of these churches proceeded so far in number and strength that the South Classis of Bergen felt forced to consider a more efficient division than now existed. Classis of

Newark.

The South Classis of Bergen, to which these churches, grouped about one great center of population and life, belonged, included a group about ano-ther center of population and life. These centers were Newark and Jersey City. These local institutions and associations were distinct, too distinct to The old church of Bergen clash, yet so distinct as to divide. in its group and the old church of Second River in Belleville,

other.

in its group, stood like ancient towers over against each The profoundest unity of Christian love and harmony

of action existed in the* Classis, but so strong became the conviction of the necessity of concentration, that the Classis was

prepared by almost unanimous consent to petition for

divi-

sion.

The growth and feeling could not be set forth better than in the words of Rev. Dr. Taylor who supported the movement with his usual zeal. The resolution and petition was passed at a meeting of the South Classis held at Lafayette, April 18, 1871, and presented to the Particular Synod which met

at Jersey City

May

8,

1871.

Classis now numbers 18 petition sets forth that the organized churches, and there is good prospect of other new

The

' '

churches and enterprises, within a short period. The growth of Essex and Hudson counties is so rapid and substantial, that we may reasonably anticipate a denominational growth that will be in full proportion to our present advancement and to our future zeal and resources for church extension.

Any

proportionate development of church enterprise in the is sure of large reward. There are now valuable

direction

openings which should be occupied at once. Our churches are nearly all self-supporting and in healthy condition, with opportunities for large growth from the increasing populaThe classis is at present as tion of our suburban region. of old Classis Bergen was, at the time of division large as the

REFORMED PROT. DUTCH CHURCH IN NEWARK

17

in 1841, when nine churches were set off to form the classis of Passaic, leaving nine in the present body. At the time of the last division in 1863, the Classis of Bergen numbered 11

churches, and the South Classis of Bergen was organized with thirteen. The divisions now proposed will leave nine churches in the South Classis of Bergen, with 795 families and 1196 communicants, according to the report of 1870. It will give the new classis nine churches with 1075 families, and 1648

communicants. Should our anticipation be realized, one church at least, Linden, will soon be added. The division will make both bodies equal to the average size of the sister classes of the Reformed Church. It was in view of the above ' '

statement,

Resolved, that the Particular

Synod

of

New Brunswick

be requested at its next session to take constitutional action, as is in such cases provided, to organize a new classis, to be called Classis of Newark, and to be composed of the following churches Belleville, First Newark, Irvington, Second New:

ark, Franklin,

North Newark, West Newark, Clinton Ave.

Newark and East Newark. Reformed Church of Linden, now by the South Classis of Bergen, when organized, be added to the roll of the Classis of NewResolved:

that the

in process of organization ark.

Accordingly this petition was submitted to the particular Synod of New Brunswick at its session in Jersey City, May 8, and a committee was appointed to attend the 1st Church of Newark, Tuesday, July 27, 1871, at 3 o'clock P. M., to superintend the enrollment of the churches. On the day appointed the committee met and was regularly constituted. The Rev. Dr. Abeel, as designated by the Classis, preached the sermon,

and the

Classis of

Newark was

declared,

and constituted by

the authority of the Synod.

The effect of the separate organization of the Classis was seen in the further extension of the churches chiefly in the suburban towns. Though not in the city, they are the fruits of the

Dutch churches

in the city.

18

EEFORMED PROT. DUTCH CHURCH IN NEWARK East Orange Church.

In 1875 the Rev. Dr. George S. Bishop, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Orange, with a large following of his people, applied for admission to the Classis of Newark

and were received into the

A

Classis.

church

edifice

was

erected in East Orange and sustained by the free offerings of the people. The church grew rapidly. Dr. Bishop continued

was made pastor emeritus and was installed pastor. Communi-

to serve the church until he

Rev. Dr. "W.

Warren

Giles

cants, 495; scholars, 303.

In the year 1880 Trinity Church, Plainfield, was received and in 1881 the Rev. Dr. A. V. V. Raymond, subsequently called to the Presidency of Union College, was made pastor, serving until 1887 when he was succeeded by the Rev. Cornelius Scfcenck; on the loss of his health, Dr. Schenck was made emeritus with the Rev. John Y. Broek as pastor. Communicants, 832 scholars, 1050. These churches were not fruits of the missionary efforts of the Classis but came of themselves under its care. The German Church of Plainfield was received by transfer from Classis of Raritan, October 14, 1884. It is now under the pastoral care of Rev. George Hauser, 1894 to 1901.

into the Classis

;

The Church of Montclair Heights, Rev. Geo. D. Hulst, was organized on March 18, 1897. Hyde Park, East Orange, organized Oct. 27, 1904. Under Rev. Charles F. Shibe.

Netherwood, Plainfield, organized Jan. 16, 1910. First under Rev. Royal A. Stout, and now under Rev. Edward S. Ralston.

Marconier, Oak Tree, N. Under Rev. J. T. Lansdale. At the 25th Anniversary

J.,

organized April 26, 1912.

of the Classis, according to the report, the nine or eleven churches had become fifteen; the families increased from 1282 to 2372 the communicants from ;

Sunday School scholars from 2485 to 5200 the sums spent on church support and work from $13,996.74 to $33,000.00 and the contributions to religious and benevo1835 to 4582

the

;

;

;

COMMITTEES FOK 19161917

19

lent purposes from about $30,000 to $54,000, the largest outside of the Metropolitan Collegiate Churches. At this writ-

ing the fifteen churches have become nineteen churches with a report of 3522 families, 6471 communicants, 7070 scholars, benevolence $27,000.00, congregational $93,167.00.

NEW JERSEY HISTORICAL COMMITTEES, 1916

SOCIETY.

1917.

Appointed by the President on December

4,

1916.

Finance and Building Charles M. Lum, Wallace M. Scudder, J. Lawrence Boggs, William J. Magie, Joseph M. Riker,

James

J.

Bergen, Charles B. Bradley.

Frederick A. Canfield, Joseph F. Folsom, William Disbrow, J. Lawrence Boggs, Charles W. Parker, Miss Altha E. Hatch, Edwin R. Walker, Frank Bergen, Henry G. Atha.

Library

S.

Cabinet and field,

Museum William S. Disbrow, Frederick A. CanHiram E. Deats, Miss Altha E. Hatch.

Membership

J.

Lawrence Boggs, William

J.

Magie, Austin

Edwin S. Lines, Charles W. Parker, Edwin R. Walker, Frank Bergen, Henry Gr. Atha. Printing A. Van Doren Honeyman, Frank Bergen, Joseph Scott,

F. Folsom.

Genealogy and Statistics

The Woman's Branch.

Colonial Documents Austin Scott, Ernest C. Richardson, Joseph F. Folsom, A. Van Doren Honeyman, James J. Bergen, Hiram E. Deats.

Joseph F. Folsom, Wallace M. Scudder, Edwin R. Walker, William J. Magie, Austin Scott.

Editorial

Reminiscences of the

War

of 1812.

The following letter written to the Editor by a (Editorial Note: eon of the late Vice Chancellor Amzi Dodd, is self-explanatory of the following article.) I am sending you a clipping from the New York Observer. The clipping I found among papers that came to me from other days. It was doubtless preserved by one of my great aunts as it mentions my father's grandfathers John Dodd and Parson Grover (Stephen Grover of Caldwell). The article at a guess was probably printed about 1858 or 1859. The author signs himself "One of the Veterans", and the statements

made were any way.

quite sufficient to establish his identity to my satisfaction is his military record quite imposing for such a brief

Here

service :

Horace Holden, Major and Aide-de-camp Staff of Brigadier General Dec. 5, 1814. Lieut. Captain Kilbourn's ComColfax. Sept. 1, 1814 pany, Lieut. Col. John Seward's Kegt: William Coif ax's Brigade New Jersey Detailed Militia. Horace Holden was a son of Lieut. Levi Holden, of Washington's Life Guard, Kevolutionary Army, long a resident of Newark, whose portrait along with his wife's hangs in the library of the New Jersey HisThe article is written in a bright and interesting way, torical Society. and you will find it entertaining, even if you can not make use of it in your weekly column.

Very truly yours,

EDWARD W. DODD.

A

few years ago, Congress, it will "Revenge is sweet". be remembered, granted to the surviving veterans of the war of 1812, certain bounty land. Being numbered among those valiant defenders of my country, I, of course, received my

grant for 100 acres of land.

There lives in this city a certain lady, whom I love more than any other, but not having a very just appreciation of my valuable services, she took it into her head to ridicule the idea of my receiving any bounty land, as a reward of military duty, and almost questioned the propriety of my accepting This roused my martial spirit, I threatened to be avenged

it.

of her, by telling the story of my gallant exploits. Not to be too prolix in my introduction, I will state the facts of the

REMINISCENCES OF THE WAE OF and having received and sold my upon the indulgence of my country. case,

land,

1812

21

"throw myself

' '

In August, 1814, everything in our political horizon looked gloomy and foreboding, and the dark clouds of war passed heavily over the land. Our gallant little navy had achieved glorious victories, yet our wide extent of seaboard, the insecure state of some of our frontier settlements, and the

unpopularity of the war in most of the Eastern States, with the crippled condition of our finances, greatly embarrassed Mr. Madison's administration. A desperate effort was to be made to sustain the honor of the country, and defend our

from an invading foe. was a Federalist, and always have been, and was originally opposed to the war, but now the time had come (just before I attained my majority) when party feeling must be laid aside, and I take some active part. firesides

I

The plain matter of fact was, there was no alternative. I was obliged to do it. I had just before gone over to Brooklyn with all the bar and law students of the city, and my shoulders were actually blistered under a scorching sun in June, while assisting in throwing up entrenchments on the heights at Fort Greene. I had never borne arms a day in my life, and, to be candid, I think I had no great courage to boast of yet there was no alternative. All over 18 years of age were liable I to be drafted, and there was no way of escape for 'me. therefore joined a uniform company, then under the command of Capt. John V. B. Varick, a most worthy gentleman and ex:

began to provide myself with the necessary I went to visit my father in New Jersey, him what an important matter was engageing the at-

cellent officer.

I

accoutrements, when

and

tell

tention of the

The

young

soldier.

man heard my story, and I soon saw the fire He would have preferred that I should his eye.

old

kindling in not be interrupted in

my law studies, just drawing toward their completion, but I assured him, that, however little my taste and inclinations were consulted, I must either join CapHe paused a moment, tain Varick 's company, or be drafted. and said "Why, my old brother officer of the Revolution,

EEMINISCENCES OF THE

22

WAE OF

1812

General Colfax, has just been summoned from his retirement, to take charge of a New Jersey brigade, and as he was the first, and I second in command of Washington's Life Guard for several years, I can procure for you a situation in his

and

' '

you of the necessity of going as a private. It will not be presumed that I was long in yielding my assent to the proposition: no sooner said than done. In a very few I was to to act as Aid to Genrequested days, prepare myself eral Colfax: Capt. Varick erased my name from his roll. Governor Wm. S. Pennington gave me a commission in Capt. D. Kilbourn's company, and about the 1st of September, with

family,

relieve

a fine steed, duly caparisoned, I entered upon my at Jersey City, where the brigade was encamped.

new

duties

The news of McDonough's victory arrived shortly after, which we celebrated with becoming honors, and immediately after, were ordered to the Highlands of Neversink, whither

we proceeded without

delay.

Here, on these lovely heights, we pitched our tents; one of the most delightful spots ever presented to the human I will not stop to describe its beauties; I should fail if eye. I attempted it. During our short sojourn at this enchanting

place,

Commodore Jacob Lewis, who commanded

at this time

(Mr. Jefferson's favorite mode of defence,) stationed in the lower bay within Sandy Hook, politely invited us to dine, and promised to entertain us with Guna

flotilla of gun-boats,

which being interpreted, I found to mean Boat Turkey, good salt pork. Some of the General's family accepted the I invitation, and were most kindly received and cared for. recollect I begged to be excused, as I wished to improve the time in describing the beauties of the scenery to an absent friend.

We

had enjoyed ourselves here but a very few days, received from the War Detents to strike our and proceed to Sandy Hook, the partment, most inhospitable sand heap that was ever trod upon by the I have not visited it but foot of man, as I then thought. once for more than forty-four years, possibly it has im-

when peremptory orders were

proved in this age of progress.

REMINISCENCES OF THE

WAE OF

1812

23

On this barren sand heap we pitched our tents, with some of the noblest and bravest sons of New Jersey, including Vandyke, Neilson, Jos. Warren Scott, of New Brunswick, Ricketts, Williamson, of Elizabeth, the Hon. Garret D. Wall, of Trenton, General John Dodd, of Bloomfield, and a host of other worthies. Shall I describe to you, in a few words, General Win. He was one of nature's noblemen in appearance, as

Coif ax?

well as in reality. His age was about sixty rather above the medium height of commanding person an expressive, intelligent countenance fine high forehead, grey hair, and a most :

;

;

;

benignant smile, blended with heroic firmness. The uniform of the General and his staff was buff and blue, the same as worn by General Washington. General Colfax was not unlike him in his majestic appearance. He looked like one born to command. There was but one house on Sandy Hook. It was kept by one Schenck at the lighthouse. This we made our head-quarters, and were provided with all the comforts could reasonably desire.

At was a

we

the extemity of the Hook, looking toward New York, which has since been washed away, manned

fort erected,

by a motley crew called Sea Fencibles, (neither seamen nor landsmen,) -- they were placed under the command of GenThe dignified bearing eral Colfax, rather against their will. of the General readily convinced them, that subordination

and respect

to his

commands were

indispensable,

and they

soon cheerfully acquiesced in his authority.

The October Term (1814) of the Supreme Court was held I had prepared myself for examination, and although I was not of age until the succeeding 5th of November, I presumed upon the indulgence of the court, and in con-

in this city.

my military services, to offer myself for examhaving obtained leave of absence for that purpose.

sideration of

ination

:

Major James Fairlie was then the Clerk of the court. On examining my papers, he discovered that I lacked about ten days of being of age, and with characteristic exactness refused to place

my name upon

the

list

of applicants.

REMINISCENCES OF THE WAR OF

24

Van

1812

In this dilemma, I made my appeal to Judge Win. Ness, who without hesitation ordered my name to be

W. in-

fellow students, and having passed the orbefore I was deal, 21, I was duly sworn as an attorney of the

serted

among my

Supreme Court, and immediately returned to camp. Here it is proper to state, that if there was no bloodshed, nor any hard fighting, we saw the enemy every day, but they dared not come within gunshot of us. The Bellephoron " and two other British ships of war, ' '

hove in sight every morning, endeavoring to prevent our merchant vessels and the coasting craft from gaining the Narrows, and frequently fired upon them. We most courbut they ageously returned their shots, with red-hot balls, never reached the enemy, and theirs never reached us: they came quite near enough to answer my wishes We had some noble officers: one (without disparagement to many others) I will mention: Col. John Frelinghuysen, a brother of the Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen. He was a lawyer, and a pious man. It was his habit every Sabbath to form his regiment into a hollow square, and conduct religious services himself: and although Parson Grover, our brigade chaplain, was at headquarters, I was among a few who were !

so insubordinate as to leave the regular services for the laypreacher. I suppose, at this late day, I shall be excused for

my

preferences in that respect.

In the early part of November, the weather became very cold, and the quarters of the soldiers, accustomed to good home fare, became uncomfortable: we were gratified with orders to repair again to Jersey City. A memorable day was

and Gov. Tompkins, who at hand, the 25th November, then had the command of the forces in this vicinity, had determined to make a great day of it. All the Jersey troops were invited to participate in the celebration. It happened to be one of those cloudy, cold, raw days, which pierce you through and through. We were early under marching orders. Gen. Colfax had a beautiful highspirited sorrel horse, which he thought would require a little more attention to keep in line than he wished to bestow upon him, and he re-

REMINISCENCES OF THE quested Brigade Major

Ward

to

WAB OF

1812

25

exchange horses with him

for that day, which the Major gladly acceded to, as he was an expert horseman, and could show himself off to great ad-

vantage.

We

came

to the city

and marched up Broadway in

fine

beyond the old Sailors' Snug Harbor. Our wing rested upon Broadway, near Fourteenth street, and the line extended to the Battery. It was late in the afternoon when we

style,

passed in review of Gov. Tompkins at the City Hall. General Colfax and his staff were invited to dine with the Corporation

upon that occasion. We had as one of our distinguished guests John Randolph, of Eoanoke, Va., whom I had never seen before, nor ever afterwards. We had a splendid entertainment, to which ample justice was done by the half frozen and half famished Jersey blues: but I must hasten to close this sketch.

There was living at that time, at the corner of Nassau street, a venerable and pious man, whose memory deserves a better tribute than my feeble pen can give him, Captain Christopher Prince. Here he and his amiable wife, who was a relative of General Colfax, lived in primitive and Christian simplicity. The General determined, in company with Major Ward, who was also a relative, to pass the night with Capt. Prince. After dinner was ended, I escorted the General and Brigade Major to the house of Captain Prince, where I intended to leave them, and return to my own home. The evening was and soon well pretty advanced, very Captain Prince, with ex-

and Cedar

emplary fidelity, commenced family worship. The Brigade Major had had a very severe and toilsome day in managing the sorrel horse, and it is not to be wondered at that the cold and fatigues of the day, after a hearty dinner, rendered him rather a sleepy attendant

upon evening worship.

He

stood leaning in a reverent posture over the top of a chair, inclined forward a little and resting upon two legs, while the venerable Captain with unusual fervency was offer-

ing prayer.

Major

Overcome with sleep for a moment, our worthy balance; his chair slipping from under him,

lost his

AN INQUIRY

26

glided across the room, while he went plunging after it, exConfound the claiming, as he fell full length upon the floor, ' '

sorrel horse!"

Such an affecting incident you may well suppose alarmed us all, except the excellent Captain, who continued his prayer with unruffled composure.

At its close I congratulated the Major that it was simply a dream, and that the sorrel horse had done no farther damage and respectfully took my leave. ;

On

the 7th of December I was discharged for that campaign, expecting to resume my duties in the spring. Here my military career ended. This is all I ever did to entitle

me

to

cannot

my

military bounty land; and

now

help

if I

did not earn

it,

I

it.

whether, after such an exhibition of military prowess, I am not entitled to more consideration than the amiable lady referred to has thought fit to award me. I therefore submit,

One

AN

of the Veterans.

INQUIRY.

For the Archives of the United States Congress, and for the archives of the various States, there is making a collection of the portraits of United States Senators by H. J. Gensler of The collection is nearing completion but from the older states there are still wanting likeneses of some of the Senators. Of New Jersey there cannot as yet be found any portrait of Jonathan Elmer, Aaron Kitchell, James "Wilson and Ephraim Bateman. These men lived before the daguerreotype and the photograph, and their likenesses must, if made, have been paintings or drawings, or even silhouettes. Descendants of these prominent Jerseymen are requested to aid Mr. Gensler in his search. Washington.

Revolutionary Pension Records of Morris County. (Continued from page 159 of Proceedings of 1916.)

State of

New jersey

Morris County >Ss. Be it remembered that on this day personally appeared before me Cornelius Voorhies Esquire one of the Justices of the Peace for said County of Morris Person Green of age & being duly sworn deposeth and saith that he was well acquainted with Jarzel Turner deceased who was a Sergeant in Capt. Jonas Ward's company in Col. Oliver Spencer's Regiment that this deponent attended him as a Nurse in his Sickness and at the time of his death that he died whilst in the Service of the United States on or before the twenty ninth day of July in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and Seventy seven at Pompton and further this deponent saith not full

Sworn the 14th day of December

AD

1789 Peirson Green

before

me

Cornelius Voorhies J. Peace

The Court having heard and Considered the said Certificates an Opinion and do adjudge that the said Sarah Turner widow of the said Jarzel Turner deceased is Justly intitled to the half pay of her said late husband from the twenty ninth day of July in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and seventy seven during the time she shall remain his widow ....

&

Affidavits are of

Given under our hands teenth day of December

AD

&

the seal of the said Court the seven-

1789

Samuel Tuthill Alexander Carmicael

At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of the Peace holden at Morristown in and for the County of Morris on the eighth day of July in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and ninety

38

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS MORRIS COUNTY Present

Samuel Tuthill

1

Silas Condict |

Esquires

John Carle William Woodhull Application being made to the Court in favour of Elizabeth Wordun widow of Samuel Worden deceased for her late husbands half pay the following Certificates and Vouchers were presented

&

read viz

Nl Army Accounts July 1 1790

Office of

This certifies that

it Appears by the Rolls of the 3d Regiment Jersey that Samuel Wordun Enlisted a sergeant in Capt Coxs Co February 20 1777 for the War and died. Elizth Nordun Muster of October 1779. Joseph Howell Jun.

of

New

.

.

.

Commisr P

Nl

M Oenl.

This may certify that the above named Sam Worden was an inlisted Soldier and listed as Sergeant in the third Jersey regiment And that to the best of my Recollection & Information he died while in Service Eliz.

Town July 2nd 1790 Elias Dayton late Col.

New

Jirsey Morris County

N2

)

)

Personally Appeared before

me John Deboe

one

of

the

Justices of the peace for said County Abraham Vanduyn and being duly Sworn and Saith that he was personally present about

years ago and Saw Samuel Wordon marry Elizabeth David Morrinus a Minister of the Gospel and further Young by this deponent saith not Sworn before me this 5th day of July 1790

twenty

five

Abrm Vanduyn John Deboe

J. P.

We the Subscribers two of the Justices of the peace for the County of Morris residing in the Township of Pequanack do certify that Elizabeth Wordon was the lawfull wife of Samuel Worden and is the real Widow of Samuel Worden by whom She has had Seven Children of which five are yet living and that She has a legal settlement in this Town Pequanack July 5th 1790 .... John Deboe J P Jacob Gould J P

EEVOLUTIONABY PENSION EECOEDS MOEEIS COUNTY

29

Application being made to the Court in favour of Martha Treelease late Martha Lyon Widow of Henry Lyon Deed for her late husbands half pay... the following certificates and Vouchers

were presented and read Viz

.

.

.

Office of

Army

Accounts July 1 1790

Nl This certifies that it appears by the muster Rolls of the first New Jersey that Henry Lyon inlisted a P. in Capt Morrison 's Compy July 24 1777 for three Years, promoted Corpl. March 1778 and died July following

Regt of

Joseph Howell Jun Commissr & P Genl.

M

M. Ogden

late 1st J.

Regt

.

.

.

N2 This may certify that Henry Lyon served as a Soldier in Capt Isaac Morrisons Company in the first New Jersey Regiment And that he died to the best of my knowledge and belief in service New Ark July 2d 1790 Jesse Baldwin late Lieut in Capt Isaac Morri sons Compy

This

may concern that Richard Treelease lawfully Married the tenth day of May 1788

is to certify to all it

& Martha Lyon were July 3d 1790

Test Joseph Grover Paster of the Church of Persippening State

of

New

Essex County

To

all

Jersey Ss.

Whom

)

)

it

may

concern

We whose names are hereunto subscribed two of the Justices of the peace of the County of Essex and State of New Jersey do hereby certify that we was personally Acquainted with Martha Lyon now Martha Trelease and that to the best of our knowledge she continued Henry Lyons Widow from the time of his death till she was married to Richd Treelease on the tenth day of May 1788 as witness our hands John Peck Justice of the peace

John Lindsly Justice of the peace.

The Court having heard and duly considered the

.

.

.

Certificates

affidavits in favour of Elizabeth Worden are of Opinion and do adjudge that the said Elizabeth Worden is entitled to the half pay

and

30

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS MORRIS COUNTY

of Samuel Worden her deceased husband. .and having heard and duly considered the Certificates in favour of Martha Trelease late the widow of Henry Lyon deceased are of opinion and do adjudge that the said Martha Trelease is entitled to the half pay of her .

husband Henry Lyon deceased for and during the time She remained his widow.

late

.

.

New

Jersey ) Essex County ) This Affidavit was left out it ought to have been entered before the above Adjudication. E Russell (Clk.) Personally appeared before me David Littell one of the Justices of the peace for said County Margaret Wade and being duly sworn saith that She was personally present some time in the Year One thousand Seven hundred & Seventy three and Saw to Martha Tomkin (now Martha Treelease) by Jacob Green a Minister of the Gospel and further this deponent saith not Sworn before me this 5th day of July 1790 David Littell Justice of* the peace

Henry Lyon Married

her

Margaret

X Wade mark

Application being made to the Court in favour of Phebe late widow of Squire Lum Deed for late husbands half pay the following Certificates and Vouchers were presented and read Viz This may certify that Squire Lum served as ensign in the five months Service in General Hurds brigade Col Martins Regimen and in the company which I had the command of in the year 1776 untill the sixth day of August on which day he died with the camp sickness in the city of New York. David Bates Capt We Whose names are under Written two of the Justices of the peace for the County of Morris residing in the Township of Hanover do certify that Phebe Leonard was the lawf ull Wife and the real Widow of Squire Lum and that She continued his lawfull widow from the time of his death Which was the Sixth day of August one thousand Seven hundred & Seventy six untill her Mariage with David Leonard the twenty third day of April and Year 1778 and that She hath a legal Settlement in this Town

Leonard

.

.

.

Hanover July 7/1790

Hiram Smith J

Peace. Cornelius Voorhies J Peace.

This

may

certify that on November 3 1788 Squire in the holy banns of Mariage

Phebe Ward were Joined

Lum and and pro-

EEVOLUTIONAEY PENSION EECOBDS MOBEIS COUNTY

31

nounced man and wife by me Timothy Johnes Minister of the Gospel Morris Town July 8 1790 The Court having heard & duly considered the Certificates in favour of Phebe Leonard late the widow of Squire Lum deed are of Oppinion and do Adjudge that the said Phebe Leonard is entitled to her late husbands half pay for and during the term she remained his

Widow. At a Court .

.

of General Quarter Sessions of the peace holden & for the County of Morris on Tuesday the 1791 twenty seventh day of September

at

Morristown in

AD

.

Present iSilas Condict Jno. Carle Alexr. Carmichael

.

.

Esquires

David Thompson Application being made to the Court in favour of Susanna Bowlsby late the widow of John Martin deceased for the half pay of her said late husband deceased the following Certificates &Vouchers were presented & read Viz

New

Jersey Morris County

)

)

Personally appeared before (me) this 28th Day of September EphraimManning who being duly sworn deposeth & Saith, that some time in the fall of the year One thousand seven hundred & seventy seven he Said Manning was on a monthly tour of duty at Elizabeth Town under command of Major Sealy & he said Manning with said John Martin & Joshua Ball being on gard at Cranes point Were surprised & taken prisoners by the refugees & conveyed to Staten Island where they remained prisoners of war untill General Sullivans army came onto the Island at which time they were conveyed to New York & put into the Sugar house shortly after which said Ball was liberated on account of his being a young lad & that he said Manning & John Martin continued in confinement & that some time after John Martin was taken sick & sent to the hospital & at that time he said Manning heard the Doctor tell an Officer that damn them he could kill them as fast as How Could send them to him & that Some days after John Martin was sent back to Sugar house where he continued a few days & was taken Sick again & Sent the second time to the Hospital after which he said Manning never heard from him any more. .further this deponent Saith not... (Signed) Ephraim Manning Sworn before me this 28th of September AD 1791... (Signed) Hyeram Smith... .

32

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS MORRIS COUNTY

Personaly appeared before me Hyeram Smith one of the Justices of the peace for the County of Morris John Howard who being sworn on the holy evangelist of Almight god deposeth & saith that soon after Joshua Ball returned from being a prisoner

New York he Said Howard saw said Ball & enquired of him what became of John Martin who was taken prisoner with him his answer was that he had died in Hospital at New York upon which Said Howard asked him (Ball) if he was with him wLen he died, Balls answer was that he was not present when Martin died but that he said Ball saw him carried on the bier to the grave, & that the persons who buried him told him said Ball that it was John Martin who died in the Hospital & further this deponent in

Saith not

.

.

.

Sworn before me

this 29th

day

John Hayward

.

.

.

of September 1791...

Hiram Smith Hanover September 29th 1791 This

a young

.

.

.

certify thai in the fall of the Year 1777 John Martin married Industrious man was a soldier in my company on

may

a monthly tour of duty at Elizabeth town & was on guard at Cranes Point at which place he was taken prisoner by the British

&

carried to

New York where

belief he died in hospital

.

.

to the best of

my

information

&

.

David Bates

late Capt.

Brant was

certify that on July 27. 1777 John Martin & Susanna Joined in the holy bands of Mariage & pronounced man

&

me Joseph Grover

This

may

wife by

minister of the Gospel in Percepining

Septr. 26/1791

This may certify that on April 1. 1788 George Bowlsby & Susanna Martin late Susanna Brant was Joined in the holy bands of Mariage & pronounced man & wife by me Joseph Grover Minister of the Gospel in Percipining Septr. 26. 1791

.

.

We

.

whose names are underwritten two of the Justices of the for the County of Morris residing in the township of Hanover peace do certify that Susanna Bowlsby late Susanna Martin was the Lawful wife of & real widow of John Martin & that She continued his lawful widow from the time of his death until her mariage with George Bowlsbey & that She hath her legal setlement in this town Hyeram Smith Corns. Voorhies Hanover Septemr. 29th. 1791... The Court having heard & duly considered the certificates in favour of Susanna Bowlsbey late the widow of Martin deed, are of Opinion & do adjudge that the said Susanna Bowlsbey is intitled to her late husband John Martin deceased's half pay for & during the time that she remained his Widow. .

.

Records of a Hackensack Bible. Including family names of Ensign, 1710 Stockton, 1730 ; Arnett, 1759 Bennett, 1781; and Taylor (Copied by Mrs. Francis A. Westervelt, President of the Bergen County Historical Society.) ;

.

;

BIRTHS. 1 2 3

4 5 6

7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Thomas Stockton

Senr

born 1730 1735 14 Benjamin Brearley Stockton Sr b Aug Sarah Howell Arnett 1759 born May 17 Thomas Stockton b Aug 27 1777 Susannah Aenett Stockton b June 16 1781 Rebecca Stockton b June 30 1783 Hannah White Stockton b Feb 7 1879 Sarah Brearly Stockton b Nov 13 1787 31 Benjamin Brearley Stockton b Jany Mary Hatfield Stockton b Feby 1794 Abigail Arnett Stockton b Aug 18 Isaac Arnett Stockton b Apr 22 1797 1799 Henry Hollock Stockton b June 19 Sarah Brearley Stockton 1802 Jany 4 17 1781 Ensign Bennett b Dec Asahel Bennett b Apr 25 1783 Elisha Bennett b Jan 30 1785 1787 Minnie Bennett b Jany 21 1789 Olivia Bennett b Jany 5 1791 Helen Bennett June 3 1794 Eliza Bennett b June 11 Frederick Bennett b July 24 1796 1798 Sally Maria Bennett b July 29 1801 Nancy Bennett b Jany 27 Elsie Bennett b Dec 4 1802

Sarah Stockton

his wife b

M

M

DEATHS. 1 2 3

4 5

Thomas Stockton

Sr died Sept 15 1799 Sarah Stockton his wife d April 9 1814 Sarah Brearley Stockton d Dec 1795 23 Elisha Bennett d June 30 1787 Edwin Stockton d May 12 1822

1756

BOOK NOTICE

34

6 7 8

Benjamin

9

Caroline

10 11 12

Abigail

B Stockton d June 9 B Stockton d Sept 6

1829 1829

A

Henry

K

Asabel

P

McDonald d Sept Stockton d Sept 4 1838 1840 Bennett d June 11

MEMORANDUM. 1 April 9 2

Benjamin

B

Stockton was married to Sarah H. Arnett

1778

B Stockton was married to Olivia Bennett 1820 Rev Hutchins Taylor was married to Eliza Bennett June Benjamin

June 19 3

19

P Bennett was born Feb

4

Asahel

5 6

was born Dec 22 Asahel P Bennett was married Sally Ensign

20 1754? or 1774? 1710 to Sally Ensign June 13

1780

7 8 9

10 11 12

Edwin Stockton was born July 31

1821

1823 Bennet Stockton b April 11 1826 Benjamin Stockton b April 23 Caroline Stockton b Sept 15 1831 rine Stockton b

March 24

Stockton b July 13

1829 1834

Book Notice. Edmond Hawes

of Yarmouth, Massachusetts, an Emigrant to America, in 1635, his ancestors, including the Allied families of Brome, Colles, Greswold, Porter, Rody, Shirley and Whitfield and some of his Descendants. By James Willia Hawes, A. M. The Lyons Genealogical Company, New York, 1914. :

this title appears the story of Edmond Hawes of SoliWarwickshire, England, who emigrated to America in 1635, and his descendants to the eighth generation. Edmond Hawes came to Boston on the ship James of 300 tons burden, the master of which was William Cooper. For a while he dwelt in the vicinity of Plymouth and of Duxbury and by 1644 had settled at Yarmouth. Much of the volume, slightly more than half the pages, is concerned with the Hawes family in England, but the American section is a valuable contribution to family histories dealing with Massachusetts founders. The pages number 217 which include a

Under

hull,

copious index.

Jedidiah Swan's Orderly Book. From Rev. Dr. David 0. Irving, of East Orange, the Historical Society in 1909 received a very interesting gift in the orderly book of Captain Jedidiah Swan, of Colonel Philip Van Cortlandt's regiment in the Continental Army. The entries in this interesting book run from July 7, 1776, to September 24, 1776, and the daily records cover from one to three The period was that just previous to and just sucpages. ceeding the Battle of Long Island. Between August 25 and 30 no entries appear, for during those four days the battle raged, and the troops made that masterly crossing to New York, to avoid being caught between Howe's army and the British naval force. No time under such conditions to write up orderly books. Captain Swan was evidently a painstaking officer, and he has written down a great mass of interesting facts about the army, as such facts came to him for transmission to those under his authority. Particularly valuable are the addresses of the "General" or commander-in-chief, written out in full to be read to the army. Among these addresses is found an account of the attack on Fort Moultrie, near Charleston, S. C., and the repulse of the British, news conveyed by Washington to inspire the zeal of the troops awaiting Howe's attack on Long Island. The orderly book contains 154 pages, of which the entries fill 124. The size is 6 by 814 inches, and the covers are flexible.

The Authenticity of

the Book.

Lest anybody in later ages should doubt the authenticity Swan's orderly book, its owner in 1833, Recompence Stanberry, of Morris County, went before a justice of the peace and swore to the following Before the subscriber, a justice of peace in and for said County, personally appeared Col. Kecompenee Stanberry, aged 75 years, and being duly sworn, saith that this book which upon its face (title page) purports to be a book containing the names of the men composing the Company of Cap't Jedidiah Swan, and record of transactions connected with Cap't Swan's Militia duties and services in the war of the revolution, is a book containing original entries made by said Cap't Swan in of Captain

:

his life time.

That

this

Deponent belonged to said Cap't Swan's com-

36

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

.

pany and did duty

therein, in the time of said war, and was intimately acquainted with Cap't Swan, who was brother-in-law of this deponent, and knows the hand writing to be that of Cap't Swan. That this deponent has been in possession of said book for many years, having received it from the Executor or administrator of Cap't Swan. Recompence Stanberry. Sworn and subscribed before me July 8, 1833. Charles Freeman, J. Peace.

The following is a true copy taken from a page in the orderly book of ''A List of Capt. Jedidiah Swan's Compy in Colonel Philip Van Cortlandt's Kegiment." Capt. Jed Swan; Lt. John Craig; Lt. Saml. Woodruff; Ensg. John Williams. Sergts.

Henry

David Thurston, Jacob

Miller,

Abm. Lawrence,

Mills.

Wm.

Corp. Recompence Stanberry, Eichardsons Gray, Ebenezer Williams.

Little,

Drum and

fife,

John Hawkins, 13 Sept. Discharged Dav;

id Hubble, in the Ranks.

Privates, Henry Ralph, Benjamin Meeker, Andrew Denman, Justice Whitehead, Jonathan More, Moses Bonnel, Thos. Jones, Saml. Vallentine, David Little, John Smith, Josiah Frazy, George Jewell, Discharged 1st of Sept. Lawrence Thorp, Nathl. Rodgers, Benjamin Frazy, Saml. Hicks, Daniel Squire, Jos, Lambert, John Sanders, Hezekiah Broadbury, John Woodruff, Jjoshua Bud, James Vrelandt, Benjamin Scudder, John Daniel, Elihu Campbell, Willm. Woodruff, Matthew McDonald, Saml. Maxfield, Jonas DeGramo, Wm. ;

Elftone, died 19th Oct., Thos. More, Jos.

Hetfield,

Henry

M. Deeds, John Gray, discharged 25th October; Henry McMannus, Nathl. Maxfield, Benj. High, David Borows, Joshua Tucker, Saml. Benjamine, Wm. Hoff, Saml. Gray, David Thelfey, Ezekiel Ball, David Williams, John Clark, James Gilman, George Reed, Peter Covert, Thomas Smith, Benj. Clark, John Clark, Genl. David Scudder, John Thezot, Willis, Geo.

Norris Clark, Brant.

Abraham

Sanders, Nathanel

Dunham, William

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK Head Quarters July 9th 1776 Parole

Countersign

A

working Party of 150 Men properly officer 'd to go to Kings Bridge To-morrow to march at Six oClock from the Parade they are to take two days provision with them, after which they will draw out of the Stores there. To take their ;

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

Arms & Tents with them & when will give

them

37

they get there Genl. Miffin

orders.

As the Enemy may make an Attack early in the morning, when there may not be time for the Soldiers to fill their Canteen, The Genl. Directs that they be filled every evening. The it is not neglected as it is a matter at this Season. James Johnston Soldier in Capt. Hides Company and Coll. Wylly's Regt tried at a Court Martial whereof Coll. Reed was President, for Desertion is found guilty and sentenced to be whip'd 39 Lashes on his naked Back. Serjnt.

officers to

of

take care that

much consequence

A

George Douglass, John Davis, John Cooper, Robert Sawyer, George Clarkson, all of Capt Van Wyck's Company, Col Me Dougals Regiment tried at the same Court Martial for mutiny and Sedition. Sergnt George Duglas is acquited, the others severally found Guilty and Sentenced, Davis to be whiped 39 Lashes, Cooper 30 Lashes, Sawyer & Clarkson to be whiped each 20 Lashes on there Bare Backs for the said offence. The Genl. approves of the foregoing Sentence and orders them put in Execution at the usual Time & Place. Some Persons having Barbarously wounded and maimed spme Cattle belonging to Leonard Sichenard Esqr on Fryday Last the Genl hopes no Soldier in the Army is concer 'd in so bare & Scandalous an action but if it should appear otherwise such person may Depend on the Severest punishment any Person who can give any Information in the matter will be well rewarded.

Brigadier for the Day, Genl Spencer Field officer for the Piquet Col. Webb sard and Major Shereman Brigade Major for the day.

Lieut. Col.

Wes-

Peck.

Head Quarters July

8th 1776 Countersign The new from Connecticut & New Jersey daily arriving a report is to be made every day to the Genl of the number arriving by the Commanding officer of each Corps, in order that proper Arrangement may be made. All officers are required to be carefull that their Men are Acquainted with the orders that they may not plead Ig-

Parole Johnston

norance.

Brigadier for the Day Genl. Lord Stirling Field officers for the Piquet Coll. Ward, Lieutt. Coll. Stoutenburgh and Major Tuttle Brigade Major for the Day, Field

38

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S OBDEBLY BOOK Head Quarters July 20th 1776

Parole Countersign Daniel Grimes of Capt. Shaws Company Col Maxfield's Regt tried by a Gen Court Martial, whereof Col. Webb was president was found guilty of Desertion but some favourable Circumstances appearing in the Prisoners behalf his Punishment is remitted. The Provost martial is ordered to deliver him to Capt. Fulton in order to be put in some Regiment to do duty untill a good opportunity offers to send him to his own.

Brigade Major for the day Hoops Brigadier for the day Genl Wadsworth Field officer for the Piquet Col Van Cortlandt Lieut Col. "Willson and Major Drentin

Guard 1 Cap For Fatigue

for

2 1

Sub do

2 Sergt 1 do

2 Corp

2

1 do 3

C

D do

2

D

36 26 62

Head Quarters July 21 1776 Parole Philadelphia

Countersign Quebec William Baker of Cap. Johnson's Company in Cor. Me Dougal's Regiment charged with Absenting himself several Days from the Camp without Permission having been Tried by a General Court Martial whereof Coll Webb was President and found guilty was Sentenced to receive 20 Lashes The Genl approves the Sentence and orders it to be Executed at the Usual Time and place Sergt Ballard late of Genl Lees Guard now in Custody for having presumed to give a pass to a person to Cross the East River Appearing to have done more Thro' Ignorance than Design the Genl is pleased to Discharge him but If any Inferior officer shall hereafter take such a Liberty he will be It being again declared that Passes to severely punished. Citizens or Country People are only to be granted by John Berrien, Henry Willmot and John Ray Junr or one of them Passes to officers and Soldiers only by a Major General The Brigadier Genl of the Brigade to which the person belongs the Adjut General or Gen Secretary or Aid-de-Camp. The Genl has great pleasure in Communicating to the officers & Soldiers of this Army the Signal Success of the

American Arms under Gen Lee at South Carolina The Enemy having Attempted to Land at the same Time that a most furious Canonade for 12 Hours was made upon the Fortifications near CharlesTown both Fleet and Army having been repulsed with great Loss by a small Number of Gallant Troops

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK just raised

The Enemy have had 172 Men

killed

39

and Wound-

Among whom

are several officers Two Capital Ships much damaged One Frigate of 28 Guns entirly lost being abandoned and blown up by the Crew and others so hurt that they will want great Repair before they can be fit for Service and all on the Loss on our Parts of Ten killed and 22 Wounded The firmness, Courage and Bravery of our Troops has

ed

Crowned them with Immortal Honor They dying Heroes Conjured their Brethren never to Abandon the Standard of Liberty and even those who had lost their Limbs Continued at their Posts Their Gallantry and Spirits extorted applause from Their Enemies Who Dejected and defeated have retired to their former Station out of the Reach of our Troops This glorious Example of Troops under the like Circumstances with us the General hopes will animate every officer

and Soldier to Imitate and even Out do them when the Enemy shall make the same Attempt on us, With such a bright Example before us of what can be done by brave and Spirited Men fighting in Defence of their Country we shall be loaded with a double Share of shame and Infamy If we do not Acquit ourselves with Courage and a Determined Resolution to Conquer or die With this hope and Confidence and that this Army will have It's equal share of Honor and Success the Genl most earnestly Exorts every officer and Soldier to pay the Utmost Attention to his Arms and Health to have the former in the best Order for Action and by Cleanliness and Care to preserve the

latter to be exacts in their Discipline Obedients to their superiors and Vigilant on Duty With such preparation and a Sitable Spirit There can be no Doubt but by the Blessing of Heaven we shall repel our Cruel Invaders preserve our Country and gain the greatest Honor

A Working party of 150 Men properly officerd to parade Morrow Morning on the Grand Parade at 6 a Clock with their Arms and 1 Days provision to go up to Kingsbridge by Water to relieve the party which went up the 15th Inst, to apply to Genl Putnam for Boats The Genl is much pleased with the Alacrity of Men in doing Fatigue Duty and being reto

solved to ease them as Much as the Service will admit directs that until farther orders the Men who are to go upon Fatigue shall be Excused from turning out to their Alarm Post for that day Unless in Case of a real Alarm Working party of

A

50

Men properly

officerd to

Attend Cap Anderson when and as

long as he shall direct Brigadier for the Day Gen Heath Field officers for the Piquet Coll.

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

40

and Major Smith

Brigade Major for the Day

"Wyllys Lieut, Coll

C

Wyllys for Guard on the Parade for Kingsbridge for Cap. Anderson for daily fatigue

S

S

C

D

P

4

85 22

4

130

01

4 2

4 2

5

5

1 5

1

3

3

8

Head Quarters July 22nd 1776 Parole Richmond

Countersign Saroy

The Orderly Sergeants who attend at Head Quarters are hereafter to bring their Dinner and wait till they are regularly relieved as it is much to be feared the State of the necessary Houses in the City may endanger the Healths of the Troops quartered there it is recommended to the officers

and Men to guard against it as much as Method can be fallen upon to remove or iencies to

apply to the Barrack

possible and If any lessen the InconvinMaster for that Purpose.

The Gen has Noticed with pleasure the Care of the Troops Encampments on this Subjects he hopes they will continue it for the Sake of their own Healths and Credit of the

in the

Gen that many Regiments lessen their Rations of Meat If they could be permitted is concerned for the Health of the Troops and desired to gratify them in every reasonable Request Induces him to direct that Colls of such Regts as chuse to adopt this plan Signified to the Commissary Genl and in 2 Days afterwards the Quarter Masters of such Regts be allowed to draw one Quarter Part of the Usual Rations in Money to be laid out in Vegitables for his Reg, Passes from Coll Knox for the officers and Soldiers for the Artillery only to be suffered to pass the Ferrys.

Army

it

being represented to the

would at this Season chuse to and supply it with Vegitables

Brigadier for the Day Genl Spencers Piquet Coll Bailey Lieutt Coll. Wills Major Howell Brigade Major for the Day Henly

C For fatigue for Guard Capt. len

Howten

Adjt Clun

Lieutts

Lyon

field officers for

the

S

S

C

D

C

1 1

1 2

2

1 1

42 25

John Biglow

1

John Wel-

to Compose a Court Martial to be held at Coll. Johnson's Quarters to morrow at 10 aClock.

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

41

Head Quarters July 23 1776 Countersign Upton Capt Hutchens Company and Coll.

Parole Trenton

Cornelius Bradly of Ritzman's Regt. tried by a Gen. Court martial whereof Col. Webb was President and found guilty of absenting himself from Camp & enlisting into another Corps sentenced to receive 39 Lashes Patrick Leonard Nicholas Carna and James

Gary of Capt. Claggits Coll. Hands Reg tried by the same Court martial and Convicted of leaving Camp with-out leave and of riotous drunken Behaviour were sentenced to receive Leonard and Carna 30 Lashes and Gary 39 Jonathan Davis of Capt. Haidenburgh 's Company Coll. Ritzma's Reg. tried by the same Court martial and Convicted of Desertion Sentenced to Receive 39 Lashes the General approves of the Sentence & orders them to be Executed at the usual Time and Place.

Lieut Josiah Fullar of Capt. Bray's Company and 20th Regt now Commanded by Lieut. Coll Drake having been tried by a Gen Court martial whereof Coll. Webb was president for being absent from the Company and Regt. to which he belonged for more than a Month and being Innoculated for the Small pox. is acquited of the Charge the Gen Contrary to Orders approves Thereof and orders Lieutt Fullar to be Immediately discharged. It is with great Astonishment and Surprize the Genl learns that Soldiers enlist from one Company to another and frequently receive a Bounty and that some officers have so glaring a Fraud upon the knowingly Received such Men public and Injurious to the same will be punished in the most Examplary Manner and the Genl most earnestly requests and Expects every good officer who loves his Country not only to open such practices but to make the offender known that they may be brought to Justice. The Guard at the Ship yards to be reinforced with a Capn. and 20 Men

For Fatigue For Guard

1

2

1

1

2

1 1

1 1

42 Privates 26 Privates

An orderly Sergeant to attend at Head Quarters by 8 a Clock Cap. Morris A Corporal to attend Genl. Heard by 8 a Clock to morrow Capt. Swan Brigadier for the for the piquet Col.

Baldwin

Day

Gen. Lord Sterling Field

Lieutt. Coll Russel

Brigade Major for the

Day

and Major Buel

Livingston.

officers

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDEBLY BOOK

42

Head Quarters July 24

1776.

Parole Virginia

Countersign Wales. Three Hundred Men properly officered to parade with Arms to Morrow Morning 6 oClock on the Grand parade to Relieve the party that went up to Kingsbridge on the 19th Inst. to take One Days provision and go up by Water, attending to the Tide. Gen. Wardsworth's Brigade to furnish 50 Carpenters with A Capt 2 Subs, 4 Sergeants 4 Corps, 1 Drum and fife to proceed to Kingsbridge to build Stoves for the Commissary and Quarter Master Genl. This Detachment to be allowed for in the Detail and to proceed by Water to apply to Genl. Putnam for boats to Parade with Arms and 1 Days Provision 6 aClock to morrow morning at the Assistant Quarter Master office and take his Directions. Each Brigadier with the Colls, and Commanding

Genl.

officers

of the Several Regiments* in his Brigade are to meet in Order to make an Estimate of the Quantity of Paper absolutely necessary to serve a Regiment for Returns and other Public uses for a Months and make Report Thereof to the Genl. at orderly Time on Friday next. That the Quarter Master Genl. may be directed to provide and deliver the same Monthly to the Colls, for the Use of their respective Regiments.

The General being Sensible of the Difuculty and Expence of Providing Clothing of almost any kind for the troops feels an Unwillingness to Recommend, Much More to order any kind of Uniform but as it is Necessary that Men should have

'

Cloaths and appear Desent and light he Earnestly encourages the Use of Hunting with long Breeches made of the same Cloth gater fasion about the Legs to all those who are yet unprovided no Dress can be had Cheper nor more Convenient as the Wearer may be Cool in warm weather and warm in Cool weather by puting on Under Cloaths which will not Change the outward Dress Winter or Summer, besides which it is a Dress which is Justly Supposed to Carry no Small Terror to the Enemy who think Every Such person Compleat

A

Marksman.

Some Difficulties having Intervinced so that the Commissary Genl Cannot Comply with the order of the 22d respecting the lessoning the Rations of Meat and paying Money in Lieu that the Men may Increase their Vegitables in the Time allotted him for that Purpose. The Colls, are Desired not to draw for such Money till further Orders and Directions be taken in the Matter which will be done Immediately.

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

43

Day Genl. Heard field officers for the Piquet Douglas Lieutt. Coll. Hall and Major Haydon Brigade Major for the Day Gordon. 48 Privates for Kingsbridge to parade at 6 oClock with Arms

Brigadier for the Coll.

etc.

For Fatigue For Guard For Kingsbridge

'

C

S

S

C

D

P

1 1

2

1 2 1

1 1

1 1

42 2b 12

Head Quarters July 25 Parole Abington

1776.

Countersign Bedford.

Alexander Stedman David "Woods George Redwell Gideon of Coll Chestons Regiment Thomas Andrews of Coll Willys Giles Thrall & Ebenezer strool of Coll. Wards & Seth Basset of Coll. Parsons to Work at the Weelwright Shop under Capn Ford till further orders the Countersign to be Delivered by the proper officer to the guard as well as the other Guards and Care to be taken in future that the provost martial Guard be properly officered their having been a Complaint made on that head, Henry Davis of Capn. Johnson Company Coll. McDouglas Regt. Tried by a Gen Court Martial whereof Coll. Webb was president and found guilty of Desertion Sentenced to Receive 20 Lashes.

Demond

Patrick Lyon's of Capt. Curtiss Company and Regr. late of Coll. Learned 's tried by the same Court martial and found guilty of being in Liquor and found sleeping on his Post was Sentenced to receive 30 Lashes the Genl. approves each of the above Sentences and orders them to be Executed at the Usual Time & Place. It is with Inexpressible Concern the Genl. sees Soldiers fighting in the Cause of Liberty and their Country Committing Crimes most Destructive to the Army and which in all Armies are punished with Death. What a Shame and Reproach will it be If Soldiers fighting to Enslave us for 2d or 3d a Day should be more regular, Watchful and sober than Men who are Contending for every thing that is dear & Valuable In Life. .William Baker of Capn. Johnson's Company and Coll. McDougal's Regiment having been Sentenced to be Whipt 20 Lashes for absenting himself several Days from Camp is pardoned by Genl. on some favourable Circumstances appearing but is to be publickly repremanded at the head of the Regiment. .

.

44

The Honble. Continental Congress in Consideration of the Sergt. Major, Qr. Master Sergt. Drum & Fife major not having Pay adequate to their Service and hoping it will Exthem to Vigilance and Industry have been pleased to Increase the pay of these officers having no other Appointment 1 Dollar a Month. cite

.

.

Peter Gordon Esqr. is appointed Brigade Major to G-enl. Heard 's Brigade and is to be obeyed & respected Accordy.

ADVERTISEMENT. Stolen out of the House of Brigadier Genl. Lord Sterling a neat pair of Silver mounted Pockets Pistols Screw Barrel with the Name of S. Hake Engraved on the Lock. Whoever will discover the Thief and Pistils shall receive Six Dollars reward or Four Dollars for the Pistols only by Conveying them to Brigadier Genl. Lord Sterlings Quarters. Brigadier for the D#y Genl. Heath. Field officers for the Piquet Coll. Ritzma Lieutt. Coll. Clap & Major Dey Brigade Major for the Day Wyllys.

AFTER ORDERS Those Soldiers who have entered on Board the Bow Commanded by Cap .... are to repair Immediately on Board and the officers of the Regts. to which they belong to are to forward them as soon as possible as the Service is of the utmost Importance. Gaily

Head Quarters July 26 1776 Countersign Darby The Genl Court Martial to set to morrow for the Tryal of Ensign Bryant now under Arrest for Sending some Soldiers to take away old Iron and other Materials from the Ship now fitting for public use. The Qr Master Genl. is to

Parole Cambridge

have the Rigging Stores and other Articles belonging to those & any Vessels safely secured in some Ware House or Store officer or Soldier who shall be found Medling improperly with any parts of them may Depend upon being punished very severely.

A

Guard at Harrison's Brewery to be mounted Consisting of 1 Subn, 1 Sergt. 1 Corpl. & 24 Privates every Evening and Gentries to be posted at proper Distances from the Air furnace along the Shore till they come opposite to Coll. Baldwin's Quarters Genl. Green being particularly engaged at present Passes Signed by Lieutt. Blodgets to be allowed suf-

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S OBDEELY BOOK

45

persons to Cross the Ferries agreeable to the orders of the 22 Inst. It is now Settled that such Regts. as chuse to lessen their Allowance of Meat and receive Money instead thereof to be laid out by the Qr Master in Vegitables do it upon the following Regulations. Instead of one Pound and an half of Meat each Soldier to draw one Pound and one penny Lawf ull Money of New England to be allowed for the Difference, to be paid to the Colls orders and laid out by the Qr Master for the Purchase of Vegitables two Days Notice to be given to the Commissary Genl. Complaints have been made that some of the Soldiers 111 treats the Country people who come to market the Gen most possitively forbids such Behaviour and hopes the Officers will Exert themselves to prevent it good policy as well as Justice demand that they should have all possible encouragement as the Health of the Soldiers much depends upon Supplies of Vegitables. Those who have been guilty of such Practices will do well to Consider what would be our Situation at this Season If we drive of the Country People and break up the Markets the Healthy will soon be sick and the sick must perish for want of Necessaries no favor will be shown to any offender hereafter.

ficient to enable

The person who supplies the Camp with Beer has represented that he must stop his Business If his Barrels are not returned the Genl. do actually charge the Qr Master to take Care of the Beer Barrels and prevent their being Cut for Tubs as hereafter an Acct. will be kept every Regt and the different Barrels Charged to such Regts or the Quarter Master If he does not attend to it The Commissary Genl will deliver Pork Barrels to any of the Regt who will apply to him to be cut up for Tubs. Brigadier for the Day Genl Spencer. Field officers for the Piquit Coll Chester Lieutt Coll Manson and Major Walls. Brigade Major Henly, Lieutt Coll Brearly officer for

Grand Battery.

Head Quarters July Parole

27

1776.

Countersign France. who are to attend the Men upon Complaints are Fatigue and remiss. The Genl hopes they will Consider of so bad an Example might be to the Men and as he believes it proceeds rather from their Inattention than Design flatters himself there will be no Occasion to re-

mind them

of their

Duty

hereafter.

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S OBDEELY BOOK

46

John Bartley of Capn Moreton Company in the Train by a Genl Court Martial whereof Coll. Webb was President for Drunkeness absenting himself from Guard without Leave threatning to desert and take Man's Life away & for abusive Language found guilty and sentenced to receive 39 Lashes. James Steel of Capn. Pierce 's Company Coll Ritzma's Regiment tried by the above Court martial for sleeping on his Post is found Guilty and sentenced to receive 20 Lashes The Genl approves of each of the above Sentences and orders that they be put in Execution at the usual Time and Artillery tried

place.

Brigadier for the Day Genl. Lord Sterling Field officers for Piquet Coll Persons Lieutt Coll Clark and for main Guard Lieutt Coll. Hearts Major Meed Brigade Major for the Day Livingston Major Wells Orders being unable to attend Major Hearts Hospital to

mount

this

Day (

S

S

C

D

Ps.

1

2

1

1

1

2

1 1

42 26

'

For Fatigue Guard

1

Head Quarters July 28th 1776 Parole Gravesent Countersign Hungary William Peck Esqr. who has for some Time past done the Duty of Brigade Major to Genl Spencer is appointed to that Office

and

is

to be

obeyed and respected accordingly.

Some

of the Adjutants have of late been very remiss in making their Returns by 11 oClock on Saturday, not sending their Detachments properly Officered, or relieving their orderly Sergeants at head Quarters These Gentlemen will in future be pointed out in General Orders and after that be put under Arrest If they are not attentive to their Duty.

The Genl finding the Number of sick increase & being Dethem well accomodated as posible directs Barrack Master under the Directions of the Col or Commanding Officer of each Regiment fix on some House Convenient to the Regt to be Improved as an Hospital for the Reception of Patients first taken down Or where Disorders do not require special assistance beyond that

sirous to have

own Regimental Surgeons, one of the Surgeons of the Hospital will occasionally visit these Hospitals and determine when the Nature of the Case requires the Patient to be removed to the Genl. Hospital which will hereafter kept in difof their

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

47

ferent Houses Contiguous to each Brigade The Regimental Surgeons are to Receive Directions from and be responsible The Regito the Hospitals with Conveniences for their Sick mentals J
The Detachment for Guards to be on the Grand Parade every Morning before 8 oClock Genl Heard and Genl Wardsworths Brigades required particulary to attend to this order. The fatigue men to be dismised from Work an Hour sooner than they have been as the Weather is so very hot and the Number reduced from 900 to 600 This Alteration only to Effect the Men Imployed on the works. The full Compliments to be kept up at the Ship Yards and about the Shipping.

33886

C S S P C and 150 PriMajor Porter with vates to parade to morrow morning 6 oClock with Arms on the Grande Parade 1 Days Provision to go up to Kingsbridge and relieve the Party which went up the 22d Inst to apply to Gen Putnam for Boats and attend to the Tide. Brigadier for the Day Genl Heard Field officers for the Lieutt Coll Arnold and Major Tuttle for Main Piquet Coll Guards Major Foy Brigade Major for the Day Peck. C S S D C Ps. For Fatigue 1 1 2 1 1 28 1 Guard 1 1 25 Kingsbridge

6

Head Quarters July 29 1776 Countersign Kingwood The Two Companies of Coll Nucomb Regt on long Island to join their Regiment at New York Immediately.

Parole Jersey are

01100

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

48

The Chief Enginers finding great Difficulty in Sinking the Well at Bayard's Hill for the want of proper Workmen is allowed to Select such from any of the Regt First applying to the Coll or Commanding offices and those men to be Excused from all other Duty while on this Service. The Qr Master Genl has Directed to furnish 12 Quire of paper to each Regt for Months to be Distributed as follows 1 Quire to the Commanding officers of each Regt, 1 Quire to each Company & 1 Quire to the Agedents the Remaining to be delivered to the Coll as a reserve for Special Occasions Exclusives of Orderly Books and Blanks returns furnished as usual Some Difficulties arising respecting the men going on board the Row Galleys out of the Regt. The Genl directs for the future when men are wanted for that Service or of the like kind application be made to Genl Rutman who will Call upon the Commanding officers of Regts for such Men as are fit for that Service having Respects to the Strength of such Reg and what it may Have furnished heretofore on the like Service, And as the Genl flatters himself every officer only attend to what may best serve the Genls good he doubts not they will encourage their Men to turn out as Volunteers, such only being required & that they be Men of approved Fidelity and Courage. Col. Baldwin 's and Col. Bailey to be mustered next Thursday. The former at 7 oClock in the Morning the Their Corps to be off Duty latter 5 oClock in the afternoon one Day previous to being mustered. '

Brigadier for the Day Genl Heath, Field officers for the Piquet Read Lieut Coll Wysenfelse and Major Porter for Main guard Major Howell. Brigade Major for the Day Wyllys.

Head Quarters July 30 1776 Countersign Medford The Quarter Master Genl is to provide a Number of Cantiens as Soon as possible and to have the Water in the Several woris in Casks Examined that their may be A fresh Supply if Necessary it is Reported to the Genl that the Pump Water in the City is Very unhealthy, the officers and Soldiers are therefore Cautioned against the Use of it. And the Quarter Master and Comissary Genl are to meet together and fix upon Some Mode of Supply of fresh Water for the troops in the Parole Lancaster

City.

All the Detachments at Kings Bridge and the Post this Army to Join their Respective Corps here Except

from

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S OBDEELY BOOK

49

that at Burdet's ferry and the Carpenters ordered on the twenty fourth a field officer 3 Captains 6 Sub 6 Ser, 6 Cor, 6 drums and fife 150 Privates to Parade to Morow Morning at Five oClock in the Grand Parade with Arms and go up by Water to Relieve the Party Stationed at Burdeth ferry and their to take Orders from Gen Miflin and take one Days ProBaldwin 's and Bailey 's Regt to be Omited out of the vision. Detail on Account of their being Mustred on thursday Major Reply to Command the Guards ordered the 26 Instant to be at Harrisons Brewery to be at Lispenards where provided for them. Brig, for the Day Genl Spencer field officer for Piquet

mounted

Room

Coll.

A

is

Huntington Latimer & Major Smith

Leitt. Colll.

Main Guard Leutt. Coll Russel Major of Brigade Genley S C S C

for

for fatigue

Coll.

P

1

1

1

27

S

S

C

P

00006 C

for Kings Bridge

D

1

Van Cortland to send 1 Orderly & 1 Corp for Gen Heard.

Sergent to

Head Quar-

ters

Head Quarters July Parole Norwalk

31,

1776

Countersign Oxford.

Ensign Briant Charged with Embessling Private Property having been tryed by a Gen Court Martial Whereof Coll. Well was President is acquited of any fraudilent Intention but censsured by the Court for Indiscretion in Permitting Some of the Soldiers on taking away old Iron. The Genl approves the sentence & orders him to be Discharged from Arrest. Jabez Farmer & Fredrich Duthagen both of Cap Johnson's and Col McDougaPs Reg tried by the Same Court Martial for Desertion and Convicted Were Sentenced to receive Parmer 30 Lashes & Dulhagen 39 Lashes 13 Each Day for 3 Days Successively. Joseph Dennis of Capn Beckman's Company and Coll Lashens Regiment tried by the Same Court Martial for a Breach of the 5th And 30th Articles of War found Guilty of a Breach of the 5th Article Viz Joining in a Meeting and Sadition Sentenced to receive 13 Lashes 3 Days Successively and to be Confined for 1 Month The Genl Approves of the above Sentence & orders them to be Executed at the Usual Time and place. Dennis to be delivered ;

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

50

over to the officer of the Guard at the City Hall and Closely Confined for one Month. It is with astonishment and Concern the Gen finds that the Precautions used to prevent the Countersign being made known to any not Intitled to it are Defeated by the Ignorance of Mis-Conduct of those to whom it is Instructed in Order that none may plead Ignorance hereafter The Officers and Soldiers are to know that the following Rules are established.

The Adjutant Genl, at 6 oClock P. M., will deliver the Parole and Countersign to the Major of Brigade and Adj of Artillery they at Retreat beating and not before are to Deliver them to the Adjutant of Their respective Brigades. The Adjutants are to Deliver them to field officers of their respecIf required then to the officers of the Advance tive Reg. Guard then to the officers of every other Guard in & About the Camp or City and the Genl flatters himself that when the Importance & Necessity of Secrecy upon this Head is Considered Every officer aifd Soldier will pride himself in his Fidelity, Prudence,-

and

Dissipline.

Brigadier for the day Genl Lord Stirling. Field officer for the Piquet Coll Martin. Lieut Coll Reed and Major Bevel. For Main Guard Lieutt Coll Sheperd Brigade Major for the Day Livingston Coll. Van Courtlands.

C For Fatigue For Guard

S

S

C 1

1

1 1

1

1

D

P 17

1

22

AFTER ORDERS.

An

addition of 600 Men properly Officered is to be made Number of Fatigue to morrow from the several Brigades As Many Seaman are to be furnished to make up this Additional Number as can be readily and Conveniently Collected. By order of his Excellency Genl. Washington.

to the Usual

Head Quarters Augt. Parole Paris

1st,

1776.

Countersign Reading.

Wardsworths Brigade to go over to long Island to morrow Morning then to take their orders from Genl. Green. It is with great Concern the Gen Understands that Jealouses have arisen among the Troops from the Different Provinces and Reflections frequently thrown out which can only tend to Iretate each other and Injure the noble Coll Jays Regt of Genl

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDEELY BOOK

51

Cause in which we are Engaged and which we ought to supHand and one Hart.

port with one

The Genl most Earnestly

&

Intreats the officers

Soldiers

Consequences that they can no way assist our Cruel Enemies more Effectually than making Divisions among ourselves That the Honour and success of the Army and the Safety of our Bleeding Country depends upon Harmony and good agreement with each other, That the Provinces are all United to oppose the Common Enemy, and all Distinctions Sunk in the Name of an American to make this honourable, and Preserve the Liberty of our Country ought to be our only Emulation and he will be the best Soldier and best Patriot who Contributes most to this Glorious work, whatsoever his Station, or from what lower part of the Continent he came, Let all distinctions of Nations, Countries and Provinces therefore be lost in the Generous Contest who shall behave with the most kindness and good humour to each Other. If there to Consider the

are any officers and Soldiers so lost to virtue and a Love to Country as to Continue in such practices after this order. The Genl. assurees them and is directed by Congress to Declare to the Whole Army that such persons shall be severely punished and Dismissed the service with Disgrace. his

Brigadier for the day Genl "Wardsworth Field Officer for the Piquet Coll. Ward. Lieut Coll. Hall and Major Phillips

For Main Guard Lieutt. Coll Monson Brigade Major Gordon. S C C S 1 1 1 1 For Fatigue 1 1 1 For Guard

Head Quarters Augs. Parole Salem

D 1

2,

P.

34 22 1776.

Countersign Taunton. Regts are to be particularly Careful that the Damaged Cartridges are Preserved and Sent in to Mr. Comissary Chever at the Elabratory as it will be a great Publick Saving The Court Martials are often Detained by none attendance of Witnesses all officers and soldiers Notified to Attend as Witnesses at any Court Martial are to be puntial and in future any Neglect of this kind will be punished as Disobediance of Orders; Notwithstanding the Great Abusses of Regimential hospitals Last year the General hath out of Indulgance and Kindness to the troops who

The

Colls, of the Several

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

52

them Permited them once more to be opened with Surgens will fully Conform to the Rules and Ordinances which have been Made and particularly that they Act with the Strickest of honour and Candour in their to like

a

full that the Regt.

Drossts.

Upon the Several Stores, and Accounting with the Director Genl. of the Hospital when required making him Regular returns of the Sick, and applying what they receive to their patience only The Colls & field officers of the Several Regt. would do well to Visit their Regimental Hospitals frequently, and see those regulations observed and in all Cases Except Slite and putred Disorders have the sick removed to the Genl. Hospitals near the Brigade or the Genl must in Justice brake them up again Richard Lawrence

of Capn Gilberts Company and Coll Been tried by a Genl Court Martial whereof Coll. Webb was President, and Convicted of Desertion was Sentenced to receive 39 Lashes The Genl approves of the above Sentence and orders it to be Executed at the Usual Time and place.

Prescots Regt having

The New Troops a Comming in are upon their Arrival are to apply to Capn Felton at the Quarter Master Genl store in the Broadway who will give them all Necessary Instructions.

Brigadier for the Day Genl. Heath Field Officers for the Piquet Coll Philip van Courtlandt Lieutt Coll Clap & Major Hayden, for main Guard L. Coll. Jacobs Brigadier Major for the Day "Wyllys

10111 01110 C

For Fatigue Guard

S

S

C

D

and 34 Privates and 22 Do

Reinforcement for Harrisons Brewery this Evening from Van Courtlandt Regiment one Corporal and five privates N. B. The above Reinforcement to parade at Gen Heards 6 oClock This afternoon. Coll.

Head Quarters Augt. Parole tJxbridge

3,

1776.

Countersign Virginia.

That the Troops may have an Opportunity of attending Public "Worship, as well as take some rest after the Long fatigue, they have gone through, the Genl Excuses them from

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDEELY BOOK

53

Duty on Sunday (Except at the Ship Yards) or some The Genl. is sorry to special Duty, untill farther Orders be Informed that the foolish and Wicked Practices of Cursing and Swearing (a Vice heretofore little known in the American Army) is growing in fashion he hopes the officers will by Example as well as Influence endeavour to Check it and that boath they and the Men will reflect that we can have little hopes of the Blessing of heaven on our Arms If we Insulted by our Impiety and folly, Added to this it is a vice so mean and Low without any Temptation that every man of sence fatigue

and Character Detest and Dispise is it. Clarkson and Chase under Confinement for Desertion and reinlistment into the Artillery from another Corps to return to Capt. Berimons Company until Coll. Helmores Regt which Claims them come into Camp. Brigadier for the Day Genl Spencer Field officer for the Piquet Coll. Wyllys Lieutt Coll. Brealy and Major Ludlow Major of the Brigade Henly

C For Guard

S

S

C

D

P.

1

1

1

1

22

Bergen County Tombstone Inscriptions.

Old Burial Ground, Mahwah, Bergen Copied Sept.

181910 by John

Co.,

N.

J.,

& W.

Neafie

B.

(Bissell

Van

Farm)

Alstyne

N. Y. City.

Magdalena Karrigh, b. 24 April, 1700. d. 25 Sept, 1791. John Jawrence, d. 11 Aug. 1804. Margaret Wanmaher, wife of Andrew Hennion, d. May 3

1.

2.

3.

1798

aged 24

M.

4.

yrs.

mo.

4

15 ds.

G. 1786.

Inscription entirely obliterated.

5. 6.

J. L.

7.

Conrod Brown, d. Dec. 1793. Leah Fox, b. Mch 30 1787 d. Jan. 251789. Elias Falu, d. Jany 311771, aged 83 years. 1 mo. 19

8. 9.

ds.

(see Note).

12.

Philip Fox, b. Aug. 1709, d. Mch. Catrin Fishar, d. April 11787. I. B. M. 1767.

13.

Henry

10. 11.

yrs.

7 mos. 4

14.

1759, 15.

Eslor, b. Jan.

241749,

51790.

d.

Aug. 281798, aged 49

ds.

Hannah Buskirk,

late

wife of Henry Asler,

aged 25 yrs. 4 mos. 24 1774

d.

b.

Mch 4

ds.

John Asler, b. 1703. 15. M. E. 1709 d. Sept. 251787. ''Here lyeth the body of John Suffern, son of John and Mary Suffern of New Antrim, was born the First day of February A. D. 1776. Departed this Life the 15 of January 1777. Aged 11 b.

16.

Months And 15 Days." G. P. 1777. 1789 M. D. aged 27 years. 17.

18.

Mch.

121777

19.

Mary Brown,

20.

P. F. the wife of H. Fox, d. Feb. M. F. September 241786.

21.

b.

d.

Oct. 21793. 101791.

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS 22.

L. F. 1781

23.

H.

W.

24.

W.

S.

25.

M. W. Dec. 181770.

(dim).

Aug. 20

1770

(dim).

P. B. 1745.

26.

27

55

L. B. 1795.

28.

Peter Smith,

Oct

d.

1834, aged 31 yrs. 9 mos.

&

5 days,

(very dim). 29. 30.

David Hemion, d. Jan. 25 1842. aged 57 yrs. 6 mos. 2 ds. Hannah, wife of David Hemion, d. Nov. 9 1855 aged 64

yrs. 2 mos. 23 ds. 31. Jacob D. Fox. d.

May 101830, aged 29 yrs. 11 mos. 21 ds. David. D. Fox. b. Jan. 121793, d. May 20, 1869, aged 76 yrs. 4 mos. 8 ds. 33. Catharine Storms, wife of David D. Fox, b. 25 Aug. 1804. d. 20 Jan. 1827, aged 22 yrs. 4 mos. 26 ds. 34. Martin Fox, d. Mch. 71826, aged 29 yrs. 3 mos. 18 ds. 35. Stephen Fox. d. Nov. 171827, aged 32 yrs. 10 mos. 27 ds. 36. David Fox. b. Jenry 221755. d. April 24, 1800. aged 45 32.

years, 3 months, ten days. 37.

aged, 38.

Catherine Hemion, widow of David Fox, d. Mch. 17 4 years, 11 mos. 23 ds. (stone broken). SxH. b. 29 Aug. & d. 5 Aug. 1791.

1831

(was this Stephen Hemmion?) (a literal copy). Ellen, wife of Stephen Hemmion d. Mch. 191814, aged 91 years. (next stone to No. 38). 39.

40.

Jon. Rush.

d.

41.

Leah Fox,

b.

12 May 1812. Dec. 241790.

d. Oct.

131809, aged 18

yrs.

9 mos. nineteen days. 42. Philip Fox. d. June

231807, aged 22 years, 4 mos. 7 ds. Mch. 141797. aged 68 years & 5 months.

44.

W. Wanmaker, 1783 C. W.

45.

Richard Wanmaker,

43.

d.

d.

Sept. 24

1828, aged 78 yrs. 9 mos.

6ds. 46. Margaret, wife of Richard Wanmaker, aged 83 yrs. 2 mos. 2 ds. 179 47. (Inscription illegible). 48. N. H. 1765. (very dim.)

d.

Mch. 181833,

.

49.

16

ds.

50. 51. 52. 53.

Peggy Van Boskirk,

b. 12 Aug. 1804, aged 2 yrs. 7 mos. (Date of decease omitted.) (very dim.) George Carlough, d. Sept. 21799. A. C. or A. G. ove. de 5 April, 1783. (very dim.) John Wanamaker, d. Mch. 141868, ae 84 yrs. 8 ds. Anna, wife of John Wanamaker, d. Mch 8. 1845, aged

58 yrs. 6 ds.

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

56 54. d.

July 55. 56.

& 21839, aged

Josiah, tenth

youngest son of John 9 yrs. 3 mos. 17 ds.

& Anna Wannamaker,

Michael Messenger, b. Mch. 131774, d. Aug. 20-1852. Mary, wife of Michael Messenger, d. Jan. 5 1859, aged

82 yrs. 5 mos. 27 ds. 57. Henry Fredrick, d. Dec. 16 1796, aged 1 yr. 5 mos. 4 ds. 58. Margan, daughter of J. Carlough, d. Mch. 191818. 59. The child of J. Carlough, b. Dec. 171808, d. Oct. 121809. 60. Henry Carlough, b. Aug. 11807, d. Mch. 91808. 61. A brown stone, with lengthy inscriptions, illegible. 62. Another brown stone with lengthy inscriptions, illegible. 63. James Wannamaker, d. Dec. 31 1840, aged 88 yrs. 9 mos. 12 ds. 64. Sarah, wife of James Wannamaker, d. Aug. 25, 1841. aged 87 yrs. 8 mos. 12 ds. 65. Jno. T. a small stone, very dim & old. Abraham Frederick, .d. April 13 1810, aged 48 years. 6. 6.

17761801.

7.

William Bevans,

Inscription illegible. d.

Feb.

91845, aged

23 yrs. 3 mos. 11 ds.

Franklin, son of William & Hannah Bevans, d. May 4 1831, aged 7 mos. 23 ds. 69. John, son of William & Lucinde Bevans, died Aug. 15 1843 5 mos. 21 ds. aged 70. Margaret Van Winkle, wife of Coonrad Mausinger, born Sep. 41737, d. Apr. 181812, aged 75 yrs. 7 mos. 14 ds. 68.

Nicholas Maysiger, d. Oct. 91804. Susanna, wife of Nicholas Messenger, aged 77 yrs. 10 mos. 9 days. 1789 M. D. aged 27 years. 73. 71.

72.

74.

G. P. 1777.

75.

A

76.

I.

d.

Jan.

9

1843,

grey stone, (inscription illegible.) B. 12 D. x 1782.

d. Oct. 231835, aged 1 yr. 9 mos. 23 ds. Charles, son of Silas & Margaret Osborn, d. Oct. 14 1847, aged 19 years. H. Frederick, b. Dec 29 1729 d. Jany. 301790. 79. 80. Mary Fredrick, b. Dec. 241793, d. Feby. 51794. (dim.) 81. Margaret Frederick, b. Dec. 71793, d. Mch. 81794. (dim)

77.

James Ausband,

78.

P. F. 1785. 82. died April 24, aged 57 years. 83. Christian Wanmaker, aged 2 years, 8 months.

b.

Feb.

71777.

Rachel Wanamaker, b. Mch. 221789, 4 aged years, 5 months. About 60 rough stones without marks. 84.

d.

d.

Oct.

71779,

Aug. 211793,

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

57

Npte. Inscription No. 0, is probably intended for Elias Valleau, b. Dec. 12 1687 per tombstone. This old grave yard marks the site of the ancient Ramapo

Lutheran Church, organized before 1750, and which has long been extinct.

See History of Rockland Co., N. Y., by D. Cole, 1884. Township, page 297, for additional information.

Ramapo

OLD BURIAL GROUND AT HARRINGTON PARK,

BERGEN

CO., N. J.

Copied November, 1910, by John Neafle

New York Leendert Degraw,

1.

b.

& W.

Van

B.

June 221793,

d.

Nov.

101794, aged

1

In Dutch

yr. 4 mos. 18 ds. 2.

Alstyne,

City.

Leonard Degraw,

b. Sept. 5

1721

d.

Mch

2

1814, aged 92 yrs.

5 mos. 25 ds. 3.

Elizabeth,

widow of Leonard Degraw,

93 yrs, 10 mos. 14 4.

5.

d.

Nov. 14

1823, aged

ds.

John Degraw, d. Sept. 5 1846, aged 84 years, 2 mos. 8 days. Maria Duryea, wife of John Degraw, d. Feb. 26 1844, aged 78

4 mos. 18 days. William Degraw, d. July 10 1852, aged 86 yrs. 2 mos. 14 7. Vroutje Blauvelt, wife of William Degraw, d. Mch. 19 aged 77 yrs. 4 mos. 3 ds. yrs.

6.

8.

Elizabeth Degraw, wife of Cornelius J. Smith, yrs. 11 mos. 7 ds.

d.

ds.

1846,

Mch 311821

aged 19 9.

Elizabeth Degraw, widow of John yrs. 4 mos. 29 da.

W. Ferdon,

d.

Nov. 22

1847,

aged 74 10.

Garret Naugel,

11.

Jacub Blauvelt,

d.

b.

Nov. 20

Mch

23

1818, aged 50 years, 24 days. 1757, d. Nov.

1800, aged 43 yrs.

7 mos. 7 ds. lla.

86

Maria Naugle, wife of Jacob Blauvelt,

yrs. 3 12.

yrs, 11

15. 16.

86 yrs.

Jan. 18

Elizabeth, dau. of Jacob Blauvelt, died Sept. 23

mos. 23

1849, aged

Jacob

1810, aged 20

ds.

13. Jacob, son of Jacob 12 days. 14.

d.

mos.

I.

Blauvelt, died Sep. 24

1815, aged 4 mos.

I. Blauvelt, d. Apr. 21 1855, aged 71 yr. 4 mos. rough stone, no marks, very old. Rachel Blanch, wife of Jacob I. Blauvelt, d. July 5 1873, aged 11 mos. 16 ds.

A

BEEGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

58

17.

Cornelius Blauvelt, b.

May

1815, d. Nov. 3

12

1843, aged 28

yrs. 5 mos. 22 ds.

18. 19.

yrs. 1

Cornelius Blauvelt, d. Sept. 21 1872, aged 60 yrs. 8 mos. 17 ds. Maria, wife of Cornelius Blauvelt, died June 15 1888, aged 75

mo. 4

ds.

Jane, dau. of Cornelius & Maria Blauvelt, d. Dee. 18 1848, aged 2 yrs. 20 ds. 21. 1865, Irena, dau. of Cornelius & Maria Blauvelt, d. Apr. 20 aged 15 yrs. 14 ds.

54

20.

Mary

22.

John

23.

Catherine,

I.

Blauvelt, d. Feb. 71874, aged 88 yrs. 4 mos. 26 ds. wife of John Blauvelt, died Sept. 29 1844, aged

yrs. 10 ds.

24.

Jacob

25.

Ann Moore,

J. Blauvelt, d. Sep.

yrs. 10 days.

26. 27. 28.

29

1875, aged 61 yrs. 10 mos. 21 ds. d. Oct. 29 1905, aged 88

wife of Jacob J. Blauvelt, ,

John H. Blauvelt, d. May 7 1847, aged 1 yr. 3 mos. 14 ds. John I. Blauvelt, d. Aug. 16 1843, aged 27 yrs. 9 mos. 20 ds. Willie C. son of John & Mary A. Blauvelt, d. Oct. 13 1865,

aged 6 mos. 4

ds.

d. Dec. 13 1863, aged 81 yrs. Richard H. Costner, d. Apr. 8, 1883, aged 71 yrs. 4 mos. 23 ds. 31. Joseph W. son of Richard & Maria Costner, died Nov. 2 1848, aged 6 yrs. 1 mo. 2 ds. 32. Francis H. Ottoh, d. Oct. 1 1850, in the 75th year of his age.

29.

Henry Rose,

30.

33.

A

34.

John, son of Julia Hunger,

large

brown

stone, lettering scaled d.

off.

Nov. 16

1859, aged 1 yr.

11

mos. 35.

36.

A

G IB B

October

117

Mary

39.

40.

A

6.

A

10 38.

brown

GB M

stone,

almost

illegible.

A brown stone, almost illegible. DEN 5, IS F. G. GESTORVEN, GBOREN JANEWA 28, 1748. A small APRIL 2 IS ANNO 1732 1748

Abraham A.

Blauvelt, b. Apr. 24

86 yrs. 4 mos. 12 ds. 42. Alche, wife of yrs. 9 days.

Abraham

stone.

Very dim. 1726, d. Sept. 5

Blauvelt, died

Mch

Martyntie Blauvelt, wife of Garret Demarest, Sep 7 1784, aged 29 yrs. 7 mos. 27 ds.

43. d.

thick.

small brown stone.

MARTINTIE BLAUVELT. 41.

&

large grey stone, very broad

1762 I

37.

GIB

1722 I

28

b.

1812, aged

1820, aged 91

Jan. 11, 1755,

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

59

Tunis I. Blauvelt, d. Mch 5 1868, aged 74 yrs. 15 ds. Margaret, wife of Tunis I. Blauvelt, d. Oct. 3, 1842, aged 48 yrs.

44.

45.

5 mos. 46. Hellen, dau of Tunis I. & Margaret Blauvelt, d. Feb. 201834, aged 6 mos. 11 ds. 47. Isaac, son of Tunis I. & Margaret Blauvelt, d. Sept. 191830, aged 2 yrs. 1 mo. 6 ds.

Helon Maria, dau. of David

48.

aged 3

Helen, wife of David mos. 17 ds.

49. yrs. 3

& Helon

Blauvelt, d. July 6

1831,

yrs. 2 mos. 23 ds. I.

Blauvelt, died

Mch

26

1880, aged 80

50. Rachel Demarest, widow of Isaac J. Blauvelt, d. Sept. 15 1835, aged 78 yrs. 5 mos. 4 ds. A foot stone marked, AC. AB. 1820, (This may belong to No. 51.

42.)

Peter Merseles, d. Feb. 19 1832, aged 70 years, 1 mo. Jane Durie, wife of Peter Merseles, d. Apr. 3, 1834, aged 67

52.

.

53.

years. 54.

Jacob Merselus,

d.

Mch. 14

1846, in his 82d. year.

Letty Blauvelt, late wife of Jacob Merselus, b. Aug. 4 1777, Apr. 10 1865, aged 87 yrs. 8 mos. 6 ds. Elizabeth Mercelius, wife of Abraham I. Blauvelt, b. Aug. 13 56.

55. d.

31874.

1787, d. June

A

57.

A.

I.

large stone on its face, too heavy to move, foot stone

marked

B.

58.

Gasy Demarest, widow of James Durie, last the wife of Abram May 1 1824, aged 79 yrs. 4 mos. 13 ds. Hannah Blauvelt, wife of John Westervelt, d. July 17 1827,

Blauvelt, d. 59.

aged 24 60.

26

yrs. 29 ds, also

their

daughter,

Mary

Jane,

d.

Aug.

12

1827,

aged 2 mos.

ds.

61. 62.

Frederick Blauvelt, d. Nov. 22 1828, aged about 60 years. 1847, in her Elizabeth, wife of Frederick Blauvelt, d. May 6

78th year. 63. 64. 65. 66.

I, Haring, d. May 13, 1857, aged 80 yrs. 1 mo. 28 ds. Sarah Belinda Harris, d. Dec. 31 1860, aged 11 mos. 6 ds. Isaac Waldron, d. Oct. 25, 1837, aged 57 yrs. 8 mos. 11 ds. John, son of Anthony & Susan Jackson, d. May 21 1855, aged

Henry

7 yrs. 7 mos. 20 ds.

ANO

67.

1768

JANUARIE DE

A

7

AB 68.

14

Abraham Quaekenbush, Apr. 131768.

ds. b.

d.

Feb. 27

brown

stone.

1854, aged 85 yrs. 10 mos.

BEEGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

00

Abram Quackenbush,

Elizabeth Myer, wife of yrs. 12 ds.

69.

d.

Mch

24

1807,

aged 37 70.

Abraham Myer,

d.

71.

Cathrena Myer,

d.

April 11 Aug. 25

1780, aged 60 years. 1817, aged 83 yrs, 11 moa. 16 da.

also her infant daughter, 72.

Cathrena, lying adjoining. Rebecca Durie, wife of John Myers, died 81 years, 6 mos. 73.

May

26

1854, aged

John A. Myers, d. Sept. 191829, aged 65 years, 23 days. Nan, wife of Frank, served her time with Tunis and Elizabeth Haring, and died Feb. 14 1851, aged 43 yrs, 10 mos. 74. 75.

,

Auguste Schweldler, Geb. Ficker, Geb. Apr. 4 1820 in Grimshayn, Sachsen, Gest. Jan. 25 1900, in Eastwood. 77. Daniel Blauvelt, d. Feb. 23 1820, aged 86 years, 3 mos, 5 ds. 78. Eachel Blauvelt, b. 16 Apr. 1764, d. Nov. 26, 1811, aged 47 76.

years, 7 mos. 10 ds. (In Dutch.)

widow, of

79.

David D. Blauvelt,

80.

Blauvelt, d.

yrs. 9 mos.

1825, aged

b.

Feb.

111768,

d.

Jan.

71849, aged

80

yrs, 10 mos. 27 ds.

Maria, wife of David D. Blauvelt, died Apr. 25

81.

49

1822

aged

yrs. 6 mos. 6 ds.

Abraham D.

82.

Blauvelt,

b.

Jan.

271777,

died

Apr.

81864,

aged 87 yrs. 2 mos. 11 ds. 83. Margaret Cooper, wife of Abraham D. Blauvelt, b. July 17, 1777, d. Jan. 26 1851, aged 73 yrs. 9 mos. 9 ds. 84. Daniel D. Blauvelt, died Mch 20 1873, aged 78 yrs. 6 mos. 2 ds. 85.

June 9 86. yrs. 7

Effey Demarest, wife of Daniel D. Blauvelt, b. Sept. 13 1861 aged 62 yrs, 8 mos. 27 ds. Harmin Blauvelt, b. May 9 1761, died Dec. 16, 1852

mos. 7

87.

aged 91

ds.

Lisabeth Haring, wife of

foot stone

1798, d.

Blauvelt, lettering scaled,

marked L. H.

I. Blauvelt, d. Oct. 221846, aged 66 yrs, 2 mos, 8 ds. Catherine Eckerson, wife of Jacob J. Blauvelt, d. Dec. 13 1856, aged 78 yrs. 7 mos. 27 ds. 90. Maria Myers, wife of John I. Blauvelt, d. Oct. 8 1854, aged

88.

Jacob

89.

94 yrs. 2 mos. 6 91.

85 yrs, 92. 93.

ds.

Jane Blauvelt, wife of Henry I. Haring, d. June 25 1863, aged 4 mos. 17 ds. John Blauvelt, d. Nov. 21 1842, in his 85th year. 1854, in her Catherine, wife of Jacob Blauvelt, died Dec. 17

70th year. 94.

John Blauvelt,

d.

Jan. 22

1855, aged 52 yrs. 2 mos. 6 ds.

BEBGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCEIPTIONS

61

Peter Perry, d. April 15 1884, aged 55 yrs. 11 mos. 7 days. Justin Demarest, d. Nov 1 1878, aged 80 yrs. 10 mos. 28 ds. Margaret Haring, wife of Justin Demarest, d. Feb. 14, 1885,

95. 96.

97.

aged 82

yrs.

4 mos. 11

ds.

dau. of Justin

Mary Margaret,

98.

& Margaret

Demarest,

June

d.

1842, aged 13 yrs. 4 mos. 17 ds. Ann Eliza, dau. of Justin & Margaret Demarest, d. Jan. 99. 1848, aged 1 yr. 7 mos. 16 ds.

12

5

Bachel Durie, wife of James Demarest, d. Feb. 25, 1883, aged 100. 58 yrs. 11 mos. 101. Mary, dau. of James & Rachel Demarest, d. Aug. 10 1881,

aged 25

yrs. 10

mos.

Children of James & Rachel Demarest. Justin Henry, died Aug. 23 1849, aged 1 yr. 11 mos. 11 Sarah Matilda, d. Jan. 9 1855, aged 4 yrs. 5 mos. 25 ds.

102. 103.

ds.

Al Hier Leght Begraaven, het Lichaem van Isaac J. Blauvelt, geboren in het yaer 1754 Maert 31de, overleeden 21de December in het yaer 1805, oud eynde 51 yeaer, 8 maenden, and 20 dagen. (copied 104.

is

in full.) 105.

Anno 1791 den 17 van July is alhier begraaven het lighaem van Margrietje Blauvelt, huysvrow van Theunis Helm, oud 84 yaer en 3 maenden. 17 (H. B.)-93. (copied in full.) Anno 1791 den 26st van July is Alhier Begraaven het lighaem 106. van Theunis Helm, oud 84 yaer en 9 maenden. (H. B.) (copied in full.)

Many rough

stones without marks.

BURIAL GROUND, ECKERSON FARM. OLD TAPPAN, BERGEN CO. N. J. Copied Nov. 3rd, 1912, by John Neafie, N. Y. 1.

Samuel Titus,

d.

Feb.

25

1831,

aged 51

yrs.

6

mos.

17

ds.

(dim)

Joseph Fletcher, son of James & Eliza Titus, b. Apr. 13 1850, Sep 20 1850, aged 5 mos. 8 ds. Garret T. Hering, D. May 251849, aged 70 yrs. 4 mos. 1 day. 3. 4. Cornelius Eckerson, b. Nov. 12 1755, d. Mch 13 1848, aged 92 yrs. 4 mos. 1 day. 5. Elizabeth Haring, wife of Cornelius Eckerson, b. Dec. 7 1759, 2.

d.

d.

Sep 6.

191841, aged John Eckerson,

mos. 1 day.

81 yrs. 9 mos. 12 ds. b.

Mch

1

1785, d. Sep 2

1839, aged 54 yrs. 6 ,

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

62

Maria Herring, wife of John C. Eekerson, d. Apr. 6 1875, aged 7. 83 years, 5 months. 8. 1826, d. Cornelia, dau. of John & Maria Eckerson, b. Aug. 26 9 3 ds. 21 mos. 29 yrs. 1848, aged May Frederick Eckerson, d. Nov. 27 1863, aged 48 years, 8 days. Isaac Craft, 117th N. Y. Vol. Infantry, d. May 231886. 11. Henry Gardinier, d. Apr. 231887, aged 85 yrs. 2 mos. 9 ds. Rachel Haring, wife of Henry Gardinier, b. Feb. 26, 1797 12.

9.

10.

Apr.

d.

45 yrs. 1 mo. 22 ds. Eddie, son of Edward & Freelove Johnson, aged 8 mos. 22 days,

171842, aged

13.

(no dates.) 14.

Celia Loekwood, wife of Russell Fisk, borr "Warwick, R. I. 1794 died at Tappan, N. J. Jan. 31 Ibo4.

June 24 15. 16.

Abraham

J. Eckerson, b. Caroline E. Smith, wife of

d.

Abraham

J.

Eckerson, b. 1827,

d.

1910. 17.

J.

Blanch Eckerson,

11

Dec.

d.

1888

aged 22

3

yrs.

mos.

5 ds. 18.

Margareta Haring, wife of

1899 aged 57 19.

Meta Catherine Helmken,

20.

Abraham

Eckerson,

yrs. 8 mos. 4 days. 21. Catherine Smith,

aged 67 22.

23

d.

Eckerson,

Aug. 18

yrs. 5 mos. 24 ds.

yrs. 10

b.

Apr. 16

b.

Sep. 6

wife of

d. July 61863. May 101847, aged 76

1862

1770, d.

Abraham Eckerson,

d.

May

17

1842,

mos. 24 ds.

James A. Eckerson,

d.

Mch

22

1875, aged

68 years, 6 mos.

ds.

23. Elizabeth Blauvelt, wife of James A. Eckerson, d. Apr. 21 1846, aged 34 yrs. 2 mos. 10 ds. 24. Jane Wortendyke, wife of James A. Eckerson, d. Mch 12 1883, aged 76 yrs. 2 mos. 9 ds.

Garret Eckerson, d. Oct. 19 1879, aged 81 yrs. 1 mo. 3 days. Sophia Bogert, wife of Garret A. Eckerson, b. Sep 28 1805, d. Dec. 22 1861 aged 56 yrs. 2 mos. 24 ds. 27. Hattie S., daughter of John W. & Maria E. Eckerson, d. Dec. 25. 26.

19

1886, aged 3 yrs. 2 mos. 5 ds. Our Babe. (A small marble stone, no dates.) 29. Henrietta, dau. of Albert B. & Annie Eckerson, d. 28.

aged 9 30.

aged 7 31.

yrs. 8

mos. 5

Mch

14

1867

ds.

Peter H. son of Albert B. yrs. 3 mos. 23 ds. Francis, child of Albert B. yrs. 6 ds.

&

Annie Eckerson,

& Annie

Eckerson,

d.

Mch 281867,

d.

Mch

11

d.

Mch

1867

aged 4 32.

1867

Annie, daughter of Albert B. yrs. 4 mos. 10 ds.

aged 2

& Annie

Eckerson,

10

BEEGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

A

small brown stone.

33.

C. E.

34.

Cornelius Eckerson, b.

21

years, 7 days,

aged 35.

63

d.

July 28, 1839

(scaled.)

Catherine Myers, wife of Cornelius Eckerson, yrs. 10 mos. 19 ds.

d.

June 17

1892,

aged 90 36.

5

Rebecca, daughter of Cornelius and Catharine Eckerson,

1842, aged 15 yrs. 9 mos. 18 ds.

A

number of unmarked

graves.

d.

Feb.

Minute on the Death of William ADOPTED DECEMBER Newark,

The Board

New

of Trustees of the

4,

C.

Morton.

1916.

Jersey,

New

ciety learned with great sorrow that on their esteemed and beloved treasurer,

December

4,

1916.

Jersey Historical SoNovember the tenth

William C. Morton, suddenly had been removed by death from the midst of a busy life. At a special meeting held on November the eleventh expressions of regret at the loss to the board of a good friend and a faithful officer in the going of Mr. Morton were The board desired to go on record as sinfeelingly uttered. their loss, and as deeply sympathizing with lamenting cerely his bereaved wife and family. Mr. Morton was elected treasurer of the Society on November the twenty-first in the year nineteen hundred, and served with peculiar efficiency, combining punctuality with His marked faithfulreliability, for more than fifteen years. ness and his genial spirit were features of his character that won him the confidence and the friendship of his fellow members of the board and of the Society. He had become a member of the Society on May 18, 1893.

With grateful appreciation of his services and with sincere sympathy for his family the board through this record desires to keep his name in loving remembrance as marking a worthy Christian, a valuable citizen and a manly friend.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

New VOL.

Jersey Historical Society NEW

II.

New

No> 2

SERIES

Light on Famous Controversy in the History of Elizabethtown

BY WILLIAM

J.

MAGIE, FORMER CHANCELLOR OF

NEW

JERSEY

The controversy between the Associates of Elizabethtown and the Proprietors of New Jersey over the title to the land on which the town was settled may be said to have begun in 1670, when the Associates refused to pay the quit-rents demanded by the Proprietors, and the last trace of it was seen when the Answer of the Associates to the Elizabethtown Bill in Chancery was filed in 1751. Since both of the parties to this long-pending controversy based their claims in whole or in part upon the right of the English King, it will be well to consider primarily

what

right the

English King had to the

soil

of

New

Jersey, for no greater title could be acquired under his grant It has or letters patent than such as he rightfully had.

been generally assumed by those who have written on this subject that the King had absolute dominion over the soil of New Jersey, with the power to vest a complete title in his grantees or patentees. During the latter part of the controversy the Proprietors made such claim. On the other hand many of those who settled in New Jersey asserted claims to titles based on titles procured from Indians, which

they insisted were superior to the Proprietors' rights. Such a claim, however, was repudiated by the Associates. They 5

NEW LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

66

insisted that a perfect title could only be created by a grant from the Indians under license from the King, confirmed

by the grant

of the King. After the feudal system was introduced in England, it became a maxim of the law that all lands in England were held mediately or immediately from the King. When lands

England the doctrine was deemed some limitations. If the foreign land had been acquired by conquest, the early view seems to have been that the King became possessed of an absolute were acquired outside

of

to be applicable but with

all the lands of the conquered nation, upon the that ground by his right of conquest he might take the lives of the conquered or banish them. This barbarous rule last-

title

to

ed for years, and, after the conquest of Canada, the Acadians were despoiled of the lands which they had occupied for a generation, and*were driven into exile with only such

property as they could carry with them. Lands were, however, deemed to be acquired by what was called the right of discovery. If the discovered land

was uninhabited being ited, a

in the

the complete dominion was recognized as King. But if the discovered lands were inhab-

more limited

right

was recognized.

Discovery under which lands before

unknown

title

could be claimed was of world and inhabited

to the civilized

only by uncivilized tribes or heathen. When such discovery was made by one of a nation, the reigning potentate of that nation claimed the right to forbid and prevent any other nation from trading there or from acquiring rights therein, and this although it incidentally deprived the inhabitants of liberty of action in respect to trade

manner and with

and intercourse.

In

reason, the King claimed the license his and to others to acquire title to right subjects lands from the inhabitants and owners. But no such

like

as

little

potentate ever claimed any such power to convey the soil of an inhabited country under the right of discovery, so as to deprive the owners of their right. It necessarily resulted that a complete

title

under these circumstances could be ac-

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

67

quired only by the union of the title of the owner and the the King by license or grant.

title of

This was the view taken by the Supreme Court of the United States in a case involving title under Indian grants. Chief Justice Marshall, in delivering the opinion, used the following language

:

"On the discovery of this immense continent the great nations of Europe were eager to appropriate to themselves so much of it as they could respectively acquire. Its vast extent offered an ample field to the ambition and enterprise of all and the character and religion of its inhabitants afforded an apology for considering them as a people over whom the superior genius of Europe might claim an ascendency. The potentates of the Old World found no difficulty in convincing themselves that they made ample compensation to the inhabitants of the New, by bestowing on them civilization and Christianity in exchange for unlimited independence. But, as they were all in pursuit of nearly the same object, it was necessary, in order to avoid conflicting settlements and consequent war with each other, to establish a principle which all should acknowledge as the law by which the right of acquisition, which they all asserted, should be regulated as between themselves. This prin;

was that discovery gave title to the governments by whose subjects or by whose authority it was made, against all other European governments, which title might be consummated by possession. "The exclusion of all other Europeans necessarily gave to the nation making the discovery the sole right of acquiring the soil from the natives and establishing settlements upon it. It was a right with which no Europeans could interfere. It was a right which all asserted for themselves, and to the assertion of which, by others, all assented. "Those relations which were to exist between the discoverer and the natives were to be regulated by themselves. The rights thus acquired being exclusive, no other power could interpose between them.

ciple

"In the establishment of these relations the rights of the original inhabitants were, in no instance, entirely disregarded, but were necessarily, to a considerable extent, impaired. They were admitted to be the rightful occupants of the soil, with a legal as well as just claim to retain possession of it, and to use it according to their own discre-

NEW

68

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

tion; but their rights to complete sovereignty as independent nations were necessarily diminished, and their power to dispose of the soil at their own will to whomsoever they pleased was denied by the original fundamental principle that discovery gave exclusive title to those who made it. "While the different nations of Europe respected the right of the natives as occupants, they asserted the ultimate dominion to be in themselves, and claimed and exercised as consequence of this ultimate dominion a power to grant the soil while yet in possession of the natives. These grants have been understood by all to convey a title to the grantees, subject only to the Indian right of occupancy." Johnson v.

Mclntosh, 8 Wheaton 543.

New York

In the

an Indian

title this

Court of Appeals language was used:

in a case involving

"It was a necessary sequence to the claim that the sovereign had the ultimate title to the soil, that the right to extinguish the Indian occupation was exclusively vested in the sovereign. The Indians were held to be incapable of alienating their lands except to the Crown, and all purchases made from them without its consent were regarded and treated as absolutely void. grant from the Crown only conveyed the fee, subject to the right of Indian occupation, and when that was extinguished under the sanction of the Crown the possession then attached to the fee, and the title of the

A

grantee was thereby perfected." Seneca Nation 126 N. Y. Reports 122.

There was reason, therefore,

v.

Christie,

in the assertion of the

Associates that the right of the King was largely the right of pre-emption. History leaves no room for doubt that the sole claim of the

Crown

of

England upon lands

in

North America was

based upon the right of discovery. The discovery was claimed to have been effected by Sebastian Cabot (in the reign of Henry the Seventh) who sailed along the coast from Florida to latitude 67. 5' north. No conquest had been

made from by

the Indian possessors of the lands thus claimed If the Dutch, who were in possession of

discovery.

parts of New York and New Jersey, had any valid claim, they had not been conquered or dispossessed in March,

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

69

But England never .admitted a rightful possession Dutch. They made protests and objections to the States General of Holland against such possession. The reply of Holland was that the enterprise was not that of the Dutch Government, but only that of the Dutch West India Company. It is obvious that under the prevailing rule the 1664. of the

Dutch inhabitants were intruders another power, and,

if

in a land discovered

their intrusion

by was not supported by

a license from the King, they were subject to expulsion. On March 12, 1664, Charles the Second, then King of

Great Britain, by letters patent, granted to his brother James, then Duke of York, great tracts of land in North America, one of which included the whole of New Jersey. The grant was in the nature of an ordinary conveyance of land described in fee simple, to be holden of the King "as of our manor in East Greenwich, in the County of Kent, in free

there

and

common

was granted

socage." By the same letters patent to the Duke of York and his heirs,

deputies, agents, commissioners and assigns absolute power to govern all the King's subjects who should adventure

themselves in the said lands or should thereafter inhabit the same.

The Duke was

also

empowered

to constitute

and

confirm Governors and officers within said lands, and to ordain and establish orders, laws, directions, instructions,

forms and ceremonies of government and magistracy for the government of said lands. Such Governors and officers were to have power to exercise martial law in as simple a

manner as the lieutenants of counties in England had. The Duke was also granted power to admit persons to trade within said lands and to have and possess any lands therein according to the laws made and established by virtue of the letters patent

and under such conditions as the Duke should

further made lawful for the Duke, his heirs and assigns, to transport to the said lands any of the King's subjects, or any other strangers not prohibited, that would become the King's loving subjects, with such things as were necessary for the use and defense of the inhabitants and the carrying on of trade with the people there. There appoint.

It

was

NEW

70

was

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

Duke and every Governor or appointed by him authority of government over the

further granted to the

officer

inhabitants

of the said lands, the

right

to

repel

or expel

therefrom every person who should attempt to inhabit them without a special license of the Duke, his heirs and assigns. It is obvious that such rights as the King had by virtue of discovery in the soil of America were transferred to the Duke of York in fee. It is also obvious that the King in-

Duke and his heirs with some of the Royal Prerogatives of Government. When a similar grant by James the First was under consideration in the English House of Lords, Lord Westbury declared that such a grant was surprising and unheard of. He said tended to endow the

:

i

"There

delegated in terms (whether good or not in law is another question), but in terms there is delegated to a subject the right of exercising Royal prerogatives, the right of dealing out grants of immense territory, and I presume the corresponding right of exercising all the powers and duties of Government over an extent of land equal in dimensions to some Kingdoms." Alexander v. Officers of is

State for Scotland, L. R.,

i

Sc.

and Div. App. Cas. 276, 286.

Nothwithstanding such a criticism upon such a grant I suppose that it must be conceded in the examination of the matter that the Duke of York acquired not only a right to the soil, such as the prevailing doctrine permitted the King to have, but also the right that the King had to select and license such persons as he chose to acquire an Indian title, which, with a grant from the

by so eminent a Judge,

Duke, would make a complete

title

to the lands in

New

Jersey.

The Duke of York, having acquired such rights and powers as were conferred upon him by the letters patent of March the I2th, 1664, commissioned Richard Nicolls, Esquire, to be his Deputy Governor within the lands granted, to perform all the powers that were granted by the letters patent, to be executed by the Duke's deputy, agent or assigns. His commission was dated April 2nd, 1664. At

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

71

that time parts of New York and New Jersey were occupied by the Dutch settlers under the Dutch West India

Those settlers did not pretend to have made under the authority of the States General Holland, nor under any license under the King of Eng-

Company.

their settlement

of

land.

It

is

clear

that

under the right of discovery they

were trespassers that the King

of

England might

eject.

The Duke

of York, being at that time the Lord High Admiral of England, sent out four vessels of the King's fleet and with them went Nicolls (who was a Colonel in the

army) and four hundred and fifty soldiers. It is somewhat who was in command of the fleet, but it was either Sir Robert Carr or Col. Nicolls. A commission consisting of Sir Robert Carr, Col. Nicolls, Sir George Cartwright and Samuel Maverick went along, who were empowered to doubtful

settle

boundaries and consider the general welfare of the

Colonies.

The

fleet

sailed

from Portsmouth

in

May

following

New York

on the 3Oth of Ausubmitted to the force and The Dutch Government gust. on September 8th Col. Nicolls and Sir Robert Carr landed their force of soldiers and took possession. The Dutch settlers were not ejected from the lands they occupied or deprived of their liberties. They apparently submitted at once and arrived

to the

in the

harbor of

government established by

Col. Nicolls.

After Col. Nicolls established the English power, he issued a proclamation publishing the terms, upon observing which the inhabitants of the Provinces of New York and New Jersey might acquire property in lands in either

The proclamation was under his commission Province. irom the Duke of York and by virtue of the powers and authority vested in him by the Duke. It was entitled thus "The conditions for new planters in the territories of His :

Royal Highness, the Duke of York." The first condition shows that the necessity of acquirIndian title by purchase from them was recognized, an ing for it declares that purchases were to be made from the Indian Sachems and recorded before the Governor. Pur-

72

NEW LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

chasers were not to pay the Governor for the liberty of purchasing. They were to set out a town and inhabit together, and

no purchaser should

any time contract for

at

himself with any Sachem without the consent of his Associates or special warrant from the Governor. Purchasers

were to be

free

from

all

manner

of assessments or rates for

years after the town plot was set out. Thereafter they were only to be liable to public rates according to the customs of the inhabitants, both English and Dutch. Lands

five

thus purchased and possessed should remain to the purchasers and their heirs as free lands to dispose of at their pleasure. Liberty of conscience was thereby allowed in all the territories of the Duke, provided such liberty was not

converted to licentiousness, or the disturbance of others in. the exercise of the Protestant religion. The several townships were to have liberty to make their particular laws and decide all small cases within themselves. After other matters, the

proclamation ended by providing that every town-

ship should have the free choice of their officers, both civil and military, and all men that should take the oath of allegiance, who were not servants or day laborers, but permitted to enjoy a town lot, were to be esteemed free men

who could not forfeit that character without due process of law. It may be noted in passing how succinctly the main features of the Grants and Concessions of the Proprietors afterward promulgated are expressed in this proclamation. There is the right to acquire an absolute title in land; the of the jurisdiction,

right to enjoy liberty of conscience and adjudicate and to choose their to be deprived of of law.

;

the right to legislate officers and not

own

any such privilege except by due process,

The date at which this proclamation was published does not clearly appear, but, on the .i6th of September, 1664, six men from Jamaica, Long Island, petitioned Col. Nicolls to grant them liberty to purchase and settle a parcel of land upon the river "called Cull River." This, no-

NEW doubt,

which

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

was what was then otherwise now called Newark Bay.

73

called Achtercull,

and

is

On

the 3oth of September, 1664, Col. Nicolls, in writing, consented to the proposals of the petition and promised to give the "Undertakers" all due encouragement in so good

These "undertakers" were John Bailies (Baily), Thomas Benydick, John Foster, Nathaniel Denton and Luke Watson. Pursuant to the authority and license thus given, John Baily, Daniel Denton and Luke Watson purchased a tract of land and procured a conveyance thereof, dated October The grantors named in the deed were Matano, 28, 1664. Manamowane and Cowescomen, of Staten Island. Of these grantors Matano alone executed the deed. There were twoa work.

Daniel Denton,

others who signed the deed by making a mark, but whowere not apparently the grantors. The lands thereby conveyed were described as follows: "Bounded on the south by a river commonly called the Raritons River and on the east by the river that parts Staten Island and the Main and to run northward up After Cull Bay till we come to the first river that sets westward up After Cull Bay aforesaid, and to run west into the country twice the length as it is broad from the north to the south of the aforementioned bounds." The grant was to Baily, Denton and Watson with their Associates and the habendum to the same persons, their associates, executors and assigns. The consideration was twenty fathoms of trading cloth, two made coats, two guns, two kettles, ten bars of lead and twenty hand-

powder. The grantees covenated, however, to pay therefor 400 fathoms of white wampum after a year from the day of entry of the grantees upon the land.

fuls of

By

a

deed

dated

as Governor under the

December

Duke

ist,

1664,

Col.

Nicolls,

York, after reciting the Denton and of Watson Baily, by the Indian deed, purchase confirmed and granted to John Baker, John Ogden, John Baily and Luke Watson, their associates, heirs, executors, administrators and assigns, the same tract of land, by the description contained in the Indian deed. The habendum of

74

was the

NEW LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY to the four parties named, subject to the payment to or his assigns, a certain rent "according to the

Duke

customary rate of the country for new plantations."

It

was

therein provided that the grantees should settle plantations on the lands granted with all convenient speed and

that no other person should have liberty to do so, except the grantees should neglect the planting agreed on. It was further recited that the persons planting said lands should

have equal freedom, immunities and privileges with any of His Majesty's subjects in any of his colonies in America. The grantees and their associates were given liberty to purchase of the natives or others who have the propriety thereof as far as Snake Hill. The confirming grant by Col. Nicholls recites the Indian deed to Baily, Denton and Watson, but confirms the title to Baily and Watson, and John Baker and John Ogden. It is a conceded fact that Baker and Ogden had bought from Denton his title. According to the recognized doctrine with respect to the acquisition of title to lands in countries that had been discovered by English subjects, it seems clear that the title of Baker and the other Associates was complete. Under a license from the representative and deputy of the Duke of York, empowered by him to execute the authority conferred upon the Duke in determining who should be admitted to settle within the Duke's Dominions, they had purchased the Indian title to the Elizabethtown tract, they had recorded the deed before the Governor, and he had granted and confirmed to them the tract in fee for themselves and their Associates. Unless there was some flaw in some of the various steps taken, or unless the Duke of York's deputy had been deprived in whole or in part of his authority to act, the title seems to be unassailable.

Duke of York conveyed New JerLord Berkeley, and Sir George Carteret. The conveyance purported to be by lease and release under the Statute of Uses. The lease was dated June 23rd, the release June 24th, 1664. This was two months after the commission given to Col. Richard Nicolls and after his departure In June, 1664, the

sey to John,

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

75

with the squadron destined to bring New York into subjection. The confirmatory release was of that sort then used for the conveyance of lands. It recited the grant to the Duke by the King's letters patent, so far as that transmitted to the Duke the title to lands. No specific consideration was named therein, but it was declared to be in consideration of a competent sum of good and lawful money. The granting clause granted, bargained, released and confirmed to Berkeley and Carteret the whole of New Jersey, declaring that the tract was thereafter to be called New Caesarea, or New Jersey, with all the rivers, mines, minerals, woods, fishings, hawking, hunting and fowling and all other royalties, profits, commodities and hereditaments appertaining to said lands, in as full and ample manner as the same had been granted to the Duke of York. The habendum was of the said tract with its appurtenances to Berkeley and Carteret, their heirs and assigns forever, yield-

Duke

yearly twenty nobles of royal same should be lawfully demanded the Inner Temple Hall, London, at the feast of St.

ing therefor to the

money

of England,

at or in

if

the

Michael the Archangel.

CARTERET COMMISSIONED GOVERNOR.

On the loth day of February, i664-'65, Berkeley and Carteret commissioned Philip Carteret as Governor over the lands thus conveyed to them, with power to nominate a Council, consisting of not more than twelve or less than six, unless the constituents should choose all or any of such

On

same day Berkeley and Carteret issued and Agreements of the Lords Proprietors of New Csesarea, or New Jersey, to and with all and every the adventurers and all such as shall

Council.

what they

the

called the Concessions

settle or plant there.

As such that that

title

was the

quired.

to lands as

title

that the

title

was thus conveyed was

all

had by right of discovery, alone which Berkley and Carteret ac-

King

originally

NEW LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

76 It is

confer

obvious that

it

would have been impracticable

to

upon purchasers coming to plant or settle in New Jersey by actual conveyances from Berkeley and CarThe long distance and the slow transmission of letteret. ters and papers seemed to forbid such an attempt. It is true that they might have constituted their new Governor title

their attorney in fact to

make

the necessary conveyances.

But they did not do so. On the contrary they devised a very ingenious scheme which, if their title to the lands in

New

Jersey be considered by itself, lacked legal correctness. set out for the general planters and The Governor and Council, with the purchasers was this

The scheme which they :

General Assembly (if there was any) were to divide all lands and the Governor was to issue a warrant, directing the Surveyor-General to lay out such a number of acres

was entitled to; the SurveyorGeneral should then certify to the Chief Secretary or Register the location and number of acres laid out, and thereon a warrant should issue directing the Chief Secretary to prepare a grant of such land to the purchaser in fee, yielding, as the person applying for

however, and paying yearly, on March 25, one-half penny of legal money of England for every acre. To this grant the Governor was given power to put the seal of said Province and to subscribe his name the major part of the Council were to subscribe their names the grant was then to be recorded and was declared to be effectual in law for the enjoyment of the lands on payment of the rents aforesaid. It is to be noted that the first payment of rent was fixed by the terms of the concession for March 25, 1670. ;

;

OPPORTUNITY FOR LITIGATION.

A

comparison of the dates above stated discloses the

opportunity for serious litigation over the title to the lands contained in the Indian deed and Nicolls grant. The Duke of York had commissioned Col. Nicolls on April 2, 1664,

and given him authority to settle the tracts which the King had granted the Duke. On the 24th day of the succeeding

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

77

June, while Nicolls must have been upon the ocean, the Duke executed the lease and release to Berkeley and Carteret;

and

undoubtedly without any knowledge of

Nicolls,

that grant, in September, 1664, licensed the Indian purchase, and after the purchase had been made, confirmed it

by

his grant

on December

I,

1664.

Apparently no effort was made by the Duke to protect the interest of any who by virtue of his commission to Col. Nicolls had dealt with him and expended money in the purchase and settlement of lands in New Jersey; nor does the Duke seem to have made any strenuous effort to give notice of his transfer of title to Berkeley and Carteret as, by a letter from him to Col. Lovelace, afterward Governor of New York, dated Nov. 25th, 1672, he stated that he wrote to Col. Nicolls signifying his transfer of New Jersey on the 28th of November, 1664, which was two days before Col. Nicolls confirmed the grant to the Associates. Although the Duke of York seemed to ignore the possibility that purchases might be made under his instructions to Colonel Nicolls, before the latter was notified of the conveyance of New Jersey to Carteret and Berkeley, there is

strong reason to suppose that the Proprietors considered that possibility and provided for it. When the contest between them and the Associates was at its height, the Duke wrote a letter to Col. Lovelace, then his Deputy in America.

The

latter

was dated November

after noticed.

that the

Duke commanded Lovelace

in the contest. lace

On

produced the

"The Duke's

New

it

is

and

will be here-

sufficient to

say

to aid the Proprietors

the I5th of May, 1673, Governor Lovebefore his Executive Council and

letter

the following entry

ing to

25, 1672,

For present purposes

was made:

letter

dated

November 25th read

relat-

Jersey.

"A letter from the Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret to recommend the affayers of Jersey to the Governor. "Coll. Nicolls Patents to Elizabeth Town and Nevis-

New

ans

now made

void by the Duke.

NEW LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

78

"A letter from the Lords Proprietors to Coll. Nicolls confirming his Patents before Captain Philip Carterets Arrival being objected the state of the case to be returned to His Royal Highness." COL. LOVELACE

Colonel Lovelace was a

AND HIS LETTER.

man

of intelligence

and honor.

evident that he had produced a letter from the Proprietors to Nicolls before Carteret's arrival, which he conIt is

A

strued as confirming the Associates' title. thorough search has been made in the archives of New York, but the letter has not been found. It may be conjectured plausibly that

it

was returned

to the

Duke

as part of the "State of the

never appeared in any part of the contest and the Associates were doubtless ignorant of it. Case."

It

As the primary purpose of my investigation is to discover if possible the grounds upon which Baker and his Associates resisted for so long a period the claims asserted by persons high in authority and strong in influence, both with the King and the Duke of York, who soon after became the King, I refrain at the present from expressing any opinion upon the legal aspect of the controversy. To determine the motives of the Associates we must discover what they did in settling their tract and laying out the foundation of Elizabethtown on the banks of the Kill von Kull and the Elizabeth River. The sources of information are meagre. There can be no doubt that the Associates made records of the organization and of their successive acts in books kept for that purpose. If these books were accessible doubtless they would give a vivid picture of the birth and growth of the new settlement. But, unfortunately, those books have disapare peared, and in all probability have been destroyed.

We

driven to other sources from which inferences may be drawn, as to what was done by the Associates in organizing

and settling the town. In 1745, more than eighty years after the Indian Grant and Nicolls deed, the Proprietors filed in the Court of

NEW Chancery

name

of

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

New

79

Jersey the Bill which has obtained the Some four

of the Elizabethtown Bill in Chancery.

or five years afterwards the Associates filed an Answer to the Bill which seems to have been put in by all those who

represented the original purchasers and who claimed rights Elizabethtown under them. Facts stated in the Bill and admitted in the Answer may fairly be inferred to be truthin

ful,

and to justify reliance on what

is

there stated and ad-

mitted as to the conduct of the Associates.

ANOTHER SOURCE OF INFORMATION. There

is

another source from which valuable informa-

may be obtained. It seems to have escaped the attention of some of the local historians who have dealt with the tion

subject, and not to have received from others of its existence the attention it deserves.

After

much

litigation in the

Courts of

New

who knew Jersey over

and after the discovery of the loss of the books of record, a meeting of the Associates, calling themselves Freeholders of Elizabethtown, was held on the 2nd of August, 1720, and it was unanimously agreed to open a new book, "to be improved to be a book of records for the use and behoof of the freeholders of Elizabethtown." At the same meeting Samuel Whitehead was chosen as town clerk and a committee of seven men was selected, to whom the freeholders assembled granted full power to act for them in matters touching the settlement of their rights and properties claimed by force of grants and purchase under Governor Richard Nicolls. There was entered in the said book afterward records of meetings and transactions and a prettyfull narrative is contained in an affidavit made by Samuel Whitehead (who is recited therein as having been more the

title

than thirty years the clerk of Elizabethtown) of all the matters concerning the purchase, the admission of Associates with Baker, Ogden, Baily and Watson, the original purchasers and the nature of the divisions arranged for by the Associates.

NEW

80

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

It may be fairly inferred that the Associates were advised that something more was necessary for the protection of their titles as Associates. There is entered at the other end of the book a valuable document dated November

whom

only 12 made their mark) This document was the work undoubtedly of a sound legal mind. It recites the commission of Nicolls, his conditions on which purchases of lands could be made, his license and the confirmatory deed of It names those who became Associates with the Nicolls. original grantees and those that were admitted afterward in 1699. I* sets out tnat th e Associates had, at diverse times, met and agreed upon divisions of the lands in question

signed by 113 (of claiming Associate rights. 18, 1729,

among themselves, the surveys of which were entered in books kept for that purpose by the town clerk, and that the surveys were intended to convey to the persons who had obtained them an estate in severalty in fee simple. It fit

then avers the loss of those books, so that the benefrom the record was frustrated, but that, as

to be derived

the original surveys were existing, it was thereby agreed that such divisions and surveys, and also such as might

be agreed upon, should be perpetuated, and should be also entered in this book, and it was declared that such entry should be as effectual at law for transferring an estate in severalty to the persons who had previously or might thereafter obtain surveys as if a partition had been made by indenture under the hands and seals of all the thereafter

parties interested, or as if the authentic or legal manner.

same had been done

in other

noteworthy that this document was actually signed book by many of the original Associates, and by the descendants of such. One of the signers was the Rev. Jonathan Dickinson. There were wax seals to each of the signers except five. As the impressions on the seals differ, it is a fair inference that they were signed at different It is

in the

times.

After the document the book contains records of the meetings of the Associates, and of the appointment of com-

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

81

mittees to protect their interests, particularly to inspect and determine the validity of the surveys that should be offered for record. Thereafter follow the entry of many surveys, and the last record is dated January 25, 1788, and is of a survey dated December 3, 1764.

DECISIVE EVIDENCE OF ACTS OF THE ASSOCIATES.

seems incontestable that this book furnishes important and decisive evidence of the acts of the Associates. The book is now in the Library of Princeton University. It

From

these sources there may be derived, in my judga fair ment, picture of the acts of the antagonistic parties after the execution of Nicolls' confirmatory grant. It is

conceded on the part of the Proprietors

that, very shortly after obtaining that grant, the grantees entered upon the lands and founded the settlement. Before the summer of

1665 at least four houses were erected by them, and, it may be assumed, were occupied by them and their families. These houses, according to tradition, were built along the river, probably all on the north side of it and east of the present Broad street. Possibly one or more of them might have been on the south side of the river.

About the first of August, 1665, there appeared to these settlers Philip Carteret, holding the commission of Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret, as Governor of JerHe had arrived in York on the ship Philip, on sey.

New

New

July 2Qth, 1665, and there, no doubt, received information from Col. Nicolls of the grant that had been made by him

and of the settlement begun under that grant. It is unlikely At all that he had previously known of Nicolls' grant. events he proceeded to Elizabethtown Point with his ship.

He had

brought on that ship a number of proposed settlers, thirty in all, together with provisions and implements suitable for use in forming a settlement.

some

According to tradition he was met settlers already there.

nage 6

it is

As

probable that the

was landing was

the ship

at the landing

by

of considerable tonat the point.

From

NEW LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

82

the landing he went, accompanied by the previous settlers,, to the place where the houses had been located. Whether story is mythical or not is uncertain, it that he marched from the Point carrying a hoe

the

is

improbable on his shoul-

der to indicate that he intended to be a planter in the new land. It is most likely that the Associate Settlers for the first

time ascertained at the landing of Governor Carteret that Duke of York had conveyed New Jersey to Berkeley and Carteret. Yet it does not appear that the new Governor asserted any right to dispossess the settlers already

the

there and claiming to possess the land under the Indian deed and Nicolls' grant. On the contrary the Governor settled

among them and purchased

in the lands.

the rights of John Baily In order to be able to make such purchase,

he had to obtain the consent and approbation of the other Associates. By NicoTls' grant it was provided that none should have liberty to settle thereon without such consent and approbation. Doubtless he was duly admitted as an Associate, and his name now appears as such in the book in the

Library at Princeton.

At some subsequent period the

original Associates and admitted as Associates, including Governor Carteret, met and determined to admit in the settlement 80 families, with the privilege of extending the number to 100 if it afterwards seemed proper. The inhabitants took the oath of allegiance, and included therein was a stipulation that they were to be true and faithful to the Lords Proprietors and the Government of this Province of New Jersey. It is to be noted that the government of the Province was then claimed to be in the Lords Proprietors. The terms for settling the town were these Each inhabitant was to have a home lot in the town of four acres and a "pittle," or additional two acres, more or less. Thereafter divisions of the common property were to be made from time to time among the Associates. The plan devised for such divisions was the surveying, under the direction of the Associates, of lots within the purchase and the di-

other

new

settlers

who had been

:

NEW vision of the

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY same

83

to individual settlers in proportion to

their contribution to the cost of the purchase and the settlement. Those who contributed the least had what is called

Others who contributed more had a Second Lot Right, or a Third Lot Right; the Second Lot Right being twice as much, and the Third Lot Right being three times as much as a First Lot Right. When surveys had been made by the direction of the Associates, a First Lot Right man acquired a title in severalty to one lot, a Second Lot Right man acquired a title to two lots, and a Third Lot Right man acquired a title in severalty to three lots. The surveys were returned to the Associates and entered in the books of record. a First Lot Right.

As scheme

the legal title was in the original grantees, this for severance of title could only be effective with

the consent of the original grantees, given by a satisfactory instrument. It is possible that such a consent was entered in their

books of record and signed and sealed by the orig-

It is interesting to notice that this mode of for a severance of title resembles that adopted providing Lords the Proprietors themselves, and provided for in by

inal grantees.

the Concessions. But there

was

this

marked

difference.

The

Associates' plan provided for a severance among all the purchasers from time to time and in different proportions.

Before 1670 two such divisions were made. By the six acres were set off to First Lot Right men and twelve acres and eighteen acres to Second and Third Lot Right men, respectively. By the second division twelve

first

acres were set off to First Lot Right men and twenty-four acres and thirty-six acres to Second and Third Lot Right

men, respectively. Governor Carteret took part in these divisions and accepted the lots thereby alloted to him, and he was a Third Lot Right man. No divisions were afterward made until 1699, which was about the time the controversy began. After the arrival of Philip Carteret and those with him and their union with the settlers who were already established, the new settlement grew with a rapidity quite

NEW

84

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

unusual in those times. Settlers came from Long Island and the east and the number allotted by the agreement of the Associates was made up. Houses were built and a church was erected. None of the settlers appear to have been requested to take title under the Proprietors' Concessions for some years. Titles were taken by Philip Carteret under his Third Lot Right and by several of his friends who

had become Associates.

The town was made

the capital of the government,

and, on the 3Oth of May, 1668, the first Legislature met here, and, having read an act relating to crimes, which it seems had been presented by the Governor and Council,

they referred the matter to the next session, to be held on November of the same year. That meeting was held at Elizabethtown and passed several acts. It is probable that other mee'tings were held afterward, but none are contained in the collection of Learning and Spicer, the next meeting reported by them having taken place on the 5th of the third of

November,

1675.

The amicable

relations between the Governor and the were maintained until about the year 1669. The Governor and his friends were admitted as Associates, and

settlers

acquired rights according to the Associates' agreements. of the Governor during that time was probably

The conduct

the ground upon which, after the death of Sir George Carteret, his widow and others interested charged him with

having connived at the purchase from Indians. The Governor issued a declaration just before he left for England, denying reports tending to indicate that he had been unfaithful to the Lords Proprietors of the country. The period of good feeling was brought to a close in 1670. By the concession of the Lords Proprietors, all settlers were entitled to hold their lands free from rent until 1670. When that period arrived the Elizabethtown Associ-

were astonished to have the rent of one halfpenny an acre demanded of them, as if they had acquired title under the Concessions. It was then perceived, probably ates

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

85

for the first time, that they were to be called on to submit to the title of the Proprietors. About this time Governor Carteret conveyed to Richard

Mitchell a tract of land in the town for a house lot. Mitchell had not been admitted as an Associate. The Associates at a meeting on June iQth, 1671, determined that Richard Mitchell should not enjoy his lot given him by the Governor and that some one should go the next morning and pull up his fence. This summary mode of enforcing the rights of the Associates resulted in a riot, for which several persons were afterward indicted and fined. The public became so inflamed that courts were resisted, jails were broken open and the authority of the Governor contemned. The affairs of the Province were in a state of confusion and the Governor and some of his friends went to England in 1672.

In May, 1673, his friends returned, bringing the letter Duke of York to Lovelace, of November 25, 1672, and a letter from Charles the Second, bearing date Decemof the

ber 9th, 1672, to Berry, the Deputy Governor and the Coun-

The Duke's letter is printed on page 31 of Learning and Spicer. It declared that his letter to Col. Nicolls, of November 25, 1664, required him to aid Berkley and Carteret in the possession of New Jersey. It went on to recite that under pretended grants from Col. Nicolls some contentious persons claimed lands, which claims the Duke asserted were posterior to his grant to Berkeley and Carteret and then directed Governor Lovelace to assist the cil.

;

New

Jersey.

persons to submit

and be

Proprietors in maintaining the possession of

The King's

letter

commanded

all

obedient to the laws and government established by the Proprietors under pain of his high displeasure. The pressure upon the Associates was so great that

they yielded so far as to take out warrants for surveys. This act, however, did not bind them to the payment of Under the Concessions when the surveys were rerent. turned a grant was made, subject to the payment of rent. When that was accepted the acceptor became bound. Of those who applied for surveys many declined to proceed

NEW

86

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

further and never took out the grants, and

still

resisted the

of rent.

payment It was evident

to both sides that the question could not be settled by any violence short of a revolution. Recourse was therefore had, after some years, to the courts. In 1693, one Fullerton, claiming under the Proprietors,

brought an action of ejectment against one Jeoffrey Jones, who was one of the Associates and claimed title under them. The cause was tried at Perth Amboy in May, 1695, and a special verdict was rendered upon which the court entered judgment against Jones. Under a provision of the Concessions, Jones took an appeal to the King in Council and the appeal was heard before a committee, one of whom was Chief Justice Holt. After hearing argum'ent the judgment was reversed. Unfortunately the ground of reversal does not appear, for no reports of the Privy Council were at that time printed. The

counsel for the Associates was William Nicolls, who made an affidavit, a copy of which appears in the Answer in Chancery. He asserts that the whole dispute was whether Col. Nicolls might not grant license to any subjects of England to purchase lands from the native pagans, and if, upon such license and purchase, they should gain a property in the lands, and that those questions were decided in the

affirmative It

may

and the judgment was reversed for that reason. perhaps be doubtful whether the Privy Council

had declared such a reason for their

reversal, because the

Proprietors began to harass the Associates by a large number of actions questioning the title to the Elizabethtown grant. It

of

would serve no useful purpose

litigation.

In

general

the

to

decisions

follow the course

were

adverse

to

The Judges were appointed by the This Proprietors and some of them were Proprietors. seemed to the Associates to explain the continual adverse decisions. It excited their feeling and induced them to

the

Associates.

unite in a petition to the King.

The

petition

and Spicer, page 689, and was signed by

is in

Learning

sixty-five of the

NEW Associates.

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

It is

not dated, but shows that

after the death of Charles II,

and

it

87

was made

after the reversal of

Fullerton v. Jones. They boldly attack the courts and their right to take jurisdiction, and prayed that the King would either place the petitioners under the government of New York and grant to the New York courts power to act in

East Jersey, or appoint indifferent judges to administer jusbetween the Associates and the Proprietors.

tice

[To be Continued]

Archives of

New

Jersey,

Volume

Five,

Second Series Continuing its work under an appropriation from the State the Historical Society has published Volume Five, Second Series, of the Archives, which contains extracts relating to New Jersey, mostly from the "New Jersey Gazette," in dates from October, 1780, to July, 1782. The period covers the closing years of the Revolution, and from the contemporary accounts of that historic period thus brought availably together much of interest and of value may be gleaned. Local celebrations over the surrender of Cornwallis are reported, and many other matters of the War. The proclamation of Governor William Livingston appointing December 13, 1781, as a day of thanksgiving for the State, is among the documents reported in full. The value of newspaper extracts for historical and genealogical purposes has long been recognized by the Historical Society, and the importance of publishing such extracts, especially those of early dates taken from rare and unavailable papers, has also been so fully recognized that with the present publication fourteen volumes have been issued, extending from 1704 to 1782, with a gap including the years of 1774 and 1775 The whole life of a people is more or less still to be filled. touched by the newspaper, and by no other medium is the atmosphere of the past so well brought back. Professor Austin Scott, LL.D., of Rutgers College, one of the members of the Society's Committee on Colonial Documents, has edited the volume and written the Preface. It contains 490 pages, including a copious Index.

The State

of

New

Jersey

[Address delivered by Hon. Joseph S. Frelinghuysen, March 17, 1917, before the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, at Montclair, in response to thetoast, "The State of New Jersey"].

Mr. Toastmaster and Gentlemen: I feel deeply honored you have accorded me the distinction of replying to

in that

this toast, the State of

New

Jersey. I shall attempt though do justice to this inviting theme the Commonwealth of our loves and hopes. I

shall doubtless fail

to

:

Of this splendid Commonwealth, we, her sons, are everlastingly proud. Yet it has ever seemed to me that we, and our forefathers before us, have been almost cruelly negligent in our duty in proclaiming to the world the paramount services of the citizens of New Jersey in the forma-

development of the nation. We have played no empire building, yet we have been unduly modest, or criminally remiss, in demanding from our sister States a full recognition of our place in the scheme of tion and

minor

role in

evolutionary development as a nation.

we

are sandwiched in between two and two great cities of those Comgreat Commonwealths, achievements of our dismonwealths. the Repeatedly, in men have the course of time, obliterated, been, tinguished or at least obscured by methods employed by New York and Pennsylvania chroniclers, to blazon to the world the deeds of their own sons, at the expense of those of New Jersey, not one wit less eminent or less forceful factors in history-making. This has been our own fault, and from

Unfortunately,

henceforth

let

us refuse to take a back-seat at the behests

or as a result of the methods of our neighbors across the North and the Delaware rivers.

"THE STATE OF

NEW

First, let us not forget that

JERSEY"

New

Jersey

89

was not only

settled years before Pennsylvania, but the first Europeans to locate on our own home soil arrived here at least two

years prior to the landing of the Pilgrims on Plymouth Rock. Do not forget that, men of New Jersey, though we have had no Longfellows, Whittiers, or Lowells to laud in verse the beginnings of our dearly loved State. It was in 1618, a quarter of a century before William Penn was born, that the first European settlers established themselves in the wilds of what is now Bergen County. These original colonists were members of the little band of Dutch pioneers, who had located in what is now New York

State about four years previously. As it was not my good fortune to be born of Irish if I had been consulted in the matter the result have been different I am proud of the fact that I might came of the same stock which originally peopled our muchbeloved State.

lineage

In 1623, five years after the colonization of North Jersey, another band of Dutch pioneers located in South Jersey, under the leadership of Captain Cornelius Jacobsen

Mey,

after

The

whom

ablest of

Cape all

May takes its name. New Jersey's historians,

of

the late

of Paterson, describes the early Dutch emias "the first settlers of our State, the sturdy pioneers grants who here planted the original banner of civilization, of re-

William Nelson,

and political liberty who offered free asylum to men and all women without questioning their views who respected every man's religious faith as a matter beligious all

;

;

tween himself and his God." Such were the founders of the Commonwealth, and we should ever thank God that from such an inspiration our State had its birth. Following the Dutch in 1638 and this, too, was prior to the birth of William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania came the Swedes, who settled on both sides of the Delaware, their colony extending from Capes May and Henlopen to the point where is now located our State Capitol.

"THE STATE OF

90

The Swedes,

NEW

JERSEY"

the Dutch, were a simple-minded, industrious, law-abiding, religious people. Governor Printz, who came over in 1643, engaged to keep the new settlement like

from foreign and domestic enemies, to preserve amity, good neighborhood and reciprocity with foreigners, with his own people and with the savages, and, to employ the phraseology of that day, "to render justice without distinction so that there may be no injury to any man." It was in 1664 that the English assumed jurisdiction of the territory now embraced within the limits of New Jersey, under the joint control of Lord John Berkeley and Sir George Carteret, and from them we derived our first Constitution, which embraced this notable clause safe

:

"That no persoij qualified as aforesaid within the said Province at any time shall be in any ways molested, punished, disquieted or called in question for any difference in opinion or practice in matters of religious concernments, who do not actually disturb the civil peace of the said Province but that all and every such person and persons may, from time to time, and at all times, freely and fully have and enjoy his and their judgments and consciences in matters of religion throughout the said Province, they behaving themselves peaceably and quietly, and not using their liberty to licentiousness, nor to the civil injury or outward disturbance of others any law, statute or clause contained, or to be contained, usage or custom of this realm of England to the contrary thereof in anywise notwithstand:

;

ing."

Twelve or thirteen years later, in 1677, came the settlement of the Quakers in South Jersey, or West New Jersey, as it was called, at Burlington, who were governed under a

new

Constitution, promulgated in London, before the first Colonists sailed. This second historic document contained

this

memorable provision

:

"That no man, nor number of men upon earth, hath power or authority to rule over men's consciences in religious matters

;

therefore

it

is

consented, agreed and or-

"THE STATE OF

NEW

JERSEY"

91

dained, that no person or persons whatsoever, within the said Province, at any time or times hereafter shall be any ways, upon any pretence whatsoever, called in question, or in the least punished or hurt, either in person, estate or privilege, for the sake of his opinion, judgment, faith or worship towards God, in matters of religion but that all ;

and every such person and persons may from time to time, and at all times, freely and fully have and enjoy his and their judgments, and the exercise of their consciences, in matters of religious worship throughout all the said Province."

Thus, two centuries and a half ago, were laid the foundations of civil and religious liberty, which have made our Commonwealth notable among the sisterhood of colonies and States, and thus were sown the seeds which have ever since brought the fruition of universal freedom of thought and speech whereby

we

are to-day a free and

happy

people.

In all the crises of our history since, as a Province and a State, forgetting not their noble heritage, the sons of New Jersey have ever been alert, vigilant, patriotic, and on the firing line

when duty has invoked

the intelligent service of

true Americans.

New

Jersey took the lead

Stamp Act began

in 1765.

when

New

the agitation over the Jersey was at the front

when

the necessities of the situation demanded militancy rather than pacifism, in 1774 and 1775. Certain of her sons were conspicious in the Continental Congress. In the

persons of Lord Stirling, of General William Maxwell, of General Joseph Reed, of General Philemon Dickinson, etc., others of her sons rendered heroic service in the field. Within her borders three of the most splendid victories of the Revolution were won. Upon her soil Washington's Army was encamped for more than half the period of the entire war.

Thus, I say to you, men of New Jersey, we need not hang our heads when we hear spoken of the heroic services of America's nation-builders in the early days of our West-

"THE STATE OF

92

NEW

JERSEY"

ern civilization, or the achievements of the country's statesmen and soldiers in the later days of stress and trial, for

among

these dominating figures upon the public stage were

men from our own

strong in the

drama

State,

who

played major parts

of national development.

When, the war being over, and the citizens of the thirteen infant States found themselves governed, or misgovernby an inadequate, haphazard system of executive and it was New Jersey which came to the

ed,

legislative control,

front with suggestions eventuating in the Federal Constitution of 1787. And it fell to her lot to be the third State to

immortal document, being only six days behind Pennsylvania and twelve days behind Delaware. As upon all other occasions, our sires helped blaze the

ratify that

way for

for a better, ampler, safer form of government, a guide republics which have since come into being.

all

Passing by the three-quarters of a century which intervened, during which formative period the statesmen of

Commonwealth were leaders in thought and we come to the great crisis of 1861, when destiny this

action,

forced

the nation to face the most ominous tragedy in our history. And what was New Jersey's part in that amazing

Fort Sumter was fired upon April 12, 1861 President Lincoln issued his call for troops April 15. On April 16, Company A., National Guard, of Trenton, was under

crisis?

arms.

;

New

in 1775.

The

Jersey was never a laggard.

She was not

She had not been

in 1861.

State furnished during the

war

thirty-seven regi-

ments of infantry, three regiments of cavalry, and one regiment of artillery all told, she supplied 76,814 troops. Upon every battlefield her soldiers were found. In every emergency they responded to duty's call bravely and well. Undying laurels were won by them, for themselves and for :

their native State.

New Jersey General Philip Kearny, was killed by a Confederate bullet. General Winfield

The most

celebrated soldier produced by

during the Civil

who

War was Major

"THE STATE OF

NEW

JERSEY"

93

Scott denominated him "The bravest man I ever knew, and the most perfect soldier." You are all, I know, proud :

of the fact that he

was

of splendid Irish lineage.

Next

in

and eminence, among New Jersey's military heroes, was Judson Kilpatrick, Major General of Volunteers, who, like Kearny, was of Irish ancestry, a fact of which he was always proud. New Jersey, during her existence as a State, has, from ability

her citizenship,

made many notable

contributions to the

nation at large: commanding figures upon the. public stage. First, should be named the present occupant of the White

House, Woodrow Wilson, who was a citizen of New

the only incumbent of this post Jersey when chosen. However,

Grover Cleveland, though a resident of elected to the Presidency,

New York when

a native of our

own

State,

Essex County. We have every right heroic character, whose robust Americanism no

having been born to call this

was

in

ever questioned, a son of New Jersey, for he was not only born within our borders, but died here and now rests

man

in

New

Jersey

soil.

The third Vice President of the United States, Aaron Burr, was a native of New Jersey; and so was the much loved Garret A. Hobart, chosen to that high office in 1896, with the sainted McKinley. Two Vice Presidential nominees have been Jerseymen, Theodore Frelinghuysen, who ran on the Whig ticket with Henry Clay in 1844 and who also served six years in the

United States Senate

and William L. Dayton, the

col-

league of General John C. Fremont on the first Republican ticket, in 1856; Dayton also having served nine years in the United States Senate.

have been Frederick T. FreSecretary of State from 1881 to 1885, linghuysen, and who likewise served in the United States Senate. New

Among

Cabinet

officers

who was

Jersey has also furnished three Secretaries of the Navy Samuel L. Southard, 1823 to '29; Mahlon Dickerson, 1834Southard, also for '38; and 'George M. Robeson, iS6g-'^. .a time, served as Secretary of the Treasury ad interim, and :

"THE STATE OF

94

NEW

JERSEY"

Secretary of War ad interim was Governor of the State in i832-'33 a Senator of the United States upon two occasions, ;

;

and

at

one time President pro tempore of the Senate.

Dick-

erson was also Governor in 1815 to 1817, and served in the United States Senate from 1817 to 1833, a longer period than any other citizen of the State.

The most distinguished diplomatic post offered to a son of New Jersey was the British mission, tendered to Frederick T. Frelinghuysen in 1870, but which he declined. William L. Dayton, previously referred to, was Minister to France from 1861 to 1864. William Walter Phelps, who served several terms in Congress, was Minister to Austria from 1881 to 1882. Peter D. Vroom was Minister to Prussia from 1853 to 1857. Judson Kilpatrick twice represented the United States as Minister to Chile, from 1865 to 1870 and again in 1881. New Jersey's latest contribution to diplomacy was Henry Van Dyke, recently Minister to the Netherlands.

Two

Speakers of the National House of Representahave come from the State of New Jersey: Jonathan Dayton, who presided over the fourth and fifth Congresses, and likewise served in the United States Senate from 1799 to 1805, and William Pennington, who was Speaker of the tives

thirty-sixth Congress. Three citizens of

New

Jersey have occupied seats on bench: William Paterson, from Supreme from P. to 1806; Joseph 1870 until his death; Bradley, 1793 and Mahlon Pitney, one of the present Justices. Some of the nation's most celebrated naval heroes have been Jerseymen. Among these was Richard Somers, who, in 1804, commanded the "Intrepid," fitted out as a bomb vessel, which was sent into the harbor of Tripoli, Africa, to destroy the enemy's ships, but which was itself destroyed with all on board: this being the most notable exploit in the history of the United States Navy aside from Hobson's performance at Santiago, Cuba. the United States

Another famous

officer

from

New

Jersey was Captain

"THE STATE OF James Lawrence, result of

wounds

NEW

JERSEY"

a native of Burlington, who died as the between his vessel, the "Chesa-

in action

peake," and the "Shannon," in 1813, and

fame by

95

won

everlasting

dying injunction, "Don't give up the Ship." Still another son of New Jersey, who achieved distinction at sea, was Commodore Robert Field Stockton, who conquered California in 1846. Later, in 1851 to 1853, he sat in the United States Senate, as did his father, Richard Stockton, and his son, John Potter Stockton. New Jersey has produced numerous men of letters, who have won world-wide distinction in the domain of his

literature. Chief among these was the celebrated novelist, James Fenimore Cooper, a native of Burlington. And what can be said of New Jersey of more recent

years?

How

has her influence been exerted in the manifold

civilizing processes which have made the nation great, erful and prosperous beyond comparison?

pow-

of justice we Jerseymen have every right Throughout the land the term "Jersey jusemployed to symbolize the highest type of efficiency

Of our Courts to be proud. tice" is

in civil jurisprudence.

In the ennobling cause of education New Jersey has always held a front rank in the forward march of events. With two Universities which antedate the Revolution, and with a common school system which has been a model for other commonwealths, we point with pardonable pride ta our achievements in this field of endeavor. In industrial progress no other State, unless it may be Pennsylvania, has outstripped us. For our factories, our mills and our potteries we are famous throughout the world, and our products are found in the marts of every nation beneath the sun. With a soil whose variety and fertility cannot be excelled, New Jersey may be denominated one of the richest garden-spots of the nation. From the arms of lavish nature we receive the choicest of products, which we pour into the lap of the expectant world. Our farmers take high rank in

"THE STATE OF

96

NEW

JERSEY"

domain of agriculture by reason of their intelligence, industry and progressiveness. America was slow to awaken to the necessity for modthe ever-widening

ern highways. In this great movement New Jersey blazed the way, and set the pace for her sister States. Recogniz-' ing the need for even a larger measure of progress along this line, our State officials are

system citizens,

now

formulating plans for a

up-to-date highways which will gratify our and win the plaudits of the nation at large.

of

New

Jersey has likewise been a leader in the higher

phases of sociological development. She was first to heed the outcry for humane legislation for the betterment of the condition of the men,

women and

children

who

workmen's compensation law became a model

toil.

Our

for other

and our child labor laws have received the approval and publicists. What need to proceed further with this catalogue. Perhaps I have wearied you already with the recital. But, as a Jerseyman, to the manner born, and a lover of my native heath, my heart has burned within me, not once but many times, because of the failure of Americans as a whole to recognize the distinguished services of our notable men in all fields of endeavor, and to concede us States,

of our humanitarians

pre-eminence in the sisterhood of States. Let us here highly resolve to-night that, henceforth, we owe a duty to ourselves and to our Commonwealth to exact that degree of recognition to which we of New Jersey are entitled, by reason of our merits and our achievements as a free and

progressive people. There is not a fairer State in the Union than New Jersey. From Colonial days she has stood for the eternal precepts of Liberty and Religious freedom. During the RevoThe lution she was the battleground of the Republic. battlefields of Trenton, Princeton

and Monmouth can never

be effaced from the annals of history. When Lincoln called, her sons answered the call and

her citizens contributed of their treasure and life-blood in order that the Union might be preserved. Her coat-of-

NEW

"THE STATE OF arms

reflects

JERSEY"

97

Emblazoned on

her sentiments and emotions.

the shield are three ploughshares, showing that she prefers the acts of peace and agriculture, yet willing to forge the ploughshare into a sword to defend the national honor, as

is

expressed on the scroll beneath: "Liberty and Pros-

perity."

New

Jersey Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Ohio

Through the courtesy of Mr. A. S. Abbot the late William Nelson received some time ago a list of Revolutionary soldiers buried in Hamilton County, Ohio, as inscribed upon the tablet placed in the Soldiers' Memorial Building of Cincinnati, by the Ohio Society of the Sons of the Revolution. It was dedicated on October 19, 1909. Of the 178 names given, New Jersey is credited with sixty-nine, more than any other State. Cincinnati was originally settled in 1788, under the name of Losantiville, by John Cleves Symmes of New Jersey, who led a colony of Jerseymen and Kentuckians, many of them veterans of the

The New Jersey names are alphabetically as follows John Andrew, Thomas Auton, David Black, John Bonham, Aaron Bonnell, Jacob Broadwell, William Brown, Jacob Bruen, John Carle, John Charlton, Joshua Davis, Jehial Day, Henry Deats, Isaac Drake, Benjamin Engart, Benjamin Flinn, Jonas Frazee, Gershon Card, George Gwinnup, Adrian Hageman, Luther Halsey, John Halsread, James Harmer, James Hillyer, Abner Johnson, Thomas Keeler, Oliver Kelley, John Kerr, Thomas Lacey, James Lyon, Robert McCullough, Alex. Martin, John Meeker, Gershom Norris, John Parker, David Pierson, Jonathan Pitman, John Riddle, Bethuel Riggs, Henry Rogers, John Rose, Joseph Rose, Joseph Ross, John Schooly, Daniel Seward, John Shipman, Elisha Shepherd, William Slayback, Abraham Smith, Oliver Spencer, Nicholas Stevens, Hezekiah Stites, Jedediah Sturgis, Cornelius R. Sedam, John Cleves Symmes, Timothy Symmes, Price Thompson, Henry Tucker, John Van Cleve, Abraham Voorhees, David E. Wade, Amos War.

:

Ward, Miles Williams, SUPPLEMENTAL LIST

Israel

Wood.

Cornelius Little, Oliver Martin, Samuel Pierson, Charles Stone, John Mercer. SUMMARY OF OTHER NAMES ON TABLET: From Massachusetts, 16; New Hampshire, 7 Connecticut, 28 Delaware, i South Carolina, i ;

:

;

Maryland, 9; Pennsylvania, 29; Virginia, 15; with New Jersey's 69 makes a grand total of 7

;

New 178.

;

York, 3; Total, 109;

Revolutionary Pension Records of Morris County [Continued from Page 32]

RECORD OF MOSES CARMAN At

&

a Court of General Quarter Sessions held at Morris

Town

in

for the County of Morris on tuesday the twenty fifth day of Sep-

tember A. D. 1792. Present Samuel Tuthill, William Woodhull, Alexander Carmichael, John Carle, Esquires. Application was made to the Court in behalf of Abigail Carman Widow of Moses Carman dec'd for a Certificate to entitle her to a Warrant for the half pay of her husband. And the following Vouchers were presented to the Court in the words & figures following Viz To all whom it may concern I do Certify that Moses Carman dec'd was a Soldier enlisted for the War Served as a good Soldier in my Company in Col Spencer's Reg't untill some time in February 1778 at which time he died while in service at Valley Forge. Given under my Hand this 22nd of Sep'r 1792 :

:

JONAS

WARD

Late Cap't of the Sixth Comp. late Col. Spencers Reg't. This may Certify that Moses Carman was a Soldier of Col : Spencer's Regiment in the Continental service & that he died at Valley Forge the beginning of the year 1778

Morris

Town

Dec'r i8th 1781

JABEZ CAMPFIELD Late Surgeon of Said regiment.

Morris County Hanover Township state of New Jersey this may we whose names are under written was personally ac-

Certify, that

quainted with the late Abigail Carman dec'd & that she was the lawful widow of the late Mosses Carman dec'd & that she [has] her settlement in this

Town DAVID BATES STEPHEN MUNSON Freehold [ers]

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

99

New Jersey Essex County Personally appeared before me Peter Trembly one of the Justices of the peace for the said County Joseph Acken of full age & being duly sworn deposeth & saith that he well knew Abigail Carman to be State of

Widow

the

of Mosses

there abouts 1783

And

Carman &

that she died

Deponent further Sworn before me this 5th day of November 1791 PETER TREMBLY JR. this

December the 2nd or

saith not

JOSEPH ACKEN

Sept'r 25th 1792 Personally appeared before me Hiram Smith one of the Justices of the peace, David Bates of full age & made Oath that he saw Mosses Carman married lawfully to Abigail Acan some years previous to the War between England & America & further this

deponent saith not. Sworn before me the above date

DAVID BATES

HIRAM SMITH The Court having heard & duly considered the Certificates in favour of Abigail Carman the widow of Mosses Carman dec'd are of Opinion & do adjudge that the said Abigail Carman is entitled to her late husbands half pay during the time she remained his widow

RECORD OF PHILIP MINTHORN At a Court of General Quarter Sessions held

&

at

Morris

Town

in

for the County of Morris on tuesday the twenty fifth day of Sep-

tember A. D. 1792

Samuel Tuthill, William Woodhull, Alexander CarmiJohn Carle, Esquires Application was made to the Court in favour of Abigail McMilan widow Abigail Minthorn for the half pay of her deceased husband Present

chael,

late

The following Certificate was presented to the Court Viz: I Certify that I remember that Philip Minthorn was a Non Commissioned Officer in the first Jersey Reg't. Enlisted for the War. And believe he died a Sergeant in the year 1780 Morris Town Sept'r loth 1792

Late L't Col.

An

ist

Jersey Reg't

W.

&

D.

HART

also of the

2nd

was also presented to the Court in the Words followMorris County State of New Jersey Personally appeared before me the Subscriber one of the Justices of the peace for said County Stephen Day Esq'r & being duly sworn deposeth & saith that Abigail Minthorn was the Wife of Philip Minthorn & that she was married to said Minthorn in the year 1764 ing Viz

Affidavit :

ENOS WARD Js

STEPHEN DAY

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

100

Morris County State of New Jersey To Whom it may concern We the Subscribers do certify that Abigail Minthorn was the wife of Philip Minthorn dec'd & Continued to be his lawfull Widow

from the day of his death untill the day of her marriage to Charles McMillan being the ist day of Sept'r 1783, & that she has a Settlement in the Township of Morris given under our hands this 24th day of Sept'r 1792

ENDS WARD Js Morris County State of New Jersey Personally appeared me Alex'nd Carmichael one of the Justices of the peace for said County W'm Tuttle who deposeth & saith that he knew Philip Minthorn to be a sergeant in the ist Jersey Reg't Commanded by Col Mathias Ogden & farther this Deponent saith not :

W'M Late Eng'r

Sworn before me

this 26th

ist

TUTTLE

N. Jersey Reg't

day of Sept'r 1792

ALEX'ND CARMICHAEL

The Court having heard & duly considered the Certificates in favour of Abigail Minthorn Widow of Philip Minthorn dec'd are of Opinion & do adjudge that the said Abigail Minthorn is entitled to her late husbands half pay during the time she remained his Widow

RECORD OF ISAAC WOOD At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of the peace held at Morristown in and for the County of Morris on Tuesday the nineteenth day of March A. D. 1793. Present Samuel Tuthill, Alexander Carmichael, Hiram Smith, Silas Condict,

John J. Faesch, Esquires, Justices Application was made to the Court in favor of Sarah Wood widow of Isaac Wood deceased for the half pay of her deceased husband.

The following Affidavits, sented to the Court.

& in

Certificates

and Vouchers were pre-

This may Certify whom it may concern that I married Isaac Wood Sarah Whittenack in the winter of 1776 & that she has lived a widow my neighborhood ever since his death Witness my hand this i8th

day of March 1793 JON'A STILES Late Justice of the peace

Wood a Soldier in Capt'n William New-Jersey Reg't died at or near YorkVirginia on or about the first day of October in the year of

These are Piatt's

town

to certify that Isaac

Company

in

of the

first

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

101

our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty one As Witness hand this fifth day of January 1793

my

NATHAN WILKERSON Then

Lieut'n

These may Certify that Isaac

in

the 3rd Jersey

regiment

Wood

a Soldier in Cap't William Jersey Regiment and at or near

Piatts company of the first New Yorktown in Virginia on or about the first day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and eighty one, about the time of the investment of the Army under Lord Cornwallis by the American & French Armies Given under my hand at New Ark New Jersey March I2th 1793 J. N. GUMMING Late Lieut'n Col. Comd'r Jersey Batt'n

Whereas George Bockover came before me Alexander Carmichael one of the Justices of the peace for the County of Morris & maketh Oath that he saw Isaac Wood enlist as a Soldier during the

war in Capt'n of March

Piatts'

Company near about

the year 1778 in the beginning

GEORGE BOCKOVER

Sworn before me

this

I9th day of

March

1793

ALEX'DR CARMICHAEL Morris County Ss We John Carle & Alexander Carmichael Esq'rs two of the Justices of the Peace in and for the County of Morris do certify that Sarah Wood widow of Isaac Wood deceased late a Soldier in the Army of the United States, now resides in and is an Inhabitant of the County of Morris as we verily believe Morristown March igth 1793 JOHN CARLE ALEX'DR CARMICHAEL

The Court having heard

the above Certificates and Vouchers and

duly considered the same are of Oppinion that the said Sarah Wood of Isaac Wood deceased is justly entitled to the half pay of

Widow

her deceased husband from the tenth day of October in the year of our Lord Seventeen hundred and eighty one to this day and do order the Clerk to make out a Certificate accordingly

SAMUEL TUTHILL J.

J.

FAESCH

ALEX'R CARMICHAEL

RECORD OF DANIEL HALE At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of the peace held at Morris in & for the County of Morris on Tuesday the nineteenth day of March A. D. 1793 Present Samuel Tuthill, Alexander Carmichael, Hiram Smith,

Town

Silas Condict,

John

J.

Faesch, Esquires, Justices.

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102

Application was made to the Court in favor of Sarah Frazee widow of Henry Frazee she was late widow of Dan'l Hale dec'd for the half pay of Dan'l Hale dec'd her former husband.

The following to the Court Viz

Affidavits, Certificates

and Vouchers were presented

:

This may certify that the twenty first day of December one thousand seven hundred & seventy two, I married Daniel Hale unto Sarah Lacey of Morris Town & County Certifyed by me

TIM'Y JOHNES minister of the Gospel

To whom

may concern This may certify that it

seven hundred

the third day of

December one thousand

&

seventy eight, I married Sarah Hale unto Henry Frazee of Hanover in the County of Morris Certifyed by me Sept'r 28 1792

AARON KITCHELL

To whom

it

then Justice Peace

may concern

I do here by Certify tnat Daniel Hale was an enlisted soldier for three years or during the war in Capt'n Silas Howell's Company in the first Jersey Regiment in the service of the United States & that said

Daniel Hale was killed at the battle of Germantown 4th of October 1777 and that said Daniel Hale was regularly appointed & served as a Serjeant in said

Company

at the time

he was killed

JOHN HOWELL Late Capt'n in the said ist Morris Town :8th, Dec'r 1792

Morris County

Ss.

We

New

Jersey Regiment

Samuel Tuthill and Alexander Carmi-

chael Esq'rs two of the Justices of the Peace in and for the County of Morris, do Certify that Sarah Frazee widow of Henry Frazee, and also

she was the

widow of Daniel Hale

the United States as

we

dec'd late Sergeant in the army of & inhabits in the Town-

verily believe, resides ship of Morris, in the said County of Morris,

dated

March

I4th 1793

SAM'L TUTHILL ALEXANDER CARMICHAEL

The Court having heard and duly considered the said Certificates and Vouchers are of Opinion that the said Sarah Frazee widow of Henry Frazee deceased and who was the widow of Daniel Hale deceased is Justly entitled to the half pay of her former deceased husband Dan'l Hale from the 4th day of October in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred & seventy seven untill the third day of December seventeen hundred & seventy eight, and do order the Clerk to make out a Certificate accordingly.

SAM'L TUTHILL FAESCH ALEX'DR CARMICHAEL J. J.

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103

RECORD OF JOSEPH HATHAWAY At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of the peace held at Morristown in & for the County of Morris on Tuesday the nineteenth day of March

AD

1793

Samuel Tuthill, Alexander Carmichael, Hiram Smith, Silas Condict, John J. Faesch, Esquires, Justices Application was made to the Court in favour of the Legatees of the Widow Sarah Hathaway dec'd for the half pay of her deceased husband Joseph Hathaway dec'd The following Affidavits Certificates & Vouchers were presented Present

to the Court, Viz.

These may certify that Joseph Hathaway & Sarah Lyon on the November one thousand seven hundred and fifty three were joined in the holy banns of marriage and were pronounced man & wife by Timothy Johnes Minister of the Gospel Morristown fifteenth of

Extract from Test: by

my Church Record

TIMOTHY JOHNES

Clk.

Morristown March igth 1793 I

here by Certify that Joseph

Hathaway Matross

in a

company of

Artillery raised by the State of New Jersey, was enlisted by me & died in actual Service under my orders some time about the month of August In the

Campaign one thousand seven hundred & seventy six my hand at Morristown this Sixteenth day of March

Given under 1793

JN'O DOUGHTY Capt'n Lieu't of Artillery in 1776

We

the Subscribers two of the Justices of the peace for the County of Morris do hereby Certify that Sarah Hathaway was as we verily believe the lawful wife of Joseph Hathaway (who, it is generally re-

ported, died in the Service of the United States) and that She remained the real widow of the said Joseph untill the time of her death In wit-

ness whereof

we have hereunto

set

our hands

ALEX'DR CARMICHAEL

ENOS WARD, JUSTICE Morris County igth March 1793 Ss. Be it remembered that on the igth day of 1793 before Silas Condict Esq'r one of the Justices of the peace for said County personally appeared Joseph Halsey who being duly

Morris County

March sworn

saith that

Sarah the widow of Joseph Hathaway dec'd (who as

general report says died in the Service of the United States) departed this life on or about the third day of Feb'y last and that untill the time

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

104

of his death as this deponent verily believes was the real said Joseph Hathaway dec'd and further Saith not

widow

of the

JOSEPH HALSEY

Sworn

the

day above before

SILAS CONDICT

The Court having heard and duly considered the said Certificates are of opinion that the said Sarah Hathaway was entitled to the half pay of her deceased husband Joseph Hathaway from the thirty first year of our Lord Seventeen hundred and Seventy day of February in the year of our Lord Seventeen hundred and ninety three untill the time of her death and do order the Clerk to make out a Certificate accordingly

day of August

in the

six untill the third

SAMUEL TUTHILL FAESCH

J. J.

ALEX'DR CARMICHAEL

RECORD OF TIMOTHY WHITEHEAD At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of the Peace held at Morristown in and for the County of Morris on Tuesday the nineteenth day of March AD 1793 Present Samuel Tuthill, Alexander Carmichael, John Carle, David Thompson, Hiram Smith,

Silas

Condict, John

J.

Faesch,

Esquires,

Justices

made to the Court in favor of Hannah Genung Hannah Whitehead, widow of Timothy Whitehead for the half

Application was late

pay of her deceased husband the said Timothy Whitehead The following Affidavits, Certificates and Vouchers were presented to the Court Viz Morris County Ss Nathaniel Beach of full age being duly sworn, deposeth and saith that in or about December Seventeen hundred and Seventy five he was present and Saw Hannah Beach this deponent's daughter married to Timothy Whitehead of Mendham in the County of Morris by the Reverend Jacob Green of Hanover in the County afore-

Timothy Whitehead was killed in the late war with Great Britain, whilst he was out on a tour of duty as a militia man in a skirmish at Spanktown against the troops of Great Britain as this deponent has been informed, and that the said Hannah remained the widow of the said Timothy Whitehead deceased untill about the year seventeen hundred and seventy nine when she was married to Benjamin Genung as this deponent has been informed. said, that the said

NATHANIEL BEACH Sworn the 8th December AD 1792 before me SAMUEL TUTHILL Justice of the Peace

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105

Morris County Ss James Beach of full age being duly sworn deposeth and saith that on or about December Seventeen hundred and Seventy five he was present and saw Hannah Beach this deponent's Sister married to Timothy Whitehead of Mendham, in the County of Morris by the Reverend Jacob Green of Hanover in the County aforesaid that the said Timothy Whitehead, was killed in the late war with Great Britain, whilst he was out on a tour of duty as a militia man in a skirmish at Spanktown against the troops of Great Britain as this deponent has been informed, and that the said Hannah remained the widow of the said Timothy Whitehead deceased until about the year Seventeen hundred and Seventy nine when he was present and Saw her married unto Benjamin Genung

JAMES BEACH

Sworn the i8th December AD 1792 before SAMUEL TUTHILL Justice of the peace Morris County Ss Ebenezer Tingley of full age being duly Sworn deposeth and saith that some time in the month of January Seventeen hundred and seventy seven he was out on a tour of duty with Timothy Whitehead as militia men under the Command of Col. William Winds went with his party to Spanktown to take some field pieces from the Enemy of the United States, that they were attacked by a flanking party of the British troops

&

the said

Timothy Whitehead was shot down

about ten feet of this deponent while fighting with the enemy and further this deponent saith not

EBENEZER TINGLEY

December AD 1792 before me ALEX'R CARMICHAEL Justice of the Peace

Sworn

the I7th

Morris County Ss Benjamin Genung of full age being duly Sworn deposeth and saith that he was married unto Hannah Whitehead the Widow of Timothy Whitehead deceased on the tenth day of May Seventeen hundred and Seventy nine by the Reverend Jacob Green of

Hanover And further

this

Sworn before me this STEPHEN JACKSON

igth day of December 1792

deponent saith not

BENJAMIN GENUNG Justice

Artemas Day Esq'r of full age being duly some time in the month January Seventeen hundred and Seventy Seven he was out upon a tour of duty with Timothy Whitehead as Militia men under the Command of Col: William Winds who went with his party to Spanktown to take some field pieces from the enemy of the United States that were attacked by a flanking party of the British troops & the said Timothy WhiteMorris County Ss

Sworn deposeth and

saith that

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

106

head was Shot down within about ten or twelve feet of this deponent while fighting with the enemy and further this deponent Saith not

ARTEMAS DAY Sworn before me this 9th day of February 1793 ALEX'R CARMICHAEL Justice of the peace

& Township To whom

Morris County certify that

Hannah

it

may

concern, this

of Timothy Whitehead township of Morris

is

ENDS WARD

March

may

Benjamin Genung formerly the wife a lawful resident of this County & in the

the wife of

Justice

I2th 1793

To whom it may concern, this may certify that I Hannah the wife of Benjamin Genung was the widow Timothy Whitehead & is now a resident of Morris township Morris County

verily believe that

of

ABRAHAM FAIRCHILD

Justice a peace

The Court having heard the above Certificates, Affidavits and Vouchers and duly considered the same are of opinion that the said Hannah Whitehead widow of Timothy Whitehead deceased is entitled to the half pay of her said husband Timothy Whitehead deceased from the thirty first day of January in the year of our Lord Seventeen hundred and Seventy Seven to the tenth day of May in the year of our Lord Seventeen hundred and Seventy nine untill She was married to Benjamin Genung and do order the Clerk to make out a Certificate accordingly

SAM'L TUTHILL FAESCH ALEX'DR CARMICHAEL J. J.

RECORD OF ASAHEL SHIPMAN At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of Morris

Town

in

&

for the

the peace holden at

County of Morris on Tuesday the 24th day

AD

of September 1793 Present Silas Condict, John Jacob Faesch, David Thompson, John

John Starke, Alexander Carmichael, Abraham Fairchild, Esq'rs Application was made to the Court in favour of Alicia Camfield late widow of Asahel Shipman deceased for the half pay of the said Carle,

Asahel Shipman her deceased husband The following Certificates and Vouchers were presented Court Viz

to

the

We

Certify that Asahel Shipman was a soldier in the first Regiment of Jersey & died at fort George of the small pox on the sixteenth day of July 1776 as witness our hands this fourteenth day of November, 1785

HOWELL late Cap't of s'd Regiment WILLIAM WINDS late Col. of s'd Regiment

SILAS

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

107

These may certify that on the 23d of November 1772 Asahel Shipman & Electa Riggs were joined in holy matrimony and pronounced man & wife by Timothy Johnes Pastor of the Church at Morris Town

New

Jersey

A

true

Copy from my Church record Test.

December

Hanover July 8th 1793 concern that Mathew Campfield Electa Shipman [were] married Dec'r 1783 by Rev'd Jacob Green true copy from the records of Marriages kept by s'd Mr. Green This Certifies to

&

A

TIMOTHY JOHNES

2ist 1785

Test.

all

whom

it

may

CALVEN WHITE Pastor of the Church Hanover

Morris County Ss We the subscribers two of the overseers of the poor and two of the inhabitants of the Township of Hanover do Certify that we verily believe that Electa Campfield now the wife of Mathew Campfield was really the Wife & widow of Asahel Shipman deceased that she is now an Inhabitant of the Township ,of Hanover & County of Morris :

ABRAHAM

FAIRCHILD,

TIMOTHY TUTHILL, Overseers of Poor

JOSEPH TUTHILL, BENJAMIN BURROUGHS, Inhabitants in

Hanover

Dated September 24th 1793

The Court having heard the above Certificates and Vouchers [&] duly considered the same, are of opinion that the said Electa Camp field late widow of the said Asahel Shipman dec'd is entitled to the half pay of the said Asahel Shipman dec'd from the sixteenth day of July in the year of our Lord Seventeen hundred and Seventy six untill the fifteenth day of December in the year of our Lord Seventeen

hundred and eighty three untill She was married unto the Said Mathew Campfield and do order the Clerk to make out a certificate accordingly JOHN CARLE JOHN STARKE DAVID THOMPSON

RECORD OF ABIEL TOMPKINS At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of the Peace holden at Morristown in and for the County of Morris on tuesday the Seventeenth day of December AD 1793 Present Samuel Tuthill, John Carle, Ellis Cook, Alexander Carmichael, Jabez

Campfield

Application was made to the Court in favour of Elizabeth Prudden late widow of Abel Tompkins dec'd for the half pay of the said Abiel Tompkins her deceased husband

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

108

The following

Certificates

and Vouchers were presented

to

the

Court Viz. This may Certify that on the Sixth day of December in the year of our Lord Seventeen hundred and sixty four, Abiel Tompkins and Elizabeth Bridge were joined in the holy banns of marriage and pronounced man and wife by me

TIM'Y JOHNES Pastor of the Church at Morristown

Morristown Dec'r igth 1793 This may Certify that on the Sixteenth day of March in the year of our Lord Seventeen hundred and eighty three Benjamin Prudden & Elizabeth Tompkins were joined in the holy banns of marriage &

pronounced man and wife by

me TIM'Y JOHNES Pastor of the Church at Morristown

Morristown Dec'r ipth ^93

New Jersey Somerset County Personally appeared before me Henry Southard one of the Justices of the peace in & for said County John Ward of lawful age who being duly sworn deposeth & saith that he was acquainted with Abel Tompkins that in the month of January or February in the year 1777 said State of

Tompkins was on a tour of duty in the militia in the Service of the United States at Morristown guarding the Continental Stores and Prisoners under the command of Lieutenant Benjamin Pierson that said Tompkins was taken from the Guard to the hospital to take Care of the Continental Soldiers who was sick with the Small Pox this deponent afterwards saw said Tompkins sick in the hospital & the next day after he saw him was informed that he was dead & further ;

;

this

deponent saith not

JOHN WARD Sworn before me the HENRY SOUTHARD

7th day of

December

AD

1793

Morris County Ss. Personally appeared before me Samuel Tuthill Esq'r one of the Justices of the Peace in & for the said County of Morris Frederick King an Assistant deputy Qu[arter] Master duly appointed by Thomas Mifflin Esquire Quafrter] Master General for the purpose of taking care of the sick of the Army of the United States that were in and about Morristown in the 1777, who being duly sworn saith that he employed Abiel Tompkins in January in the year

AD

aforesaid then a Militia man, to attend in the hospital as a nurse to take Care of the Soldiers that were then sick with the small pox that the said Abel Tompkins continued in said hospital as a nurse untill he was taken Sick and died in the hospital in February in the year aforesaid being effected by the Stinck & malignity of the disorder then

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

109

prevailing in the hospital three others of the nurses died about the same time And further this deponent saith not

FREDERICK KING

Sworn

December SAM'L TUTHILL 20th

AD

1793 before

me

New Jersey Essex County Personally appeared before me John Peck one of the Justices of said County Joseph Tompkins and being duly sworn, saith that on or about the 25th of February 1777 he was at the house of Ralp[h] Bridge State of

County of Morris which was then used as a hospital for the Army that he there saw and spoke with Abel Tompkins who was then tending and nursing said Soldiers who were, many of them exceeding bad with the small pox. And further saith that he heard s'd Abel Tompkins complain to General Green (who Came to the hospital while he was there) that he was not relieved the day before as he expected to have been, that he was very unwell, much disordered in his head and could scarcely walk that he thought the Scent of the small pox was the Cause of it and believed it would kill him General Green told s'd Tompkins that he could not be relieved that day, but must continue tending till the next day in the

sick soldiers of the Continental

said he should certainly be relieved And further this deponent saith that a few days after he heard that s'd Tompkins died in the hospital before he was relieved

when he

JOSEPH TOMPKINS

Sworn before me JOHN PECK

this third

day of December 1793

New Jersey Morris County Ss: the Subscribers two of the Justices of the said County of Morris do Certify that we verily believe that Elizabeth Bridge was State of

We

married to and became the wife of Abel Tompkins and that from the death of the said Abel Tompkins untill her marriage with Benjamin Prudden she was his widow and resided in the township of Morris in the County of Morris aforesaid As Witness our hands this sixth

day of December

AD

1793

SAM'L TUTHILL ALEX'R CARMICHAEL Justices of the Peace

The Court having heard the above certificates & Vouchers & duly considered the same are of opinion that the said Elizabeth Prudden late widow of the said Abiel Tompkins dec'd is intitled to the half pay of the said Abiel Tompkins from the first day of March in the Year of our Lord seventeen hundred & seventy seven untill the six-

110

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

teenth day of March in the Year of our Lord seventeen hundred and eighty three when she was married to Benjamin Prudden

SAMUEL TUTHILL JABEZ CAMPFIELD ALEX'R CARMICHAEL

RECORD OF STEPHEN OGDEN At a Court of General Quarter Session of the Peace holden at Morristown in and for the County of Morris the Seventeenth day of December Anno Domini 1793 Present Samuel Tuttle, John J. Feasch, David Thompson, Jabez Canfield, Alexander Carmicle, Ellis Cook, Esquires Application was made to the Court by Stephen Ogden of Morristown in Said County for an adjudication in this forum for his half pay as an Invalid the following Vouchers were presented to Court and Read Viz

New Jersey Morris County Be it Remembered that on this day personally appeared before me Alexander Carmichael Esquire one of Justices of the Peace of Said County Nathaniel Broadwell of full age who being duly sworn, disposeth and Saith that some time in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven and this Deponant apprehends in the month of September of that year that a

was fought between the British and the Americans in late War between them, at Second River in the County [of Essex] and State aforesaid that during the said Battle this deponent being in the advanced Guard under the command of Cap't Daniel Brown found Stephen Ogden of Morristown at Head Quarters at Ward Session after said Battle confined with a wound it was said he received in said Battle with a Bullet entering his left side and that he this Deponent saw Doct'r Bern Budd with his instruments cut and take out the Ball from the right side of the said Stephen Ogden's Body and that the said Stephen Ogden remained at his own house for some time afterbattle

wards Confined with the said

Wound NATHANIEL BROADWELL

Sworn before me this i4th day of December ALEXANDER CARMICHAEL

1793

State of New Jersey Morris County Be it remembered that on this day personnally appeared before me Alexander Carmichael Esq'r one of the Justices of the Peace of the said County Benoni Hathaway of full age who being duly sworn deposeth and saith that in the month of September in the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven a battle was fought by the British and the Americans near second river in the county of Essex and State aforesaid that he this

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

111

deponent acted as one of the Majors of the first Regiment of the Morris County Militia in said Battle and that Stephen Ogden belonging to the said Regiment was a Soldier engaged in the same and received a dangerous wound with a ball Entering his Side and at that time it was thought [he would] die with it And that the said Stephen Ogden beh[aved] as a brave good Soldier in said Battle and that Generfal]

Winds

the

Commander

in

Chief of the Militia in said Battle

informed him this deponent that he was near to the Said Stephen Ogden when he received the said Wound

BENONI HATHAWAY

Sworn before me this i6th day of December ALEX'DR CARMICHAEL

New

Jersey, Morris

County Be

it

1793

Remembered

that

on

this

day

personly appeared before me Alexder Carmichael Esq'r one of the Justices of the Peace of the said County Stephen Ogden of full age

who

being duly sworne deposeth and saith that [he] was a Soldier of Regiment of the Morris County Militia in the Battle fought at or near Second River in the County of Essex and state af'd by the

the

first

British and Americans in the month of September one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven and that he this Deponent in Said Battle received a wound in his left Side with a ball which passed partly thro his Body and that Doct'r Bern Budd who attended him extracted the said Ball on the right Side that [he] was removed to his house in a few days where he was confin'd with said wound for three months that he then recoverd so that he could ride about and some times work at business which did not require much exertion that he this Deponent expecting he might in time be relieved from the injury he re-

ceived by said this

wound

has not applied before

Deponent has been unable

now

for relief but that he

work at any hard labour especially said wound and is from time to time

to

at mowing ever since he received rendered still more incapable of labour and he has Just cause to fear he will shortly be totally disabled by the same and that he this Deponent is now forty three years of age has a wife and three Children and but a small Farm and dependent alone on his labour for Support

STEPHEN OGDEN

Sworn before me this i6th Day December ALEX'DR CARMICHAEL

1793

New Jersey, Morris County Be it Remembered that on this day personlly appeared before Alexder Carmichael Esquire of the Justices of the Peace of Said County Joseph Lindsley of full age

Who

being duly Sworne deposeth and Saith th[at in] September one thousand seven hundred and se [venty] seven a battle was fought near Second River in the County of Essex and State af'd between the British and Americans that he this Deponent was dureing the said

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

112

main body of the Militia about the distance of a mile from the place of action which was fought by advanced Party that after it was over he saw Stephen Ogden of the County of Morris who was in the Said Battle comeing from it on horse back behind another and a third Person holding & supporting him on the horse he was taken off and carried into a house wounded with a ball in the back or side that he this Deponent had conversation with Doct'r Budd the Battle with

Phisition or Surgeon who dressed the wound of the said Stephen Ogden and enquired of him the nature of it the Doct'r answered that the Ball took him in the side and passed by the back bone which he was afraid was fractured but hoped he might recover that the said Stephen Ogden was a brave Soldier a true friend to his Country and chearfully turned out in the time of an Alarm or otherwise in defence of it and that he has frequently heard the Said Stephen Ogden complain that he could not work at any kind of

Chief

bending or Stooping business

and that

his

te

if

it

did

it

laid

him up for

complaints the [injury] of said

several days

wound and

his dis-

ability increase

his

JOSEPH

X

LINDSLEY

mark Sworn before me this 17 December ALEXANDER CARMICHAEL

1793

The body of Stephen Ogden of Morris Town

in the

County of

Morris, having been examined, a scar appeared in his left side, about two inches above the hip-bone rather nigher to his back bone than the middle of the hip bone, another scar appeared in his right side between

one and three inches from back bone The scars are said to have been the consequence of a Bullet having entered in his left side, and having been extracted from his right side and the preasent appearance makes it altogether likely to have been the case, Gunshot Wounds altho entirely healed and remainning so sometimes render the subject in capable of the common exercise and exertions of Bodily strength, which those enjoy who have received no such Wound M'r Ogden has often called upon the subscriber to know, if no remedy could be devised to relef him from the pains with which he is frequently affected the wound being entirely heald, I have constantly informed him that I knew of no medical application that would be likely to mend his circumstances These is wit no doubt, but that M'r [Ogden's] bodily ability to procure a livlihood from labor has been rendered much less, that it would have been, had no such wound been by him received

JABEZ CANFIELD Surgeon

Morristown December I7th 1793

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

113

The Court having heard said Vouchers and duly considered the same are of an Opinion that the Said Stephen Ogden is Justly inby reason of his preasent disability to git a livlihood occationed by the af'd Wound and do therefore adjudge to him the sum of two Dollars per Month monthly commencing on the day of

titled to relief

made

the date of this order

the twentieth day of

December

in the

year of our Lord Seventeen hundred and ninety three

SAMUEL TUTTLE JABEZ CANFIELD ELLIS COOK

RECORD OF THOMAS THOMPSON [At a] Court of General Quarter [Sessions] of the Peace holden Morristown in and for the County of Morris on the seventeenth Day of December in the year of our Lord Seventeen Hundred and Ninety four Present Samuel Tuthill, David Thompson, Ellis Cook, Jabez [at]

Campfield, Esq'rs

of

Application being made to the Court by Abigail Thompson Widow Thomas Thompson Deceased who Died in the Service of the United

States whilst in the Militia for an adjudication of this Court for her Husbands half pay the following Certificates and Vouchers were

late

read Viz

AD

I Certify that on the first day of December 1763 I maried Tho's Thompson and Abigail Ross which appears from the records of the Church of New Providence which I have kept

JONATHAN ELMER member of the

A

Presbyterian Minister of the Gospel of Christ Synod & of the N. York Presbetery

This may Certify that Abigail Thompson the Widdow of Thomas Thompson who Died while in the Militia Service of the United States is now and has been since the Death of her said Husband a Citizen within the s'd County

&

we have

this

set

our hands

township of Morris In testimony of which 23d of Sep't 1794 CORNELIUS LUDLOW PETER LAYTON is to Certify that Thomas of Militia Died in the Service

Morris County, State of N. Jersey This

Thompson a in the month

Soldier in

my Company

Jan'y 1777 he then Being in a tour of Duty

as Witness

my Hand PETER LAYTON Cap't 1794 Sep't i8th 8

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

114

We [Militia]

son

do

Certify that [Thomas] Thompson a Soldier [in] the died at Connecticut [Farms] at the House of Jn'o Thomp-

in [the]

Month

of Jan'y 1777 as Witness our

Hands

THOMAS THOMP[SON] RACHEL THOMPS[ON] HEZEKIAH THOMP[SON] Sept.

i

Qth 1794

The Court having examined the [Vouchers] and Considered the same do Judge that the s'd Abigail Thorn [pson] is intitled to the half pay of her deceased Husband from the Month of Jan'y A. D. Seventeen Hundred and Seventy Seven SAMUEL TUTHILL DAVID THOMPSON J. J.

FAESCH

RECORD OF AARON CRANE At a Court of General Quarter Sessions of the Peace holden at Morristown in and for the County of Morris on Tuesday the Twenty second day of September AD. 1795. Present Samuel Tuthill, Alexander Carmichael, Jabez Campfield, John J. Faesch, Simeon Broadwell, Esq'rs On the Application of Mary Porter Widow of David Porter and formerly the Widow of Aaron Crane late a Soldier in the Continental Army in the Service of the United States for an adjudication of this Court for the half pay of her late husband the said Aaron Crane during the Term of her Widowhood the following Certificates & Vouchers were presented & read Viz't I

do Certify that Mary Hfathaway] and Aaron Crane, they both in the holy bands of

being inhabitants of M[orris]town were joined

Matrimony the 27th Jan'y 1774 (Test) TIM'Y JOHNES Minister of the Gospel Morristown 3ith March 1794

New Jersey, Morris County Ss. Be it remembered that on the 28th day of April 1794 before Silas Condict Esq one of the Justices of the Peace for the said County, personally appeared Simeon Hathaway of full age who being duly sworn saith that he was present and saw Aaron Crane an Inhabitant of the said County inlist as a Soldier in Capt'n Peter Dickerson's Company in Col. Elias Dayton's Regiment some time near the end of the year 1776 or the Beginning of the year 1777 to serve three years or during the War as a Soldier in the American Army and this deponent further saith that some time in the Winter Seventeen hundred and Seventy seven the said Aaron Crane was taken sick and died at Mount Independance near Ticonderoga,

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS that he this deponent

Nursed him

115

was present when he further this deponent saith not

in his sickness,

deceased and Assisted to Bury him

And

his

SIMEON X HATHAWAY mark

Sworn

the day abovesaid before SILAS CONDICT

me

Morris County Ss: Be it remembered that on the 28th day of April 1794 before Silas Condict Esq'r one of the Justices of the peace for the said County personally appeared Hannah Hathaway who being duly sworn saith that she saw Mary Crane [Widow of] Aaron Crane (who died in the Service of the United States) married to David

Porter on the Sixth day of April Seventeen hundred further this deponent said not her

&

eighty

and

HANNAH X HATHAWAY mark

Sworn before me

the day abovesaid

SILAS CONDICT

Morris County Ss: We the Subscribers two of the Inhabitants & Freeholders of the Township of Morris in the County of Morris afs'd do Certify that we verily believe that Mary Hathaway was married to and became the Wife of Aaron Crane & that from the death of the said Aaron Crane untill her Marriage with David Porter She [was his] Widow & then resided & still doth reside in the County of Morris aforesaid

Witness our hands

this

Seventeenth day of March

AD.

1795

GEORGE P. HARD

BENJAMIN FREEMAN The Court having heard & examined

and Vouchand duly considered same, are of an opinion that the said Mary Porter is intitled to the half pay of her deceased husband the said Aaron Crane from the Month of December AD: Seventeen hundred & Seventy seven untill the Sixth day of April Ad: Seventeen hundred & eighty the time she was married unto the said David Porter. And do said Certificates

ers

order the Clerk to make out a Certificate accordingly

SAM'L TUTHILL SIMEON BROADWELL ALEX'R CARMICHAEL

RECORD OF

COL.

JACOB FORD,

JR.

a Court of General [Quarter Sessions] of the Peace holden at Morristown in and for the [County] of Morris on the third Tues-

At

day

in

December AD Samuel

Present

Doughty, Esq'rs

1795.

Tuthill,

John De Camp, Jabez Campfield, John

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS

116

Theodosia Ford by Gabriel H. Ford her Attorney presented to the Court of General Quarter Sessions of the peace holden at Morristown in and for the County of Morris on Friday the eighteenth day

of December in the year of our Lord One thousand Seven hundred and ninety five her Petition for an allowance of Half pay as Widow of [Jacob] Ford Junior deceased late first Colonel of the first regiment of foot Militia in the County of Morris aforesaid accompanied with the followng Vouchers and Certificates, to wit,

No. I The Deputies of the Several Counties of New-Jersey in Provincial Congress To Jacob Ford Esq'r. reposing especial trust and confidence in your Patriotism, Valour, Conduct and Fidelity, Do by virtue of the power and authority delegated to us by our Con-

We

stituents and in pursuance of the directions of the Honorable the Continental Congress constitute and appoint you the said Jacob Ford Jun'r First Colonel of the first Regiment of Foot Militia in the County of Morris You are therefore to take the said Regiment into

your charge and Care as Colonel thereof, and duly to exercise both Officers and Soldiers of 'that Regiment in Arms And as they are :

hereby directed to obey you as their Colonel so you are likewise to observe and follow such [orders and directions] from time to time as you shall receive from your superior Officers the Provincial Con& Committee of Safety. And for your so doing this shall be your

gress

Commission Dated the twelfth day of January [1776] By Order of [the] Congress SAM'L TUCKER President Attested

ABRA: CLARK D. Sec'ry No. 2. I, Timothy Johnes Junior do Certify that in the late War between the United States of America and Great Britain I was Surgeon of the first Regiment of Foot Militia in the County of Morris and State of New-Jersey commanded by Jacob Ford Junior who was first Colonel of the Regiment And I further Certify that from the Beginning of December Seventeen hundred and Seventy six the said Colonel Ford was constantly in Service with the said Regiment untill he died under my Care as Surgeon aforesaid that a short time before his death towards the end of December the enemy came out in force; and he and his regiment was obliged to fall back from the Lines and retreat the round [after] the Mud-rounds to Morristown where he and his regiment with some continental troops halted a few days when General Maxwell arrived and took command as Brigadier of the Whole with fresh orders from General Washington to March; that the said regiment was paraded and just ready to march, and the Colonel (notwithstanding a mortal cold he got on the retreat) still attended under Arms in front of the Regiment, when he was Struck all at once with a Pleurisy & delirium he was lifted from his horse and borne off the field as the March began. A Small Militia

REVOLUTIONARY PENSION RECORDS Guard and myself

117

Surgeon Stayed behind to attend him. the seventh day when he died [him ] at Morristown under [my] Care the tenth day of January Seventeen hundred and Seventy Seven. By General Washington's orders (who was then in town) Colonel Ford was buried with the Honors of War Given under my hand the twenty fifth day of September Seventeen hundred and Ninety three TIM'Y JOHNES late Surgeon I

as Regimental

accordingly attended

No. 3. I William Maxwell late a Brigadier General was ordered by his Excellency General Washington about the latter end of December 1776 to take the command of the Troops at Morristown under the Command of General McDougal General Washington informed me they would consist of some Continentals with two Regiments of Militia or Levies I received the Continentals from General McDougal and applied to Colo' Jacob Ford Jun'r for the Troops under his Command and while he was collecting some and preparing those he had, for Service he was taken Sick doing Duty on the Parade, of which I marched off his Sickness I was informed Shortly after he died. of his other officers, Troops to the lines of the Enemy under and most of them remained there with me during the Winter Given under my hand this 23d day of September 1793

WM

MAXWELL

late Brig'r General.

We

Samuel Tuthill and John Doughty Esquires two of the Justices of the peace of the County of Morris do Certify that in our belief Theodosia Ford was the lawful Wife and is the real Widow of Jacob Ford Junior of Morristown deceased late first Colonel of the first Regiment of Foot militia of the County of Morris And I Parties and Samuel Tuthill do further Certify that I saw the was an Inhabitant with them of the [same] place untill the death of Colonel Ford and am well acquainted with his said Widow As Witness our Hands this fourteenth day of December Seventeen hundred and No.

4th.

ninety five

SAM'L TUTHILL JN'O

DOUGHTY

The Court having heard and examined the Said Vouchers and and duly considered the Same do adjudge that the Said Theodosia Ford widow of the Said Colonel Jacob Ford Jun'r dec'd Certificates

intitled to the half pay of her Said late husband from the tenth day of January in the year of our Lord Seventeen hundred & Seventy Seven at which time he died in Service as aforesaid As Witness our hands in open Sessions this eighteenth day of December Seventeen hundred and Ninety five JABEZ CAMPFIELD JN'O DOUGHTY SAM'L TUTHILL JN'O DECAMP is

Jedidiah Swan's Orderly Book [Continued from Page 53]

Head Quarters, Aug't 4, 1776. Parole Wiston Countersign Yarmouth Passes Signed by the Quarter Master Gen'l, or his Assistant Mr. Hughes for persons in the Department to Cross the ferries to be Admited as Sufficient, Thomas Herbert of Cap't Wyleys Company in Col'l Sergeants Regiment, tried by a Regimental Court Martial and Convicted of Theft was Sentenced to Receive Thirty Nine Lashes but having appealed to a Gen'l Court Martial whereof Col'l Webb was The sentence of Regimental Court Martial was reversed president and the person Acquited.

The Gen'l approves th Acquital and orders him to be Discharged. Daniel McGuire of Cap'n Scots Company Col'l Sergeants Reg't, both Tried by the Same Court martial and Convicted. McGuire of Deand Enlisting into another Compy. And taking a Second Bounty Sentenced to receive 39 Lashes, Samuel Weaver of Desertion only Sentenced to receive 30 Lashes, William McFrain of Cap't sertion,

Wyllys Company the Above Reg't tried by the Same Court Martial & Convicted of Desertion Sentenced to receive 30 Lashes. William Digs of Cap't Woods Compy, Col'l Baldwin Reg't tried by the Same Court Martial and Convicted of Desertion Sentenced to receive 20 Lashes. The Gen'l approves of each of the above Sentences and orders them to be put in Execution at the usual Time and place. The Court Martial to set tomorrow for the Tryal of Lieut't Hobby of Col'l McDougals Regt't now under Arrest for Misconduct in leaving the Vessels under his Care at the East River on friday Evening last. Witness to attend. All persons are Strictly forbid medling with the flat bottom'd Boats, without leave from Gen'l Putnam Excepting on some Special business and those persons who have any of them are desired to Return them safe.

The Guards

at the

Wharfs

to attend to this Order.

ADVERTISEMENT. Lost one Day last Week a Snuff Box, made of paper Machee lined with Tortoise Shell had a female Figure and two Boys Painted on the Lid, the painting much Abused, a neat Circle of buried work round the Picture.

Whoever

will bring

it

to the

Quarter Master Gen'l Office Shall

receive four Dollars for their Trouble.

Brigadier for the Day Gen'l Lord Sterling. Field officers for the Piquet Col'l Selleman, Lieut't Col'l Clarke

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK and Major Wells,

119

Main Guard Major Dye, Brigade Major Liv-

for

ingston.

For Fatigue o..i..i..i..i..22 For Guard i. .o. .1. .1. .0. .20

Head Quarters Aug't

5th, 1776.

Countersign Bedford

Amboy

Parole

The Gen'l has nothing more at Heart than the Health of the Troops, and as the Change of Encampment has been found very Salatory by such Regt'ts as have Shifted their Ground It is recommended to the Several Brig'r Gen'ls to have it more generally adopted and the Gen'l once more calls upon the Officers and men Who are Quartered in Houses to have them kept Clean and Wholesome. Brig'r Informed the Gen'l that some

Scott

Brigade on Acct of the

Battalion

first

Difficulties

who had

had arisen

in

his

reed some assurances

from the Commitee of this Convention of this State that they should not be removed out of Town, Unless the Army moved Generally. The Gen'l at the same time being of Opinion that from the Knowledge of the City they can be more Serviceable than any equal Number of Men

who

are Strangers Orders that on Wednesday Gen'l Scotts Brigade into the City and Gen'l Fellow with his Brigade take their place.

moves

He

also directs that

no Officer or Soldier of Gen'l Fellows Brigade

take up their quarters in any dwelling Houses in or near their ments Except they are placed their by the Q Master Gen'l.

Encamp-

The Gen'l cannot dismiss this matter without assuring the first Batalion of Gen'l Scotts Brigade that he will have the ground of their Claime particularly enquired into by the Provincial Congress of the State of

New York

as well because they

may

rest assured that at the

public faith is preserved with them. He Expects and will The that they observe their Engagements to the publick.

Same time require Arrival of

new Troops requiring some Change In the arrangement and particularly with Respect to the Alarm Post Major Gen'l Putnam with the several Brigadiers are desired to Meet to Morrow at 10 oClock at the City Hall to Consider there of and make Report to the Gen. Adjutant Gen'l will attend at the Same Time.

Brigadier for the Day Gen'l Wardsworth. Field officers for the Piquet Col'l McDougal, Lieut't Col'l

The

Wesson

and Major Mead. For Main Guard Major Tuttle. Brigade Major Gordon. For Fatigue o. i i i i .22 For Guard i. .o. .1. .1. .0. .24 .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Head

One Hundred and Sub

Quarters, Aug't 6th, 1776

Countersign Durham with a Field Officer 3 Captains 6 6 Sergents 6 Corporals and Six Drums and fifes to proceed to

Parole Canterbury

fifty

Men

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

120

Burdits Ferry opposite Mount Washington to relieve the Party now there for this purpose to parade tomorrow Morning with Arms on the Grand Parade at 7 oClock. Apply to Gen'l Putnam for Boats and

Attend

to the Tide.

Every Commanding officer of a Regiment or Corps in future is to account on Back or at the Bottom of his Return for all the officers and Men return'd to be on Command Expressing the place and Service in which they are Engaged, Notwithstanding the orders Issued and the Interest the Troops have in it, Complaints are made of the bad Behaviour of the Troops to people at Market, taking and Destroying their things. The Gen'l declared for the last time that he will punish such offender most Severely and in order that they may be Directed An officer from each of the Guards nearest to those where the Country people come is to Attend from Sun rise till 12 oClock and he is Strictly Enjoined to prevent any abuser of their kind to Seize any offender and send him Immediately to the Guard House reporting him also at Head Quarters. The officers of Guards in future will be Answerable If there are any more Complaints unless they Apprehend the offender. A Copy of this order to be put up in Every Guard House in the City James McCormick of Cap't Fanningtons Company, Col'l Sergeants Regt't, Thomas Williams of Cap't Barne's Company and Same Reg't, Peter Burke of Cap't Ledyards Company, John Green of Cap't Johnsons Company, both of Col'l McDougals Reg't, all Tryed by a Gen'l Court Martial of which Col'l Webb was president and Convicted of Desertion were sentenced to receive 39 Lashes each. The Gen'l Approves of the Sentence and orders them to be put in Execution at the usual time and place. Hugh Lacey of Cap't Stewards Company of Hylanders tried by the same Court Martial and found Guilty of Impudence and Disobedience to the orders of his Captain, was Sentenced to receive 20 Lashes. The Gen'l is pleased to pardon him on Condition that he makes a Suitable his faults to his Cap't, Hendricks Sent, Jacob Lent Chas Lent Peter Brown, Jeremiah Hewson Ornamu's Akeman all of Cap't Hyatt's Company and Col'l McDougals Reg't having been Confined for some time for Desertion and no Evidence Appearing Against them are Ordered to be dismissed for want of prosecution. Major Printice to take the Command of the Detachment ordered

Acknowledgment of

to Berdits Ferry. Brigadier for the

day Gen'l Heath.

Field officers for the Piquet Col'l Doughlas, Lieu't Col'l Chandler and Major Foy for Main guard Lieu't Col'l Arnold. Brigade Major for the Day Wyllys. .22

Fatigue

I. .0. .1. .1. .1.

Guard

o. .1. .1. .1. .0. .24

Kingsbridge

5

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK Head Quarters Aug't

121

7th, 1776.

Parole Essex

Countersign Fairfield The Order of 23th of July respecting the removal of the Sick from the Regimental to the Gen'l Hospital having been Misunderstood by some, The General directs That it be taken with the following Explanation. The Regimental Surgeons are to send at any time with the Usual Ticket any patient to the General Hospital whose care re-

Whenquires it (Putred and Infectious disorders always Excepted.) ever the Director General or any Surgeon of the Hospital by his Director visits the Regimental Hospitals they are to direct what patients are proper to be removed, but it is Expected that when any Surgeon Visits the Regimental Hospital he will Consult with the Regimental

Surgeon, and If they should Differ in Opinion they will refer it to the who has by the Resolution of Congress a Superinten-

directors Gen'l, dency over the

The

Whole.

Gen'l most earnestly

recommends

to the

both departments to Cultivate to their own Honour and the good of the Service. A Sub. and 20 Men to be placed at Hobuck ferry for Examination of Passengers the Officers to receive his Orders

Gentlemen

in

from the Adjutant General at Head Quarters. The pay Master having a Supply of Cash the Col'l or Commanding officers of Regiments are to apply for their June pay, and make up pay Rolls for July and deliver them to their Respective Brigadiers for Examinareceived

tion.

As many Soldiers discharge their Pieces under a Pretence of Ignorance of Gen'l orders, and others having leave to do so from their Officers because they cannot draw the charge, the Gen'l directs that the Col'ls of the Regiments or Commanding Officer Caused Daily Inspection to be made of the State of the Arms and when any are found loaded which cannot be drawn they are to Cause such Men to assemble on the Regimental parade or some other Convenient place but at the same time nearly Retreat-beating and their discharge there pieces no alarm will then be given, 'and the Officers will see there is no unnecessary It

is

firings.

the

Duty of the

Col'l

and the Reputation of

much depends upon

the good order of his hopes he as well as every other Officer and the so

Attention to

Arms Men,

his

Regiment

that the Gen'l will

pay Strict

it.

John Tolgraves Wyllys Esq'r is Appointed Brigadier Major to Mark Hopkins Esq'r to Gen'l Fellow. They are be Obeyed and respected Accordingly.

Gen'l Wardsworth, to

Brigadier for the Day, Gen'l Spencer. Field officers for Piquet Col'l Chester, Lieut't Major Porter. Main Guard Lieut't Col'l Latimer.

Brigade Major Fish. For Fatigue o. I i For Guard i. .1. .1. .

.

.

.

.

I

.

.

i

.

.22

.1. .0. .25

Col'l

Wells and

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

122

Head Quarters, Aug't 8th, 1776 Parole Greenwich Countersign Kensington Passes Signed by the president of the Convention of New-York to be Deemed Authentick and Noticed as such by the officers attending at the Ferry's as the Movement of the Enemy and Intelligence by diserters gives the utmost reason to believe that the great Struggle in which we are Contending for every thing dear to us and our Posterity is near at Hand. The

Gen'l most earnestly

recommends the

Mens Arms Amunition and

State of the

Sudenly called to Action nothing of And does most anxiously Exort both

Strictest attention to the

flints

kind

that If

we should

be

be to provide. officers and Soldiers not to be this

may

out of their Quarters or Encampments, Especially early in the ing or Time of Flood Tide.

Morn-

A

Flag in the day time or a Light at Night in the Fort on Bayards with 3 guns from the Same place Fired Quick but Distinct

Hill,

Considered as a Sign for the Troops to repair to their Alarm and prepare for Action, and that the Alarm may be more Effectually given the Drtims are Immediately to beat to Arms upon the Signal given from Bayards Hill. This Order is not to be Conis

to be

posts,

sidered as Countermanding the fireing Two Guns from fort George as formerly Ordered that is also to be done upon an Alarm But the flag will not be hoisted at the old Head Quarters in the Broadway. Col'l Persons, Col'l Bud, Col'l Huntington, Col'l Webb, Col'l Wyllys, Col'l Bailey, Col'l Baldwin, Col'l McDougal, Col'l Ritzma and Lieut't Col'l Shipperd to attend at Head Quarters this Evening at 6 oClock.

Brigadier for the Day Gen'l Lord Sterling. Field officers for the Piquet Col'l Newcomb.

and Major Repply. Main Guard Lieut't

Col'l

Lieut't Col'l Russell

Reed.

Brigade Major, Livingston. Fatigue o. .1. i. I. I. .21 .

Guard

o. .0. .0.

.

.

.

I. .0.

.17

Head Parole

Quarters, Aug't Qth, 1776

Countersign

.

.

Cap't Lieutanant Sergeant with the Artillery, with two field to Attach himself to Gen'l Heards Brigade with the Amunition Carts as ordered by Col'l Knox. While time will permit he must Manuver with the Regiments of the Brigade and practice as much as possible the Horses not to be taken away from the Carts, but kept with the driver in some Convenient Place Contegious to the Brigade so as to

be ready at a

Moments warning.

to do the same with Lord Sterlings Brigade. Cap't L't Johnson to do the same with Gen'l Spencers Brigade.

Cap't L't

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

123

Cap't L't Crane to do the same with Gen'l Heaths Brigade. amunition Cart is provided for each Regiment with

An

Spare These Carts are Immediately to join the Several Regiments to which they belong and keep with them in some Safe place near the Regiment. The Quarter Master Gen'l to have the Water Casks replinished. The Commissary Gen'l to deliver to the Col'l of each Regiment Rum in proportion to half a pint to a Man, the Col'l to make a return of the Number of his Men, for this purpose and see that it is properly As delt out by putting it under the Care of very different Officer. there are some Regiments yet Deficient in Arms the Gen'l directs that the Col'l or some Commanding officers of Regiments See what good Arms there are Belonging to the Sick and put them into the hands Cartriges.

of those

who

to apply to

are well.

If there

the Adjutant Gen'l.

should be a deficiency, they are then The Gen'l officers to be at Head

Quarters this Evening at 6 oClock precisely. The Gen'l exorts every man both officers and Soldiers to be prepared for Action, to have his Arms in the best order, and not to wander from his encampment or Quarters, to remember what this Country expects of them, what a few

Men have lately done in S. Carolina against a powerfull fleet and army, to acquit themselves like Men and with the Blessing of heaven on so just a Cause we Cannot doubt of Success. Col'l Glover and Col'l Smallwoods Regiments are to be under the Immediate direction of brave

Brig'r General Sullivan untill some further arrangement is Made of the Brigade. Nicholas Fist Esq'r is appointed Major of Brigade to Gen'l Scott,

obeyed and respected accordingly. Brigadier for the Day Gen'l Scott. Field officers for the Piquet Col'l Johnson L't Col'l Sheppard and M'r Smith for Main Guard, Major Brooks Brigade Major Fish. One Orderly Sergeant for Head Quarters (from Col'l V'n Cort-

is

to be

landt).

One Orderly For Fatigue For Guard

Corp'l for Gen'l Heard. o. .o. .0. .1. .0. .17 o.

.

I.

.

I. .1.

.

I. .21

0. .!..!.. 2.. I. .38

[To be Continued]

Minutes of the Trustee [By resolution of the Board of Trustees of the New Jersey Historical Society, the Minutes of the Board will be published regularly hereafter in the Quarterly "Proceedings"].

NEWARK, NEW The Board

JERSEY, JANUARY 8, 1917. Jersey Historical Society met President Francis J. Swayze presided,

of Trustees of the

New

afternoon at one o'clock. and there were present also Charles M. Lum, Austin Scott, A. VanDoren Honeyman, J. Lawrence Boggs, James J. Bergen, Edwin R. Walker, Frank Bergen, Charles W. Parker, Frederick A. Canfield, Miss Altha E. Hatch, and Joseph F. Folsom. Excused, Hiram E.

this

Deats.

The minutes of December 4, 1916, were read and approved. The report of the treasurer, J. Lawrence Boggs, was read and approved. The balance shown was $514.08. The report of the Membership Committee was presented by the The following members chairman, Mr. Boggs, and was approved. were elected

Life, Charles B. Sanford Contributing, William S. Baker, Albert Banister, James A. Cartright, Charles H. Hawkins, and William C. Headley, all of Newark, and Hon. Edmund B. Learning of ;

;

W.

Camden.

The Finance Committee, through Mr. Lum, reported progress on basement room. The Library Committee, through Frederick A. Canfield, chairman, reported. For the Committee on Colonial Documents Dr. Scott reported progress with publishing the Archives. The following resolution in"That the President, or one of cidental to the report was adopted: the Vice-Presidents, be authorized to certify to any bills to be paid

New Jersey." secretary was directed to certify to the above resolution and to the fact that a majority of the Board was present. by the State of

The

The Board authorized

the committee to bind 1450 copies of

Volume

2nd

Series, at a cost not to exceed 35 cents, provided that the binders bind on the credit of the State of Jersey. 28,

New

The Board authorized for the civil

list

the expending of $25.00 for preparing index

for the Society of Colonial

Wars.

MINUTES OF THE TRUSTEES

125

A proposed gift of a collection of New Jersey Indian arrow heads was accepted with thanks from Dr. J. Hervey Buchanan of Plainfield. Miss Hatch announced the mid-winter meeting of the Woman's Branch to be at Mount Holly on February 14, 1917, and invited the Board to attend. The Board elected Mr. W. I. Lincoln Adams of Montclair a trustee to serve in the

vacancy caused by the election of Dr. Scott to the Vice-

Presidency.

The Board stood upon its rule not to sell any of the manuscripts of the Society after hearing by letter the request of the American Art Association representative, Mr. Arthur Swann, on behalf of a client

who wished

to

buy

letters written

The meeting adjourned.

by Major George W. Whistler. JOSEPH F. FOLSOM, Rec. Sec'y-

NEW JERSEY, FEBRUARY 5, 1917. New Jersey Historical Society met

NEWARK,

The Board of Trustees this

of the

afternoon at one o'clock.

There were present Francis

J.

Swayze,

M. Lum, A. Van Doren Honeyman, J. Lawrence Boggs, Frank Bergen, Henry G. Atha, Miss Altha E. Hatch, W. I. Lincoln Adams, and Joseph F. Folsom. Excused, E. S. Lines. The minutes of the meeting of January 8 were read and approved. The treasurer, Mr. Boggs, read his report, which was approved. The balance shown was $871.13. For the Membership Committee Mr. Boggs presented a report which was approved. The death of the Honorable William J. Magie of Elizabeth, a member of this board, among others was reported. Edward A. Stokes of Pottersville, having paid the dues of a contributing member for twenty years, was elected a life member. Samuel R. The following Contributing members were elected Baker, Robert Crabb, L. D. H. Gilmour, and John W. Halsey, of Newark; Mungo J. Currie of Jersey City; J. Amory Haskell and John B. Lunger of New York and William O. Wiley of East Orange. The resignation of William A. Baker, a Contributing member, was accepted. The report of the Library Committee, read by Mr. Boggs, was President, Charles

:

approved.

For the Committee on Colonial Documents Mr. Honeyman reported Volume 5, Second Series, of Newspaper

progress in the publishing of Extracts.

There was appropriated $100 for purchasing at auction sale, February 8 and 9 in New York, New Jersey items from the library of the late Garret D. W. Vroom. The bill of Charles A. Shriner for publishing the Proceedings for July, 1916, amounting to $150.33, was ordered paid. Various insurance policies, amounting ordered renewed for three years.

in

all

to

$20,000,

were

MINUTES OF THE TRUSTEES

126

The following resolution was passed "Resolved, That the treasurer be and is hereby authorized to open a savings bank account in the name of this Society and to deposit in such account all Life membership dues received from this time." :

The meeting adjourned.

JOSEPH F. FOLSOM, Rec.

NEWARK, NEW The Board of Trustees of

MARCH

5,

1917.

New

Jersey Historical Society met Vice-President Charles M. Lum pre-

the

afternoon at one o'clock.

this

JERSEY,

Sec'y.

and Frank Bergen, Hiram E. Deats, J. Lawrence Boggs, A. Van Doren Honeyman, Austin Scott, Henry G. Atha, Edwin S. Lines, sided,

Miss Altha E. Hatch, and Joseph F. Folsom were present. Excused Francis J. Swayze, Charles W. Parker. The minutes of the meeting of February 5 were read and approved. The treasurer, Mr. Boggs, reported with balance of $739.61. Ap:

proved.

For the Membership Committee Mr. Boggs reported as chairman and the report was Approved. The following were proposed and elected as Contributing members: Mrs. Frank W. Bamford, Trenton; Roland I. Hopper, Newark Professor William F. Magie, Princeton Henry C. Pitney, Jr., Morristown Hon. Bennett Van Syckel, 1 renFrancis L. Minton of New York ton Ridley Watts, Morristown. City was elected a Life member. The resignations of Dr. L. Eugene Hollister, of Newark, Madison Grant, of New York City, and Orra The death E. Monnette, of Los Angeles, California, were accepted. of William A. Linn of Hackensack was reported. Mr. Honeyman reported for the Library Committee, and the report was approved. For the Committee on Colonial Documents, Dr. Scott reported, and the committee was authorized to distribute Volume 5, Second Series, ;

;

;

;

of the Archives, according to existing methods, the details as to binding to be left to the committee. Mr. Boggs, of the Committee on purchasing books at the Vroom sale in

New

of which the

York, February

9,

reported that $140.50 had been spent, given fifty, and President Swayze

Woman's Branch had

twenty-five dollars.

Approved. Mr. Bergen was requested to prepare a minute on the death of trustee, the Honorable ex-Chancellor William J. Magie. The Committee on Colonial Documents was authorized to seek an appropriation from the State for the continuation of the publishing of the

New

Jersey Archives.

The following committee on procuring a speaker for the annual Edwin S. Lines, Frank Bergen, meeting in October was appointed :

and Austin

Scott.

The meeting adjourned.

JOSEPH F. FOLSOM, Rec.

Sec'y.

MINUTES OF THE TRUSTEES

127

LIST OF DONORS TO LIBRARY OCTOBER, 1916, TO MARCH, 1917, INCLUSIVE.

Mr. Frank D. Andrews, pamphlet; Anheuser-Busch Co., pamphlet; Mr. Edwin S. Balch, volume Dr. George S. Bangert, manuscript Mr. Patrick H. Baskervill, two volumes Mr. Charles Bradley, pamphlets, Mrs. C. H. Brush, print, and a collection of bank notes, framed volume Mr. Frederick A. Canfield, volume Mrs. Charles A. Christian, nine volumes Rev. Herbert G. Coddington, three volumes Miss Harriet J. Cooper, eighty-nine volumes and two pamphlets D. A. R., Fort Washington Chapter, volume; D. A. R., National Society, two pamphlets and three volumes Mrs. C. C. Davis, two curios, collection of letters, and a copy of the records of the Second Presbyterian Church of Mendham, N. J. Mr. Hiram E. Deats, (Woman's Branch) three engravings, Mrs. Laban Dennis (Woman's Branch) one curio; Dr. William S. Disbrow, pamphlets Mr. Arthur G. Doughty, pamphlet Miss Clara B. Eno, five manuscripts Mr. C. M. Farnum, pamphlet and volume; Mr. Morris P. Ferris, pamphlet; Rev. Joseph F. Folsom, volume; Mrs. Emma M. Golding, engraving (framed); Adjutant John M. Gould, pamphlet; Miss Margaret S. Haines, (Woman's Branch), two pamphlets, four curios, seven portraits, one manuscript; Miss Altha E. Hatch, (Woman's Branch) pamphlet; Garrit Haulenbeek estate (through Miss Caroline Y. Haulenbeek) fifteen volumes Mr. James W. Hawes, volume Mr. Elroy Headley, three volumes; Mrs. G. V. D. Hankinson, manuscript; Mr. Alfred M. Heston, manuscript and pamphlet; Mrs. Henry J. Hoerner, (Woman's Branch) volume and sixteen pamphlets; Holbrook estate, sixty volumes, five manuscripts, four pamphlets Mr. A. Van Doren Honeyman, two volumes Mr. James H. Hyde, pamphlet Mr. Chester N. Jones, two volumes Mr. James Lawrence Kearny, portrait Mr. Calvin N. Kendall, two volumes; Mr. Burnet Landreth, volume; Mr. Marion L. Lewis, seven volumes Bishop Lines, eight pamphlets, one volume Mr. Edward H. Lum, manuscript Mr. Richard J. Merrell, pamphlet ; Miss Augusta A. Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., N. Y., volume Morris, two volumes; Miss Lucy Morris, (Woman's Branch) curio; Morristown Trust Co., through Mr. Card, (Woman's Branch) volume; Miss Mary B. Morton, four curios Mr. Walter A. Morton, photograph Gov. Franklin Murphy, volume; Mr. John Neafie, manuscript; New Jersey Society, Order of Founders and Patriots, pamphlet Newark Public Library, volume Mr. Walter S. Nichols, volume Mrs. Kate Hamilton Osborne, volume Hon. Charles W. Parker, map Hon. R. Wayne Parker, two broadsides Mr. John F. Patterson, pamphlet; Mr. William H. Peck, portrait (framed); Mrs. E. Barclay Price, six volumes, one pamphlet Princeton University, volume Mrs. E. G. Putnam, (Woman's Branch) volume; Mr. Edward S. Rankin, map and print Mr. Henry Runyon, volume Mr. Edward L. Ryerson, two volumes; Mr. L. J. Ryerson, volume; St. Andrews Society, N. ;

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MINUTES OF THE

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TRUSTED

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terthwaite, manuscript; ;

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The Old

Style Definite Article

"Ye

A widespread, popular error is that which, supposes our forefathers to have This error is exuttered the word "ye" where the article "the" was meant. hibited whenever an old-fashioned concert or singing school is gotten up, and the program is printed beginning "Ye Olde Folks Concerte." Modern humorists have printed verses abounding in the word "ye." Eugene Field, in a very tender poem, entitled "Medieval Eventide Song," speaks of "ye garden that bloometh farre awaye," but even in medieval times "the" garden, and not "ye" garden, would have been the uttered term. One may look in vain through the printed books of the past for the word "ye" where "the" was intended. No "ye" for "the" appears in the English Bible printed in 1558, and the old books of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries of both England and America all use the word "the," just as it is used The famous Bay Psalm Book, printed in 1640, has title, "The Whole Booke of Psalmes." may be asked, has come this persistent "ye?" There must The answer its use, however erroneous or misapplied.

in present-day printing.

"the" as the

first

Whence, then,

word it

of its

be some reason for briefly may be stated by saying that "ye" is a corruption of the Anglo-Saxon character "thorn," equivalent to "th," and the vowel "e." The combinatioon "th" in Anglo-Saxon, as in Greek was one letter, and this character was used by writers down to the beginning of the nineteenth century. It appears in manuscripts but not in books, because the printers had no types for "thorn." After printing became common the It was used by engravers upon tombstones. engravers seem frequently to have used "ye" and "the" at option, sometimes using both forms on the same tombstone. The "e" was placed either directly above the "thorn" or above a line to the right. The character "thorn" as originally written differed from "y," but there is such a similarity as to have led some people, particularly in the eighteenth In this century, to confuse it with "y," with which they were more familiar. manner, the use of "ye" for "the" is explained.

JOSEPH

F.

FOLSOM.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

New VOL.

Jersey Historical Society

II.

New

No

NEW^SERIES

3

Light on Famous Controversy in the History of Elizabethtown

BY WILLIAM

J.

MAGIE, FORMER CHANCELLOR OF

NEW

JERSEY

[Concluded]

THE HOME GOVERNMENT TAKES PART The unsatisfactory condition of affairs West Jersey began to attract the attention of ment

in the closing years of the

in

both East and

the

home governCom-

Seventeenth century.

had been strenuously made that the Proprietary government had been inefficient in providing for the defense of

plaints

the Province against foreign enemies or of the settlers against the Indians; that it had failed to repress the disorders which had broken out into lawless violence and might thereafter en-

danger

the-

Naturally such com-

very existence of the Colony.

plaints led to questioning the

wisdom and expediency of Pro-

prietary governments, whose officers, executive and judicial, were appointed by the owners of the Proprietary rights, many

of

whom

were non-residents, and

all

of

whom

were interested

pecuniarily in the exploitation of these vast tracts of land yet

These questions led to an examination of the unoccupied. of the rights Proprietors to set up and maintain a Government. In April, 1699, the Board of Trade and Plantations represented to the

9

King (William III)

that a trial be

had upon a feigned

NEW

130

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

Westminster Hall whereby the Proprietors' claim toGovernment might be determined. Whether the Proprietors, before that time, had begun to

issue in

the right of

have doubts as to their right to the Government of New Jersey or not, may be questioned. At all events, they had made propositions to the English authorities in which, while protesting that they had acquired such right, they offered to surrender

the right to the Crown, retaining their property in the land.

BOARD OF TRADE AND PLANTATIONS' REPORT These propositions, and others, relating to the

state of the

Provinces were referred to the Board of Trade and Planta-

which body (one of whom was Matthew Prior, the poet) on Oct. 2, 1701, made a detailed report. For my present purtions,

pose

it is

sufficient to

quote the following:

all which we humbly represent to your ExcellenThat not being satisfied that the forementioned grants from the Duke of York (the only title upon which the said Proprietors claim a right to Government) without any direct and immediate authority from the Crown, were or could be of any validity to convey that right (which we have been informed is a power inalienable from the Person to whom it is granted and not to be assigned by him unto any other, much less divided, subdivided and conveyed from one to another, as has been done in the present case) we did thereupon humbly represent to His Majesty, the i8th of April, 1699, that a trial might be had in Westminster Hall upon a feigned issue whereby their claim to the Right of Government might receive a de-

"Upon

cies.

termination."

The report then proceeded to recommend that the King should appoint a Governor over the Provinces and instruct him to establish a Government therein. Nothing was done upon this recommendation during the William III, but on April 15, 1702, the Proprietors of both Provinces surrendered all rights of the Government of New Jersey to Queen Anne, who had come to the Throne on the 8th of the preceding March. On April I7th, 1702, Queen Anne accepted the surrender. On the 5th of December following she commissioned Edward Hyde, known as Lord Cornlifetime of

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

131

New Jersey, and sent him out with the well-known "Instructions," under which he established the

bury, to be Governor of

Royal Government of

NEW

New

Jersey.

ACTIONS BROUGHT AND JUDGMENTS

The change

in the

government did not diminish the

litiga-

tion between those claiming under the Proprietors and those claiming under the Associates. Many actions were brought

One resulting in judgments sustaining the Proprietors' title. is deserving of notice, for it is evident from contem-

of these

poraneous accounts that the Associates hoped to be able to carry it before the King in Council and so to obtain a judicial settlement of the vexed question which would determine whether the reversal of the

judgment

in Fullerton v.

Jones was upon

the merits of the respective claims. In 1714 an action of ejectment

was brought in the SuCourt Edward Vaughn, claiming in the right of preme by his wife under a Proprietary title against Joseph Woodruff, claiming under the Associates. The issue was tried in 1716 at the Bar of the Supreme Court and a special verdict was returned. Arguments thereon were had at least at two subsequent terms. In May, 1718, the Court directed judgment to be entered in favor of Vaughn, the plaintiff. Woodruff promptly brought a writ of error thereon to the Governor and Coun-

The cause was there argued at length in 1719, and a rehearing was had in August, 1725, but no judgment was everentered thereon. In consequence, Woodruff was unable to apcil.

peal to the

King

in

no explanation of

Council as he had intended to do.

I

find

The Associates

naturally asserted that the Proprietors (some of whom were members of the Court) were unwilling to have their claim reviewed by a this action.

Court which would have settled the question forever. It may be inferred that this indication of the purposes of the Proprietors induced the Associates to make up the Book before mentioned to preserve a record of the various surveys and divisions previously made and recorded in the lost Books. It seems that the judgments supporting the Proprietors' claims were generally entered upon special verdicts. But as

132

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

time passed some juries rendered general verdicts. Thus, in the action of Patrick Lithgow, claiming under the Proprietors against John Robinson, et als, claiming under the Associates, division of 1699, which was commenced in 1731 and brought to trial in 1734, a general verdict was reached for the defendants. And in another action commenced in 1738, in which

James Jackson, on the demise of Joseph Halsey, claiming under the Associates, was plaintiff, and John Vail, one of the Proprietors was defendant, and which was brought to trial in March, 174.1-2 (the trial lasting forty hours) a general verdict was rendered for the plaintiff. These judgments doubtless encouraged the Associates and probably induced the Proprietors to resort to a Court of Equity

up of the Associates' title in the thenwhich might be brought on the pending that the title was not only good, but had ground Proprietors' to enjoin the setting suits

and

in other suits

been settled at law. TH>: ELIZABETHTOWN BILL IN

CHANCERY

This resulted in the filing by the Proprietors of the celebrated Elizabethtown Bill in Chancery, which long ago disap-

and which we only know from a copy by James Parker in 1747. It appears therefrom that the Bill was filed on April 13, 1745, and that it was addressed to the Governor, Lewis Morris, who held lands under the Proprietors. If the Proprietors hoped that the interest of the Governor might render him favorable to their claims they must have been disappointed by the death of Governor Morris in May, 1746, and the subsequent appointment of Jonathan Belcher, who had no Proprietary interest, but was a friend and intimate of the people of Elizabethtown where he peared from the printed in

files,

New York

fixed his residence.

This celebrated document was evidently the work of inteland experienced lawyers. It was of prodigious length and perhaps was amenable to some criticism in respect to some of its allegations, but it must be presumed that it made the ligent

strongest case possible for the Proprietors. The Associates were thus attacked in a novel way.

Here-

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

133

tofore the Proprietors had attacked individuals and challenged their title under the Associates. In the early litigation it would

seem that the individual defendants stood upon their defense own means. Gradually it came to be perceived that

with their

each attack upon individual

titles

affected the titles of all the

Associates, and committees were formed to aid the defense. Money was raised by sales of parts of the original tract which had not been divided and contributed for the expenses, prob-

ably in violation of the laws against champerty and maintenance if those laws were in force in the Provinces. Now the whole

body of the Associates was attacked, and prove successful, the idated.

The

situation

title

was

if

the attack should

of every individual would be inval-

critical.

The

risk

was

great, because if

successful each of the defendants would have been defenseless against actions of ejectment, resulting in his ouster from the house and lands, built and improved by the toil and priva-

tion of his ancestor or predecessor in title. It may well be conceived that they deliberated long and anxiously. The original eighty Associates had all died or removed. The feelings

which stirred them to violence, when in 1670 they discovered that they had been permitted and encouraged to build up the

town under

their purchase, but

were now required to pay perby way of quit-rents, must

petual tribute to the Proprietors

if not totally disappeared. The question could be considered dispassionately. If prudence required submission it seems clear that the Associates could have cleared

have largely subsided

from the Proprietors' claim by paying the quitrents in arrears and undertaking their future payment. The were not the arrears rather forwere quit-rents large, although their lands

midable.

Some

circumstances seemed to encourage submission. The Proprietors were people of wealth, title and station. While the Associates and other sympathizers could generally elect a majority of the Lower House, the Council, the Courts and the

Governorship were usually filled by Proprietors and their sympathizers. Moreover, the Associates had been long practically deprived of competent legal advisers.

Many

years before,

NEW

134

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

when negotiations were going on looking to the making up a case for judicial decision, they had bitterly complained that every lawyer of reputation and standing at the Bar of the Provinces was under retainer by the Proprietors, and had even asked the release of one of them so as to enable them to be represented.

ANSWER TO THE BILL The

deliberations of the Associates resulted in a determi-

new

upon their title. They were two young lawyers who had been As solicitors and counsel they practicing but a few years. drafted an "Answer to the Bill," which was sworn to by over 400 claimants under the original Associates. This document was probably filed shortly after August, 1751. It has also disappeared from the files, but is believed to be still in existence. Our knowledge of it is obtained from the publication nation to resist the

attack

able to secure the services of

in 1752 of a copy, which, although rare,

eral public

and private

libraries.

It

may

be found in sev-

does not betray any lack

of ability or experience by its youthful draughtsmen. It takes up, one by one, the charges of the Bill, and in concise and vig-

orous terms presents the defenses of the Associates. So far as known, no replication then a necessity under the rules of Chancery pleading was ever filed, and no attempt was ever made to bring the cause to hearing before Governor

Belcher or any succeeding Governor.

The counsel

for the

Proprietors died shortly after the Answer was filed. The stirring scenes of the French War, in which many of the sons of

Elizabethtown took an honorable part; the excitement occasioned by the passage of the Stamp Act in 1765, and not allayed its repeal in 1766 because of the accompanying assertion of

by

a right in Parliament to tax colonies the outburst of resistance to the duty imposed on tea, followed by armed resistance and ;

assertion of independence of Great Britain and the forming of a new nation, attracted all the attention of the people inter ;

arma ued

silent leges.

So

this contest, first raised in 1670, contin-

to the filing of the

settled.

Answer

in 1752,

was never

judicially

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

135

This resume of historical facts affords the only ground on which we can form some estimate of the motives that actuated the Associates in pertinaciously maintaining the contest, which, in view of the wealth and influence of the Proprietary party, may well be called unequal.

not difficult to conceive the astonishment of the Ason being informed about 1670, that the Proprietors claimed that they should take title under the Proprietors for the tract which they had bought from the Indians under the license and with the approval of Col. Nicolls, the deputy of the Duke of York and doing so, should bind themselves to pay a perpetual quit- rent (which, though small in detail, amounted to a large sum in the whole) to the Proprietors. They were It is

sociates,

;

probably incredulous that the Duke of York, heir to the Crown,

who had commissioned

Col.

Nicolls as his deputy,

and

in-

him

structed

to take steps to settle the territory of the Duke, would have done anything to interfere with those who, in ignorance, had relied on Governor Nicolls' authority, without

When the demands of the were and when the Associates reflected Proprietors persisted in, that the Governor and Agent of the Proprietors had not warned the actual settlers he found there in 1665 that they had no title against the Proprietors, but had joined the Association, contributed to their common fund, had taken part in the divisions of their tract and accepted the shares allotted to him in such division, the indignation and resentment of the old providing for their protection.

settlers

may be

easily understood.

It

doubtless accounts for

the violence which occurred and the unpopularity of Governor Carteret.

GOVERNOR CARTERET'S CONDUCT It is

not easy to satisfactorily account for the conduct of When he arrived here he respect.

Governor Carteret in this was only 26 years of age.

He was

charged with the responsi-

New

ble duty of settling Jersey in the interests of the Proprietors and on the basis of their Concessions. He found a settle-

ment already begun. It may well be that he judged it wise to unite with the settlers and build up the town, relying on the

NEW

136

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

Proprietors ratifying his action in case of success.

This

is

the

motive usually attributed to him. A more perfect explanation would appear if we knew that he was cognizant of the letter of the Proprietors to Col. Nicolls, before his arrival here, which

Governor Lovelace produced before his Council in New York, and which Lovelace thought had confirmed Nicolls' grants in Elizabeth Town and the Navesinks. Even then it would be difficult to understand his failure to acquaint the Associates of such an important fact. However honest were the intentions of Governor Carteret, it

was

inevitable that the Associates should be unable to find

conduct consistent with fair dealing. From their point of view they had been led, not only by his reticence as to Prohis

by his active co-operation with them, to devote some six years'to the hard life and labor of pioneers in a new land. They had been induced thereby to take their di-

prietors' claims, but

visions under the Associates, they had felled the woods, built their houses, prepared the soil for tillage and contributed to

To

be told at the end of six years' had no title to the lands they had reclaimed, but must take title from the Proprietors, and agree to pay annual tribute to them, seemed to be so grossly unfair

the erection of a church.

work and

struggle that they

as to arouse a resistance that never wholly disappeared. When under pressure of threats from the Duke of York and Charles II they yielded and applied for surveys, the larger number of them still refused to take the titles which would have fastened on them the perpetual burden of annual quit-rents.

REVERSAL OF FULLERTON

Then followed

the reversal by the

v.

JONES

King

in

Council of the

judgment of the Proprietary Courts in Fullerton v. Jones. The Associates were informed by the Agent who prosecuted the appeal of Jones that the judgment of reversal was upon the validity of the Indian deed and Nicholls' grant and therefore felt

assured of their

titles.

This assurance of validity of title doubtless induced the individual Associates to defend the many actions of ejectment. When it was found that the Provincial Courts continually ruled

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

137

favor of the title of the Proprietors, the same sentiment induced the holders of the lands to band together for a mutual defense to endeavor to supply the place of their lost records, and to make the impassioned appeal to the King against the injustice of being compelled to submit the issues involving the in

;

validity of the Proprietors' title to the decision of those

Judges

who

held their position by appointment of the Proprietors whose title would be affected by their decision.

The same

influence

no doubt stimulated the desire of the

Associates to present a case to the King in Council on appeal when it could be settled whether the decision in Fullerton v.

Jones was upon the merits of the controversy or not. When was defeated by the failure of the Governor and

their desire

Council to decide the issue presented by the writ of error taken Vaughn v. Woodruff, and when they were further encour-

in

aged by two verdicts of juries in favor of the Associates' title, it seems apparent that the like motive brought about their union in answering the Elizabethtown Bill.

CLAIMS AND EVIDENCE OF TITLE It is

now my purpose

to discover,

if

possible,

whether the

Associates or the Proprietors had any title to the tract of land which was described in the Indian grant to the licensees of Colonel Nicolls and, if so, which of the parties had such title.

The

first

question to be determined respects the rights

which the King of England had acquired upon the continent of North America.

The claim in

Chancery

of the

King

filed in 1745.

is

very fully in the Bill thus set forth was a title

set forth

The

title

by discovery and not a title by conquest. It was based upon the discovery by Sebastian Cabot, who, in the time of Henry VII (1497) reached the eastern coast of North America, about the latitude of Florida, and sailed along the coast to the latitude

67^

degrees north. of England possessed no rights in the soil of the vast country along which Sebastian Cabot sailed, except such as the recognized international rule of law gave him. The

The King

country was inhabited, but the inhabitants were uncivilized

NEW

138

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

savages, and, to use the language of the day, pagans. If the troops, made war upon the ignorant natives and subdued them, a barbarous rule might have been applied.

King had landed

The King might have destroyed the inhabitants and taken the land and granted it to whomsoever he should select. But when no war had been waged and no conquest had been made, a was recognized by international law in the potentate presiding over the nation of the original discoverer almost equally barbarous. The King or other potentate by such a discovery right

was recognized

as having a right to exclude from settling upon all other nations and peoples. He had

the discovered territory

a right to license his own subjects or others to enter upon the discovered land and to acquire from the inhabitants, by negotiation and purchase, a title. purchase by any other than one

A

licensed by the King of other potentate of the discoverer was deemed to be of no value. The poor natives were thus, with-

out any fault of their own, deprived of the right to dispose of their lands to whomsoever they should select in fact it may ;

be said that they were compelled by their ignorance to dispose of their lands to the licensees of the King; yet the theory was that they were to be satisfied by a fair purchase. Of course

was no standard of value that could fairly be used between the native owners and the proposed settlers in the new country. Glittering toys, gaudy coats, and, worst of all, intoxithere

cating spirits, were, as a rule, the price offered. They cost the little, but satisfied the untrained and un-

proposed purchasers taught savage.

This was the view taken by Chief Justice Marshall in the case to which attention has been already called. The quotation made from his opinion establishes, in my judgment, the requia tide under the discovery of Sebastian Cabot to be A from the King, or from some other whom the King had deputed to grant licenses, and a purchase under the license from the native inhabitants. sites of

:

license

To

aid in the investigation I have undertaken it will be well mind the claims of each of the parties to this contest.

to fix in

the

The claim of the Proprietors was based upon the deed of Duke of York to Berkeley and Carteret. No other convey-

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

139

ance to them was relied upon, and it was not pretended that they or their successors had ever acquired the right, interest or title of the Indian possessors of the land included in the

Elizabethtown

may

It

tract.

be here observed that the

Answer

to the Bill in

Chancery attacks the deed from the Duke of York to Berkeley and Carteret. That deed was a familiar form of conveyance of title to land in England which grew up after the enactment of the Statute of Uses. The old common-law lawyers adhered to the notion that no title could be conveyed except by an owner in possession and capable of making livery of seisin. The Statute of Uses was conceived to recognize a possession of a constructive nature, and the cunning of the profession then discovered that, by making a lease, an owner of land out of possession might confer upon the lessee a constructive possession, so that the owner might by a release pass an absolute title to the lessee.

The

Answer upon

the deed in question was and release the Duke of York was That must be adnot in possession of the land conveyed. mitted such possession as existed was in the Dutch and it was adverse to the English title. The argument then was that the Duke's lease and release passed no title, because the Statute of Uses did not extend to or operate upon titles to lands to which the King's right had been obtained only by discovery thereof by one of his subjects. criticism of the

that at the date of the lease

;

Looking at the title supposed to be conveyed by the lease and release as a title to land, this argument was perhaps not without

effect, but, in

my judgment, it

erred because the

Duke

of

York had acquired by in the soil of

New

his letters patent from the King no right Jersey for the King had no such right, and :

therefore could not convey to the Duke any such right. The right which the letters patent transferred to the Duke was a right to settle the

pagan

lands, to select such persons as the

Duke should choose, to make such settlement, and to govern them when the settlement was made. The power of government involved the selection of the

140

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

settlers,

and

was a power pertaining

and not

at all a title to land.

it

The claim

to the

of the Associates was to a

Royal prerogative title

the Indian possessors under the license by the uty authorized for that purpose. It is clear,

conferred by

Duke

or his dep-

by the way, that upon the doctrine of Chief

Justice Marshall the Proprietors could not have succeeded as plaintiffs in any litigation respecting the title to the Elizabeth-

town title

tract even if Col. Nicoll's authority did not exist, and the of the Associates were thus shown to be defective. For

no doctrine

is

better settled than that a plaintiff in

an action

involving the title to land must succeed entirely upon showing a good title in himself. The weakness or non-existence of title in the

defendant would not

he established such a

entitle the plaintiff to

title in

recover unless

himself.

If it be assumed that the Indians' deed to the Associates was void because made to persons not duly licensed to acquire

such a title, it remained true that the Indians or the Associates had possession and title and that the Proprietors had never acquired both, either from the Indians or from the Associates.

The claim of

the Associates

license of the English

Crown

was primarily based upon

the

to purchase the Elizabethtown

from the Indians and the subsequent purchase, the deed was duly recorded in the manner directed in the instructions to Colonel Richard Nicolls. It must be conceded

tract

for which

that if Col. Richard Nicolls, at the time of giving the license to purchase, had authority to do so, the Indians' deed established in the grantees an estate in fee which could be sustained in an

action of ejectment and could afford a complete defense to the alleged title of the Proprietors.

In dealing with this question it is important to ascertain the nature of the licensing power claimed by the King in lands of uncivilized heathen discovered by one of his subjects. It was manifestly either from a branch of the King's power to govern his settlements in such lands when they had been made

or from a power of an analogous nature. Such powers were branches of the King's prerogative, which he could exercise by himself or by persons appointed for that purpose by him.

When

NEW the

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

King made

to the

Duke

of

York

141

the letters patent, he

placed in his brother's hands the selection of persons to make settlements in the tract over which the Duke was given complete powers of government, and he further authorized the

Duke

to exercise these

powers either by himself or by deputy

appointed by him. That Colonel Richard Nicolls was such a deputy there can be no question, and that his exercise of the power of selecting

and authorizing purchases from the Indians was an exercise by a deputy of the prerogative power conferred upon the principal must be admitted. settlers

If the power of the deputy had not been superseded on the 3Oth day of September, 1664, when his license was signed by him, and on the first day of December, 1664, when his con-

firmatory grant was made, his acts were final and conclusive. The claim of the Proprietors on this subject was that as

whole of the lands in New Jersey Colonel Nicolls was deprived of the power to license purchases from the Indians on the 22nd and 23rd day of June, 1664, when the Duke of

to the

York made the deed to Berkeley and Carteret in England. The appeal is to the known doctrine that when a principal who has given an agent power over the principal's land divests himself of property in the land by a conveyance to another, In my judgment the power of the agent is thereby revoked. this principle is inapplicable according to the doctrines above stated respecting title in discovered lands. Neither the King nor the Duke of York had any title of any kind and no right beyond that of excluding every other nation from settlement in the discovered property and of selecting such persons as the

King desired

Consequently the conveyance produce the effect contended for. A critical examination of the release also indicates, in my judgment, that there was no direct conveyance of the Royal to settle therein.

to the Proprietors did not

Prerogatives which the

Duke had been empowered

the letters patent. It was a mere grant of land with tenances, "in as full and ample manner as the same

Duke

of

York by

to use its is

by

appur-

granted

the before-recited letters patent." It seems that this language cannot be construed as conveying

to the said

142

powers of the Royal prerogative, such as the powers of government, and the included or collateral power of determining who should make a settlement and form the community to be governed. This conclusion, so far as the powers of government are concerned, will perhaps seem strange to those who remember that under the Proprietors a government was set up and actually in operation for 37 years and until, upon a threat of a test the Proprietors' right to govern, the powers The govof government were surrendered to Queen Anne. ernment so set up was undoubtedly a de facto government. All

proceeding to

who came over with Philip Carteret were bound to acthat cept government by the terms of the "Grants and ConcesThe Associates who were already settled here were sions."

those

not thus bound but Undoubtedly became bound by the oath they took recognizing the Proprietors' government. Yet such recognition did not, in any respect, affect the

title

to lands

claimed by the Indian deed.

While the conveyance from the Duke of York to Berkeand Carteret lacked the legal efficiency that its terms indiley cated, because the Duke of York had no title to the lands conbe argued that it could be construed as creand Carteret a power of government and inBerkeley a to select who should be admitted to settle cidentally power and be governed, and that thereby, as to the whole of New Jersey, the powers of Col. Richard Nicolls were, inferentially veyed, yet

it

may

ating in

at least,

revoked.

The Board

of Trade and Plantations in the recommenda-

tion to the Council to test the right of the Proprietors to a government took the position that the Royal Prerogative of

government over a discovered country, when intrusted to the Duke, was incapable of being passed over by him for any part of the vast dominion which the King's letters patent had conferred upon him. There can be no doubt that, when an agency is created involving the exercise of discretion in the person selected, such

person has no power to transfer to another that exercise of discretion which had been conferred upon him as a personal

NEW The

duty.

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

letters patent did, indeed, authorize the

143

Duke

to

and appoint a deputy who should represent him and govern the new territory and the whole of it. Such deputy would govern absolutely in the name of the Duke as representing the sovereign who had conferred upon him the power of government. It seemed to the Board of Trade and Plantations select

not to be capable of being construed as authorizing the Duke to subdivide his grant and confer upon each division a power of government.

As

their report said

:

"To admit

that construc-

would permit the Duke to subdivide it in innumerable quantities and to grant to each the Royal Prerogative of government, by which he would thus evade the responsibility which the letters patent had imposed upon him." tion

POWERS OF BERKELEY AND CARTERET, AND NICOLLS But

if

this be considered rather hypercritical,

and

if

there

can be discovered from the transaction an intent to confer up-

on Berkeley and Carteret the power of government inclusive of the power of selecting the community to be governed, a further question is at once raised. It must be conceded that on the 24th day of June, 1664, when the Duke's release was executed, Colonel Richard Nicolls was the Governor and Deputy of the Duke of York for the whole of the territory, a right which the Duke acquired under the letters patent. Did the conveyance to Berkeley and Carteret, construed as conferring upon them powers of government (part of the Royal Prerogative) ipso facto deprive Colonel Nicolls, on whom these powers had been conferred by the Duke, of any power so conferred, before the new Governors had appeared in this country in person or by duly appointed agents, and had made public their accession to the authority conferred upon them? To assert the affirmative to this proposition at the time when the source of power was 3000 miles distant and the time required to transmit intelligence was never less than months, would require us to acknowledge that every act done by a Governor in the Colony might be found afterward to have been nullified

England.

and made of no avail by the action of the Duke It is incredible that

in

such was the contemplation of

NEW

144

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

the parties. As a matter of fact, in the change of Governors the previous incumbent in practice retained his power until his successor appeared in the Colony armed with his commission

and required the

officer

he superseded to recognize his au-

thority. It results that

on

this construction of the

Duke's release

the powers of Colonel Nicolls were retained by him until Philip Carteret arrived with his commission under the Proprietors: then,

upon the theory above

stated, the

powers of Colonel Ni-

colls, so far as they affected New Jersey, ceased to exist. But this conclusion renders it clear that when Colonel Nicolls li-

censed the Associates to purchase of the Indians, and when he confirmed their purchase, he was without knowledge of the

conveyance by the Duke in the previous June, and the purchasers were equally ignorant. It seems manifest from all the accounts of the occurrences that the

knowledge of the Duke's conveyance

to Berkeley

and

Carteret did not reach Colonel Nicolls or the public here until the summer of 1665, when Philip Carteret's ship arrived.

Upon this situation much consideration, that effective

I

have reached the conclusion, after

from Colonel Nicolls was and the Indian deed was good, and the power of Nithe license

had not, at the time it was exerted, been, in fact, taken away from him. This conclusion relates to the situation at the

colls

time of Carteret's arrival, but this does not tions that

were raised

settle all the

ques-

in the long controversy.

DOCTRINE OF SOVEREIGNTY OVER CONQUERED TERRITORY

The

additional circumstances that

must be considered be-

fore a definite opinion can be pronounced upon the legal ation are as follows

situ-

:

1671 -'72, England declared war against the and the existence of war between these nations, it is asserted in the Bill in Chancery, was proclaimed in New Jersey on the i6th of July, 1672. In the following year a Dutch fleet cruising along the coast of America was informed of the defenseless condition of New York. The Dutch comman-

In March,

Dutch

;

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

145

der made sail for New York and, about the 3Oth of July, 1673, took possession of the City of New York and gradually extended the Dutch authority over both the Provinces of New

York and New Jersey. The war came to an end with the Dutch in possession, but the treaty of peace made in February, i673-'74, it was exby pressly stipulated that the country taken from the English was to be "restored to it

its

former owners

in the

same condition

as

be at the time of publishing this peace." Upon these circumstances it seems apparent that Charles

shall

II,

then King of England, conceived that he had acquired a

new

and that the acquisition was rather from the Dutch which gave him the such power acquired by conquest. So he made, on June 29, a second to the Duke of York of the whole tract 1674, grant which he had granted to him by the letters patent of March 12, 1664. Thereupon the Duke of York by lease and release made the grant of East Jersey to Sir George Carteret. The lease and release were dated the 28th and 2gth of July, 1674. right in the country,

in the nature of a conquest

This arbitrary division of the lands of New Jersey was afterwards adopted and made effective by what is called the Quintipartite deed, which was dated July ist, 1676, and was

made by

Sir George Carteret and the assigns of Lord Berkeley with Sir George Carteret, had been the grantees in the who, Duke's original conveyance in 1664. in

The dividing line between East and West Jersey was left some doubt by the language used in the Duke's grant and

the Quintipartite deed. It may be possible that the Elizabethtown tract extended so far to the west that portions of it were included in West Jersey but this is doubtful and it is plain that ;

the

main and valuable portion was within the boundaries of

East Jersey.

The

doctrine

to slay

mitted

and destroy

among

sovereign of a country gained conquered country because of his right

that

rights in the soil of a

the

all its

inhabitants

was not universally ad-

the laws of nations.

Grotius and other writers on the laws of Nations admitted some sovereign rights in the conqueror but limited those 10

NEW

146

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

rights to destruction of life and denied them as to the acquisition of the property of the conquered, except as it was seized in or after a conflict. Whether the rights of a conqueror were

limited or not all

it

seems to

me

manifest that the rule did not at

apply to the situation of the Colonists in

New

New York

and

Jersey when

the treaty which terminated the war between was signed and restored to the King and Holland England those colonies.

The

colonies in question were built up and inhabited by loyal subjects of the English crown. The English sovereign or his alter ego, the Duke of York, owed the colonists protection

That protection was manifestly not result was that they were unable to repel invasion the Dutch and were forced to yield to them. the of

from foreign

invasion.

given them.

The

The King

did not procure the restoration of these colonies by a conquest of the territory, but by means of a treaty which

put a period to the state of war between England and Holland. So the colonies returned to the King by peaceful means. But if the King's troops had invaded the colonies and driven out the Dutch, it is impossible to conceive that the King could have thereby obtained authority to slay all the inhabi-

who had been his loyal subjects, and who, by reason of his failure to protect them, had been compelled to submit to the Dutch invasion. tants

Lacking that power the most arbitrary and extensive of claimed rights of the conqueror, he did not by the transfer acquire any right over the soil of the colonies, and the deed to the

Duke

of

York was of no

avail to pass to

him any

right

over such lands. If it were otherwise all colonies would have been at the mercy of their King. If they became valuable and populous, by withdrawing his protection he might permit them to be invaded and taken by another nation, and then, having conquered the other nation, he might restore himself and withdraw from the colonists whom he had neglected the rights which they had acquired under him. This is so contrary to reason that no such doctrine is discoverable in any of the writers on the subject.

If the

power of destruction of the conquered did not ex-

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

the appended

ist,

power ceased

to exist.

147

Cessante ratione ces-

sat lex.

For these reasons, in my judgment, the Proprietors were unable to rely upon the second conveyance from the Duke of York, and the Associates' title acquired under the Indian deed

was not thereby affected. The first of the questions which is,

I think, to

be thus answered:

I

have undertaken to decide

The

persistent resistance of

demands of the Proprietors was due to an honest belief in the validity of their title, and that belief arose naturally from the circumstances.

the Associates to the

There are two other questions affecting the Proprietors' which ought to be considered. It is asserted that the original Associates upon the arrival of Governor Carteret took the oath of allegiance including a stipulation that they were to be true and faithful to the Lords Proprietors and the government title

of the Province.

As

and had established-

the Proprietors claimed the government that oath was a natural sequence of

it,

up the new town: but it any way recognized the of the to the soil which was afterward asright Proprietors serted. The right of government and the right to the soil were distinct rights and the recognition of the one did not involve their union with Carteret in setting is impossible to conceive that it in

the recognition of the other. It is also asserted that the protesting Associates admitted the rights of the Proprietors when many or most of them con-

sented to take out surveys of their land. As has been stated, this was no recognition of the neces-

from the Proprietors and did not bind any of payment of the quit-rents demanded by the Pro-

sity of a title

them

to the

prietors.

EXTENT OF TERRITORY GRANTED other questions raised by the Bill and Answer in was one affecting the extent of the territory granted Chancery the Indians and claimed by the Associates. By the Indian by

Among

NEW

148

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

ran up After Cull Bay "till we which sets westwards up After Cull Bay aforesaid," and then to run west into the country. The northern boundary of the tract, therefore, depends upon the location of the river intended by the description above quoted. On the part of the Proprietors it was contended that the river intended was what was then called and is yet called Bound Creek. On the part of the Associates it was contended

deed the

come

line dividing the tract

to the first river

that the river intended

was

contention involved the

the Passaic.

title

mouth of Bound Creek and

It is

obvious that this

to a considerable tract as the

the

mouth of

the Passaic are sep-

arated by several miles. I have reached the conclusion that the Proprietors were correct in their contention, and that Bound Creek satisfied the description of the Indian deed. At the time the Bill in Chancery that

was

filed, it is

Bound Creek had been somewhat diminished

the destruction of the forests around

its

probable

in size

by headwaters and the

consequent erosion from the cultivated land carried into the stream.

The Associates' answer does not deny that at that time it was navigable for small vessels. The Bill had asserted that it was so much of a water-way as to be frequently used and, indeed, that a small vessel had been built thereon for the navigation of the adjoining waters. The Associates further contended that

it

was not a

which was

river but a

mere

tidal stream, the

in a cove, the location of

which

is

still

head of

to be ob-

served. Perhaps it was not, strictly speaking, a river, but a stream capable of being used and which was used for driving a mill ran into this cove, and from that point to the Bay it was

rather a tidal river.

Bound Creek has been

so contracted by deposits from the and adjoining country by being closed by causeways and railroads that it is not at this day easily discoverable, but at my earliest recollection it was no inconsiderable stream. Once, when driving to Newark, I was in company with an old man who was born in that neighborhood and lived there until he grew up, when he came to Elizabethtown and resided

NEW there

till

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

149

The road on which we were passing, and called the lower road to Newark, deviated from the upper road to Newark just south of what

his death.

which was then the road called

now Evergreen Cemetery, and by

a circuitous route running near what was formerly a station on the Pennsylvania railroad called Waverly, it avoided the hills of the upper road, which is

were then quite formidable to heavy traffic. The upper road crossed the stream which ran into the cove, but did not strike Bound Creek. The lower road crossed Bound Creek by a stone bridge and joined the upper road at a spot near the present station of the

Lehigh Valley Railroad.

As we were crossing the stone bridge, my old companion pointed out to me the decayed and broken down timbers of what had formerly been a bulkhead or wharf along Bound

me that in his youth the farmers used to send produce from that wharf by sloops to New York and obtained by the return of the vessel what they needed from the So that even in the close of the Eighteenth century, which city. was about the time when my old companion was a boy, the stream was navigable and of some importance. Creek, and told

their

It

would seem by the use of the word

"first" in the de-

scription of the stream, the grantors intended to indicate one river out of more rivers setting westward. The only other river that could be claimed to be thus designated was the Passaic. It is

true that the

first

course of the Passaic from the

Bay

not in a westward direction, but a little east of north. It maintains that course, however, only for a short distance and then is

turns west.

But as Bound Creek was a river

in the sense nat-

urally to be applied to the word as used, the Passaic the first river setting west.

was not

As I have mentioned, the location of the boundary between Elizabethtown and Newark was always a matter of question and doubt. A meeting of the notable people of both settlements for the purpose of agreeing upon a dividing line was undoubtedly held upon a hill, since called Dividend Hill, which was near the head of the cove. It is quite true that the purpose of the meeting may have been to determine not the line of division between lands in respect to their ownership, but

NEW

150

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

rather a division with respect to the jurisdiction of each set-

tlement; but I think that inference cannot be fairly drawn. The Associates of Elizabethtown claimed the power of

government over the whole extent of municipal affairs

tract ;

this

purchased by them, and to the seems to have been conceded

them during the government of Philip Carteret, at least up my judgment the selection of Diviwhich to start the line of division is a strong indication that the original purchasers and their contemporaries recognized that as in the line of division, and to

to about 1670; so that in dend Hill as a place from

such recognition could not have been the "river setting westward from the

and could only be applicable

if

if

they understood that

Bay" was the Passaic, believed that river was they

Bound Creek.

THE HERMAN TRACT PURCHASE There was another point made in the Bill of Chancery which it may be proper to notice. It was contended that while the Dutch were in possession, one Augustine Herman purchased from the Indians a large tract of land which the Proprietors claimed included some, claimed by the Associates.

if

not the whole, of the lands

understand the purpose of the Proprietors If Herman's grant was effective it was making to maintain that the Proprietors had acquired any impossible It is difficult to

in

right

this claim.

from the Indians.

But, on the doctrine laid

down by

Chief Justice Marshall, it is obvious that the conveyance made by the Indians to Herman conveyed no title because he had no license

from the King of Great Britain

to settle

upon lands

within the territory granted to the Duke of York. His title could not have been set up against a purchase from the Indians made under a valid license from the King of England

or his deputies.

The Answer in Chancery contends that Herman, who remained in the Provinces after the Dutch had been expelled from power, never made any claim under the alleged title, although he and his children had, for many years, owned and possessed other tracts of land within the Provinces.

NEW

LIGHT ON FAMOUS CONTROVERSY

151

But a more effectual objection was made to the effect that the alleged conveyance had none of the form or purpose of a conveyance of land in that it was not sealed, nor did it contain words indicating a conveyance of land in fee, but was merely a license to settle given by the Indians. As the Answer asserts that the Herman deed was accessible at that time, if this description of its purport was correct, it is certain that it could play no part in the controversy between the Associates and the Proprietors.

The Cyclopedia

of

New

Jersey

The third volume of the "Cyclopedia of New Jersey," edited by Mary Depue Ogden, and published by the Memorial History Company of Newark, has just been received at the library of the New Jersey Historical Society. The volume contains 305 pages, including an index of the names of persons, and is It a continuation of the truly monumental work purposed. equals in biographical and genealogical value the previously published volumes of the set, and excels them in some particuobviously in the richness of the illustrations. Many beaucoats-of-arms are inserted, and many engravings of scenes and houses are added to the usual number of portraits found in the other volumes. The subjects, to which an unusual amount of attention is given (the sketches including a great wealth of genealogical material of direct and of collateral lines) are Craig A. Marsh, Erastus G. Putnam and Jonathan Ackerman Coles. Many other subjects are amply sketched and given the background of family and descent. The list is too long to reprint, but an inspection of the index will show how comprehensively the volume touches New Jersey biography. Among some sketches of interesting New Jersey characters of the old times written by Joseph F. Folsom are to be found an extensive story of Captain Daniel Bray of Hunterdon County; also of Colonel Charles Stewart, Commissary General of the Continental army Rev. Orange Scott, hymnist lars,

tifully colored full-page

;

Archibald Kennedy

and

;

Robert Lettis Hooper

;

;

Caspar Wistar

;

others.

This fine work when completed will make an authoritative compendium which all who seek information on the history, biography, or genealogy of the State will find necessary to examine.

The

Chalice of Queen

Anne

HISTORICAL ADDRESS GIVEN IN S. PETER'S CHURCH, PERTH AMBOY, N. J., ON ST. PETER'S DAY, 1917, BY THE REV. W. NORTHEY JONES, M. A., RECTOR.

We

DEAR FRIENDS gather here, as is our custom on our patron saint's day, to listen to an historical address, and I have chosen as my subject one of our treasures and heir-looms of the past and still in use on every Lord's Day, The Chalice of :

Queen Anne. "Good Queen Anne" ascended deserves her

title

land's sovereigns, she

beloved

a

If not

of 'Good.'

woman

was

the throne in 1702 and well one of the greatest of Eng-

certainly one of the best

and most

of unblemished character and a devoted

Churchwoman. England has had sovereigns who were Church-

men by

accident and could readily change their religion should

change of residence or matrimony demand, but Anne was a Churchwoman from conviction. Had she lived, say two years longer,

and had not died

in this

pacy

in 1714,

we would have had we had.

episco-

country 75 years earlier than

Queen Anne wished

to show her interest in the ChurchAmerican colonies and give her encouragement to that feeble spark of Church life which was under the fostering care of the new and first-established of all the English Mis-

men

in the

sionary Societies of the world, the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, familiarly known as the S. P. G.

She gave communion silver to Trinity Church, New York Peter's, Albany; Christ Church, Philadelphia; S. Peter's, Westchester; Christ Church, Rye; S. George's, Hempstead; S. Paul's, Wickford, R. I. S. Mary's, Burlington, N. J. and ;

S.

;

to our

own

beloved parish.

;

THE CHALICE OF QUEEN ANNE

153

Records of this parish do not begin until 1718, from which date we have a continuous record of the proceedings of the Vestry. The parish registers before and after that date were lost and we have no information from this source until after the War of the Revolution; so we have no knowledge as to when this communion silver was received. We know however that Burlington received her set in 1708 and we have a right to presume that ours was received at about the

same

time.

Let us imagine ourselves present when it is first received in Perth Amboy. Amboy had perhaps 75 houses, situated in

hamlet where

this part of the

back of

was the great

this spot

not grown as the

first settlers,

had hoped. They had expected

we now

are,

near the shore and

The town had

forest primeval.

some of

whom

were

still

alive,

the capital and Caesarea, would be the metro-

their

little village,

seaport of the province of New polis of the world, but New York was fast outstripping Amboy. The Church, too, had not grown as some of them had

hoped, and they were without a resident clergyman at this time.

They were was

still

worshipping

built for a courthouse,

in the colonial building

and was situated

which

at the foot of

High

property. The majority of the 24 Proprietors of the province of East Jersey were Churchmen and they voted to give this building, first designed for governStreet, near the

Long Ferry

Church as a place of worship. It was and the corner stone of this first building can to-day be seen in our east wall. They had fitted up the building, glazing the windows and putting in pews, so that it was quite comfortable; but after they had occupied it for 23 years as a Church, they were now looking forward to having a larger and more churchly edifice and in fact their previous rector, the Rev. John Brooke, had collected 200 pounds for this purpose, but he had died the previous year and with his death their hope was deferred and not realized until 1722.

ment purposes,

to the

called S. Peter's

.

Now

year of grace 1708, the Rev. Edward Vaughan of S. John's, Elizabeth, comes over to take S. Peter's under his care. The handful of churchmen in Amboy were too poor and in the

too few to support a clergyman, and during

all

the years

from

THE CHALICE OF QUEEN ANNE

154

the establishment of the parish in 1685 until after the War of the Revolution, they were dependent upon outside help. After the rectorship of Mr. Perthuck, who came to them in

1685 and whose services seem to have been confined to Amboy, they were dependent upon clergymen who were practically circuit-riders, having as many as five or six places or stations care. This parish was yoked quite often with S. John's, Elizabeth; Christ Church, New Brunswick; S. James, Piscataway and S. Andrews, Staten Island. After the organ-

under their

;

ization of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in 1702, that great missionary society sent its clergy over to S.

Peter's

and furnished

even for a

little

their stipend until the Revolution

and

while after that.

The colonists are happy at this time in the thought that Lord Cornbury has 1)een removed from the Governorship. Nominally a Churchman as every Governor had to be, he was a moral degenerate who had never placed himself inside a

He

had held the Governorship of the united colonies Jersey, the first appointment over the royal at the same time that he was Governor of New York province, but he had never concerned himself with the Jerseys, except to persecute some of the righteous men of the colonies and the clergy of the Church. The Rev. Mr. Brooke and the Rev. Mr. Moore, both of whom had been in charge of S. Peter's, had been imprisoned by him. Now he was removed, which was a Church.

of East and

West

;

source of joy to the Churchmen of S. Peter's. Rev. Mr. Vaughan, of Elizabeth, had arranged for a service in Amboy when the new chalice of Queen Anne should

How encouraged they were that morning when they were gathered together to receive the gift of Queen Anne and to receive the sacred sacrament from that chalice, to know that their good Queen had so remembered them and sympathised with them in their hardships of colonization and their attempts to keep alive true rebe used in the service of the Church.

new world. Brethren, we can say

ligion in this

as

we

look back, that Almighty

God

has blessed and kept alive the memory of Anne. Other memorials of the great, the rich, and undeserving, have perished

THE CHALICE OF QUEEN ANNE

155

from the earth but Anne's memorial, like that of Mary who broke the box of nard on Jesus' feet, will continue forever, in that generations of Americans yet unborn, members of her colonial Churches will bless "Good Queen Anne" when they ;

"Anne Regina" engraved on chalice and paten of their Church. parish This handful of Churchmen, perhaps not more than 15 in number, needed this encouragement coming to them. Of their see that

number was Thomas Gordon, probably the greatest man in the settlement, who in 1702 had become secretary of the 24 Proprietors and afterward a member of the Provincial Assembly. He it was whose body lies at the southeast corner of the church with the Latin inscription on the tombstone. He had come over with his wife and four children only to be bereaved of them all they had succumbed to the rigors and hardships of colonial life. Twenty-five years had passed since then, when in all a ;

young man's enthusiasm he had left Pitlochie, Scotland, with them and now in middle life he had married again. His love and benevolence toward S. Peter's at that time have come down to us through all the generations, in the endowment of land which he gave his Mother Church. Then there is George Willocks and his good wife Margaret, who induced him to bequeath to S. Peter's Church a part of this churchyard and his own dwelling as a parsonage to S. Peter's Church he and his wife are there to receive from this chalice. John Barclay is there, whose brother wrote that famous controversial book, which was the text-book of the Quakers. Barclay's Apologies together with Fox's book of Martyrs was in every Quaker home for over a hundred years. John, however, is a Churchman and shows his devotion to S. Peter's by acting as a clerk of the parish and bequeathing to her large grants of land. His name like that of Willocks and Gordon is engraved on the tablet of the Church's benefactors which is on the east wall behind the pulpit of the Church. ;

Perhaps Colonel Morris is present, that ardent Churchalways had family prayer in his home and who afterwards became Governor of this State and founder of one of the greatest of American families. Thomas Farmar

man who

THE CHALICE OF QUEEN ANNE

156

He

has come out to the service.

has become a counselor

under the Queen's government and is afterwards to become Chief Justice. He it was whose memorial stone is on the wall of the vestibule of this Church. Captain Elisha Parker is probably of the number. John Harrison, whose name also appears in the tablet of the benefactors of the parish, is not present in body, though present in spirit, for he is on the fron-

For

tier fighting.

are engaged

as to-day the nations of the old and new world momentous struggle, so in that day were

in their

Duke

of Marlborough was winning his battle against Louis of France, the colonists on this side of the water were fighting in the French and Indian War.

they engaged

;

while the

Not one family name of these I have mentioned as having received communion from that chalice, remains in the fair town of Perth to-day, but the names of those faithful few benefirst

factors

and founders of

though having no living de-

S. Peter's,

scendants here, are cherished by us with grateful remembrance and the chalice from which they received reminds us when

we

see

it

of the fellowship of the which they are a part.

communion

of saints of

all

the ages of

The representative of Governor Hunter is present and reads the message of the Queen, telling of her interest in Perth Amboy and her gift to the Church. The Rev. Mr. Vaughan expresses the appreciation of the congregation in receiving the gift and proceeds to bless and consecrate the holy vessels and

then in those unfailing words of the divine liturgy as we have it to-day, he proceeds to consecrate the holy elements and to administer to the assembled Churchmen.

Another decade passes.

Some

It

is

of those early settlers at that

the 4th of August, 1718. first communion from the

Queen Anne chalice have gone to their rest. Now the parishioners assemble to celebrate the receiving of their charter from King George the First and listen to its reading by Robert Hunter, Esq., "Captain-General and Governor-in-chief of the Province of New Jersey and New York and Vice-Admirall of the same," for which privilege granted to them by His Majesty the newly constituted corporation "shall pay unto our Receiver General of said Province of New Jersey upon the feast day of

THE CHALICE OF QUEEN ANNE S. Peter the Apostle one pepper corn

the

if

157

same be

legally de-

manded."

We

now

see the Rev. Mr. Vaughan in his black in his heavily powdered wig ministering and tippet the eucharist from this chalice to the newly appointed vestry; William Eier and John Barclay, wardens; Thomas Gordon, John Rudyard, Robert King and John Stevens, vestrymen; Governor Hunter and his attendants together with the other

can

gown and

members of

The Rector

the congregation.

dence, and has moved from Elizabeth

to

is

now

in

resi-

Amboy, having mar-

ried a lady of "great affluence" possessing a fortune of 2,000

pounds. Five years more pass by. In this year of grace of 1723, the Rev. Mr. Skinner is now rector of S. Peter's. His real

name

is

McGregor.

He was

the cause of the Pretender

the Battle of Preston Pans.

a Jacobite and after espousing

in Scotland fled to

We

know

that his

America

after

body now

lies

Churchyard somewhere near the chancel, but in what particular spot his grave is, we do not know. Probably his tombstone, like that of many others, was destroyed at the Revolution. He has under his charge 20 communicants and in S. Peter's

about seventy families.

The Queen Anne communion silver, chalice, paten and brought in the new Church, which has just been erected. The long-deferred hope of having a more churchly .

flagon, are

edifice, in the

midst of a God's Acre where they can place their The congregation has moved

beloved dead, has been realized.

from the Long Ferry building to the present site. The pulpit is placed on the broad side of the Church in the centre of the north and was either two, or three stories like other colonial pulpits of the time, the top level for preaching, the middle level was for the reading of the lessons, and the lower level was for the clerk (or dark), who

high and,

was

the responses when in that Georgian era of indifference and Erastianism the people allowed other persons to assume Above the pulpit over the preacher's head their privileges. was the sounding board, on the top of which a wooden dove

made

was

carved, a symbol of their belief, that God, the

Holy

Spirit,

THE CHALICE OF QUEEN ANNE

158

upon the preaching. This wooden ornament can now be seen in our present Church above the chancel arch and the dove has for many years been the symbol on the seal of our rested

There was a small communion table placed parish Church. in the east surrounded by a semicircular communion rail. There

was no

recess chancel.

Half the pews, that

is, those on the north side, ran north and south, the pulpit being in the middle the other half of the pews on the south side ran at right angles to these other pews, that is east and west but all pews faced the pulpit and only a few pews on the northwest corner happened to face the altar and the reason they did so was because they faced the pulpit ;

;

too.

The new

rector after congratulating them on the consumin erecting the new Church bids them

mation of their hopes

contribute to the erecting of a gallery across the south side facing the pulpit. He informs them that the Church has rented all its pews at about six pounds per annum apiece and that there are not enough to go around. The gallery which the rector pleaded for was^ not completed until 1753, when the

generation that wanted

it

had passed away.

He

tells

us that

his congregation during the summer would sometimes number 150 persons, but in the winter he would not have more than

We ourselves have recollections of primitive 60 persons. methods of heating the Church, which may account for this difference in the size of the congregation in the winter and the summer. Let us look forward another forty years. ert is

Summer McKean

is

the brother of the

now

The Rev. Rob-

rector of S. Peter's Church.

Governor of Pennsylvania.

He

is

He also

the beloved physician of many for he is a "doctor of physic" as well as "a rational divine" as his gravestone at the northeast corner of the Church testifies. He was the founder and first

New

Jersey Medical Association, as well as of the S. P. G. He uplifts the chalice of the worthy missionary in his hands Anne thus inviting the communicants to Queen President of the

come forward

to the Lord's Table.

Franklin and Lady Franklin,

His Excellency, Governor just taken up their

who have

THE CHALICE OF QUEEN ANNE

159

residence in the Governor's mansion (now the large apartment house in Kearny Avenue), come forward to receive. The worthy priest has on a surplice, made by Lady Franklin herself. Perhaps Benjamin Franklin, too, was present, to wish his son God-

new work of taking up the Governorship. Scatamong the parishioners and other citizens Perth Amboy, were members of the Assembly and Council this royal province, which was now in session in Perth Am-

speed in his

tered here and there of of

How little could Governor Franklin forsee what was coming! Fourteen years pass and that son is estranged from his noted father, separated forever from his wife and compelled to spend the rest of this life in prison, for he had espoused the Royalist cause when the Revolution broke out and was deposed from the Governorship. He was an able man and an upright. He made a capable Governor and was beloved by boy.

many though

He

a Royalist.

lived too late or, shall

we

say,

too soon.

One more

scene and

I

am

done.

It is

the

Sunday before

Christmas in 1776. That bright scene in the old Church on this spot, which we have just recalled, is now changed and the interior furnishings of the

House

of

God

are demolished.

Men's

hearts are sad and full of anxious forebodings as the Rector holds the Chalice of Queen Anne in his hands. Underneath his

black gown, he has on the uniform of a British Chaplain, for the Rev. John Preston is not only rector of S. Peter's, but Chaplain of his Majesty King George the Third's 26th Regi-

ment.

Perth

Washington's

Amboy

has been in British possession since

retreat with the patriot forces

from

New

Jersey

Six months occupancy of the Church as a patriot barracks had well nigh demolished it and many of the gravestones of the forefathers of the hamlet had to the south of the Delaware.

been torn up and used to build fires upon. In the midst of this ruin, some order was accomplished. Chairs and benches were brought in to take the place of the pews which had been destroyed and everything put in readiness for the celebration of the Divine mysteries.

As

the priest

lifts

the chalice in invitation, twenty

municants only come forward to receive.

There were

comthirty

THE CHALICE OF QUEEN ANNE

160

enrolled as such on the parish register, so history but the patriotic side claims some of the younger only those on the King's side are present to-day.

twenty

who

tells

us,

men and Of the

received communion, were probably John Smythe,

Michael Kearny, William Hicks, Thomas Skinner, Dr. John Lawrence and James Parker. These men had recently been arrested by the patriots and afterwards Philip

Kearny,

released on parole and had now found their way back to Perth few British officers and a soldier or two and some Amboy.

A

negro slaves were probably of the number, for always since the founding of S. Peter's there have been a few colored commun-

Here and there in the congregation can be seen a Scotch Highlander of His Majesty's 42nd foot, in his tarleton and bare knees, an English Grenadier, or a member of the I7th Dragoons, all of whom were quartered in the town. Perhaps icants.

even

in the

back of the Church could be seen a Hessian with

his long hair

hanging down to his waist with the strands

all

carefully greased together and tied into a pigtail with a ribbon. Surely this chalice has .been present and witnessed many

From

strange scenes in this Church! earlier chalice of the Rev.

this

chalice,

or the

John Talbot, did the Bishop, clergy

and lay deputies receive the Eucharist, when the first convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of New Jersey met in S. Peter's for

May

its

second sitting on the i6th of

in 1786.

Again

it

was from

this chalice

and

in this

church on July

Bishop of New York, received and then proceeded to administer the Precious Blood of Christ to a young Irishman named George Hartwell Spieren, the Rector Designate of this Church, a young man of brilliant attainments who, with his other gifts and graces, had established a reputation as an accomplished dancer.

9, 1788, that

It is

Bishop Provoost, the

first

pleasing to note in this connection that that

wave of

New

England Puritanism which afterward swept over the whole country and which considered dancing a device belonging to the devil only, had not reached the fair town of Perth, and that people here could cultivate the art without any

qualms of conscience.

THE CHALICE OF QUEEN ANNE

161

Then the young deacon newly ordained, as is the custom of the deacons, at the service of ordination, proceeded to administer the communion to his new parishThus was the cup a silent from this chalice. ioners

New

ordination held in the state of Jersey. to speak of any of the scenes that this chalice has witnessed in this present edifice since the time of its con-

witness to that

Time

fails

first

me

secration in 1855 by Bishop Odenheimer to the present time. Oh Chalice of Queen Anne, what memories, what associations thou dost recall! What scenes of interest! What is-

sues of life thou hast witnessed! What vows, what prayers, what consecration and fervor, what repentance and tears hast thou seen and what comfort and consolation in all the varying conditions of

life

hast thou bestowed

!

What

strength hast thou

to go on in the battle of life, what penitence has been sealed in the Precious Blood of Christ which

given, what courage

came from thee Would that we had the power to keep fresh in our minds some of those scenes of interest, the devotion of some of thy faithful sons and daughters during the two hundred and nine years that thou hast been in our hands Hadst thou the power of speech, what mysteries thou couldst reveal, how many a person here confirmed has come forward to the sanctuary rail to partake from thee in all the unction and fervor of a new found love and then, what coldness followed and thou sawest them no more This present war is God's scourge to remind men that they !

!

!

cannot always forget heavenly things that the Christian man cannot continually neglect the worship of the sanctuary and fail to take regularly from thee or such as thee without im;

periling his soul. Would God that more would receive from thee, thou who art the rallying point and focus of our faith, who art to us the symbol of the communion of saints, the ever

present token like Israel's Ark, of God's presence with us and the reminder of His infinite love in shedding His Blood for

you and me

!

And

as the years roll by, may thou become the parishioners of S. Peter's and be source of victory, Chalice of Queen Anne

ever more dear to us to us the sign 11

and

O

!

Newark's Founders Day (May

21, 1666)

[The following document signed by Joseph F. Folsom and Frank Urquhart was adopted as a resolution at a meeting of Newark's "Committee of One Hundred" on the date and occasion plainly set

J.

forth in its text. It fixes as definitely as present knowledge permits the date proper for Founders Day for Newark. May 21, 1666, was the day the colonists on board their vessel drew up a certain agreeit seems probable they landed the same day and were immewarned off by the Indian occupants. Five days later, May 26, 1666, Governor Philip Carteret wrote letters introducing Captain Treat and others to the Sachem Oraton at Hackensack, and requesting him

ment, and diately

to negotiate

with the colonists regarding the purchasing of the lands.

The

date of the second landing is not known. Possibly it was the day after the negotiations, or Friday, May 27, 1666. EDITOR.]

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY, May 5, 1917. One Hundred on the 2$oth AnniverNewark, meeting on this date at the home of former

The Committee sary of

of

Governor Franklin Murphy, chairman of the Committee,

at the

corner of Broad street and Clinton avenue, would go on record with the following resolution:

Resolved,

That henceforth the date of Founders Day for

the City of Newark be fixed at the twenty-first day of the date on which, in 1666, the Milford immigrants, in

May, comfrom Guilford and Branford, drew somewhere between Elizabethtown

pany with representatives up on board their vessel, and Newark, a preliminary agreement to settle the proposed town according to a Godly government. Probably on that day they attempted to land on the banks of the Passaic and were warned off, when partially unloaded, by the Indian proprietors. Certain it is that five days later Governor Philip Carteret, residing at Elizabethtown, wrote a letter to Oraton, the Indian sachem who claimed jurisdiction over the land, asking him to receive Robert Treat and others, with interpreters, at his residence along the Hackensack, to ne-

NEWARK'S FOUNDERS DAY

163-

gotiate an agreement to allow the Connecticut people to settle the desired tract of land. On the same day, May 26, Carteret

gave credentials to Captain Adrian Post and Ide Cornelius of Bergen to act as interpreters to Captain Treat. The evidence shows that at least five days intervened between the signing of the agreement and the final landing of the colonists, and it seems scarcely probable that, with the means of travel of that period, given a council at Hackensack on Thursday, May 26, the settlement would not have been effected until at the

May 27, 1666. well-established historically that an attempted made, and that, after being driven away by the

earliest Friday,

As

it

is

landing was

Indians, the colonists returned to get the help of Carteret, it seems highly probable that the first landing or founding oc-

curred on the day the agreement was drawn up, May 21, 1666. For this date we have the great advantage of a document drawn up by the colonists, the first record entered upon their

town book by the Newark

people, and, for this reason alone, others failing of absolute validity, we have good grounds for calling the twenty-first day of May "Founders Day," and ask-

ing

its

recognition annually by the City. seventeenth of May, since 1866,

The

known

as Founder's

simply an arbitrary date, originally chosen, it is believed, because in 1866 it chanced to be the date of the annual meeting of the New Jersey Historical Society, which body

Day,

is

had charge of the Two hundredth Anniversary Celebration of the City. It was again adopted at our 25oth Anniversary without being called into question as to

its rights.

JOSEPH F. FOLSOM,

FRANK

J.

URQUHART.

Bergen County Tombstone Inscriptions Van Buskirk

Copied

May

Burial Ground, Lower Saddle River, Bergen Co., N. (Adjoining the property of H. P. Kern). Verified Nov.

21, 1911.

York

10,

By John

1912.

Neafie,

J.

New

City.

This is near Ramsey station, on the Erie Railway. Mr. Neafie wrote (January 4, 1912) "We stumbled upon the burial place over a year and a half ago, and made a copy of tombstone inscriptions. I was not satisfied with it, and made another visit a couple of months ago and carefully verified all there. I was very glad I went, as I obThis covers everything to be found tained three additional items. there. All the Dutch inscriptions are exact copies, as regards spelling, etc., and I consider it one of the most valuable acquisitions so far found." These Dutch stones were carved wholly in capitals, but in our :

reprint only the usual capitalizations are used, although the various periods are retained. 1. Anno. 1784. den. 2. dag. Mei. is. Adam Grim in den hospen. .

.

.

3.

Anno 1789 den 3 dag Septe is overleeden Maria Barbara Grim. D.H.E.V.F.G. Anno. 1 780. is. Edward Crouter ont.slapen.in.den.heer.den.i5.dag

4.

1793,

5.

and 22 dys. David Baldwin,

2.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

van May.

May

9.

Deseed.

Susanah Bauldivin, aged 17

yrs., six

mos.,

7.

d. 18 March, 1827, aged 74 yrs., 2 mos. of Rachel, wife of David Bal departed this life July 14, aged 72 yrs., 7 mos., 8 dys. (Stone in fragments). Smet. Catarina. (See Anno.i797.den.i5.dag.fe.is.overleden.

8.

Frederick

6.

In

memory

,

,

No. 23).

Van Ryper,

died Oct.

I,

1828,

aged 45

yrs., 5

mos., 25

dys. 9.

Mary Bauldwin, wife

of Frederick

Van

Ryper, died March 28,

aged 39 yrs., 6 mos. (A fragment, very old). 1826,

10.

J,

11.

1 769.

12.

13.

den. 4. October. L. B.A.BACH. (Achenbach). .Aug.is.T.I.H.E.S.P. R.H.A.B. (Top broken

off).

(Ach-

enbach). Anno.i793.den.28.dag.Februari.is.overleden.Johannis Achenbach. (See No. 27).

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

165

15.

Anno. 1802. den. 16. dag. October. is. overleden. Mary Achenbach. Anno. 1804. dan. 12. s. (next to the above stone; carving nev-

16.

I. A.

14.

er finished).

small gray stone).

(A

19.

Anno. 1 802. den. 6. dag. August. is overleden George Achenbach. (See No. 24.) Anno .1801. den .11. dag Febru is overleden Antie de huisvrou . van. George Achenbach. (See No. 25). George, son of Thomas and Ann Achenbac, died Oct. 3, 1810, aged

20.

Anno

17.

18.

.

4

21.

.

9 mos., 15 dys. 1793 den 3-4 dag Maij

.

.

.

.

yrs.,

is Margritie Achenbach overleden (See No. 28.) Polly, daughter of Rynard Achenbach, d. Aug. 16, 1802, aged .

.

.

yr.,

22.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

I

mos., 16 dys.

5

Anna Achenbach, wife

of John Cole,

d.

July 21, 1856, aged 73 yrs.,

5 mos. 23.

Catherine Achenbach, wife of George Smith, born

24.

25.

27.

28.

1775, died

29.

n,

1801,

aged 52

yrs.,

n

mos., 12 dys.

(See

18.)

Mary, daughter of John George Achenbach, born March 24, 1779, died Feby. 2, 1793, aged 13 yrs., 10 mos., 8 dys. John, son of John George Achenbach, born June 12, 1777, died Feby. 28, 1793, aged 15 yrs., 8 mos., 16 dys. (See No. 13.) Margaret, daughter of John George Achenbach, born Feby. 7, No.

30.

1771,

14,

15, 1797,

1748, died Feby.

No. 26.

May

aged 25 yrs., 9 mos., i dy. (See No. 7.) George Achenbach, born Jany. 23, 1739, died August 6, 1802, aged 63 yrs., 6 mos., 14 dys. (See No. 17.) Ann Van Buskirk, wife of George Achenbach, born Feby. 27, died Feby.

May

1793,

3,

aged 18

yrs.,

2 mos., 26 dys.

(See

20.)

Anno.i78o.den.i7.dag.Decem.is.in.d.ho.spe. Maria. D.V.B.K. 1780 den 23 dag October is i d hospen. Annatie T V B K.

Anno

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Den.8.dag.Ianv.anno.i778.is.in.den.hosp. A.D. A.V.B.K. 32. Anno.i777.den.7.d.Avgv.is.in.d.hosp. A.D. A.L.V.B.K. Anno. 1785. den. i2.dag.Nov.is.overleeden.Catrina.de.huisvrouw. 33. 31.

34.

35.

van.L.V.B.kerk. i77o.den.i4.Octob.A.T.V.B.K. Anno. 1 782. den. 5. dag. Juni. is. davit. A.

V.

Boskerk.in.den.heer.

o.s.p.

Anno.

38.

is. in. den. heer ont slapen. AbraVanBoskerk. Anno. 1781. den. 27. d.Mert. is. in. d.h. o.s.p. Geertie. V.B.K. Anno. 1776. den. 15. dag. April. is. id. ho. s. pen. Jacobus. A. V.B.K,

39.

(A brown

36.

1781. den. 16. dag. October.

ham

37.

.

A

.

.

.

stone, next to the above, inscription entirely gone).

166

40.

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS Anno.

1803. October. 27. dag.

is.

overleeden gebo-

Annatye.V.B.K.

.

43.

ren.May.i7, 1719. (A very old stone, practically all marks obliterated). Thomas A. Vanbuskirk, died Jan. 21, 1803, in the 66th yr. of age. John A. Vanbuskirk, died Dec. 21, 1815, aged 73 yrs., 8 mos., 22

44.

Abraham

41.

42.

dys.

Van

T.

Buskirk, died Feb. 20, 1806, aged 47

4 mos.,

yrs.,

10 dys. 45.

Anno. 1793. den. 24. dag. April, is. overleden.

Thomas. C. Van. Bos-

kerk. 46.

Anno. 1 793. den. 22. dag

.

November

overleeden ont 23 iahr 5 .

.

.

.

.

m

.

is

.

.Abraham .Van

49. 50.

Anno.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Boskerk.

.

Anno 1781 den 3 dag October is in den heer ont Van Boskerk. Thommas Van Buskirk, died August aged, - dys. (A brown stone, scaling.) 1778 den 17 April is Jan Van Boskerck overlede.

47.

.

10 dage. .

.

.

.

.

slapen Rachel .

.

.

48.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1795. den. II f dag. sep.

is.

yrs., 7

mos.,

.

overleden. Jacobus. P. V. B. K.ont.

3.i.m.i4.d. 51. 52.

J.A. (A small brown stone). Den. 22. d. Dec. Anno. 1773. i.d.h.o.s.b. L.T.V.B.K.

(Also nine rough grey stones, without marks, or rough brown stones without marks).

Hopper Burial Ground, Waldwick, Bergen Copied June

30, 1912,

by John Neafie,

1.

Abraham A. Quackenbush,

2.

mos., 23 dys. Infant child of David

3.

Ann

&

A. Bogert, wife of 66 yrs., mos.

n

4. 5.

7.

October

Co.,

New York

24,

1836,

N.

and three

J.

City.

aged 71

yrs.,

8

Betsy Myers, d. April i, 1831. Andrew Terhune, d. May 20, 1836, aged

Lewis Hopper, d. Mch. 13, 1879, aged 78 yrs., 8 mos., 3 dys. Maria Salyer, wife of Lewis Hopper, d. May 23, 1846, aged 39 yrs.,

6.

d.

illegible

7 mos., 7 dys.

Henry, son of Lewis and Maria Hopper, d. May 19, yr., i mo. Emily, daughter of Lewis and Maria Hopper, d. Dec.

1835,

9,

aged

1860,

I

aged

18 yrs., 14 dys.

10.

John Ackerman, d. May 5, 1847, aged 30 yrs., 2 mos., 12 dys. Catherine Ackerman, d. Dec. 18, 1848, aged 20 yrs., 3 mos., 18 dys. Adam L. Ackerman, b. Oct. 17, 1822, d. Aug. 25, 1872, aged 49

11.

Ann, wife of George Mickler,

8. 9.

yrs., 10

mos., 8 dys.

mos., 7 dys.

d.

June

30,

1891,

aged 72

yrs.,

3

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

167

14.

Maggie, wife of Albert Mickler, died May 24, 1902, aged 42 yrs. Eliza Storms, wife of Lewis Hopper, d. Jan. 18, 1870, aged 54 yrs., 4 mos. Catherine, wife of John L. Storms, died Sept. 27, 1850, aged 31

15.

Andrew

16.

Julia, dau. of

17.

Leah Ann Stormes, wife of Isaac Van Horn,

12.

13.

yrs., 10

mos., 19 dys. d. Sept. 6, 1849, aged 35 years, 8 mos., 6 dys. Lewis and Eliza Hopper, died July 6, 1855, aged 8

Storms,

J.

mos., 28 dys. d.

April

3,

1855,

aged

21 yrs., 10 mos. 18.

Sarah Leah,

d. Sept. 10, 1852,

aged

(Next stone

5 mos., 3 dys.

to

the above).

May

b.

1814, d.

Mch.

19.

Gitty Fisher,

20.

Rachel Jane, daughter of Isaac and Sarah Courties, 1852, aged 14 yrs., 3 mos., 25 dys.

21. 22.

(A foot stone marked S. L. C.) Letta Terhune, wife of Henry Christopher, 53 yrs., 2 mos., 21 dys.

23.

John Terhune,

24.

Elizabeth, wife of

d.

19,

1835.

17,

d.

Mch.

d.

June

10, 1849,

Feb. 21, 1844, aged 74 yrs., 5 mos., 27 dys. John Terhune, d. Dec. 22, 1840, aged 66

30,

aged

yrs.,

4

mos., 14 dys. 25.

Mary Ann Hopper, wife

of Sharrack Rosencrantz,

b.

Nov.

28,

1808, d.

26.

Aug. 11, 1902. Henry Hopper, d. May 23,

27.

Charity Conklin, wife of yrs.,

28.

29.

30. 31.

1856,

aged 86

yrs., 5 dys.

Henry Hopper,

d.

Dec.

2,

1856,

aged 81

9 mos.

Jacob H. Hopper, b. Dec. 7, Albert Garrison, b. Mch. 18, John A. Hopper, b. Oct. 26, Anna Debaun, wife of John

1802, d. 1786, d. 1782, d.

Mch. 5, 1854. Mch. 26, 1846. Nov. 24, 1862.

A. Hopper,

b.

May

27, 1793, d.

Nov.

8,

1867.

Old Graveyard at Copied Sept. 1.

2.

26, 1909,

Henry Van Voorhesen,

d.

Milford, Bergen Co., N.

by John Neafie,

New York

J.

City.

Mch.

6, 1803, aged 72 yrs., 25 dys.* Wilbreche Laroe, widow of Henry Voorhis, d. June 8, 1816, aged

76 3.

New

yrs.,

6 mos., 10 dys.t b. Dec. 26, 1758,

Lucas Van Voorhis, yrs., 8

d.

Sept.

13,

1822,

aged 63

mos., 18 dys.

There were six different varieties of spelling the Voorhis name. This old enclosure gives us the following specimens of quaint Dutch names, viz: Wilbrecke, Ouselche, Whelmpy, Nikansie. tNos. 1 and 2 were married Nov. 21, 1755, at Schraalenburgh. No. 2 was baptized at Hackensack, Jan. 8, 1738; therefore the age on the tombstone is two years too much. Nos. 3, 8, 9, 11, 13, 15 were six of the ten children of Nos. 1 and 2 and were baptized at Hackensack or Schraalenburgh.

I

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS

168

4 5.

[Luca]s Voorhasen -

[Aeltje Acke]rman. 12 dys. $

Garret Cooper,

May

b.

1761, d. Oct.

10,

16,

- aged 55 y

aged 59

1820,

h.

,

yrs., 5

mos., 6 dys.

7.

John Cooper, son of Garret and Hannah Cooper, 1808, d. Aug. 14, 1819, ae 10 yrs., 10 mos., 7 dys. (A small brown stone, all marks gone).

8.

Hannah Voorhis, widow

6.

J.

17, 1847, 9.

ae 81

yrs.,

James H. Voorhis,

d.

10.

Mary Demarest, wife

11.

Henry H. Voorhis,

yrs., i

of John Hopper,

n

b.

b.

Dec. 31, 1765,

Oct.

d.

7,

Dec.

mos., 17 dys.

Apr. 3, 1835, aged 62 yrs., 4 mos., 22 dys. of James Voorhis, d. Aug. 14, 1849, aged 66

mo. b.

Nov. n,

1777, d. Feb. 20, 1853,

aged 75

yrs.,

3 mos., 9 dys. 12.

13. 14.

Polly Lozier, wife of Henry Voorhis, d. Sept. i, 1832, aged 51 yrs., 8 mos., 15 dys. Albert H. Voorhis, d. Sep. 15, 1836, aged 75 yrs., 5 mos., 4 dys. Elizabeth Ackerman, Vife of Albert H. Voorhis, d. Nov. 21, 1812,

aged 52

mos., 14 dys.

yrs., 3

Van

17.

Vorehis, d. Jan. 6, 1834, aged 66 yrs., 6 dys. Henry, son of Nikansie Van Voorhies, d. Aug. 26, 1805, aged 3 yrs., 7 mos., 24 dys. Ouselche, dau. of Nicholas and Baleche Voorhis, d. Sep. 8, 1805,

18.

aged 5 yrs., 9 mos. Richard, son of Nicholas and Baleche Vorhis,

15. 16.

Nicholas

aged 14

19.

4 mos., 27 dys. Cornelius, infant son of Henry and 26, 1847,

20.

A

small

d.

Dec. 31, 1820,

yrs.,

ii

aged

brown

stone,

Whelmpy

Voorhis,

Located on the farm of John T. Cade. Neafie, 1.

3.

Sept.

no marks.

Voorhis Burial Ground, Arcola, Bergen County, N.

2.

d.

mos., 5 dys.

Copied Sept.

New York

6,

J.

1914,

by John

City.

d. May 9, 1796, in the 17 year of his age. Albert Voorhis, d. Mch. 9, 1828, aged 84 yrs., 3 mos., 23 dys. Mary, wife of Albert Voorhis, d. April 27, 1813, aged 62 yrs., 4

John G. Doremus,

5.

mos., 3 dys. (Mary Doremus). John A. Voorhis, d. Jan. 15, 1863, aged 87 yrs., 7 mos., 9 dys. Rachel Hopper, wife of John A. Voorhis, d. Mch. 31, 1832, aged

6.

George Voorhis,

4.

51 yrs., 10 mos., 23 dys. b.

Feb.

17, 1791, d.

Oct.

2,

1871.

tThis stone, beyond question, represents Aeltje Ackerman, wife of Lucas Voorhis. She was born Sept. 1, 1769, bapt. at Schraalenburgrh, Sept. 16; therefore the correct date of her death would be Oct. 19,

1814.

BERGEN COUNTY TOMBSTONE INSCRIPTIONS 7.

8.

Sarah Van Beuren, b. Sept. 7, 1793, d. Mch. 22, 1876. (Wife of George Voorhis). Mary Voorhis, d. Mch. 22, 1850, aged 34 yrs., 3 mos., 4 dys. Garrison Burial Ground, Arcola, Bergen County, N.

Located on the farm of T.

W.

Vreeland.

John, son of Daniel and

2.

mos., 23 dys. Jacob, son of Daniel and

4.

J.

1914,

6,

by John

City.

Ann Ackerman,

1.

I

Copied Sept.

New York

Neafie,

3.

169

d.

Ann Ackerman,

Jany.

d.

Aug.

6,

1825,

10,

aged 2

1827,

aged

12 dys.

yr.,

Daniel Ackerman, died March 21, 1831, aged 27 yrs., 5 mos. Garrison, wife of Daniel Ackerman, d. Sept. 4, 1827, aged 22 yrs., 10 mos.

Ann

7.

Garret J. Van Waggener, d. June 20, 1843, in his 57th yr. Ann, wife of Garret J. Van Waggener, and daughter of John and Maria Garrison, d. Aug. 21, 1843, i ner 53d yr. John Garrison, b. Dec. 24, 1782, d. May 27, 1838, aged 55 yrs., 5

8.

mos., 3 dys. Elizabeth Naugle Rutan,

5. 6.

1865,

John

aged 83

yrs., 3

widow of John

Garrison, died Nov. 24,

mos., 22 dys.

Tombstone near Scotch

Willcock's

Plains

In

Memory

of

Mr

JOHN WILLCOCKS

he

deceased Novem' r the 22<* 1776

aged 49 Years.

The above

description was copied on Nov. 7, 1914, by Mr. William Alstyne, of Plainfield, from a tombstone at Glenside Park, a mile and one-half from Scotch Plains, N. J. It is located on the edge

B.

Van

of the mountain about a thousand feet north of some bungalos. In front of the above stone stands a dogwood tree at least one foot in

There are some fifteen other small headstones and footstones same spot without inscriptions. The plot is large and has been enclosed by a wooden fence. It was then much overgrown. diameter. in the

Jedidiah Swan's Orderly Book [Continued from Page 123]

Head Quarters, Aug't 10, 1776 Parole New Castle Countersign Onslow Great Complaints are made of the Soldiers taking away the flat Bottom Boats which may now be wanted for the most Importance purposes the Gen'l forbids any person meddling with them at the place where they are now stationed but by order of Gen'l Putnam in Writing Or by one of his Aid-de-Camp and the officers of the Main Guard is to detach a Sub'r and 30 Men who are to mount Guard over them to take further orders of Gen'l Putnam the Gen'l will be obliged to every officer and Soldier who seeing them out of their places will bring

them

to their Stationed.

Brigadier for the Day Gen'l Heard. Field officers for the Piquet Col'l Lasher Lieut't Col'l Hall and

Major Shereman. For Main Guard Lieut't Col'l Hardenburgh. Brigade Major Gordon. For Guard o. i i i .23 .

.

.

.

.

.

Head

Quarters, Aug't n, 1776

Parole

Countersign furlow or Discharge are after this day (or date) to be granted to officers or Soldiers without the knowledge or Consent of the Commander in Chief When an Action is hourly Expected, a Case must be very Extraordinary that will warrant an application of this kind. But should Such happen the Col'ls are to satisfy their Brigadier first,

No

The Brig's if they Concur in it are to apply to Head Quarters from Whence only Such passes are to Insue till further Orders. The Honourable the Continental Congress have been pleased to allow a pay Master to each of the Established Regiments and directed the Gen'l to appoint them. He desires the Field officers of each Regiment to recommend to him Suitable persons, they are to be persons of Integrity and Fidelity, Good Accountants and fair writers their pay is 26 2-3 of a Dollar per Callendar Month. When a prisioner is put under Guard, the officer who sends him there is not only to put down the Crime he Stands Charged for but the Regiment and Company he Belonged to. And he should always note the Witnesses

Name

to

prove the Charge.

The Court Martial

is

to set

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

171

morrow as a Court of Enquirery on L't Messer of Col'l Lashers Regiment for Misbehaviour to his Sup'r officers Joseph Martin of Cap't Herds Company in Col'l Sellimans Regiment Tryed by a Gen'l Court Martial of which Col'l Wyllys was president for abusing and Robbing a Woman in Market is acquited for want of Evidence. Hugh Nicholas Thief belonging to Col'l Cahager A Transient Person. Nixons Regiment Convicted by the same Court Martial of Stealing A Coat, and Several firelocks from Cap't Dixons Men. Sentenced to receive 39 Lashes Each. The General Approves the above Sentences and orders Martin to be Discharged, and the Sentence upon Cahager and Thief to be Executed to Morrow Morning at Guard Mounting a Drummer from Each Regiment is to attend. Brigade to attend the Execution of the Sentence upon Cahagger and there he is to be turned out of Camp and taken up, If ever found in it again. The Practice of Sentrys Sitting down while on their post is so Unsoldierly that the Gen'l is ashamed to see it prevail so much in the Army at Nights Especially it is of the most dangerous Consequence as it Occasions Centinals Sleeping on their posts when Otherwise he would be Watchfull. The Gen'l requests the officers, Expecially those of Guards and Visiting Rounds to Caution the Soldiers Against it, and have all Convenicies for that purpose Removed officers and Soldiers will be very Carefull in Case of Damp Weather to have their Arms kept Dry and

to

fit

for Action.

Brigadier for the Day Gen'l Wardsworth. Field officers for the Piquet Col'l Maliom L't Col'l Clap and Maj'r Wells for Main Guard.

Major Dey Brigade Major Wyllys. For Fatigue o. .0. .0. i. .15 For Guard I I I I 22 5 for Harrisons Brewery .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Head Quarters Aug't Parole

The Berrien,

12,

1776

Countersign business of granting passes proveing burthensom to Mess'rs Rey, and Willmot three Others are added to them, Viz.

Goforth John Campble, and Samuel Copperthwaite, any passes Signed by either of them are to be allowed. The Hon'l Continental Congress have been pleased to appoint the following Gentlemen Major General of the United States.

William

William Heath Esq'r. Joseph Spencer Esq'r. John Sullivan Esq'r. Nathaniel Green Esq'r. And the following Gentlemen Esq'r Col'l Alexander McDougal,

Brigadier Col'l

Generals

John Nison

James Reed Samuel

Col'l

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

172

Holden Parsons

Authur

Col'l

St. Clair Col'l

James Clinton they are to

be respected and Obeyed accordingly.

Jacob Jones in Cap't Sturrod Company Col'l McDougals Reg't Tryed by a Court Martial Wherof Col'l Wyllys was presidence and Convicted for Sleeping on his post Sentenced to receive 30 Stripes. The Gen'l approves the Sentence and orders it to be Executed at the Usual time and place.

A post

Quantity of Spears being arrived the Gen'l

when they may be wanted

are to

make

Commanding Draw for them

officers

report and

Thro' the Adjutant Gen'l. Brigadier for the Day Lord Sterling. Field officers for the Piquet Col'l Selden L't Col'l Jacobs,

Mead. For main Guard Fatigue o.

Guard

o.

Lieut't Col'l Brearly.

.o. .1. .1. .

i.

.

i.

Major

.

i.

.

i.

.

i.

19 .26 .

O.. I. .2. .2. .2* .43

Brigade Major for the Day Henley. After Orders Aug't 12, 1776 Shifting of Reg't and Changes of Alarm posts may take place as possible as the time of an attack may be Hourly ExThe Gen'l orders and directs that the following Arangement pected.

That as

of the

little

Army

in

Consequence of the

late

promotions shall take place

some new Regulation can be made; Viz, that Glovers and Smallwoods, Miles and Atteys Regiments to Compose one Brigade and be under the Command of Brigadier Lord Sterling. The Regiments later Nixons, Prescots, Vernams, Littles, and Hands to form another Brigade and be Commanded by Brigadier Gen'l Nixon. The Regiments lately Commanded by Col'l McDougal, Ritzma, Webb, and the Aaruntill

;

Brigade Commanded by Brigadier Gen'l McThe Regiment Lately Parsons, Huntingtons, Wards, Wyllys, to Compose another Brigade under the Command of Brigadier Gen'l Parsons. The Regiment lately Clintons, Reeds, Baileys, Baldwins and tificers,

to be another

Dougal.

Brigade, Commanded by Brigadier Gen'l Hutchinsons, and Hichcock's Regiment to be added to Gen'l Mifflins Regiments Gen'l Heards whole Brigade is to move over to Long Island Col'l Gays Regt't to Join his Brigade in New York. Col'l Hichcocks Regt't is to relieve the detachment at Burdets ferry where it is to remain and receive Orders from Gen'l Mifflin, Lord Sterling and the Col'ls of the Regiments in his Brigade are to

Lernards Clinton.

fix

to

be

another

Sergeants

on the Brigade parade Convenient to the Several Incampments

thereof.

Gen'l

McDougal

is

to

do the same with his

Col'l.

All the other

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

173

The Brigades Parade and Alarm posts are to be as last Settled. Brigadier Gen'l James Clinton, Scotts and Fellows are to be under the Immediate Command of Major Gen'l Puttnam. The Brigadier and George Clintons Brigades to be Commanded by Major Brigadiers of Parsons and Wardsworth Brigades to be under the Command of Major Gen'l Spencer. Brigadiers Lord Sterling and McDougals Brigades to be Commanding by Major Gen'l Sullivan and be Considered as a Corps De Reserve Brigadiers Nixon and Heards Brigade to be Commanded by Major Green untill Gen'l James Clinton can Join his Brigade at this Place. Colonel Reed is to Command it under this Disposition formed as well as times will allow. The United Force of the Officers of every Rank and the Soldiers with

Mifflin

Gen'l Heath.

the Smile of Providence. The Gen'l Hopes to render a favorable Acc't to his Country and Posterity of the Enemy whenever they Chuse to make the Appeal to the great Arbiter of the Universe.

appointed Col'l of the Regiment late Parsons Col'l thereof. L't Col'l Durkee is also appointed Col'l of the Reg't late Col'l Arnolds and Major Knox to L't Col'l Thereof. The Congress have been pleased to appoint Rufus Putnam Esq'r Lieut't Col'l Tiler

and Major Prentice

is

L't

Engineer and have given him the Rank of Col'l in the Army. Maj'r Henly (for the present) is to do duty as Brigade Major in Gen'l James Clintons Brigade Major Box, in Gen'l Nixons, Major Livingston in Lord Sterlings and Major Peek in Gen'l Parsons and Richard Platt is to do duty of Brigade Majors in Gen'l McDougals all of which are to be considered and Obeyed as Such.

Head Quarters Aug't

13,

1776

Parole -

Countersign Thomas Henly and Israel Heath, Esq'rs are appointed Aid De Camp to Gen'l Heath, and are to be respected and Obeyed Accordingly. The Court Martial to set to Morrow for the Tryal of Lieut't Holcomb of Cap't Andersons Company Col'l Johnson's Regiment for Assuming the Rank of Cap't and Mounting guard as such. The Col'l of the Several Regiments or Commanding officers are to send their Quarter Masters to the Laboratory for the Aminition Carts to be Attached to

each Regiment with Spare Amunition, to have it posted in some safe and proper place near the Regiment so as to be ready in a Moments Warning. The Horses and Driver is also to be kept near the Regiment. It is the Quarter Masters business to attend to this, and in Case of Action to see the Cartriges Delivered as they are Wanted. The Enemy's Reinforcement is now Arrived so that an Attack Must and will soon be made. The Gen'l therefore again Repeats his officer and Soldier will have his Arms and Amunigood order, and keep within their Quarters and Encampments

Request that every tion in

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

174

much as possable, be ready for Action at a Moments Warning, and when Called to it. Remember that Liberty, Property, Life, and Honour as

all at Stake, that upon their Courage and Conduct, rests the hopes of their Bleading and Insulted Country, that their Wives, Children, and Parents, Expect Safety from them Only, and that we have every reason to Expect that Heaven will Crown with Success so good a Cause.

are

The Enemy will Endeavour to Intimidate us by Shew and Appearance, remember how they have been ripressed on Various Occasions by

but

a few Brave Americans, their Cause is bad, their Men is Consious of it, and If opposed with firmness, and Coolness at their first onset,

with our Advantage of works and Knowledge of the Ground the Victory is most assourdly ours. Every good Soldier will be Silent and attentive wait for Orders and reserve his fire till he is Sure of doing Execution the officers to be particularly careful of this. The Col'l

and Commanding

officers

of Regiments are to see their Super-

Men to their duty and it may not be amiss for the Troops to know that If any infamous Rascal in time of Action shall attempt to Sculk or hide himself, or Retreat from numary

the

officers so

posted as to keep the

Enemy without the Orders of his Commanding down as an Example of Cowardice.

Instantly be Shot

Hand, The General Sollemnly Promises that he

will

officer

On

he will

the other

reward those who

Distinguish themselves by Brave and Noble Actions, and he desires every officer to be attentive to this particular, that Such Men may be

Afterwards Suitably Noticed Gen'l Green to send for Ten of the flat Bottoms Boats which are to be kept under Guard at Long Island. Na person to Meddle with them but by his Special Order. 37 Men (Sailors) are wanted for the Gallies. 80 Men Properly officered and used to the Sea are wanted to go up to kingsbridge with the Ships and Rafts. They are to be furnished Immediately and parade with Blankets, and Provision, but without Arms, at Gen'l Putnams at 2 oClock and take Orders from him. John Gardner of Cap't Trowbridge Company Col'l Huntingtons Regiment Tried by a Gen'l Court Martial whereof Col'l Wyllys was President and Convicted of Desertion. Ordered to receive 39 Lashes.

John Morgan of Cap't Johnsons Company Col'l McDougals Regt't Tried by the Same Court Martial and Convicted of Sleeping on his post

Sentenced

to

receive

Speekmans Company.

Col'l

Francis Clarridge of Cap't 30 Lashes Glovers Regt't tried by the Same Court

Martial Convicted of Desertion and Reinlistment and Sentenced to Receive 13 Lashes three Days Successively. The Gen'l Approves Each of the above Sentences and orders them to be Executed at the usual

Time and place. The Court of Enquiry having reported that Lieut't Messieur had behaved Unbecoming An officer to one of Superior Rank, the Court Directed a Court Martial. Unless he Asked pardon of the officers he

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

175

Affronted but that officer having Represented to the Gen'l that he is to Pass it over The Gen'l at his Request Orders Lieut't Masser to be Discharged.

willing

Brigadier for the Day Gen'l Scott. Field officers for the Piquet Col'l Huntington L't Col'l Haurlbut. Major Howel, Main Guard Major Porter.

Brigade Major Livingston.

Head

Quarters, Aug't I4th, 1776

Parole America

Countersign Liberty Alexander, Samuel, and Lewis Morris Esq'rs are appointed Aid de Camps to Major Gen'l Sullivan, they are to be obeyed and Respected Accordingly. The Division of the Army under Major Gen'l Putnam and Sullivan having under taken some special Works are to be Omited out of the Gen'l Detail of Guards and fatigue for the The Gen'l Orders Three Days Provision to be Cooked Impresent. mediately, that the Soldiers May have their Canteens filled and be

ready to Meet the Enemy on the Shortest Notice. Such Col'l of Regiments as have not sent for their Amunition, Carts, or Drawn Rum for the Refreshment of their Men in time of Action as per Order of the 9 Instant are to do it Immediately and the Quarter Master must Care that it be used properly. The Allowance is to be half a pint per

The Brigadier Gen'l will please to Number of Spears at the Laboratory which Man.

Recollect that there are a

will be of great use at the posts and are wanted to be distributed. In case of an Alarm the Men are Immediately to repair to their Several Parades when the Roll is to be Called and then Join Battalion

and March

to their respective Alarm posts Absentees will be ConCowards and treated as Such. The Gen'l flatters himself that every Man's Mind and Arms are now prepared for the Glorious Contest upon which so much depends. The time is too precious nor does the Gen'l think it Necessary in Exerting his brave Country Men and fellow Soldiers to behave like Men fitting for every thing that can be Dear we must resolve to Conquer or Die with this Resolution and the Blessing of Heaven Victory and Success will Certainly attend us. Their will then be a Glorious Isue to this Campaign, and the Gen'l will reward his Braves

sidered as

Fellow Soldiers with every thing

The Whole

line is to

in his

turn out

power.

To Morrow Morning

in all points

ready for Action and Continue till Nine oClock without further Orders. William Peck and Charles Witing Esq'rs are Appointed Aid de Camp to Major Gen'l Spencer they are to be obeyed and Respected Accordingly.

Head Quarters Aug't Parole

15,

1776

Countersign

William S. Smith Esq'r is appointed Aid de Camp to Gen'l Sullivan during the Absence of Major Samuel to be respected and obeyed

JEDIDIAH SWAN'S ORDERLY BOOK

176

Accordingly Henry Williams of Cap't Parks Comp'y Col'l Shephards Regiment, Convicted by a Gen'l Court Martial whereof Col'l Wyllys was president of Desertion to receive 39 Lashes. The Gen'l approves it and orders it to be Executed at the usual time and place. L't

Holcomb of tried by the

and Wearing pacity.

It

Cap't Andersons Company and Col'l Johnson's Reg't, Martial for Assuming the Rank of Cap't a Yellow Cockade and Mounting Guard in that Ca-

Same Court

appearing to be done through Misinformation and want

of Experience, the Court are of Opinion he Should be Cautioned by his Col'l, and make himself acquainted with his Duty and that he be released from this Arrest. The Gen'l approves thereof and orders that

he be Discharged M'r William Caldwell is appointed pay Master to Col'l Baldwins Regt't M'r John Larance to the Regt't late McDougals.

The Gen'l directs and requests that every officer will see the Men, Arms, and Amunition put in Order as it Clears up and for