VA Investigators - VA Research - Veterans Affairs

VA Investigators - VA Research - Veterans Affairs

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station Albany, NY Albuquerque, NM Atlanta, GA Augusta, GA ast Updat...

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VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Albany, NY

Albuquerque, NM

Atlanta, GA

Augusta, GA ast Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2007

1995

2012

2003

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

1 of 39 Seminal Paper

Robert M Levin, Ph.D.

For VA funded research primarily on the lower urinary tract function and dysfunction of the male, with continual outside funding to study lower urinary tract function and dysfunction of the female.

Guven, A., Mannikarottu, A., Whitbeck, C., Chichester, P., Leggett, R. E., Kogan, B. A., & Levin, R. M. (2007). Effect of age on the response to short‐term partial bladder outlet obstruction in the rabbit. BJU international, 100(4), 930-934.

Thomas Y. Ma, M.D., Ph.D.

For his pioneering work in intestinal tight junction barrier and introduction of innovative technical approaches and paradigm-shifting scientific concepts that greatly advanced the field. He is an internationally renowned clinician-scientist who has made many seminal discoveries and introduced innovative technical advancements that have greatly impacted the research field. He has been continuously funded by the VA Merit Review Research Grant since 1990 to study NIH- National Research Service Award;  University of New Mexico- the cellular and molecular mechanisms Health Sciences Center  Outstanding Basic-Clinical Research Award that regulate intestinal tight junction Recipient barrier.

Nighot P.K., Hu C.A., Ma T.Y. (2015)  Autophagy enhances intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier function by targeting claudin-2 protein degradation. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 290(11), 7234-46.

Discovery of HIV therapeutics FTC and 3TC: 1989: Founder, Director, and Chairman of the Board for Pharmasset, Inc. (Pharmasset developed HCV direct-acting antiviral sofosbuvir that was approved by the FDA on December 6, 2013): 1998-2005.

Gavegnano, C., Kennedy, E. M., Kim, B., & Schinazi, R. F. (2012). The impact of macrophage nucleotide pools on HIV-1 reverse transcription, viral replication, and the development of novel antiviral agents. Molecular biology international, 2012.

Raymond F. Schinazi, M.D.

Susan C Fagan, Pharm.D., BCPS, FCCP

A key member of the federally-funded investigative team that developed the clot busting drug, recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rtPA), as a treatment for stroke in the early 1990s. This research led to the adoption of rtPA as the ONLY US Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacologic treatment for stroke, in 1996.

One of Scrip's 2014 100 Leaders

Other

Dr. Fagan was a key member of the federally-funded investigative team that developed the clot busting Fagan, S. C., Nagaraja, T. N., drug, recombinant tissue Fenstermacher, J. D., Zheng, J., Johnson, type plasminogen activator M., & Knight, R. A. (2003). Hemorrhagic (rtPA), as a treatment for transformation is related to the duration stroke in the early 1990s. The of occlusion and treatment with tissue manuscript was published in plasminogen activator in a nonembolic the New England Journal of stroke model. Neurologi Medicine in December, 1995,

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Baltimore, MD

Bay Pines, FL

Bay Pines, FL

Bedford, MA

Bedford, MA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1995

2012

2008

1988

1969

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Edward Weinman, M.D

For his outstanding contribution to our understanding of kidney function, from mapping out the molecular processes to discovering a new family of proteins called NHERF. He showed that these proteins are what regulate kidney functions and demonstrated their function in an animal model. His discovery has impacted not only the clinical relevance of the kidney, but also clinical syndromes in other disparate organ systems such as the gastro-intestinal tract VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award and neurologic systems. (2009)

Weinman, E. J., Steplock, D., Wang, Y., & Shenolikar, S. (1995). Characterization of a protein cofactor that mediates protein kinase A regulation of the renal brush border membrane Na (+)-H+ exchanger. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 95(5), 2143.

Bruce A Citron, Ph.D

For his team identifing mechanisms responsible for cognitive loss to advance effective therapy and have demonstrated improved outcomes, after model traumatic brain injury, by treatment with modulators of intracellular regulatory factors in the brain, e.g., an activator of the transcription factor, Nrf2 (Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-like 2; Nfe2l2). Traumatic brain injury, the signature affliction of recent deployments affecting about 15% of combat personnel, is currently untreatable and has persistent effects on patients, families, and our healthcare system. The worldwide prevalence is approximately 0.5%.

Saykally, J. N., Rachmany, L., Hatic, H., Shaer, A., Rubovitch, V., Pick, C. G., & Citron, B. A. (2012). The nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 activator,< i> tert- butylhydroquinone, improves cognitive performance in mice after mild traumatic brain in

Echeverria Moran, Ph.D., MS, BS

For her accomplishments and discoveries: (1)The use of Cotinine as a compound to prevent: Memory loss and depressive behavior by Alzheimer’s disease (2008-2011); Anxiety and enhance fear extinction induced by acute stress (2012); Memory loss by Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (2014); and (2) The use of caffeine and other Raf inhibitors to diminish Alzheimer’s disease pathology.

Echeverria V,et al. (2011). Cotinine Reduces Amyloid beta Aggregation and Improves Memory in Alzheimer’s Mice. J. Alzheimers Dis, 24(4), 817-835. PMID:21321389.

For his investigation of proteoglycans.

Humphries, D. E., Silbert, C. K., & Silbert, J. E. (1988). Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate. Biochem. J, 252, 305-308.

For his extensive investigation for over 40 years on the cortical organization and connectional anatomy of the monkey brain.

Pandya, D. N., & Seltzer, B. (1982). Intrinsic connections and architectonics of posterior parietal cortex in the rhesus monkey. Journal of Comparative Neurology, 204(2), 196-210.

Jeremiah Silbert, M.D.

Deepak Pandya, M.D.

Recognition

2 of 39 Seminal Paper

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Birmingham, AL

Boston, MA

Boston, MA

Boston, MA

Bronx, NY Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2009

2010

2010

2008

1992

3 of 39

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

Seminal Paper

Joseph Messina, Ph.D.

For his research on metabolic dysfunction following injury or infection; and the investigation of the mechanisms leading to skeletal muscle insulin resistance following trauma and hemorrhage and the effects on muscle metabolism.

NIH Predoctoral Award (1977-1979); Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Cancer Fund Postdoctoral Award (1983); National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Award (1984-1985)

Li, L., & Messina, J. L. (2009). Acute insulin resistance following injury. Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism, 20(9), 429-435.

Other

Nikhil Munshi, M.D.

International expert in the field of multiple myeloma for his extensive work in developing immunotherapy in myeloma and publications in this area.

Raj Goyal, M.D.

For his important advances in the understanding of esophageal and gastric physiology and diseases including Barrettt’s esophagus, enteric neurotransmission and the physiology and pathophysiology of gastric motility as well as the first evidence for the existence of VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award muscarinic receptor subtypes. (2014)

Richardson, P. G., Laubach, J., Mitsiades, C., Schlossman, R. L., Doss, D., Colson, K., ... & Anderson, K. (2010). Tailoring treatment for multiple myeloma patients with relapsed and refractory disease. Oncology (Williston Park), 24(3 Suppl 2), 22-9. Qazi, A., Pal, J., Maitah, M. I., Fulciniti, M., Pelluru, D., Nanjappa, P., ... & Shammas, M. A. (2010). Anticancer activity of a broccoli derivative, sulforaphane, in barrett adenocarcinoma: potential use in chemoprevention and as adjuvant in chemotherap

Shukri Khuri, M.D.

2008 Awards: the American Heart Association’s Paul Dudley White Award; the Nicholas G. Berans Veterans Association’s Distinguished Service Award; the Frank Brown Berry Prize for an outstanding physician in the U.S. federal For his leadership in developing the National Surgical Quality health care system; the Philip Crosby Improvement Program (NSQIP) which the Institute of Medicine Award for Quality; the American Heart singled out as “one of three elements that have made the VA the Association Mentorship Award in Surgery, the Presidential citation by The Association best health care system in quality management”. In addition, he of VA Surgeons; and the Ernest Amory made major contributions to the myocardial protection and his research led to development of long-term preservation of vascular Codman Award for improvements in safety conduits and organs. of care to the public

Khuri, S. F., Henderson, W. G., Daley, J., Jonasson, O., Jones, R. S., Campbell Jr, D. A., ... & Healey, N. (2008). Successful implementation of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ National Surgical Quality Improvement Program in the private sector: the p

Calvin Eng, M.D.

For his discovery of a new hormone in the venom of the Mexican beaded lizard, which in 1990 he named exendin-3. But this hormone was vasoactive, which means that it contracts or dilates blood vessels. That prompted Dr. Eng to look at the venom of the Gila monster, which is not vasoactive. There he discovered a hormone, which he named exendin-4, that was similar in structure to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1).

Eng, J., Kleinman, W. A., Singh, L., Singh, G., & Raufman, J. P. (1992). Isolation and characterization of exendin-4, an exendin-3 analogue, from Heloderma suspectum venom. Further evidence for For more information: an exendin receptor on dispersed acini http://www.mendosa.com/m from guinea pig pancre onster.htm

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Bronx, NY

Bronx, NY

Bronx, NY

Bronx, NY

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1967

1951

1961

1956

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

4 of 39 Seminal Paper

Charles Lieber, M.D.

For his research on toxicity of alcohol, elucidation of its interaction with drug, lipid and uric acid metabolism, and the pathogenesis of VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award fatty liver and cirrhosis in man and subhuman primates. (1977)

DeCarli, L. M., & Lieber, C. S. (1967). Fatty liver in the rat after prolonged intake of ethanol with a nutritionally adequate new liquid diet. The Journal of Nutrition, 91(3 Suppl), 331-336.

Kenneth Sterling, M.D.

Developed the 51-Crlabelling of erythrocytes for in vivo study as a clinical tool; first to use labelled human serum albumin for determinations of rates of turnover of this molecule in man and first to use 131-I-labelled thyroxine and triiodothyronine to study the disposal and turnover rates of these hormones in man.

Sterling, K. (1951). The turnover rate of serum albumin in man as measured by I131-tagged albumin. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 30(11), 1228.

Ludwik Gross, M.D.

Griffuel Prize in Paris (1978); Principal 1978 Paul Ehrlich-Ludwig Darmstaeder Prize in Frankfurt; French Legion of Honor (1977); William B. Coley Award (1975); Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award (1974); VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1973); Elected to the National Academy of Sciences (1973); Special Virus Cancer Program Award of the National Cancer Institute (1972); Bertner Foundation Award (1963); WHO United Nations Prize for Cancer Research (1962); He is a major proponent of the possibility that some cancers can be Pasteur Silver Medal of the Pasteur caused by viruses and began a long search for viral causes of Institute in Paris (1962); Walker Prize of the Royal College of Surgeons of England in murine leukemia. In the course of these studies, he isolated the Gross murine leukemia virus strain as well as the first polyomavirus- London (1961); R.R. de Villiers Foundation -so named for its proclivity to cause cancers in multiple tissue http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwik_Gr (Leukemia Society) Award for Leukemia types. Research (1953) oss

Rosalyn Yalow, Ph.D

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1972)

For showing that injected insulin is capable of inducing an immune VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award response which can be quantitated. (1960)

Berson, S. A., Yalow, R. S., Bauman, A., Rothschild, M. A., & Newerly, K. (1956). Insulin-I131 metabolism in human subjects: demonstration of insulin binding globulin in the circulation of insulin treated subjects. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 35(2)

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Bronx, NY

Bronx, NY

Bronx, NY

Charleston, SC Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1956

1979

1962

1985

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

5 of 39 Seminal Paper

For showing that injected insulin is capable of inducing an immune VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award response which can be quantitated. (1960)

Berson, S. A., Yalow, R. S., Bauman, A., Rothschild, M. A., & Newerly, K. (1956). Insulin-I131 metabolism in human subjects: demonstration of insulin binding globulin in the circulation of insulin treated subjects. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 35(2)

Stanley Ulick, M.D.

For his work in the chemistry and metabolism of mineralocorticoid VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award hormones. (1963)

ULICK, S., KODAMA, T., GUNCZIER, P., ZANCONATO, G., RAMIREZ, L. C., RAUH, W., ... & NEW, M. I. (1979). A Syndrome of Apparent Mineralocorticoid Excess Associated with Defects in the Peripheral Metabolism of Cortisol*. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology

Victor Herbert, M.D., J.D., M.A.C.P., F.R.S.M

He has received many awards for nutrition research include the 1972 McCollum Award and the 1986 Robert H. Herman Award (both from the American Society for Clinical Nutrition), the 1978 VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (highest He is the author of the classic book Nutrition Cultism: Facts & award for medical research given by the Fictions, described by The New England Journal of Medicine as "a US Veterans' Administration), the FDA must for all readers who value the importance of nutrition in public Commissioner's Special Citation in 1984 for health but are chagrined by the pretenders who exploit the public "outstanding and consistent contributions with food frauds, dietary cures, and nutrition nonsense." Co-author against the proliferation of nutrition (with Dr. Stephen Barrett) of Vitamins and "Health" Foods: The quackery to the American consumer," the Great American Hustle. Co-author (with A. Simopoulos and B. 1988 Honorary Membership Award and Jacobson) of Genetic Nutrition (Macmillan, 1993) reprinted in Plaque from the American Dietetic softcover as The Healing Diet (Macmillan, 1995) and (with Stephen Association, and the 1993 American Barrett) of The Vitamin Pushers (Prometheus Press, 1994), Institute of Nutrition's Lifetime Fellow described by Dr. Gabe Mirkin, New York Times syndicated writer, Award for his "nutrition research, teaching as "one of the most amazing investigative reports in the history of and unique contribution to the fight American journalism." Dr. Herbert died November 2002. against health fraud."

Norman H. Bell, M.D.

For contributions to the basic science of hormone secretion and mineral metabolism and for delineating the metabolism of Vitamin VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award D in normal and disease states. (1983)

Solomon Berson, M.D.

Herbert, V., & Zalusky, R. (1962). Interrelations of vitamin B12 and folic acid metabolism: folic acid clearance studies. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 41(6), 1263. Bell, N. H., Epstein, S., Greene, A., Shary, J., Oexmann, M. J., & Shaw, S. (1985). Evidence for alteration of the vitamin Dendocrine system in obese subjects. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 76(1), 370.

Other

Invested as a Master of the American College of Physicians on April 2, 1998. Website:victorherbert.com

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Chicago, IL

Chicago, IL

Chicago, IL

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2013

1973

1991

Name (Investigator)

Leonidas Platanias, MD, PhD

Contribution

Recognition

Served as President of the International Cytokine and Interferon Society in 20102011. Received the 2013 Seymour & Vivian Milstein Award for Excellence in Cytokine For his molecular biology and biochemistry research program; Research. The Milstein Award represents concentrating on signaling pathways in cancer cells and developing the pinnacle of scientific achievement in novel treatments for malignancies by targeting such pathways. cytokine and interferon research.

Paul Heller, M.D.

Research in hematology, immunology, enzymology and metabolism, including findings on the mechanism of immunologic deficiency in multiple myeloma, a form of cancer.

Pradeep K. Dudeja, Ph.D.

Leadership roles in editorial boards of many prestigious journals in Physiology, Gastroenterology, roles in American Physiological Society and American Gastroenterological Society, University Scholar Award at University of Illinois at Chicago, invited chair roles in NIH and VA Understanding the molecular mechanisms of  ion transport basis of study section meetings, chair roles in IBD associated diarrhea and infectious diarrhea and identification international symposiums and delivering of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of diarrheal diseases plenary lectures.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1975)

6 of 39 Seminal Paper

Altman JK, and Platanias LC. ( 2013). Acute myeloid leukemia: potential for new therapeutic approaches targeting mRNA translation pathways. Int. J. Hematol. Oncol. 3:243-250.

Other

His research is funded by four R01 grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and a Merit Review grant from the Department of Veterans Affairs. He is also the principal investigator of the NCI T32 training grant in signal transduction and cancer, and the American Cancer Society; Institutional Review Grant (IRG) that provides funding for junior investigators at Northwestern. In addition, he leads the efforts for the development of a Leukemia SPORE (Specialized Program of Research Excellence) grant at Northwestern. He has published over 250 scientific papers.

Rudders, R. A., Yakulis, V., & Heller, P. (1973). Double myeloma: Production of both IgG type lambda and IgA type lambda myeloma proteins by a single plasma cell line. The American journal of medicine, 55(2), 215-221.

Gill RK, Borthakur A, Hodges K, Turner JR, Clayburgh DR, Saksena S, Zaheer A, Ramaswamy K, Hecht G, Dudeja PK. Mechanism underlying inhibition of intestinal apical Cl/OH exchange following infection with enteropathogenic E. coli. J Clin Invest. 2007 Feb;117(2):428-37. Epub 2007 Jan 25.

Recipient of VA Senior Research Career Scientist award, 1 VA merit award, 1 NIH T-32 and 3 NIH RO1 grants for his research program

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Chicago, IL

Cleveland, OH

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2008

1967

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Subhash Pandey, PhD

Dr. Pandey’s studies have a great impact on alcohol Given his contributions to the alcoholism research and have been neuroscience research field Dr. Pandey highlighted by the National was appointed as a field editor for the Institutes of Health (NIH)leading journal of his field, Alcoholism NIAAA press releases and Clinical and Experimental Research, in included in 2007 US 2012. In 2011, he received the 6th congressional report by Professor SN Pradhan memorial NIAAA and also highlighted lectureship by the Department of by VA current trends in 2007. Pharmacology, Howard University, Several of Dr. Pandey's Washington DC for his outstanding published papers have contributions to the field of received national and neuropharmacology. In 2010, he received international recognition due the prestigious Bowles Lectureship Award to the important discovery of from the University of North Carolina for the causal role of the CREB For the cutting edge research conducted in Dr. Pandey’s laboratory his outstanding contributions to alcoholism gene transcription factor in research. Received both the Young Subhash C. Pandey, Ugale R, Zhang H, that provided evidence that decreased function of CREB and its anxiety and alcohol-abuse related genes neuropeptide Y(NPY) and brain-derived neurotrophic Scientist Award (in 1997) and Senior Tang L, Prakash A (2008) Brain disorders and recently much factor (BDNF) in the circuitry of the central nucleus of amygdala, a Scientist Award (in 2006) from the chromatin remodeling: a novel recognized work on mechanism of alcoholism. J Neurosci 28: epigenetic mechanisms of brain area associated with anxiety, fear, and emotion, may be Association of Scientists in America of involved in anxiety related to alcohol withdrawal in rats. Indian Origin. 3729-3737. alcoholism.

Leonard T. Skeggs, Ph.D.

For automated laboratory test devices and biochemistry of hypertension.

Recognition

7 of 39

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1967)

Seminal Paper

Skeggs, L. T., Kahn, J. R., & Shumway, N. P. (1956). The preparation and function of the hypertensin-converting enzyme. The Journal of experimental medicine, 103(3), 295-299.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Columbia, MO

Dallas, TX

Dallas, TX

Dallas, TX

Denver, CO

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1988

1965

1987

1995

1976

Name (Investigator)

James R. Sowers, MD ASCI, FACP, FAHA

8 of 39

Contribution

Recognition

Seminal Paper

He is one of the first clinician scientists to investigate the link between diabetes, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Long before translational investigation was en vogue, Dr. Sowers incorporated a truly integrative, translational approach, to his investigation with very effective bench and human research exploring the role of insulin resistance in cardiovascular tissue. Much of this seminal work defines what we know today regarding insulin actions in vascular biology in various human as well as in vitro and in vivo/ex vivo models of insulin resistance.

Irvine Page-Alva Bradley Lifetime Achievement Award in Hypertension (2012); COSEHC Lifetime Achievement Award (2011); Seale Harris Research Award, Southern Medical Association (2010); Fellow in the American Society of Hypertension (2010); University of Missouri, Medical Alumni Organization Citation of Merit (2008); Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society Inductee (2008); Midwestern Outstanding Research award of AHA (2006); Detroit Federal Executive Board-Distinguished Scientist (1989); Distinguished Teacher of Department of Medicine, Wayne State University (1986); Lange Medical Award for Scholastic and Research Achievement (1970)

Dr. Sowers has been continuously funded through the VA Merit Program for over 35 years and is considered a pioneer in the field of diabetes. His studies have been supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where he has been continuously funded for over J R Sowers, M B Zemel, P Zemel, F W 30 years, the Beck, M F Walsh and E T Zawada. (1988). American Diabetes Salt sensitivity in blacks. Salt intake and Association, the American natriuretic substances. Hypertension, Heart Association, as well as 12:485-490 other funding agencies.

Kosaku Uyeda, M.D.

For contributions in the field of carbohydrate metabolism and biochemical mechanisms of enzyme action.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1984)

Uyeda, K., & Racker, E. (1965). Regulatory mechanisms in carbohydrate metabolism VII. Hexokinase and phosphofructokinase. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 240(12), 46824688.

Paul Srere, Ph.D.

Biochemical accomplishments on key cellular metabolic pathways regulating lipid and carbohydrate synthesis and storage.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1974)

Srere, P. A. (1987). Complexes of sequential metabolic enzymes. Annual review of biochemistry, 56(1), 89-124.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1969)

Unger, R. H. (1995). Lipotoxicity in the pathogenesis of obesity-dependent NIDDM: genetic and clinical implications. Diabetes, 44(8), 863-870.

Roger Unger, M.D.

Allen Alfrey, M.D.

For his conception of the physiology of metabolism of fats and carbohydrates, better to better therapy for diabetes patients.

For his discovery that aluminum in dialysate was responsible for dialysis dementia, which essentially killed all renal dialysis patients within a few years

Alfrey, A. C., LeGendre, G. R., & Kaehny, W. D. (1976). The dialysis encephalopathy syndrome: possible aluminum intoxication. New England Journal of Medicine, 294(4), 184-188.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Denver, CO

Denver, CO

Denver, CO

Denver, CO

Denver, CO

Denver, CO

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1959

1992

1992

1997

2003

1998

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Ben Eiseman, M.D.

For Dr. Eiseman and team doing the first fecal transplant at VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System. Fecal transplants are now being widely used for treatment of recurring C. difficile infection.

Eiseman, B., Fowler, W. G., & Robinson, R. M. (1959). Appendectomy during right inguinal herniorrhaphy. Annals of surgery, 149(1), 110.

For the development of banding for esophageal varices, also done partly by VA investigators; this has replaced injection of sclerosants into varices.

Stiegmann, G. V., Goff, J. S., MichaletzOnody, P. A., Korula, J., Lieberman, D., Saeed, Z. A., ... & Lowenstein, S. R. (1992). Endoscopic sclerotherapy as compared with endoscopic ligation for bleeding esophageal varices. New England Journal of Medicine,

John S. Goff, M.D.

For the development of banding for esophageal varices, also done partly by VA investigators; this has replaced injection of sclerosants into varices.

Stiegmann, G. V., Goff, J. S., MichaletzOnody, P. A., Korula, J., Lieberman, D., Saeed, Z. A., ... & Lowenstein, S. R. (1992). Endoscopic sclerotherapy as compared with endoscopic ligation for bleeding esophageal varices. New England Journal of Medicine,

Robert Freedman, M.D

In recognition of his contributions to understanding of the causes and treatment of schizophrenia, a major cause of morbidity in the VA. Not only has he opened doors in our understanding of the role of the nicotinic receptor in P50 gating and schizophrenia, but his paradigm of moving from the molecular neurobiological level, to genetic studies to treatment is a paradigm that has set a precedent for the field. His more recent studies with an alpha-7 nicotinic agonist, DXMB-A hold the potential promise of a new treatment VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award option for schizophrenia distinct from the more conventional approach of the dopamine antagonists. (2007)

Freedman, R., Coon, H., Myles-Worsley, M., Orr-Urtreger, A., Olincy, A., Davis, A., ... & Byerley, W. (1997). Linkage of a neurophysiological deficit in schizophrenia to a chromosome 15 locus. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 94(2), 587-59

Thomas Starzl, M.D.

The first-ever successful human liver transplant operation took place at the Denver VA Medical Center in May 1963 under Dr. Thomas Starzl.

Starzl TE. (2003). The co-development of liver and kidney transplantation (19551967). Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health, 34(2):238-41.

William Waddel, M.D.

For observation that sulindac causes adenomas to go away in patients with familial polyposis. Sulindac an other NSAIDs are now widely used for colon cancer chemoprevention.

Greg V. Steigman, M.D.

Recognition

9 of 39

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1968)

Seminal Paper

Waddell, W. R. (1998). Stimulation of apoptosis by sulindac and piroxicam. Clinical Science, 95(3), 385-388.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Detroit, MI

Detroit, MI

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2011

2010

Recognition

10 of 39

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Seminal Paper

Adhip Majumdar, Ph.D., D.Sc.

For his laboratory's study on the role of a small sub-population of self-renewing cells termed “cancer stem cells” (CSCs) in the development and progression of GI malignancies. They were the first to demonstrate that aging is associated with increased GI mucosal proliferative processes and that the age-related rise in adenomatous polyps in the colon is associated with increase in cancer stem cells (1-3), indicating a role for CSCs in the age-related increase in GI malignancies. Since CSCs are highly resistant to chemotherapy, they have also been pursuing studies to develop therapeutic strategies to eliminate them. Dr. Majumdar's laboratory has found that the dietary ingredient curcumin and the drug metformin are highly effective in eliminating CSCs when combined with conventional chemotherapy for colorectal cancer (4,5).

Majumdar, A. P., & Basson, M. D. (2006). Effect of aging on the gastrointestinal tract. Physiology of the Gastrointestinal Tract, edited by Johnson LR, Barrett K, Ghishan F, Merchant JI, Said HM, Wood JD. New York: Academic, 405-433.

Anjaneyulu Kowluru, M.D.

Seminal contributions from Dr. Kowluru’s laboratory have identified novel G protein-dependent signaling pathways involved in physiological insulin secretion. He identified specific pathways, which are responsible for the dysfunction and demise of insulinproducing beta-cells resulting in diabetes; successfully reproduced these findings in islets from animal models of T2DM, and in islets from human donors with T2DM; and his team is actively working toward the development and testing of small molecule inhibitors for these pathways with a goal to prevent/halt the onset of diabetes and associated complications in diabetic humans, including our Veterans.

Kowluru, A. (2010). Small G proteins in islet β-cell function. Endocrine reviews, 31(1), 52-78.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Durham, NC

Durham, NC

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2004

1977

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

David S. Pisetsky, M.D.

Arising from fundamental research on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototypic autoimmune disease, Dr. Pisetsky’s discoveries have had major implications for understanding the mechanisms of many diseases affecting the Veteran population including autoimmunity, arthritis, cancer, AIDS, trauma and sepsis; this work has also been important to the development of therapies based on nucleic acids, including antisense compounds and vaccine adjuvants. A major achievement of Dr. Pisetsky’s research has been to define the unique features of DNA as an antigen, immunogen and PAMP (pathogen associated molecular pattern); a PAMP is a foreign molecule which can stimulate innate immunity and signal “danger.” Dr. Pisetsky has published important papers on the expression of HMGB1 in human and murine lupus; the mechanisms of HMGB1 translocation during macrophage activation by toll-like receptor ligands; and the release of HMGB1 during apoptosis.

Joe Brice Weinberg, M.D.

For his laboratory-based research program that has produced landmark studies elucidating basic mechanisms of disease processes over the last 40 years. He has investigated mononuclear phagocyte (monocyte and macro¬phage) and nitric oxide (NO) biology, studying mechanisms of cell activation, and the roles of macrophages and NO in disorders of prime interest to the VA—inflammation, cancer, infectious diseases, and joint injuryrepair-rehabilitation. His work has led to translational studies in patients with many different conditions such as joint trauma, arthritis, AIDS, malaria, and leukemia. Dr. Weinberg’s research career began at the Salt Lake VA Medical Center in 1974 working with Dr. John Hibbs. With Dr. Hibbs, he established that macrophage activation for tumor cell killing is a multistep process influenced by local factors such as endotoxin and cytokines. In his 1977 Nature paper, Dr. Weinberg reported that erythrocytes and hemoglobin inhibit macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing. VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award Researchers now recognize this landmark paper as the first to demonstrate heme inhibition of any NO effector function. (2010)

11 of 39

Recognition

Seminal Paper

He is a Master of the American College of Rheumatology and recipient of the Philip Hench Award and Lee C. Howley Sr. Prize from the Arthritis Foundation. The highly prestigious Howley Prize recognizes a significant advance in the understanding, treatment or prevention of arthritis and rheumatic diseases.

He is a consummate physician-scientist who has achieved international recognition for his pioneering research on the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, the immunological properties of nucleic acids and the Cook, D. N., Pisetsky, D. S., & Schwartz, generation of antinuclear D. A. (2004). Toll-like receptors in the antibodies. Since 1978, he pathogenesis of human disease. Nature has directed the Durham VA immunology, 5(10), 975-979. Rheumatology Clinic.

Weinberg, J. B., & Hibbs, J. B. (1977). Endocytosis of red blood cells or haemoglobin by activated macrophages inhibits their tumoricidal effect. Nature, 269(5625):245-7.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

East Orange, NJ

East Orange, NJ

Gainesville, FL

Hines, IL

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1999

1969

2004

1986

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

12 of 39 Seminal Paper

Other

Dr. Xu retired but continues to remain active at the VA-NJHCS as a WOC mentoring younger scientist. His area of study is the regulation of bile acid synthesis and metabolism; the role of bile acid synthesis in plasma cholesterol homeostasis.

Xu, G., Salen, G., Shefer, S., Tint, G. S., Nguyen, L. B., Chen, T. S., & Greenblatt, D. (1999). Increasing dietary cholesterol induces different regulation of classic and alternative bile acid synthesis. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 103(1), 89-95.

Peter C. Dowling, M.D.

His laboratory has carried out numerous preclinical studies on the beneficial effects and mechanism of erythropoietin therapy and its Weir Mitchell Award, American Academy congeners on tissue injury. of Neurology Highest Honor (1969)

Patents include: “Erythropoietin derived small peptides for immunomodulation and tissue protection”; “Novel drug therapy for ovarian and Troiano, R., Cook, S. D., & Dowling, P. C. other cavity epithelia (1987). Steroid therapy in multiple malignancies”; and “Local sclerosis: point of view. Archives of combination immunotherapy neurology, 44(8), 803-807. for solid tumors”

Edward R. Block, M.D.

For his achievements in the field of pulmonary and critical care medicine. He was among the first to identify and characterize the metabolic functions of lung endothelial cells, leading to a reevaluation of their role in normal and abnormal lung biology. He subsequently worked on the mechanisms by which oxidant injury affects the metabolic functions of the lung endothelial cells, leading to an understanding of how lung endothelial cell injury leads to acute and chronic manifestations and patho-physiology of lung disease. Dr. Block's work provided the basic science infrastructure for the clinical use of metabolic functions of the lung as indices of pulmonary injury, and for the use of supplemental LVA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award arginine in the treatment of pulmonary vascular dysfunction associated with acute and chronic lung injuries. (1999)

Dale Gerding , M.D.

In recognition of his outstanding scientific contributions and achievements in the areas of biomedical research relevant to the healthcare of Veterans.

Guorong Xu, M.D., Ph.D.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (2013)

Zharikov, S. I., Krotova, K. Y., Belayev, L., & Block, E. R. (2004). Pertussis toxin activates l-arginine uptake in pulmonary endothelial cells through downregulation of PKC-α activity. American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology Gerding, D. N., Olson, M. M., Peterson, L. R., Teasley, D. G., Gebhard, R. L., Schwartz, M. L., & Lee, J. T. (1986). Clostridium difficile—associated diarrhea and colitis in adults: a prospective case-controlled epidemiologic study. Archives of Internal M

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Houston, TX

Indianapolis, IN

Indianapolis, IN

Indianapolis, IN

Year

2014

2012

2014

2012

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

David Graham, M.D.

Mikias Ayalew, M.S. BME

Merril Benson, M.D.

Bruce Molitoris, M.D.

Seminal Paper

Other

For his involvement in studies evaluating various drugs in the treatment of gastric ulcers, NSAID treatment of gastritis, and the etiology of H. pylori in gastric ulcer development. He collaborated with Dr. Robert Genta in developing the “Genta Stain” for the detection of H. pylori. In 1989, Dr. Graham recruited Boris Yoffe, M.D., who developed a program on hepatitis and, in collaboration with NASA, liver tissue engineering. His work continues to play a major role in updating treatment guidelines.

Graham, D. Y., Lee, Y. C., & Wu, M. S. (2014). Rational Helicobacter pylori therapy: evidence-based medicine rather than medicine-based evidence. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 12(2), 177-186.

Featured in the VA Research Currents. This article can be found at http://www.research.va.gov/ currents/winter201314/winter2013-14-24.cfm

For his team's use of a "translational convergent functional genomics (CFG) approach to identify and prioritize genes involved in schizophrenia, by gene-level integration of genome-wide association study data with other genetic and gene expression studies in humans..."

Ayalew, M., Le-Niculescu, H., Levey, D. F., Jain, N., Changala, B., Patel, S. D., ... & Niculescu, A. B. (2012). Convergent functional genomics of schizophrenia: from comprehensive understanding to genetic risk prediction. Molecular psychiatry, 17(9), 887

An international expert in amyloidosis. His work has focused on hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis.

Martin, S. E., Benson, M. D., & Hattab, E. M. (2014). The pathologic spectrum of oculoleptomeningeal amyloidosis with Val30Gly transthyretin gene mutation in a postmortem case. Human Pathology, 45(5):1105-8

For his studies of acute renal injury and as a leader within the VA on functional studies of the kidney using multicolor two-photon microscopy.

Molitoris, B. A., Okusa, M. D., Palevsky, P. M., Kimmel, P. L., & Star, R. A. (2012). Designing Clinical Trials in Acute Kidney Injury. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 7(5), 842-843.

Indianapolis, IN

2013

Kathyrn Jones, M.D.

For her extensive publications on nerve injury, including facial nerve injuries.

Indianapolis, IN

1995

Robert A Harris, M.D.

For his work in Biochemistry.

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Recognition

13 of 39

Mesnard, N. A., Haulcomb, M. M., Tanzer, L., Sanders, V. M., & Jones, K. J. (2013). Delayed functional recovery in presymptomatic mSOD1G93A mice following facial nerve crush axotomy. Journal of neurodegeneration & regeneration, 4(1), 21. Harris, R. A., Popov, K. M., Zhao, Y., Kedishvili, N. Y., Shimomura, Y., & Crabb, D. W. (1995). A new family of protein kinases—the mitochondrial protein kinases. Advances in enzyme regulation, 35, 147-162.

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Iowa City, IA

Iowa City, IA

Kansas City, MO

Year

2005

2002

2013

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Gerald F. DiBona, M.D.

For his internationally recognized contributions to renal and cardiovascular medicine. His research focuses on the neural control of kidney function. He showed that increased nerve activity affected the kidney's ability to filter impurities from the blood, regulate blood flow and control sodium and water retention. As a VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award result, the body retains more sodium (1995)

DiBona, G. F. (2005). Physiology in perspective: the wisdom of the body. Neural control of the kidney. American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 289(3), R633-R641.

John Wemmie, M.D., Ph.D.

For his contribution to the advancement of science and medicine as a researcher demonstrating cutting-edge research that has led to many accomplishments that will benefit veterans. His research focus is on acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) in the brain. His group discovered that these channels are abundatly expressed in brain regions underlying fear, anxiety, and depression-related behaviors.

Wemmie, J. A., Chen, J., Askwith, C. C., Hruska-Hageman, A. M., Price, M. P., Nolan, B. C., ... & Welsh, M. J. (2002). The acid-activated ion channel ASIC contributes to synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Neuron, 34(3), 463-477.

Prateek Sharma, M.D.

As one of the world's leading authorities in the field of gastroesophageal reflux disease, (GERD), cancer of the esophagus (food pipe) and Barrett's esophagus, a condition leading to the development of cancer.

Parasa, S., & Sharma, P. (2013). Complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Best Practice & Research Clinical Gastroenterology, 27(3), 433442.

For his research on kidney disease as it affects patients’ lives and well-being. She developed a unique assay in which the individual filtering units of the kidney (glomeruli) are studied outside the body. Uncovered novel mechanisms of mucosal protection, injury and healing in GI tract. Identified novel molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of epithelial and vascular regeneration during esophageal, gastric and colonic ulcers healing.  Elucidated role of prostaglandins and growth factor receptors in GI cancers and

Trachtman, H., & Savin, V. J. (2014). Galactose treatment in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Pediatric Nephrology, 29(5):931. Over 350 peer reviewed publications including papers in Nature Med, JCI, Gastroenterology, Gut, FASEB J, Am J Physiol., Am. J. Pathology and others. Pai, R., Soreghan, B., Szabo, I.L., Pavelka,

Kansas City, MO

2014

Virginia J. Savin, M.D.

Long Beach, CA

1994

Andrzej S. Tarnawski, M.D., Ph.D.

Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles, CA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

1992

1988

Recognition

14 of 39

Athalie Clarke Award for outstanding research;  Arnold Bergen Award;  Merentibus Medal Award; Elected 2x Assoc. Chair  Am. Gastro Assoc./EGD; Elected Honorary Member: Japanese and

Seminal Paper

George Sachs, MB, ChirB, DSc,

For his research on the physiological characterization of the Proton- VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1992) Potassium ATPase in gastric parietal cell.

Prinz, C. , Kajimura, M., Scott, D., Helander, H., Shin, J., Besancon, M. , & Sachs, G. (1992). Acid secretion and the H, K ATPase of stomach. The Yale journal of biology and medicine, 65(6), 577-596.

Jack Coburn, M.D.

For describing the desferrioxamine test to detect aluminum bone disease (now much rarer due to better water treatment and less use of aluminum containing phosphate binders) in chronic renal failure patients. Wadsworth VA was also one of the first places in the world to use active vitamin D analog, calcitriol, to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism.

Shinaberger, J. H., Sherrard, D. J., & Coburn, J. W. (1988). Reversal of aluminum-related bone disease after substituting calcium carbonate for aluminum hydroxide. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 11(1), 70-75.

Other

Dr. Wemmie's research is funded by VA and other sources including NIMH, NHLBI and NARSAD.

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles, CA

Los Angeles, CA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2000

2003

1988

1964

1967

1962

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

15 of 39 Seminal Paper

For his research studies on the orexin (hypocretin), a hypothalamic VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award hormone whose lack of is involved in narcolepsy and other disorders of sleep and arousal. (2010)

Thannickal, T. C., Moore, R. Y., Nienhuis, R., Ramanathan, L., Gulyani, S., Aldrich, M., ... & Siegel, J. M. (2000). Reduced number of hypocretin neurons in human narcolepsy. Neuron, 27(3), 469-474.

Joel Kopple, M.D.

For his advancement of nutritional care in chronic renal failure.

Kalantar-Zadeh, K., Ikizler, T. A., Block, G., Avram, M. M., & Kopple, J. D. (2003). Malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome in dialysis patients: causes and consequences. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 42(5), 864-881.

Joseph Miller, M.D.

In the late 1960s and through the 1970s, the dialysis unit at Wadsworth improved the safety of dialysis though the development of water treatment and purification system, testing new dialysis membrane materials and development of blood-leak detectors, foam, or air detectors, and conductivity meters. Dr. Miller developed devices for isolated ultrafiltration. In the 1980s, the late Dr. James Shinaberger and Dr. Miller pioneered high flux hemofiltration therapy to improve dialysis treatment efficiency.

Shinaberger, J. H., Miller, J. H., & Gardner, P. W. (1988). Erythropoietin alert: risks of high hematocrit hemodialysis. ASAIO Journal, 34(3), 179184.

Lucien Guze, M.D.

For his research on host-parasite relationships in chronic pyelonephritis. His collaborator was George Kalmanson, M.D. Dr. Guze was an infulential Chief of Staff for Research and Education at VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1965) the Wadsworth VA Hospital.

Guze, L. B., & Kalmanson, G. M. (1964). Persistence of bacteria in" protoplast" form after apparent cure of pyelonephritis in rats. Science, 143(3612), 1340-1341.

Milton Rubini, M.D.

In 1967, Drs. Milton Rubini, the late Jack Coburn, and the late James Shinaberger created the second chronic hemodialysis unit in the Western United States.

Sokol, A., Gral, T., & Rubini, M. E. (1967). Some medical problems of chronic hemodialysis. California medicine, 107(3), 236.

In the late 1950s, Wadsworth VA was instrumental in the application of peritoneal dialysis as a life-sustaining treatment. The Don Baxter company and Drs. Morton Maxwell and Joseph Miller set up dialysis teams to treat selected patients at the VA and UCLA.

Cutler, R. E., Kleeman, C. R., Koplowitz, J., Maxwell, M. H., & Dowling, J. T. (1962). Mechanisms of impaired water excretion in adrenal and pituitary insufficiency. III. The effect of extracellular or plasma volume expansion, or both, on the impaired diu

Jerome Siegel, PhD

Morton Maxwell, M.D.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Year

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

16 of 39 Seminal Paper

Los Angeles, CA

2009

Neil Kaplowitz, M.D.

For the elucidation of the regulation of hepatic glutathione. Developing a comprehensive understanding of the regulation of glutathione synthesis by hormones and cysteine availability and glutathione turnover through release into bile and blood via carriermediated transport. Identifying a fundamental defect in mitochondrial glutathione defense in experimental alcoholic liver VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award disease. (1993)

Los Angeles, CA

1976

Sydney Finegold, M.D.

For his research on anerobic bacteria taxonomy and its importance VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1983) in disease.

Yuan, L., & Kaplowitz, N. (2009). Glutathione in liver diseases and hepatotoxicity. Molecular aspects of medicine, 30(1), 29-41. Sutter, V. L., & Finegold, S. M. (1976). Susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria to 23 antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial Agents and chemotherapy, 10(4), 736752.

For his development of nuclear medicine techniques in clinical neurology for cerebral blood flow measurements, elaboration of cerebrospinal fluid functions, and characterization of the bloodbrain barrier.

Oldendorf, W. H., Stoller, B. E., & Harris, F. L. (1993). Blood-brain barrier penetration abolished by N-methyl quaternization of nicotine. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 90(1), 307-311.

Los Angeles, CA

Louisville, KY

Madison, WI

Last Updated: 8/17/15

1993

2003

1981

William Oldendorf, M.D., Ph.D.

Craig McClain, M.D.

He was the first funded for his VA research in 1977 dealing with nutrition and alcoholic liver disease. This has been a long-standing research focus of Dr. McClain's laboratory. His group was the first to describe altered cytokine metabolism in alcoholic hepatitis, and that Hepatology article has been the second-most quoted article in hepatobiology overthe past 25 years. Dr. McClain has recently been evaluating the gut-liver axis and the role of nutrition in alcoholic liver disease. He is focusing on both micronutrients, such as zinc, and macronutrients, such as dietary fat, impacting the predisposition to alcoholic liver disease. He is also studying the microbiome in alcoholic liver disease.

Austin Shug, M.D.

For the discovering a deficiency of carnitine, a nutrient made in the body and used for generation of energy from fat, in a family with cardiac disease. As a result, administering carnitine now cures patients with some congestive cardiomyopathies and patients with carnitine deficiency.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1976)

Other

Dr. McClain co-wrote the textbook chapter on Alcoholic Liver Disease in Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease edited by Sleisinger & Fordtran, and wrote the two major book chapters on Grace A. Goldsmith Award, American nutrition and liver disease. He has published over 330 College of Nutrition - Outstanding Kugelmas, M., Hill, D. B., Vivian, B., manuscripts, and 100 book Research Award (1990); University of Marsano, L., & McClain, C. J. (2003). chapters and review articles, Kentucky College of Medicine Faculty Research Award (1996); Mentor’s Award, Cytokines and NASH: a pilot study of the mostly in the areas of alcoholic hepatitis, fatty liver American Gastroenterological Association effects of lifestyle modification and (2007) vitamin E. Hepatology, 38(2), 413-419. disease, and nutrition. Tripp, M. E., Katcher, M. L., Peters, H. A., Gilbert, E. F., Arya, S., Hodach, R. J., & Shug, A. L. (1981). Systemic carnitine deficiency presenting as familial endocardial fibroelastosis: a treatable cardiomyopathy. The New England journal of medicine, 3

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Year

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Madison, WI

2002

Joan Schiller, M.D.

For research on lung cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer.

Seminal Paper Other Schiller, J. H., Harrington, D., Belani, C. P., Langer, C., Sandler, A., Krook, J., ... & Johnson, D. H. (2002). Comparison of four chemotherapy regimens for advanced non–small-cell lung cancer. New England Journal of Medicine, 346(2), 92-98.

Along with Dr. Nilo Qureshi, they were the first to find the structure of the lipid part of endotoxins or poisons made by the bacteria Salmonella and E. coli .

Golenbock, D. T., Hampton, R. Y., Qureshi, N., Takayama, K., & Raetz, C. R. (1991). Lipid A-like molecules that antagonize the effects of endotoxins on human monocytes. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 266(29), 19490-19498.

Nilo Qureshi, M.D.

Along with Dr. Kuni Takayama, they were the first to find the structure of the lipid part of endotoxins or poisons made by the bacteria Salmonella and E. coli .

Golenbock, D. T., Hampton, R. Y., Qureshi, N., Takayama, K., & Raetz, C. R. (1991). Lipid A-like molecules that antagonize the effects of endotoxins on human monocytes. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 266(29), 19490-19498.

Robert Bush, M.D.

For his use of genetic engineering to detect a component in the common outdoor fungus, Alternaria , that causes asthma and other allergic reactions. Now that the component has been identified, it can be used to diagnose and treat allergy to this fungus.

Bush, R. K., & Prochnau, J. J. (2004). Alternaria-induced asthma. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 113(2), 227-234.

Madison, WI

Madison, WI

Madison, WI

1991

1991

2004

Kuni Takayama, M.D.

Madison, WI

2013

Terry Oberley, M.D.

His research passion was the metabolism of reactive oxygen species. Since reactive oxygen species are substrates for antioxidant enzymes, he studied the role of these enzymes in cancer. This is the redox imbalance theory of cancer, which was advanced by Dr. Terry Oberley and his twin brother, Dr. Larry Oberley of the University of Iowa.

Madison, WI

2012

Theodore Goodfriend, M.D.

For identifying the receptor for angiotensin in adrenal and other tissues.

Madison, WI

2012

Richard Weindruch, Ph.D.

For his research that found caloric restriction slows the aging process in mice, rats and primates.

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Recognition

17 of 39

Jorgenson, T. C., Zhong, W., & Oberley, T. D. (2013). Redox imbalance and biochemical changes in cancer. Cancer research, 73(20), 6118-6123. Goodfriend, T. (2012). Molecular Trafficking of Angiotensin Receptors. American journal of hypertension, 25(1), 23-23. Anderson, R. M., & Weindruch, R. (2012). The caloric restriction paradigm: implications for healthy human aging. For more information: American Journal of Human Biology, http://aging.wisc.edu/researc 24(2), 101-106. h/affil.php?Ident=67

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Madison, WI

Memphis, TN

Memphis, TN

Memphis, TN

Memphis, TN

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1995

1977

1985

1999

2002

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

18 of 39 Seminal Paper

William Craig, M.D.

For his work on "post-antibiotic effect" that formed the basis of the short- duration "Z-Pak" dosage regimen.

Craig, W. A. (1995). Interrelationship between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in determining dosage regimens for broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease, 22(1), 89-96.

Andrew Kang, M.D.

For his outstanding body of work that continues to impact our understanding and treatment of connective tissue diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. His original and seminal contribution was the discovery and development of the collageninduced arthritis (CIA) rodent model of chronic arthritis. The CIA model was the first to prove that immunization with an autologous cartilage component could lead to inflammatory, autoimmune arthritis. His work with the animal model also resulted in the development of several potential immunotherapies and vaccines that could prevent the development of CIA. More recently, he has engineered analog peptides that prevent the development of CIA in the animal model. Some of these peptides are currently in clinical VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award trials. (2003)

Trentham, D. E., Townes, A. S., & Kang, A. H. (1977). Autoimmunity to type II collagen an experimental model of arthritis. The Journal of experimental medicine, 146(3), 857-868.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1989)

Dale, J. B., & Beachey, E. H. (1985). Epitopes of streptococcal M proteins shared with cardiac myosin. The Journal of experimental medicine, 162(2), 583591.

Gianfranco Umberto Meduri, M.D.

Dr. Meduri’s has been funded for a multi-center VA Cooperative Studies Program designated CSP study # 574 and is a 45 center nearly $25 million dollars study which focuses on Intensive Care Veterans with pneumonia.

Received a prestigious award at the Caduceus Ball.

Antonelli, M., Conti, G., Rocco, M., Bufi, M., De Blasi, R. A., Vivino, G., ... & Meduri, G. U. (1998). A comparison of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation and conventional mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure. New Engla

James B. Dale, M.D.

For his academic leadership and research to invent a vaccine for group A Streptococcus, which is presently in the initial stages of clinical trials. This is the only vaccine against Streptococcus A, bacteria that can cause Rheumatic Fever, Toxic Shock Syndrome, and is the infamous "flesh eating" bacteria. The infectious diseases research group at the Memphis VA is lead by Dr. Dale who is known internationally for his academic leadership and research.

Has received numerous national and international awards and was featured in a CBS Sunday Morning News feature on April 1, 2007.

Hu, M. C., Walls, M. A., Stroop, S. D., Reddish, M. A., Beall, B., & Dale, J. B. (2002). Immunogenicity of a 26-valent group A streptococcal vaccine. Infection and immunity, 70(4), 2171-2177.

Edward H. Beachey, M.D.

For research on streptococcal infections.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Memphis, TN

Memphis, TN

Memphis, TN

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2000

1983

2000

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Jennifer Martindale-Adams, Ed.D.

For Dr. Martindale-Adams and Dr. Linda Nichols' 25-city study program to educate and help up to 150 individuals caring for dementia patients. Dr. Martindale-Adams and Dr. Nichols' REACH VA is a VA clinical pilot program to provide support for the caregivers of Veterans suffering from Alzheimer’s and Dementia. The two doctors and their staff at the Memphis VAMC lead this VHA program as well as conduct at over 20 VA facilities. Both doctors have been designated by VA Central Office (VAC) as a National Program Office for Caregiver Support and leads the entire VA’s in VA Caregiver support and are Principal Investigators on two U.S. Army research grants.

John M. Stuart, M.D.

Dr. Stuart is the Associate Chief of Staff for Research and Development, was awarded a $2.4 Million research Program Project award. The Memphis VA Medical Center was one of only three awarded by VA in the entire nation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has awarded a four-year $2.4 M grant to a collection of VA and University of Tennessee Health Science Center investigators, led by Dr. Stuart, who share an interest in connective tissue disease. The central focus of this VA Program Project is the role of immune mediated inflammation in the development of chronic arthritis and how that inflammation can be regulated. This grant, one of only three of its kind awarded in the US this year, synergizes the research efforts of three individual research projects sharing a common goal and using shared resources.

Linda Nichols, Ph.D.

For Dr. Nichols and Dr. Jennifer Martindale-Adams' 25-city study program to educate and help up to 150 individuals caring for dementia patients. Dr. Nichols and Dr. MartindaleAdams' REACH VA is a VA clinical pilot program to provide support for the caregivers of Veterans suffering from Alzheimer’s and Dementia. The two doctors and their staff at the Memphis VAMC lead this VHA program as well as conduct at over 20 VA facilities. Both doctors have been designated by VA Central Office (VAC) as a National Program Office for Caregiver Support and leads the entire VA’s in VA Caregiver support and are Principal Investigators on two U.S. Army research grants.

Recognition

Dr. Jennifer Martindale-Adam and Dr. Linda Nichols at the Memphis VAMC received the prestigious 2008 Rosalynn Carter Leadership in Caregiving Award for REACH VA; and Project REACH VA at the Memphis VAMC was recognized by the United States Senate for Recognition of Excellence in Aging Research

19 of 39 Seminal Paper

Other

Burns, R., Nichols, L. O., MartindaleAdams, J., & Graney, M. J. (2000). Interdisciplinary geriatric primary care evaluation and management: two-year outcomes. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Dr. Martindal-Adams and Dr. Linda Nichols was featured in The Commercial Appeal newspaper. The article entitled, Help for helpers: Support group eases burden of caregivers, highlighted the researchers for their efforts of a 25-city study program to ed

Stuart, J. M., & Dixon, F. J. (1983). Serum transfer of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. The Journal of experimental medicine, 158(2), 378-392.

Dr. Linda Nichols and Dr. Jennifer Martindale-Adams at the Memphis VAMC received the prestigious 2008 Rosalynn Carter Leadership in Caregiving Award for REACH VA; and Project REACH VA at the Memphis VAMC was recognized by the United States Senate for Recognition of Excellence in Aging Research

Burns, R., Nichols, L. O., MartindaleAdams, J., & Graney, M. J. (2000). Interdisciplinary geriatric primary care evaluation and management: two-year outcomes. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Dr. Nichols and Dr. Jennifer Martindal-Adams was featured in The Commercial Appeal newspaper. The article entitled, Help for helpers: Support group eases burden of caregivers, highlighted the researchers for their efforts of a 25-city study program to ed

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Memphis, TN

Memphis, TN

Memphis, TN

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1999

1972

2012

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

20 of 39 Seminal Paper

Other

Marshal B. Elam, M.D., Ph.D.

Has proposed a multi-center VA Cooperative Studies Program designated CSP study # 593 which is recently funded, 40 medical center, nearly $40 million dollars study in hyperlipidemia.

Rubins, H. B., Robins, S. J., Collins, D., Fye, C. L., Anderson, J. W., Elam, M. B., ... & Wittes, J. (1999). Gemfibrozil for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in men with low levels of highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol. New England Jo

Solomon S. Solomon, M.D.

Received the Southern Society of Clinical For his achievements in medical research that include defining the Investigation’s (SSCI) highest honor, the biochemical and molecular operations of diabetic ketoacidosis and Founders Medal, this is the highest honor helping to define the nature of insulin resistance in Type II for research and academic achievement diabetes. awarded by the society.

DUCKWORTH, W. C., SOLOMON, S. S., & KITABCHI, A. E. (1972). Effect of chronic sulfonylurea therapy on plasma insulin and proinsulin levels. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 35(4), 585-591.

Dr. Cushman is the Chief, Preventive Medicine for VAMC Memphis. This station served as the lead VA site for the largest and most definitive hypertension trial in the world, the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT), a multi-center study with nearly 45,000 enrolled volunteers followed for 10-years, which provided important new information regarding the optimal therapy for hypertension. Dr. Cushman has coordinated the VHA's efforts of 12 VA sites participating in a multinational trial, Action to Control Cardiovascular Risks in Diabetics (ACCORD). The Memphis VA Medical Center holds one of the largest research Interagency Agreements (IAA) in the entire VA as a result of this NIH trial (approximately $32.5 million for 8 years). VA John Blair Barnwell Award

Dr. Cushman and staff won a $15.27 Million plus award from the NHLBI at the National Institutes of Health to conduct a multi-center clinical trial for a new pivotal study in Hypertension, entitled Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) Dr. Cushman and staff will provide scientific leadership and oversee 22 selected VA clinical sites for inclusion in the SPRINT VA Cushman, W. C., Davis, B. R., Pressel, S. Clinical Center Network L., Cutler, J. A., Einhorn, P. T., Ford, C. E., (CCN) hub at the Memphis ... & Weiss, R. J. (2012). Mortality and VA Medical Center. Morbidity During and After the Guidelines of the NIH’s Joint Antihypertensive and Lipid‐Lowering Commission on Hypertension Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial. for physicians’ is published in The Journal of C JAMA.

William C. Cushman, M.D.

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Miami, FL

Minneapolis, MN

Year

1979

1963

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Michael D. Norenberg, M.D

For his contributions and understanding that the glial cell biology was an essential part of understanding neurological function and dysfunction. His studies showed that hepatic encephalopathy was primarily a result of astrocyte dysfunction. He alone proved that central pontine myelinosis (CPM) is caused by a rapid correction of hyponatremia (a sodium imbalance), rather than hyponatremia itself. Because of Dr. Norenberg's research and work in this area, he has rapidly transformed the standard therapy for hyponatremia and CPM has consequently become a rarely observed condition in VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award clinical practice today. (2009)

Norenberg, M. D., & MartinezHernandez, A. (1979). Fine structural localization of glutamine synthetase in astrocytes of rat brain. Brain research, 161(2), 303-310.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1962)

Vogel, W. C., & Zieve, L. (1963). A rapid and sensitive turbidimetric method for serum lipase based upon differences between the lipases of normal and pancreatitis serum. Clinical chemistry, 9(2), 168-181.

William C. Vogel, Ph.D.

For studies of phospholipids and phospholipases.

Recognition

21 of 39 Seminal Paper

Minneapolis, MN

1972

Leslie Zieve, M.D.

For studies of phospholipids and phospholipases.

Nashville, TN

2009

Ann Richmond, M.D.

For her discovery of chemokines.

Zieve, F. J., & Zieve, L. (1972). Postheparin phospholipase and post-heparin lipase have different tissue origins. Biochemical and biophysical research communications, 47(6), 1480-1485. Richmond, A., Yang, J., & Su, Y. (2009). The good and the bad of chemokines/chemokine receptors in melanoma. Pigment cell & melanoma research, 22(2), 175-186.

Bysani Chandrasekar, DVM, Ph.D.

For his seminal contributions to the field of cardiovascular disease, and is an acknowledged expert in molecular signaling and oxidative stress. He was one of the first investigators to demonstrate the central role of the oxidative stress-responsive factor nuclear factorκB (NF-κB) in post-ischemic myocardial injury, and how the inhibition of its activation following heart attack (myocardial infarction), significantly reduces cardiac injury and improves myocardial functionality. His current studies are focused on inhibiting TRAF3IP2 and its downstream signaling pathways by pharmacological interference and gene therapy to blunt progression of myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis to cardiac failure.

Chandrasekar, B., & Freeman, G. L. (1997). Induction of nuclear factor κB and activation protein 1 in postischemic myocardium. FEBS letters, 401(1), 30-34.

Nashville, TN

Last Updated: 8/17/15

1997

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1962)

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Nashville, TN

Nashville, TN

Nashville, TN

Nashville, TN

Year

2013

1994

1991

2004

Name (Investigator)

Carlos L. Arteaga, M.D.

Conrad Wagner, M.D.

Daryl k. Granner, M.D.

Greg Mundy, M.D.

Contribution

Recognition

22 of 39 Seminal Paper

For research on EGF related molecules in breast cancer.

Rexer, B. N., Ghosh, R., Narasanna, A., Estrada, M. V., Chakrabarty, A., Song, Y., ... & Arteaga, C. L. (2013). Human breast cancer cells harboring a gatekeeper T798M mutation in HER2 overexpress EGFR ligands and are sensitive to dual inhibition of EGFR a

For research on essential proteins and mechanism of folate metabolism.

Yeo, E. J., & Wagner, C. (1994). Tissue distribution of glycine Nmethyltransferase, a major folatebinding protein of liver. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 91(1), 210-214.

For his discovery of insulin action in diabetes.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (2007)

O'Brien, R. M., & Granner, D. K. (1991). Regulation of gene expression by insulin. Biochemical journal, 278(Pt 3), 609. Bauer, D. C., Mundy, G. R., Jamal, S. A., Black, D. M., Cauley, J. A., Ensrud, K. E., ... & Pols, H. A. (2004). Use of statins and fracture: results of 4 prospective studies and cumulative meta-analysis of observational studies and controlled trials. Arch

Dr. Mundy held several patents on bone metabolism (three of our recent/current CDA come from his lab). Greg died of a brain tumor several years ago.

Nashville, TN

2008

Jeffrey R. Smith, M.D.

For GWAS studies on breast cancer.

Nashville, TN

1978

Lloyd King, M.D.

For research conducted with Dr. Sidney Cohen on EGF.

Cai, Q., Kataoka, N., Li, C., Wen, W., Smith, J. R., Gao, Y. T., ... & Zheng, W. (2008). Haplotype analyses of CYP19A1 gene variants and breast cancer risk: results from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 17(1), Carpenter, G., King, L., & Cohen, S. (1978). Epidermal growth factor stimulates phosphorylation in membrane preparations in vitro.

For research on prostaglandins in acute kidney injury and hypertension.

Breyer, M. D., Davis, L. I. N. D. A., Jacobson, H. R., & Breyer, R. M. (1996). Differential localization of prostaglandin E receptor subtypes in human kidney. American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology, 270(5), F912-F918.

Nashville, TN

Last Updated: 8/17/15

1996

Matthew D. Breyer, M.D.

Presidential Award winner

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Year

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

23 of 39 Seminal Paper

Nashville, TN

2001

Ray Dubois, M.D.

COX2 in GI polyps and transformation (ASA as a preventative for CA in GI track)

Nashville, TN

2013

Raymond C, Harris, Jr., M.D.

For research on acute kidney diseases.

Sheng, H., Shao, J., & DuBois, R. N. (2001). K-Ras-mediated increase in cyclooxygenase 2 mRNA stability involves activation of the protein kinase B. Cancer research, 61(6), 2670-2675. Harris, R. C. (2013). Physiologic and Pathophysiologic Roles of Cyclooxygenase-2 in the Kidney. Transactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association, 124, 13951.

Richard M. Breyer, M.D.

For research on prostaglandins in acute kidney injury and hypertension.

Breyer, R. M., Bagdassarian, C. K., Myers, S. A., & Breyer, M. D. (2001). Prostanoid receptors: subtypes and signaling 1. Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 41(1), 661-690.

Nashville, TN

2001

Nashville, TN

2009

Richard N Pierson III, M.D.

Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering in 1999; an Individual National Research Service Award from the PHS (NIH NRSA; 1987); the ViceChancellor's Award from Vanderbilt University (1996); the F.H. Martin Faculty Research Fellowship from the American College of Surgeons (1996); the John Alexander Research Scholarship from the American Association for Thoracic Surgery (1996); the ASTS Wyeth Mid-Level Faculty Research Fellowship (2004); and Dr. Pierson has been listed among America’s For research on xenographs and transplant biology. Dr. Pearson is Top Doctors and Best Doctors in America currently at Univeristy of Maryland. since 2002.

Nashville, TN

1992

Robert J. Coffey, M.D.

For his research on TGFalpha mediated GI pathogenesis.

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Pierson, R. N., Dorling, A., Ayares, D., Rees, M. A., Seebach, J. D., Fishman, J. A., ... & Cooper, D. K. (2009). Current status of xenotransplantation and prospects for clinical application. Xenotransplantation, 16(5), 263-280. Coffey Jr, R. J., Graves-Deal, R., Dempsey, P. J., Whitehead, R. H., & Pittelkow, M. R. (1992). Differential regulation of transforming growth factor alpha autoinduction in a nontransformed and transformed epithelial cell. Cell growth & differentiation: t

Other

For more information on Dr. Pierson: http://medschool.umaryland. edu/facultyresearchprofile/vi ewprofile.aspx?id=7619

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Year

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

24 of 39 Seminal Paper

Nashville, TN

1991

Ronald G Wiley, M.D.

For research on sorting out pain mediation through targeting of specific neuronal cells (this was a first in this area of investigation).

Nashville, TN

2003

Sanford B Krantz, M.D.

For research on immune mediated anemia.

Wiley, R. G., Oeltmann, T. N., & Lappi, D. A. (1991). Immunolesioning: selective destruction of neurons using immunotoxin to rat NGF receptor. Brain research, 562(1), 149-153. Chung, I. J., Dai, C., & Krantz, S. B. (2003). Stem cell factor increases the expression of FLIP that inhibits IFNγinduced apoptosis in human erythroid progenitor cells. Blood, 101(4), 13241328.

For Dr. Cover and Martin Blaser, M.D. research on Helicobacter pathogenesis related genes.

Blaser, M. J., Perez-Perez, G. I., Kleanthous, H., Cover, T. L., Peek, R. M., Chyou, P. H., ... & Nomura, A. (1995). Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains possessing cagA is associated with an increased risk of developing adenocarcinoma of the stomac

For research on molecular diagnostics for GI malignancy.

Grady, W. M., Rajput, A., Myeroff, L., Liu, D. F., Kwon, K., Willis, J., & Markowitz, S. (1998). Mutation of the type II transforming growth factor-β receptor is coincident with the transformation of human colon adenomas to malignant carcinomas. Cancer re

Nashville, TN

Nashville, TN

Nashville, TN

New Orleans, LA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

1995

1998

1999

2002

Timothy L. Cover, M.D.

William Grady, M.D.

James R. Goldenring, MD, PhD, AGAF

Abba Kastin, M.D.

Determination that pre-cancerous lesions in the stomach arise from mature cells rather than resident progenitor cells.  He identified transdiffferentiation of mature chief cells into mucous cell metaplasia as the initiating event for the development of precancerous metaplasia in the stomach.

Elected to :American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow, Association of American Physicians, Takeda Distinguished Research Award, Amer. Physiol. Society, 2011, American Society for Clinical Investigation, 2004, AGA Funderburg Research Scholar in Gastric Biology Related to Cancer, 2004

For his contributions to neuroendocrinology and for pioneering work with brain peptides, characterized by the many aspects of his VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award concept of their multiple, independent actions. (1982)

Nam KT, Lee HJ, Sousa JF, Weis VG, O'Neal RL, Finke PE, Romero-Gallo J, Shi G, Mills JC, Peek RM Jr, Konieczny SF, Goldenring JR.; Mature chief cells are cryptic progenitors for metaplasia in the stomach. Gastroenterology. 2010 Dec;139(6):2028-2037.e9. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2010.09.005. Epub 2010 Sep 18. Kastin, A. J., Akerstrom, V., & Pan, W. (2002). Interactions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) with the blood-brain barrier. Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, 18(1-2), 7-14.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Year

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

New Orleans, LA

1962

Andrew V. Schally, Ph.D.

For his investigations of the physiology and biochemistry of hypothalamic neurohormones.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1970)

James Zadina, Ph.D.

For his research on the development of new pain medications with the pain-alleviating effectiveness of morphine-like analgesics, but with dramatically reduced side effects. Plans for clinical trials for the lead compound are currently being developed.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1986)

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1971)

New Orleans, LA

2005

25 of 39 Seminal Paper Other GUILLEMIN, R., SCHALLY, A. V., LIPSCOMB, H. S., ANDERSEN, R. N., & LONG, J. M. (1962). On the Presence in Hog Hypothalamus of (β-Corticotropin Releasing Factor, α-and (β-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormones, Adrenocorticotropin, Lysine-Vasopressin and Oxytocin Czapla, M.A., Zadina, J.E.. (2005). Reduced suppression of CO2-induced ventilatory stimulation by endomorphins relative to morphine. Brain Research, 1059(2):159-66.

New York, NY

1980

Aaron J. Marcus, M.D.

For persistent innovation in the study of platelet function, leading to the first isolation of a coagulation-promoting lipid from human platelets, for discovering arachidonic acid in platelets, for the first direct demonstration of the interaction of the acety 1 group of aspirin with platelets and for the demonstration of plateletleukocyte interactions.

New York, NY

1971

Marcus Rothschild, M.D.

For basic and clinical research on the pathological biochemistry of the liver in alcoholism and other types of liver disease.

Lazar J. Greenfield, M.D.

For inventing a filter in the early 1970s to be placed in the inferior vena cava to prevent to migration of blood clots from the leg veins to the lungs. This device to prevent potentially fatal pulmonary emboli is universally known as the “Greenfield filter” and has saved thousands and thousands of lives. Other vena cava filters have followed; his is the prototype for them all. The Greenfield filter is still being used in daily medical practice today.

Greenfield, L. J. (2010). Historical reminiscence: origin of the Greenfield filter. The American surgeon, 76(12), 1319-1320.

For his contributions to the understanding of metabolic and endocrine aspects of lung disease, and for his discovery and characterization of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP).

Said, S. I., & Rosenberg, R. N. (1976). Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide: abundant immunoreactivity in neural cell lines and normal nervous tissue. Science, 192(4242), 907-908.

Oklahoma City, OK

Oklahoma City, OK

Last Updated: 8/17/15

2010

1976

Sami I. Said, M.D.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1981)

Marcus, A. J., Weksler, B. B., Jaffe, E. A., & Broekman, M. J. (1980). Synthesis of prostacyclin from platelet-derived endoperoxides by cultured human endothelial cells. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 66(5), 979. Rothschild, M. A., Oratz, M., Mongelli, J., & Schreiber, S. S. (1971). Alcoholinduced depression of albumin synthesis: reversal by tryptophan. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 50(9), 1812.

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Omaha, NE

Palo Alto, CA

Palo Alto, CA

Palo Alto, CA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1998

1992

1981

1966

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

William Duckworth, M.D.

For his work with VA investigators Dr. Frederick Hamel and Dr. Robert Bennett. They studied the degradation and activity of two insulin analogues, lispro and B10Asp. These studies confirmed that lispro, already on the market as Humalog™, behaved the same as native insulin. However, B10Asp, was not degraded as native insulin, and had different activity with regard to mitogenicity and protein degradation. The clinical consequences of these studies, and those by others, were that Humalog was validated as a safe insulin replacement, and that B10Asp was not put into clinical use. Dr. Duckworth was also a VA investigator through much of his career, including while he was at Omaha.

Duckworth, W. C., Bennett, R. G., & Hamel, F. G. (1998). Insulin Degradation: Progress and Potential. Endocrine Reviews, 19(5), 608-624.

Eugene C. Butcher, M.D.

For his contributions to the field of immunology, particularly his research on the fundamental processes of immune response and inflammation processes of numerous diseases that affect veterans. Dr. Butcher's work has stimulated and broken new ground in understanding the molecular basis of lymphocyte homing. He identified critical molecules and established the unique homing receptor-ligands for lymphocyte trafficking into and out of the mucosal immune system of the gastrointestinal tract. He also showed that treatment of mice with monoclonal antibodies alpha4 and beta7 block T-cell mediated inflammatory bowel disease, clearly demonstrating the role of these mucosal homing pathways VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award in immunity and inflammation. (2001)

Picker, L. J., & Butcher, E. C. (1992). Physiological and molecular mechanisms of lymphocyte homing. Annual review of immunology, 10(1), 561-591.

Lawrence F. Eng, Ph.D.

For identification, characterization and immunocytochemical studies of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the intermediate filament protein of differentiated astrocytes. GFAP has become a prototype antigen in central nervous tissue identification and a standard marker for fundamental and applied neurobiology at an interdisciplinary level. Antibodies to GFAP are used routinely in medical centers throughout the world to assist in the diagnosis brain tumors.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1988)

Amaducci, L., Forno, K. I., & Eng, L. F. (1981). Glial fibrillary acidic protein in cryogenic lesions of the rat brain. Neuroscience letters, 21(1), 27-32.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1966)

Overall, J. E., Hollister, L. E., Johnson, M., & Pennington, V. (1966). Nosology of depression and differential response to drugs. JAMA, 195(11), 946-948.

Leo E. Hollister, Ph.D.

For numerous, significant contributions in the field of therapeutic drugs for mental illness.

Recognition

26 of 39 Seminal Paper

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Palo Alto, CA

Philadelphia, PA

Philadelphia, PA

Pittsburgh, PA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1995

2005

1996

1986

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

Gerald M. Reaven, M.D.

For demonstration of the relationship between degree of hyperglycemia and insulin response to oral glucose, for the conceptual definition, subsequent quantification, and major development of the idea that insulin resistance is a major factor in the pathogenesis of NIDDM, for bringing understanding to the abnormal lipoprotein metabolism characteristic of diabetics, and for persistent leadership in the application of research knowledge VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award to the treatment of diabetes. (1987)

Victoria Werth, M.D.

Dr. Schumacher received many honors and awards and the most recent include: Master, American College of Rheumatology (1998); Honorary Member, He is well known for his work on demonstrating the value of Slovakian Society of Rheumatology (1999); synovial biopsy and joint fluid analysis for the diagnosis of crystal- American College of Rheumatology induced arthritis (e.g. Gout and pseudogout). He also described Klemperer Lectureship Award (2002); joint disease associated with hemochromatosis. Dr. Schumacher is Master, PANLAR (2006); Honorary a long-standing faculty and mentor at our VA (‘retired’ but still Member, Sociedad Reumatologica de providing his expertise and mentorship to various young faculty at Euskadi/Basque Rheumatology Society the VA). He is also an Emeritus Professor of Medicine in (Feb 2012) Rheumatology. American Dermatologic Association (2000); Lady Colyton Prize for Autoimmune For developing a system to measure cutaneous lupus activity via Research, School of Medicine, University of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity and Severity Pennsylvania (2003); Lifetime Achievement Award, Medical Dermatology Society Index (CLASI) as an important instrument to monitor activity of cutaneous skin lesions. (2010)

Peter Strick, M.D.

For his scientific contributions and research accomplishments investigating the neural circuits responsible for the control of voluntary movement, cognition, and affect. Dr. Strick developed the use of viruses with an affinity for neurons as a new technique for unraveling connections in the central nervous system.

H. Ralph Schumacher, Jr., M.D

27 of 39 Seminal Paper

Other

Reaven, G. M. (1995). Pathophysiology of insulin resistance in human disease. Physiological reviews, 75(3), 473-486.

Becker, M. A., Schumacher Jr, H. R., Wortmann, R. L., MacDonald, P. A., Eustace, D., Palo, W. A., ... & JosephRidge, N. (2005). Febuxostat compared with allopurinol in patients with hyperuricemia and gout. New England Journal of Medicine, 353(23), 2450-2 Werth, V. P., Shi, X., Kalathil, E., & Jaworsky, C. (1996). Elastic Fiber‐Associated Proteins of Skin in Development and Photoaging. Photochemistry and photobiology, 63(3), 308-313.

Alexander, G.E., DeLong, M.R., Strick, P.L. (1986). Parallel organization of functionally segregated circuits linking Elected to membership in the U.S. National basal ganglia and cortex. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 9:357-81 Academy of Sciences/NAS (May 2012)

Dr. Schumacher received a VA grant in 1978 to set up the PA VA Medical Center's Rheumatology-Immunology Center providing reatment for arthritis patients. As part of the VA grant, he organized the first national Organization of VA Rheumatologist (VARC). Dr. Werth has a VA Merit funded research related to mechanisms of cutaneous photodamage, photoaging and autoimmune diseases.

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Pittsburgh, PA

Portland, OR

Portland, OR

Portland, OR

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1992

1989

1999

2003

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

28 of 39 Seminal Paper

Other

Thomas Starzl, M.D.

For his career long work in the development of liver transplantation. Dr. Starzl is now retired from the VA and is is the VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award director emeritus of the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute (1958); Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical at the University of Pittsburgh. Research Award (2012)

For more information visit these sites: http://www.laskerfoundation .org/awards/2012_c_descript Starzl, T. E., Murase, N., Ildstad, S., ion.htm ; Ricordi, C., Demetris, A. J., & Trucco, M. http://www.upmc.com/medi (1992). Cell migration, chimerism, and a/experts/pages/thomas-egraft acceptance. The Lancet, 339(8809), starzl.aspx 1579-1582. http://www.starzl.pitt.edu/

Arthur Vandenbark, Ph.D.

For his work in an animal model for multiple sclerosis; published ground-braking articles in Science and Nature on the use of vaccines to treat this chronic, disabling condition; and translated his pioneering work in mice and rats to an effective clinical trial in humans with multiple sclerosis. His compounds are now being used in diseases as diverse as stroke and methamphetamine abuse.

Vandenbark, A. A., Hashim, G., & Offner, H. (1989). Immunization with a synthetic T-cell receptor V-region peptide protects against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Nature, 341(6242), 541-544.

John C. Crabbe, Ph.D.

For his contributions towards our understanding of the genetic bases and behavioral consequences of ethanol intake (e.g., withdrawal and tolerance). His work with animal models of alcoholism has advanced the field of behavioral genetics, and it has important implications for showing the complexity of analogous traits or phenotypes underlying alcohol drinking behavior and alcoholism in humans. He demonstrated that alcohol tolerance, alcohol dependence and alcohol preference are distinct processes that can be dissected genetically. He has also shown that there is a common genetic mechanism for developing dependence on various drugs of abuse (e.g., alcohol, barbiturates, benzodiapenes VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award and nitrous oxide). (2004)

Crabbe, J. C., Phillips, T. J., Buck, K. J., Cunningham, C. L., & Belknap, J. K. (1999). Identifying genes for alcohol and drug sensitivity: recent progress and future directions. Trends in neurosciences, 22(4), 173-179.

Michael Heinrich, M.D.

For his major publication in Science in 2003 related to the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Dr. Heinrich and colleagues discovered a protein defect that triggers some cases of a deadly gastrointestinal cancer. It was the early days of personalized medicine relating to specific mutations in tumors.

Heinrich, M. C., Corless, C. L., Duensing, A., McGreevey, L., Chen, C. J., Joseph, N., ... & Fletcher, J. A. (2003). PDGFRA activating mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Science, 299(5607), 708710.

Past recipient of a Javitz Award from NIH, awarded to scientists who have distinguished themselves with a long track record of innovation and success in investigating chronic neurologic conditions.

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Reno, NV

Richmond, VA

Richmond, VA

Year

1992

2013

1990

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Esmail D Zanjani, M.D.

For his bone marrow cells research and is an internationally known hematology researcher. Dr. Zanjani and researchers Drs. Srour and Hoffman at Indiana University School of Medicine, transplanted adult human bone marrow cells into a sheep embryo that may pave the way to treating human fetuses, correcting debilitating or fatal genetic disorders. The results were repoted in "Blood," the journal of American Society of Hematology. Dr. Zanjani collaborated with Dr. Joao Ascensao and Washoe Medical Center to establish the first bone marrow treatment program in the State of Nevada. The treatment of the bone marrow takes place in the research laboratories of the Reno VAMC.

Charles Chalfant, M.D.

Philip Hylemon, Ph.D.

Salisbury, NC

1985

Donald A. McClain, M.D., Ph.D.

Salt Lake City, UT

1990

Donald Granger, M.D.

Last Updated: 8/17/15

For his key findings concerning the role of sphingolipids in inflammation and cancer.

For his research on the physiology and chemistry of bile acids. Dr. Hylemon also works in the Department of Microbiology, Medical College of Virginia.

Recognition

29 of 39 Seminal Paper

Srour, E. F., Zanjani, E. D., Cornetta, K., Traycoff, C. M., Flake, A. W., Hedrick, M., ... & Hoffman, R. (1993). Persistence of human multilineage, self-renewing lymphohematopoietic stem cells in chimeric sheep. Blood, 82(11), 33333342. Wijesinghe, D. S., & Chalfant, C. E. (2013). Systems-Level Lipid Analysis Methodologies for Qualitative and Recognized by the American Society of Quantitative Investigation of Lipid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for his Signaling Events During Wound Healing. Advances in Wound Care, 2(9), 538-548. outstanding work in lipids. Hylemon, P. B., Bohdan, P. M., Sirica, A. E., Heuman, D. M., & Vlahcevic, Z. (1990). Cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in cultures of primary rat bile ductular epithelial cells. Hepatology, 11(6), 982-988.

Gabrielsen JS, Gao Y, Simcox JA, Huang J, Thorup D, Jones D, Cooksey RC, Gabrielsen D, Adams TD, Hunt SC, For research on insulin action and Hopkins PN, Cefalu WT, McClain DA. diabetes, with recent and groundbreaking (2012). Adipocyte iron regulates work on the role of dietary iron in diabetes adiponectin and insulin sensitivity. J Clin and metabolic regulation. Invest. 122(10):3529-40. Granger, D. L., Hibbs Jr, J. B., Perfect, J. R., & Durack, D. T. (1990). Metabolic fate of L-arginine in relation to microbiostatic capability of murine macrophages. For his work with Dr. John Hibbs, Jr. where he co-authored some of Journal of Clinical Investigation, 85(1), 264-73. Dr. Hibbs' articles.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Salt Lake City, UT

Nashville, TN

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1987

1999

Recognition

30 of 39

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Seminal Paper

John Hibbs, Jr, M.D.

For his discoverery of nitric oxide as a biologically created chemical. His work demonstrated that it was synthesized from Larginine by macrophages and used in intracellular killing and cellcell killing. Prior to his work, NO was not known to be biochemically synthesized, and the endogenous mediator of blood vessel dilation caused by nitroglycerin and other nitrates was not known. John has been on the list for the Nobel prize. After NO was the science “molecule of the year” a decade ago, and the Nobel was granted to a group working on NO as a neurotransducer, he was dropped, but I believe he is again nominated as the “discoverer” of biological NO. Throughout the 1980’s Dr. Hibbs was working on the importance of arginine for parasite killing, with publications in Science, Nature, JCI and PNAS among others. In the late 1980’s, NO was determined to be the key metabolite. Dr. Hibbs was awarded the Middleton award by the VA for his lifetime accomplishments in Immunology VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award and microbiology. (1993)

Hibbs, J. B., Taintor, R. R., & Vavrin, Z. (1987). Macrophage cytotoxicity: role for L-arginine deiminase and imino nitrogen oxidation to nitrite. Science, 235(4787), 473-476.

James R. Goldenring, MD, PhD, AGAF

Elected to :American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow, Association of American Physicians, Takeda Distinguished Research Award, Amer. Physiol. Society, 2011, American Society for Clinical Investigation, 2004, AGA Funderburg Research Scholar in Determination that pre-cancerous lesions in the stomach arise from mature cells rather than r Gastric Biology Related to Cancer, 2004

Nam KT, Lee HJ, Sousa JF, Weis VG, O'Neal RL, Finke PE, Romero-Gallo J, Shi G, Mills JC, Peek RM Jr, Konieczny SF, Goldenring JR.; Mature chief cells are cryptic progenitors for metaplasia in the stomach. Gastroenterology. 2010 Dec;139(6):2028-2037.e9. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2010.09.005. Epub 2010 Sep 18.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

San Antonio, TX

San Antonio, TX

San Diego, CA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2014

2013

2011

31 of 39

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

P. John Hart, Ph.D.

Worked with a team of scientist from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Johns Hopkins University and St. Mary's University in a study that determined the three-dimensional structure of a never-before seen cell wall protein called SOD5, it is a copper-only protein that exhibits significant structural differences from copper/zinc superoxide dismutases (SODs). SOD5 molecules are found in fungi, inlcuding C. albicans, not found in humans, the structural differences can be exploited to develop compounds that specifically target SOD5 to treat a number of widespread fungal infections.

Gleason, J. E., Galaleldeen, A., Peterson, R. L., Taylor, A. B., Holloway, S. P., Waninger-Saroni, J., Cormack, B. P., The Ewing Halsell-President's Council Cabelli, D. E., Hart, P. J., & Culotta, V. C. Distinguished Professor of biochemistry at (2014). Candida albicans SOD5 represents the prototype of an the University of Texas Health Science Center unprecedented class of Cu-o

Randy Strong, Ph.D.

For his work on the rapamycin studies that offer the first real evidence that a healthy lifespan can be achieved with therapy that begins in older age. The studies are part of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) Interventions Testing Program, which seeks compounds that might help people live active and disease-free lives into old age. The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, were also involved in the study.

Miller, R. A., Harrison, D. E., Astle, C. M., Fernandez, E., Flurkey, K., Han, M., ... & Strong, R. (2013). Rapamycin‐Mediated Lifespan Increase in Mice is Dose and Sex‐Dependent and Appears Metabolically Distinct from Dietary Restriction. Aging cell.

Brian Head, M.S., Ph.D.

For developing gene therapies for Alzheimer’s and TBI.

Seminal Paper

Head, B. P., Hu, Y., Finley, J. C., Saldana, M. D., Bonds, J. A., Miyanohara, A., ... & Patel, P. M. (2011). Neuron-targeted caveolin-1 protein enhances signaling and promotes arborization of primary PECASE Award (2012) from VA BLR&D and neurons. Journal of Biological Chemistry, CSR&D 286(38), 3331

Other

For more information on the studies: http://uthscsa.edu/hscnews/ singleformat.asp?newID=313 9

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

San Diego, CA

San Diego, CA

San Diego, CA

San Diego, CA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1987

1999

1994

1995

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

32 of 39 Seminal Paper

Other

Douglas D. Richman, M.D.

For his seminal contributions that have profoundly improved the health of our Veterans and of millions of individuals throughout the world. Dr. Richman was the first to recognize the development of HIV-1 resistance to zidovudine (AZT), appreciate its broad clinical significance, and identify the HIV-1 mutations responsible for loss of sensitivity to this first effective antiviral drug. This discovery, which lead directly to recognition of the propensity of HIV-1 to develop resistance to each new antiviral agent, has profoundly influenced the development and clinical utilization of therapeutic agents for HIV-1. It established the fundamental role of systematic VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award assessment of HIV-1 resistance in the development of antiviral (2002) drugs for HIV-1 and in monitoring their clinical use.

Dr. Richman’s demonstration of the increasing transmission of drug-resistant virus to newly-infected patients in North America has resulted in the recommendation to test for drug resistance in treatment naïve patients, and Fischl, M. A., Richman, D. D., Grieco, M. his systematic investigation H., Gottlieb, M. S., Volberding, P. A., of immune responses in Laskin, O. L., ... & King, D. (1987). The newly-infected patients is efficacy of azidothymidine (AZT) in the yielding information on the treatment of patients with AIDS and continuous production of AIDS-related complex. New England mutants no longer sensitive Journal of Medicine, to neutralizing antibody.

Larry R. Squire, Ph.D.

For his research on the organization and structure of mammalian memory (humans and rodents) at the level of neural systems and cognition. His publications include approximately 350 research articles and two books.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1994)

Teng, E., & Squire, L. R. (1999). Memory for places learned long ago is intact after hippocampal damage. Nature, 400(6745), 675-677.

Marc A. Schuckit, M.D.

For his scientific contributions to the field of alcoholism and drug addiction. Of particular note were his studies showing the importance of genetic influences in alcohol dependence. His innovative population studies set the stage for exciting progress now being made in research to identify genes that play a role in alcoholism. His other major contribution was establishing the relationship between alcohol or drug dependence and severe psychiatric syndromes. He also focused on the treatment of psychiatric problems and the evaluations of the potential importance of separate tracks of care for people dependent on specific types of drugs.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1997)

Schuckit, M. A. (1994). Low level of response to alcohol as a predictor of future alcoholism. American Journal of Psychiatry, 151(2), 184-189.

Award from the Veterans Research Alliance, a San Diego-based non-profit

Oxman, M. N. (1995). Immunization to reduce the frequency and severity of herpes zoster and its complications. Neurology, 45(12 Suppl 8), S41-S46.

Michael N. Oxman, M.D.

For his seminal work in establishing efficacy of the Shingles vaccine.

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

San Diego, CA

San Francisco, CA

San Francisco, CA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1974

1967

2009

Recognition

33 of 39

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Seminal Paper

Roland C. Blantz, M.D.

For his enormous scientific contributions that include large spectrum of studies related to renal physiology and pathophysiology. He was the first to discover the mechanism by which angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration, the role of renal nerves and mechanisms of renal regulation through the tubuloglomerular feed back. He is recognized as a world expert in renal physiology and mechanisms of renal disease. His work laid the foundation for clinical studies establishing the role of the renin angiotensin system in progression of renal disease and paved way for new therapeutics. More recently his work has established the VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award link between renal disease and diabetes. (2006)

Blantz, R. C. (1974). Effect of mannitol on glomerular ultrafiltration in the hydropenic rat. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 54(5), 1135.

Albert L. Jones, M.D.

For contributions to our understanding of the synthesis, transport and catabolism of plasma lipoproteins, for showing the effects of drugs and aging on liver structure and function, for describing the mechanism of transport of peptide hormones and immunoglobulin to their sites of action and for the co-discovery of the M cell and its VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award role in the intestinal immune response. (1985)

Jones, A. L., Ruderman, N. B., & Herrera, M. G. (1967). Electron microscopic and biochemical study of lipoprotein synthesis in the isolated perfused rat liver. Journal of lipid research, 8(5), 429446.

Daniel Bikle, M.D., Ph.D.,

Instrumental in discovering the involvement of vitamin D and its active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the regulation of epidermal function and skin health. He has also contributed greatly to our understanding of the role of calcium in maintaining epidermal function, and on top of his work in the skin, he also has an excellent research program in bone.

Bikle, D. (2009). Nonclassic actions of vitamin D. Journal of clinical endocrinology & metabolism, 94(1), 2634.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

San Francisco, CA

San Francisco, CA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1997

1989

Recognition

34 of 39

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Seminal Paper

David Wofsy, M.D.

For his research with Barbara Finck, M.D. and David Daikh, M.D. on the autoimmune diseases. Dr. Wofsy's group postulated that the strategy and approach developed at Bristol-Myers Squibb Research Institute, organ transplantation, might have applicability to autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus rythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis, type I diabetes, and others. In the case of these diseases, the goal would be to prevent the immune system from attacking healthy tissue in the body as it does in the course of an autoimmune disease. They first studied this strategy at the San Francisco VA Medical Center in a mouse model for SLE and showed significant improvement. Based on the studies’ results, clinical trials were initiated in people with psoriasis and, when those trials yielded positive results, clinical trials were initiated in people with RA. The drug that was used in those studies, termed abatacept, was approved by the FDA in 2005 for the treatment of RA and it has since assumed a major role in the treatment of RA. Studies of abatacept in SLE have thus far yielded mixed results. A major trial is currently underway to determine once and for all whether this treatment will be effective in people 2007 Lee C. Howley Prize for Arthritis with SLE. Research from the Arthritis Foundation

Daikh, D. I., Finck, B. K., Linsley, P. S., Hollenbaugh, D., & Wofsy, D. (1997). Long-term inhibition of murine lupus by brief simultaneous blockade of the B7/CD28 and CD40/gp39 costimulation pathways. The Journal of immunology, 159(7), 3104-3108.

Kenneth Feingold, M.D.

For his research with Peter Elias, M.D. who discovery that the skin barrier, which prevents water loss, was the lipid (fat layer). Dr. Elias teamed with Dr. Feingold, a lipid metabolism expert to define the lipids responsible, their regulation and their role in repair and disease. By add back experiments, they identified which lipids were essential and showed that they could be used in creams and lotions to hasten repair after damage such as soap washing, solvents and adhesive tape removal. One family of lipids stood out as being important despite being at low levels: Ceramides. They went on to show that ceramides have pharmacological actions similar to, but less toxic than, steroids. They defined the molecular basis for the action of ceramides. Now if you go to the drug store, you can purchase creams and lotions that contain ceramides. A higher strength version is available by prescription.

Grubauer, G., Elias, P. M., & Feingold, K. R. (1989). Transepidermal water loss: the signal for recovery of barrier structure and function. Journal of Lipid Research, 30(3), 323-333.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

San Francisco, CA

San Francisco, CA

San Francisco, CA

San Francisco, CA

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2005

1978

1989

1975

35 of 39

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

Seminal Paper

Michael W. Weiner, M.D.

Dr. Weiner has been a leader in the field of MRI & MRS brain imaging in neurodegenerative disorders for more than two decades. This is an area of high importance in general, as our population ages, as well as to the VA research mission, in particular. His work in PTSD and Gulf War Illness, both of which have particularly high significance to the VA mission. Dr. Weiner's work has emphasized the advancement of neuroimaging is also of high significance. Brain imaging is one of the fastest growing and highest impact areas of research, in close competition with genetics/genomics for overall scientific impact. Dr. Weiner's work has done a great deal to advance the use of these important techniques in the clinical neurosciences.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (2006)

Mueller, S. G., Weiner, M. W., Thal, L. J., Petersen, R. C., Jack, C. R., Jagust, W., ... & Beckett, L. (2005). Ways toward an early diagnosis in Alzheimer’s disease: The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Alzheimer's & Dementia, 1(1), 55

Norman Talal, M.D.

For the development of immunologic concepts derived from the study of patients and animal models for autoimmune and malignant disorders, and for exploring the interface between the immune and endocrine systems which has led to new theoretical and therapeutic considerations for human diseases.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1980)

Zulman, J., Jaffe, R., & Talal, N. (1978). Evidence that the malignant lymphoma of Sjögren's syndrome is a monoclonal Bcell neoplasm. New England Journal of Medicine, 299(22), 1215-1220.

Peter Elias, M.D.

For Dr. Elias discovery that the skin barrier, which prevents water loss, was the lipid (fat layer). He teamed with Kenneth Feingold, M.D., a lipid metabolism expert to define the lipids responsible, their regulation and their role in repair and disease. By add back experiments, they identified which lipids were essential and showed that they could be used in creams and lotions to hasten repair after damage such as soap washing, solvents and adhesive tape removal. One family of lipids stood out as being important despite being at low levels: Ceramides. They went on to show that ceramides have pharmacological actions similar to, but less toxic than, steroids. They defined the molecular basis for the action of ceramides. Now if you go to the drug store, you can purchase creams and lotions that contain ceramides. A higher strength version is available by prescription.

Grubauer, G., Elias, P. M., & Feingold, K. R. (1989). Transepidermal water loss: the signal for recovery of barrier structure and function. Journal of Lipid Research, 30(3), 323-333.

Young S. Kim, M.D.

For internationally recognized contributions in the study of protein digestion and absorption; the metabolism of glycoproteins and glycolipids of colon and pancreas in health and in malignancy; and VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award the control mechanisms of patterns of colon cancer growth and differentiation. (1991)

Kim, Y. S., & Isaacs, R. (1975). Glycoprotein metabolism in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the human colon. Cancer research, 35(8), 2092-2097.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Seattle, WA

Seattle, WA

Seattle, WA

Shreveport, LA

Syracuse, NY

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1996

2006

1998

1999

1962

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

36 of 39

Recognition

Seminal Paper

Daniel Porte Jr., M.D.

For his contribution to the field of diabetes and metabolism. Has retired from VA.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1996)

Bagdade, J. D., Bierman, E. L., & Porte Jr, D. (1967). The significance of basal insulin levels in the evaluation of the insulin response to glucose in diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 46(10), 1549.

Steven Kahn, M.D.

For his research on pathophysiology, treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes. His work was the first to demonstrate that release of proinsulin (the precursor of insulin) was a marker for the subsequent development of type 2 diabetes. Dr. Kahn was one of the first to develop an interest in islet amyloid as a potential pathogenic mechanism for the loss of B-cells commonly seen in type 2 diabetes. He was the first to show that the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), the unique peptide component of these deposits, is a normal secretory product of the B-cell co-secreted with insulin.

Dr. Kahn has received numerous honors and awards, the most recent include: VA, John B. Barnwell Award (2013); The Endocrine Society Clinical Investigator Award (2013); McGill Novo- Nordisk Lifescan Lecture in Diabetes, McGill University, Montreal (2013); David Rabin Lecture, Vanderbilt University, Nashville (2013); J. Denis McGarry Lecture, Montreal Diabetes Research Center, Montreal (2013)

Kahn, S. E., Haffner, S. M., Heise, M. A., Herman, W. H., Holman, R. R., Jones, N. P., ... & Viberti, G. (2006). Glycemic durability of rosiglitazone, metformin, or glyburide monotherapy. New England Journal of Medicine, 355(23), 24272443.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (2005)

Poorkaj, P., Bird, T. D., Wijsman, E., Nemens, E., Garruto, R. M., Anderson, L., ... & Schellenberg, G. D. (1998). Tau is a candidate gene for chromosome 17 frontotemporal dementia. Annals of neurology, 43(6), 815-825.

Thomas Bird, M.D.

For his work in the genetics of Alzheimer’s Disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. Has retired from VA.

Sidney R. Grimes, Ph.D

For his contribution to the VA Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development mission for 32 years. He consistently advanced the fields of prostate cancer and spermatogenesis research, supported by continuous VA and National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. During the course of his career, Dr. Grimes made major contributions to the understanding of regulated prostate specific membrane antigen gene expression and testis-specific histone H1t gene expression. Dr. Grimes retired from the VA in 2008.

Good, D., Schwarzenberger, P., Eastham, J. A., Rhoads, R. E., Hunt, J. D., Collins, M., ... & Grimes, S. R. (1999). Cloning and characterization of the prostatespecific membrane antigen promoter. Journal of cellular biochemistry, 74(3), 395-405.

For his identification of electrical control systems in living organisms, including man.

Bassett, C. A. L., & Becker, R. O. (1962). Generation of electric potentials by bone in response to mechanical stress. Science, 137(3535), 1063-1064.

Robert O. Becker, M.D.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1964)

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Temple, TX

Temple, TX

Temple, TX

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

2007

2013

1988

Recognition

37 of 39

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Seminal Paper

Ashok Shetty, Ph.D.

For his research with a team at Durham VA and Duke University Medical Center that demonstrated two methods for coaxing stem cells within the hippocampus, the brain's memory and learning center, to develop into new brain cells. Research results showed that infusions of a growth factor called FGF-2 into the brains of middle-aged rats led to an increase in brain cells and caused existing neurons to sprout new dendrites, the tentacles thorugh which neurons excnage messages.

Rai, K. S., Hattiangady, B., & Shetty, A. K. (2007). Enhanced production and dendritic growth of new dentate granule cells in the middle‐aged hippocampus following intracerebroventricular FGF‐2 infusions. European Journal of Neuroscience, 26(7), 1765-1779

David E. Dostal, Ph.D.

For his research on pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy that includes research in mechanical load-induced heart failure and anthrax lethal toxin-induced heart failure. Dr. Dostal is also a Professor at Texas A&M Health Science Center.

Watson, L. E., Jewell, C., Song, J., & Dostal, D. E. (2013). Echocardiographic effects of eplerenone and aldosterone in hypertensive rats. Frontiers in bioscience (Elite edition), 5, 922.

Gianfranco Alpini, Ph.D.

For over two decades of research, Dr. Alpini’s research program has been in the forefront leading the exploration of the pathophysiology of the biliary epithelium. Prior to 1988, the intrahepatic biliary epithelium was considered by the scientific community to be an inert “plumbing system” whose main function was only the delivery of bile to the duodenum. This philosophy changed after a major contribution provided by Dr. Alpini’s work in 1988 when he demonstrated, in a manuscript published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation , that: (i) the intrahepatic biliary epithelium is lined by cholangiocytes which possess reabsorptive and secretory activities modifying bile before reaching the small intestine; (ii) secretin stimulates bile and bicarbonate secretion by directly interacting with receptors expressed only by cholangiocytes; and (iii) cholangiocytes (constitutively quiescent) proliferate in response to cholestasis/injury, an event that is associated with enhanced secretin-induced bile and bicarbonate secretion. Today, we know that secretin and secretin receptors are key factors regulating the secretory/proliferative functions of the biliary tree. Dr. Alpini has recently demonstrated that (in addition VA Research Scholar Award Recipient; to S cells in the duodenum) cholangiocytes produce secretin that is American Gastroenterological Association an important trophic factor for bile ducts. Fellow

Alpini, G., Lenzi, R., Sarkozi, L., & Tavoloni, N. (1988). Biliary physiology in rats with bile ductular cell hyperplasia. Evidence for a secretory function of proliferated bile ductules. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 81(2), 569-78.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Tucson, AZ

Year

2013

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Gayatri Vedantam, Ph.D.

For her research on healthcare-related infections and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Dr. Vedantam is a molecular biologist by training and her current research effort is investigating the mechanism(s) of gut colonization by the diarrheic disease pathogen Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). C. difficile is the causative agent responsible for the greatest numbers of hospitalacquired bacterial infections in the United States. Severity of initial infection as well as relapses are much higher with the newly emerged “hypervirulent” strains of C. difficile that are now common in VA hospitals. Dr. Vedantam’s expertise in anaerobic bacteriology, biochemistry and molecular biology has enabled her research team to rapidly characterize new C. difficile virulence factors, and refine methodologies to measure C. difficile attachment to host cells under completely anaerobic conditions.

Merrigan, M. M., Venugopal, A., Roxas, J. L., Anwar, F., Mallozzi, M. J., Roxas, B. A., ... & Vedantam, G. (2013). Surface-Layer Protein A (SlpA) Is a Major Contributor to Host-Cell Adherence of Clostridium difficile. PloS one, 8(11), e78404.

Hecker, L., Vittal, R., Jones, T., Jagirdar, R., Luckhardt, T. R., Horowitz, J. C., ... & Thannickal, V. J. (2009). NADPH oxidase4 mediates myofibroblast activation and fibrogenic responses to lung injury. Nature medicine, 15(9), 1077-1081.

Tucson, AZ

2009

Louise Hecker, Ph.D.

For Dr. Hecker and collaborators identifying a novel role for NADPH oxidase-4 (Nox4) in mediating myofibroblast functions and scar tissue formation (fibrosis) in the lung. Her studies support the concept that loss of cellular redox homeostasis promotes profibrotic myofibroblast phenotypes that ultimately lead to persistent fibrosis associated with aging. This research demonstrates proof-ofconcept that restoration of redox balance by targeting Nox4 may be an effective strategy in age-associated fibrotic disorders, potentially to resolve persistent fibrosis or even reverse its progression. Dr. Hecker’s research interests have expanded to include more translational aspects, including drug discovery for Nox4 and the development of preclinical animal models for pulmonary fibrosis. Her current research interests also include understanding the role of aging and senescence in lung injuryrepair responses.

Washington, DC

1960

Edward Freis, M.D.

Studies of hypertension that proved the efficacy and life saving qualities of medical treatment.

Fred Gordin, M.D.

A renowned physician scientist who conducts critical research in the diagnosis and treatment of HIV, Tuberculosis and associated infections in veteran and non veteran patients, both nationally and internationally.

Washington, DC Last Updated: 8/17/15

2013

Recognition

38 of 39

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award (1979)

Seminal Paper

Freis, E. D. (1960). Hemodynamics of hypertension. Physiol Rev, 40(1), 27-54.

Lundgren, J. D., Babiker, A. G., Gordin, F. M., Borges, Á. H., & Neaton, J. D. (2013). When to start antiretroviral therapy: the need for an evidence base during early HIV infection. BMC medicine, 11(1), 148.

Other

VA Biomedical Laboratories R and D: Notable Biomedical Research Investigators Station

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Washington, DC

Last Updated: 8/17/15

Year

1982

2003

2012

2012

Name (Investigator)

Contribution

Recognition

39 of 39 Seminal Paper

Other

Pipberger, H. V., Simonson, E. R. N. S. T., Lopez, E. A., Araoye, M. A., & Pipberger, H. A. (1982). The electrocardiogram in epidemiologic investigations. A new classification system. Circulation, 65(7), 1456-1464.

Rautaharju, P. M. (2007). The birth of computerized electrocardiography: Hubert V. Pipberger (1920-1993). Cardiology journal, 14(4), 420421.

Hubert Pipberger, M.D.

VA BLR&D, William S. Middleton Award For pioneering the computer processing of the electrocardiogram. (1961)

James D. Finkelstein, M.D.

For establishing the importance of the “Methionine Cycle” in onecarbon metabolism and the generation of lipotropic nutrients such as methionine and s-adenosylmethionine that play critical role in preventing hepatosteatosis and other complications of liver diseases.

Raj Lakshman, Ph.D.

For establishing the metabolic basis of alcoholic hyperlipidemia and hepatosteatosis, and identified a number of potential early “biomarkers” for heavy alcohol consumption in the veteran population.

Finkelstein, J. D. (2003). Methionine metabolism in liver diseases. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 77(5), 1094-1095. Wurst, F. M., Thon, N., Weinmann, W., Tippetts, S., Marques, P., Hahn, J. A., ... & Lakshman, R. (2012). Characterization of sialic acid index of plasma apolipoprotein J and phosphatidylethanol during alcohol detoxification—A pilot study. Alcoholism: Cli

A pioneering contributor to the establishment and ongoing refinement of the CPRS System and clinical informatics in the VA nationwide. Conducted seminal “big data” analyses of seasonal fluctuations in systolic/diastolic blood pressure, and their clinical implications, in the VHA population.

Fletcher, R. D., Amdur, R. L., Kolodner, R., McManus, C., Jones, R., Faselis, C., ... & Papademetriou, V. (2012). Blood Pressure Control Among US Veterans A Large Multiyear Analysis of Blood Pressure Data From the Veterans Administration Health Data Repos

Ross D. Fletcher, M.D.