Wellesley College Bulletin Catalogue Number 1950-1951

Wellesley College Bulletin Catalogue Number 1950-1951

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10-20-1950

Wellesley College Bulletin Catalogue Number 1950-1951 Wellesley College

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WELLESLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN CATALOGUE NUMBER I95O-I95I

WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS

Visitors to the College are welcome, and student guides are available. The administrative offices in Green Hall are open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Board of Admission office is open also on Saturday morning during the college

year. Visitors to this office are advised to write in advance for an appointment.

CATALOGUE NUMBER OF THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN

OCTOBER

XO,

1950

Bulletins published seven times a year by Wellesley College, Wellesloy, Massachusetts. April, threej September, one; October, two; November, one. Entered as second-class matter, December 20, 1911, at the Post Office at Wellesley, Massachusetts, under the Act of July 16, 1894. Additional entry a;

Concord, N. H.

Volume 40

Number 2

DIRECTIONS FOR CORRESPONDENCE In the

list

below are the administrative

various types should be sent.

The

officers to

whom

post office address

is

inquiries of Wellesley 81,

Massachusetts.

General Policy of the College The President of Wellesley College Admission of Undergraduates The Director of Admission

Applications for Readmission The Recorder

Graduate Students The Chairman of the Committee on Graduate

Admission of

Inquiries Concerning Houses and Notice of

The Dean

Instruction

Withdrawal

of Residence

Payment of College Bills The Assistant Treasurer (Checks should be made payable Wellesley College)

Scholarships

The Dean Academic

The

of Students

Work

Class

of Students

Dean

Social Regulations The Dean of Residence

Requests for Transcripts of Records The Recorder

Alumnae and Undergraduate Employment The Director of the Placement Office Requests for Catalogues The Information Bureau

Alumnae Affairs The Executive

Secretary of the

Alumnae

Association

to

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE

Calendar Board of Trustees

5

....

6

Committees Officers of Instruction AND Administration Committees Historical Sketch .... The College Community. .

.

.

Buildings Admission

To the Freshman Class. To Advanced Standing. Of Foreign Students ... Of Candidates for Mas.

.

ter's

7

page Cont.

99

100

History

107

cation

22 24 27 30

Interdepartmental Courses

35 35 41

Mathematics Music

42

Physics

115 115 118 121 124 128 130 134 138 141 142 145 148

Italian

Latin

Philosophy Political Science

Degrees: Requirements Degree Requirements Degrees



Hygiene and Physical Edu8

42

Degree

Courses of Instruction. Greek

for B.A.

44 for Master's

50

Psychology Russian Sociology Spanish Speech Zoology and Physiology ..150 Interdepartmental Major 154 Program Interdepartmental Honors

Courses of Instruction: Art

51

Astronomy BibUcal History

56

....

58

156 Programs 159 Expenses 162 Financial Aid Graduate Fellowships and 165 Scholarships

Botany Chemistry Economics Education Enghsh French Geology and Geography

61

91

Summary of Students ... 179 181 Alumnae Club Presidents

German

96

Index

65 69 73 77 85

.

Degrees

.

.

Conferred

.

in

170

1950

Honors,

Prizes,

lowships

and Fel-

Awarded

.

.

175

.

185

1950

w

M

S

3 4 5 6 7 8 2 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

12

12

T

W

T

3

4

5

F 6

S

7

9 10 11

F

S

4

3

12

5

6

7

3

T

F

4

5

6

7

S

1

2

8

9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

3

M

S

S

T

W

T

4

9 10 11

8

W

5

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER W T F

M T

S

M T

S

9 10 11

8

7

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 8

T

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 6

OCTOBER M

W

T

1

S

SEPTEMBER

AUGUST

JULY M

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

3

4

5

6

7

F

S

1

2

8

9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

1951

S

M

JANUARY T W T F

12

4

FEBRUARY S

S

M

W

T

T

F 2

S

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

28 29 30 31

25 26 27 28

3

5

1

4

5

M

12

T

W

T

4

5

F

S

S

M

T

W

12

T

F

S

4

5

9 10 11

12

3

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

3

M

6

7

8

MARCH T W T

F

S

2

3 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1

4

5

6

M

T

MAY

APRIL S

3

S

S

7

JUNE W T

F 1

2

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 3

4

S

5

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

CALENDAR Academic Year 1950-1951 First Semester

Registration of

new

students, 9 a.m. to 10.30 p.m.

Wednesday, September 20 Registration closes for

all

other students, 11.00 p.m. Friday, September 22

Classes begin

„, 1 hanksgiving recess ,

.

.

f

from 4.15 p.m to

evening

from 3.15

Christmas recess

p.m.

to 11.00 P.M.

from through .

Examinations

Monday, September 25 Wednesday, November 22 Sunday, November 26 .

Thursday, December 14 Thursday, January 4 Monday, January 29 Wednesday, February 7

Second Semester Classes begin. c,

.

from 12.15 p.m.

[

Sprmgrecess|^^^jQQp^_ Examinations

",

{ \

Commencement

^,

through .

Monday, February 12 Saturday, March 31 Tuesday, April 10 .Tuesday, May 29 Thursday, June 7

Monday, June

1

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Palfrey Perkins,

b.a., s.t.b., d.d.

Boston

Chairman of

Edward

A. Weeks, Jr.,

B.S.,

the

Board

LiTT.D.

Boston

Vice Chairman

Belle Sherwin,

b.s., ll.d..

Cleveland, Ohio

Emeritus

Ruth Baker Pratt, m.h.l., litt.d, ll.d. Harvey Hollister Bundy, b.a., ll.b. Marie Rahr Haffenreffer, b.a., ll.d.

New

York,

Reginald

Fitz, b.a., m.d.

....

Dorothy Bridgman Rood, b.a., litt.d. Charles Codman Cabot, b.a., ll.b.

Brookline Brookline

Dover

.

Jean Trepp McKelvey, ph.d. Elisabeth Luce Moore, b.a., litt.d. Elizabeth King Morey, m.a. James Lawrence, Jr., b.a. SiRARPiE Der Nersessian, docteur es lettres Eleanor Wallace Allen, b.a. Jacob Joseph Kaplan, b.a., ll.b. Katharine Timberman Wright, b.a. Alexander Cochrane Forbes, b.a. Edward Leyburn Moreland, b.a., m.s., d.eng. Chaille Cage Thompson, m.a.

....

ph.d., ll.d., ex

T.

Minneapolis, Minn.

O. Kelley Anderson, b.a., m.b.a. Harold Hitz Burton, b.a., ll.b., ll.d., l.h.d. W. Howard Chase, b.a. John Charles Schroeder, b.s., d.d., litt.d. Willye Anderson White, b.a. Edward Livingston Bigelow, b.a. John Slo.\n Dickey, b.a., ll.b., ll.d.

Margaret Clapp,

N.

Boston

.

officio

Boston

Washington, D. C.

Ho-Ho-Kus, N. J.

New

Haven, Conn.

Wash.

Seattle, .

Chestnut Hill

H. N. T. N. T. N. T.

Hanover, N. Rochester,

New New

York,

York,

Brookline

Washington, D. C. Boston .

Scituate

Columbus, Ohio

Needham Wellesley Hills

Houston,

Tex.

Wellesley

President of Wellesley College

Henry Austin Wood,

Jr., b.a., m.b.a., ex officio Treasurer of Wellesley College

Belmont

COMMITTEES OF THE TRUSTEES The Chairman of

the

Board and

the President oj the College are ex officiis

members

of all committees of the Trustees.

Executive Committee: Mr. Perkins {Chairman), Mr. Anderson, Mr. Bundy, Mr. Justice Burton, Mr. Dickey, Mrs. Haffenreffer, Mrs. Moore, Mr. Moreland, Mr. Weeks, Mrs. White; and (^.v officio) Mr. Wood. Finance Committee: Mr. Anderson {Chairman), Mr. Bigelow, Mr. Bundy; and {ex officio)

Mr. Wood,

Committee on Buildings and Grounds: Mr. Moreland {Chairman), Mr. Anderson, Mr. Cabot, Mr. Forbes, Mrs. Haffenreffer, Mr. Lawrence, Mr.

Wood. Committee on Educational Policy: Miss Clapp {Chairman), Miss Der Nersessian, Mr. Dickey, Dr. Fitz, Mrs. McKelvey, Mrs. Morey, Mr. Schroeder, Mrs. Thompson. Committee on Endowment: Mrs. Haffenreffer {Chairman), Mr. Cabot, Mr. Chase, Mr. Kaplan, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Morey, Mrs. Rood, Mrs. Thompson, Mrs. White, Mrs. Wright; and {ex officio) Mr. Wood. Representatives on Joint Committees

Library Committee: Mr. Weeks {Chairman), Miss Der Nersessian, Mr. Kaplan, Mrs. McKelvey, Mrs. Rood. Pension and Insurance Board: Mr. Kaplan {Chairman), Mr. Anderson; and {ex

officio)

Mr. Wood,

Executive Committee of the Mayling Soong Foundation: {Chairman), Mrs. Moore; and (^.v officio) Mr. Wood.

Mrs. Allen

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND

ADMINISTRATION Mary

Alice Willcox, ph.d.,

Professor oj ^oology, Emeritus

Elizabeth Kimball ELendall,

Margaret Clay Ferguson,

Mary

Sophia Case,

May

Research Professor of Botany

ph.d., d.sc..

Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus

m.a.,

ViDA Button Scudder,

Katharine

Professor of History, Emeritus

m.a., ll.b.,

Professor of English Literature, Emeritus

m.a., l.h.d..

Edwards,

ph.d., Professor of Greek

Charlotte Almira Bragg,

and Comparative

Philology, Emeritus

Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus

b.s.,

Margaret Pollock Sherwood,

ph.d., l.h.d.. Professor of English Literature, Emeritus

Alice Walton, ph.d..

Professor of Latin

Laura Emma Lockwood,

Professor of English

William Skarstrom,

Language and

Literature, Emeritus

m.d., m.p.e.. Professor of Hygiene

Olive Butcher Boggett,

Associate Professor of Physics,

Professor of J^odlogy, Emeritus

b.s..

Librarian, Emeritus

b.a., b.l.s..

Julia Eleanor Moody, ph.d.,

Professor of ^oology. Emeritus Professor of Art, Emeritus

ph.d.,

Arthur Orlo Norton,

Emeritus

Professor of Spanish, Emeritus

m.a..

Marian Elizabeth Hubbard, Ethel Bane Roberts,

Professor of Latin, Emeritus

m.a.,

m.a.

Alice Huntington Bushee,

and Physical Education, Emeritus

Professor of Biblical History, Emeritus

m.a., b.d..

Caroline Rebecca Fletcher,

Grace Evangeline Bavis,

Myrtilla Avery,

and Archaeology, Emeritus

ph.d.,

m.a..

Professor of the History and Principles of Education, Emeritus

Edna Virginia Moffett,

Professor of History, Emeritus

ph.d..

Laetitia Morris Snow, ph.d..

Professor of Botany, Emeritus

Josephine Harding Batchelder,

m.a.,

Associate Professor of English Composition, Emeritus

Antoinette Brigham Putnam Metcalf,

Mary Jean

Lanier, ph.d..

Anna Bertha Miller, ph.d.. Alice Ida Perry Wood, ph.d.. Alfred Bwight Sheffield,

m.a..

and Geography, Emeritus

Professor of Latin, Emeritus Associate Professor of English Literature, Emeritus

m.a.,

Professor of Group Leadership

Mabel Minerva Young,

Associate Librarian, Emeritus

Professor of Geology

and English Composition, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus

ph.d.,

8

Faculty Seal Thompson,

m.a.,

9

Professor of Biblical History, Emeritus

Elisabeth Hodder, ph.d.,

Annie Kimball Tuell,

Professor of History, Emeritus

ph.d.,

Martha Hale Shackford,

Professor of English Literature, Emeritus

ph.d.,

Professor of English Literature, Emeritus

m.a., m.s..

Professor of English Composition, Emeritus

Barnette Miller, ph.d..

Agnes Frances Perkins,

Professor of History, Emeritus

Bertha Monica Stearns, LiLLA Weed,

m.a..

Professor of English Literature, Emeritus

m.a..

Associate Librarian, Emeritus

Mary

Cross Ewing,

Louise

Sherwood McDowell,

Dean of

b.a..

Edith Winifred Moses,

ph.d..

Helen Sard Hughes,

sc.d..

Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus Professor of English Literature, Emeritus

Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus Associate Professor of Biblical History, Emeritus

Muriel Streibert Curtis,

Mary Amerman

Associate Professor of Speech, Emeritus

ph.d.,

Ruth Johnstin, ph.d.. Katy Boyd George, m.a., Elizabeth Donnan,

Professor of Physics, Emeritus

m.a.,

Lennie Phoebe Copeland, ph.d.,

b.a., b.d.,

Professor of Biblical History, Emeritus

b.a.,

Professor of Economics, Emeritus

Griggs, ph.d.,

John Charles Duncan,

Residence, Emeritus

Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus

ph.d.,

Professor of Astronomy

Helen Somersby French,

ard Director of

ph.d.,

Margaret Alger Hayden, ph.d.. Ola Elizabeth Winslow, ph.d., Marjorie Henry Ilsley, docteur de

the

Whitin Observatory, Emeritus

Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus Professor of Z'^ology, Emeritus

Professor of English, Emeritus

l'universite de paris. Professor of French, Emeritus

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION Edward Ely Curtis, ph.d., Ralph Emerson Professor of North American History Howard Edward Pulling, ph.d.. Ruby Frances Howe Farwell Professor of Botany Louise Pettibone Smith, ph.d., John Stewart Kennedy Professor of Biblical History

Judith Blow Williams, ph.d.,

Lucy Wilson,

Alice Freeman Palmer Professor of History

ph.d.,

Sarah Frances Whiting Professor of Physics, and Dean of Students

Margaret Terrell Parkeri, ph.d.. Ruth Elvira Clark, litt.d.. Thomas Hayes Procter, ph.d.. Michael Jacob Zigler, ^

Absent on leave.

ph.d..

Professor of Geology

and Geography

Professor of French Professor of Philosophy

Professor of Psychology

Faculty

10

Katharine Canby Balderston,

ph.d.,

Martha Hale Shackford Louise Overacker, ph.d., Elizabeth Kimball Kendall

Edith Christina Johnson,

Professor oj English

Professor of Political Science

Sophie Chantal Hart Professor of English

ph.d.,

Howard Hinners, b.a., Ruth Elliott, ph.d., Mary Hemenway

Caroline

Hazard

Professor of Hygiene

Professor of

and Physical Education

and Director of

Andree Bruel, docteur de Ella Kjeats Whiting,

l'universite de PARIS,

Gabriella Bosano, dottore

Leland Hamilton Jenks,

Mary Lowell

in

Edna Heidbreder,

Department

Dean

of Instruction

filologia moderna, litt.d., Professor of Italian

ph.d.,

Professor of Sociology

Coolidge, ph.d..

Marianne Thalmann',

the

Professor of French

Professor of English, and

ph.d.,

Music

Professor of Philosophy

Professor of German

ph.d.,

Professor of Psychology

ph.d..

Marion Elizabeth Stark,

ph.d.,

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Professor of Mathematics

Helen Hull Law,

Ellen A. Kendall Professor of Greek

ph.d.,

Harriet Cutler Waterman,

Gladys Kathryn McCosh,

Grace Ethel Hawk,

Professor of ^odlog)>

ph.d.,

Professor of /^oo7o^

ph.d.,

Katharine Lee Bates Professor of English

b.litt.oxon.,

Alice Hall Armstrong^, ph.d.,

Louise Sherwood

McDowell

Professor of Physics

Jorge Guillen^ doctor en letras, catedratico de universidad, Helen J. Sanborn Professor of Spanish

Mary Bosworth Ada May Coe, Lawrence

Treudley,

Professor of Spanish

Stephen Greene Professor of Economics

Smith-, m.a.,

Helen Thayer Jones,

Dorothy Mae

ph.d.,

Robathan,

M. Margaret Ball,

Professor of Political Science

Professor of English

ph.d.,

m.f.a.,

Clara Bertram Kimball Professor of Art Research Professor of Physics

PH.D.,

Florence Louise King,

Dorothy Warner -

Professor of Latin

ph.d.,

Bernard Chapman Heyl,

^

A. Barton Hepburn Professor of Economics

ph.d..

Walter Edwards Houghton, Hedwig Kohn,

Charlotte Fitch Roberts Professor of Chemistry

ph.d.,

Lucy Winsor Killough^,

^

Professor of Sociology

ph.d.,

m.a.,

m.s.,

Dennis,

b.a., dipl.e.u..

Absent on leave. Absent on leave for the first semester. Absent on leave for the second semester.

Librarian Professor of French

Faculty Angeline LaPiana, dottore

lettere,

in

Eva Elizabeth Jones, ph.d., Francoise Ruet Livingston^,

11 Professor of Italian Professor of ^oologj)

m.a.,

agregee de l'universite, Professor of French

Barbara Philippa McCarthy^, Evelyn Faye Wilson,

Professor of History

ph.d.,

Hubert Weldon Lamb,

b.a..

Dorothy Maharam Stone,

Professor of

Grace Elizabeth Howard,

Calkins Visiting Professor of Mathematics

ph.d..

Associate Professor of Botany

Lindsay, ph.d.,

Elizabeth Beall^, ph.d..

Mary Lellah

Music

ph.d.,

Mary Whiton

Ruth Hutchinson

Professor of Greek

ph.d.,

Associate Professor of Botany,

and Dean of Residence

Associate Professor of Hygiene

and Physical Education

Austin, ph.d.,

Edith Brandt Mallory,

Associate Professor of ^oology

ph.d.,

Associate Professor of Psychology

Louise Kingsley, ph.d.,

Associate Professor of Geology

Dorothy Heyworth, ph.d., Agnes Anne Abbot, Emma Marshall Denkinger^,

Associate Professor of Physics

John Pilley, m.a.oxon., Helen Joy Sleeper, m.a.,

Magdalene

Associate Professor of Art

ph.d.,

Research Librarian in Music

mus.b.,

Schindelin, ph.d.,

Harriet Baldwin Greighton,

Associate Professor of

ph.d.,

Margaret Marion Boyce, m.a., Hannah Dustin French, m.s., Helen Gertrude Russell,

m.s.,

ph.d.,

Margaret Elizabeth Taylor,

ph.d.,

Louise Palmer Wilson, ph.d.,

Edith Melcher,

M. Eleanor

'

Research Librarian Associate Professor of Mathematics

Associate Professor of Latin Associate Professor of geology

Prentiss-, m.a.,

Associate Professor of English

Garth

m.argh.,

Gilchrist, ph.d.,

Barbara Salditt, 2

Research Librarian

Associate Professor of Frerwh

Ada Roberta Hall, ^

German

Associate Professor of Botany

ph.d.,

John McAndrew, Philippa

Associate Professor of English Associate Professor of Education

ph.d.,

ph.d.,

Absent on leave. Absent on leave for the first semester. Absent on leave for the second semester.

Associate Professor of Art Associate Professor of Chemistry Associate Professor of Physiology Associate Professor of

German

Faculty

12

Charles William Kerby-Miller,

Henry Frederick Schwarz^, Virginia Onderdonk,

ph.d.,

Associate Professor of English

ph.d.,

Associate Professor of History Associate Professor of Philosophy

b.a.,

Delaphine Grace Rosa Wyckoff,

ph.d.,

Associate Professor of Botany,

and Dean of the Class of 1952

Charlotte Elizabeth Good fellow,

ph.d.,

Elizabeth Eiselen,

Associate Professor of Geology)

Associate Professor of Latin

Anita Oyarzabal,

ph.d., m.a.,

and History

and Geography

Associate Professor of Spanish

Cecile de Banke,

Associate Professor of Speech

Alice Dowse Weeks^, ph.d.

Associate Professor of Geology

Mary Ruth

Associate Professor of English

Michael,

ph.d.,

Evelyn Kendrick Wells^,

m.a.,

Associate Professor of English

JuSTINA RuIZ-DE-CoNDE, PH.D.,

Ernest Rene Lacheman,

Jan La Rue,

Associate Professor of Spanish

b.d., ph.d.,

Associate Professor of Biblical History

m.f.a.,

Associate Professor of

Waclaw Jedrzejewicz, Beatrice Mae Quartz,

Music

Associate Professor of Russian m.a.l.s..

Katharine Fuller Wells,

ph.d..

Sydney Joseph Freedberg,

ph.d..

Librarian in Charge of Technical Services

Associate Professor of Hygiene

Herbert Morrison Gale,

s.t.b., ph.d.,

and Physical Education

Associate Professor of Art Associate Professor of Biblical History

Alice Bourgois Coleno, agregee de l'universite, Visiting Associate Professor of French

Marion Isabel Cook,

Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Physical Education

m.a..

Elinor Marie Schroeder',

ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Hygiene

Ruth Carpenter Child, ph.d., Isabella McLaughlin Stephens, m.a., Margaret Kingman Seikel, ph.d., Roberta Margaret Grahame, ph.d., Katherine Lever,

John Hewitt Mitchell,

b.d., ph.d.,

ph.d.,

Jean MacDonald Arsenian', ^

^

Assistant Professor of Education Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Assistant Professor of English Assistant Professor of English

ph.d.,

Mary Lucetta Mowry',

and Physical Education

Assistant Professor of English

ph.d.,

Absent on leave. Absent on leave for the second semester.

Assistant Professor of Biblical History Assistant Professor of History Assistant Professor of Psychology

Faculty Richard Vernon Clemence,

Helen Moore Laws,

13 Assistant Professor of Economics

ph.d.,

Head

b.a., b.l.s.,

Virginia Rogers Miller, m.a.,

Owen

Scott Stratton,

Cataloguer in the Library

Assistant Professor of Speech

ph.d.,

Assistant Professor of Political Science

Elizabeth Holmes Frisch,

Assistant Professor of Art

Sylvia Leah Berkman", ph.d.,

Assistant Professor of English

Alona Elizabeth Evans, ph.d., Miriam Clough Ayer, ph.d..

Assistant Professor of Political Science

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Ferdinand Joseph Denbeaux,

s.t.m., b.d..

and Louise

S.

McDowell

Scholar

Assistant Professor of Biblical History

Joseph Thistle Lambie, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Economics

Phyllida

Mave

and Louise

S.

McDowell

Scholar

Willis, ph.d.,

Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Mary Ellen Goodman, ph.d., Mary Doyle Curran, ph.d.,

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Teresa Grace Frisch,

Assistant Professor of English Assistant Professor of Art

ph.d..

Virginia Fleming Prettyman, ph.d..

Assistant Professor of English

Edward Vose

Assistant Professor of History

Gulick, ph.d..

Helen Storm Corsa, ph.d., Marie-Antoinette Quarre,

Assistant Professor of English b.a., c.e.s., dipl.e.s.,

Bartlett Hicks Stoodley, ph.d.

Janet Brown Guernsey,

Rhoda Garrison,

Assistant Professor of Physics

m.a.,

Assistant Professor of Botany

ph.d.,

Ellen Stone Haring,

Assistant Professor of Philosophy

m.a.,

Joseph Lewis Sullivan,

Assistant Professor of History

m.a.,

Diether Thimme,

Assistant Professor of Art

Pauline Tompkins, ph.d., Virginia

Mayo

Assistant Professor of French Assistant Professor of Sociology

Assistant Professor of Political Science

Fiske, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of ^oology,

John Franklin Hersh, Evelyn Kathryn Dillon,

and Dean of

1

Catlin,

Absent on leave.

Assistant Professor of Astronomy

m.a.,

Anne Montgomery Woodward,

Ruth Ford

and Physical Education

Assistant Professor of English

ph.d.,

James Walter Warwick,

1953

ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Hygiene

Seymour Betsky,

the Class of

Assistant Professor of Physics

m.a.,

b.a., m.s..

Assistant

to the

Librarian

Librarian of the Science Libraries

Faculty

14

Richard Burgin,

Instructor in Violin

David Barnett,

Instructor in Piano

b.a.,

Arnold Geissbuhler", Eunice Lathrope,

Instructor in Art

Cataloguer oj Rare Books in the Library

b.a.,

loLA Corliss Scheufele, Administrative Assistant^ Acquisitions Department oj the Library

Alfred Zighera, Jean Guedenet, Susan Godoy,

Instructor in Violoncello Instructor in French

lic. es let., dipl.e.s.,

Instructor in

m.a.,

Cathleen O'Conor Epstein, m.a.oxon., Winifred

St.

John Hennig,

Melville Smith,

Music

Instructor in English

Cataloguer in the Library

b.s..

Instructor in

b.a.,

Organ

Harry Kobialka, Instructor in Violin, Conductor oj the Orchestra, Director oj

Mary Joan

Ellmann,

Alice Birmingham Colburn,

Jean Knapp Marsh, I

Instructor in Hygiene

Instructor in English

ph.d.,

Gertrude Huntington McPherson,

Margaret Meda Pendleton, Judith Beach Welles,

Eleanor Adams,

Cataloguer in the Library

Roberta A. Stewart,

b.a., b.l.s.,

ph.d.,

Louis Jamison, ph.d., m.a.,

Instructor in

Botany

Instructor in Political Science Instructor in English Instructor in English

m.a.,

Patrick Francis Quinn,

m.a.,

Janice Marilyn Cunliffe, m.a.,

Natalie Elizabeth Park,

William James Cousins,

Appointed

Circulation Librarian

Instructor in Chemistry

ph.d.,

Beverly Joseph Layman,

Head

Instructor in Chemistry

ph.d.,

DoRRis Jeannette Hutchison,

*

Instructor in Biblical History Instructor in Economics

b.s.,

Frank Moore Cross,

Instructor in Geology

m.s.,

m.a.,

Ann Dorothy Dubicke,

Dargan Jones,

Instructor in Sociology

m.a.,

b.d., ph.d.,

Marion Elizabeth Kanaly,

Howard

and Physical Education

Serials Cataloguer in the Library

b.s.,

John Lewis Bradley,

Hilda Rosenbloom,

Instructor in History

m.a.,

m.a..

von Bryant Mills,

Chamber Music

Instructor in English

ph.d.,

m.a.,

b.a.,

Jr., b.d., ph.d.,

for the first

semester only.

Instructor in English

Instructor in Chemistry Instructor in Art Instructor in Sociology

Instructor in Biblical History

Faculty Katharine Taylor Loesch, Josephine Louise Ott,

Hyman Bloom, Margaret Paige,

15 Instructor in Speech

m.a.,

Instructor in French

b.a.,

Instructor in

Instructor in

b.a.,

Virginia Buckner Miller, m.a.,

WiLMA Frances

Smith,

LuciNDA Moles,

m.a.,

Instructor in Economics

Assistant Reference Librarian

b.a., b.a.l.s.,

Instructor in Spanish

Maria Luisa Antuna,

en letras,

lic.

Instructor in Spanish,

Janet Stearns Aronson,

Dexter Dyer,

and Head of

Instructor in

m.a.,

Theodor Marcus Mauch, b.d., Priscilla Alden Okie, m.a.,

Instructor in Psychology

Instructor in Geology Instructor in History Instructor in

s.t.m.,

Marian Kinnaird Solleder,

m.a.,

Elizabeth Marie Cock,

Beryl Laura Robinson, Elkins Moller,

m.s..

b.a., b.l.s.,

Nicholas Aston Beadles,

m.a.,

Klaus Goetze,

Instructor in

Economics

Instructor in French Circulation Librarian

Cataloguer in the Library Circulation Librarian Instructor in English

Instructor in Economics Instructor in

Pearl Handshuh Hack,

Paul Matthen,

m.a.,

m.s.,

m.a.,

Hygiene and Physical Education

Instructor in ^oology

m.a.,

Mary Kavanauch,

Instructor in

Instructor in English

m.a.,

Genevieve de Bidart Merrill,

Mary

Instructor in Political Science

ph.d. (lond.),

Renate Christine Wolff,

Irene

Instructor in Philosophy

b.a.,

Sirotkin, m.a.,

Eunice Marjorie Wood,

Instructor in Biblical History

Instructor in Psychology

Nathaniel Walker Roe,

Carolyn Shaw Solo,

Hygiene and Physical Education

Instructor in Speech

Irene Rita Pierce, ph.d.,

Leonard

Hygiene and Physical Education Instructor in English

m.a.,

Ruth Page Edwards, m.a., Dorotha Jeanette Garrison, m.a., Theodore Stephen Hamerow, m.a..

Phillip

Spanish Corridor

Instructor in Biblical History

b.a., b.d.,

m.s..

Sylvia Virginia Lisberger,

the

Instructor in Spanish

m..\.,

Hugh Stewart Barbour, Beverly Anne Bullen, Justine

m.p.a.,

b.a.,

Christine Mitchell, m.a.,

John Doane Wicks,

Art

Botany

m.a.,

Piano

Instructor in Political Science Instructor in Voice

Instructor in Art Instructor in

Music

Faculty

16

WiLBURY Arthur Crockett S

Instructor in Education

m.a.,

Marise Gollignon Thompson, agregee de l'universite,

GwENYTH Morgan Rhome, m.a., Margaret Lois Reynolds, b.s.,

Assistant in Geology

Teaching Assistant

Mary Herrick Ashworth,

Elizabeth Hays Scheufele,

Ruth Elizabeth Johnson,

in

and Geography

Hygiene and Physical Education Assistant in Chemistry

b.a.,

Margaret Helen Emmerling,

Instructor in French

Assistant in Botany

b.s.,

Assistant in Botany

b.a.,

Assistant in Chemistry

b.a.,

Elizabeth Norfleet King,

b.a.,

Assistant in Physiology'

Mary

b.a.,

Assistant in Chemistry

Catherine O'Brien,

Barbara Mary Walls, b.a., Ruth Eleanor Heacock, b.a.,

Barbara Visscher Brush,

Dorothy Boyd,

Assistant in ^oology Assistant in ^oology Assistant in Psychology

b.a.,

Henry Warren Fellow

b.s..

Frances Evans Camp,

Teaching Assistant

b.s..

Anne Stuart Cleaver,

Research Assistant in Physics

b.s.,

Assistant in ^oology

b.a.,

Carol Wright Haff,

Hygiene and Physical Education Assistant in ^oblogy

b.s.,

Janette Katherine Furman,

Ann Marie Grant,

in

in Chemistry

Assistant in Botany

b.a., b.s.,

Assistant in Physics

Anita Goldberg Miller,

Assistant in Psychology

Ella Georgia Loud,

Rosalie

Ruth

Schiferl,

Jane Noyes Shaw,

b.a.,

Mary

Towne,

Alita Ann Zimmerman, J.

Assistant in Botany Assistant in Botany

b.s.,

Ellen Sosnow, Phillips

b.a.,

b.s.,

Assistant in ^oology

Assistant in Chemistry

b.a.,

Assistant in Botany

b.s..

Randolph Campbell, Designer and Technical Director oj the Wellesley College Theater

Edythe Marie Scales,

Assistant in Psychology

b.a..

Lecturers Russell Gibson S ph.d., Margaret Elliott Houck, ^

6

Lecturer in Geology m.s..

Curator oj the

Absent on leave Appointed for the second semester only.

Museum and

Lecturer in Zoology

Officers of Administration

Margaret Macdonald Winkler, m.a., Arthur Eldon Winkler, b.s., m.f.a., Myrtle Agnes Stuntzner, m.a.,

Lecturer in

Music and Director of the Choir

Director of the Wellesley College Theater Lecturer in Education,

Director of the

Carol Mary Roehm^,

b.a.,

Jeanette McPherrin,

m.a.,

Richard Walden Hale,

17

Lecturer in Spanish,

and Foreign Student Adviser

Lecturer in French,

ph.d..

and Dean of Freshmen Lecturer in Education

Beatrice Allard Brooks, ph.d.,

Lecturer in Biblical History

Anne Lee Delano, m.a., Anne Cutting Jones, ph.d.,

Lecturer in Hygiene

and Physical Education Lecturer in French

pRANgois Lauriau, agrege de l'universite.

Katharine McElroy Kent

and

Page Memorial School

Lecturer in French

b.litt.oxon., b.d..

*,

Lecturer in Biblical History

SPECIAL LECTURERS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF HYGEENE AND

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Andrew

R. MacAusland, m.d.

Samuel R. Meaker,

m.d.

Clifford L. Derick, m.d.

Britton F. Boughner,

b.p.e.

Anne

L.

Page Memorial School

Myrtle Agnes Stuntzner, m.a., Anna Alden Kingman, b.a., ed.m.. Janet Anderson Moran,

Barbara Mildram,

Teacher

b.a..

Teacher

b.a..

Louise Marie Butler,

Teacher

b.s.,

Miriam Thomas Meehan,

Teacher

b.a.,

Doris Marshall Steenburg,

Mary Ganoe

Director

Teacher

b.a..

Assistant Teacher

Silsby, b.a.,

Assistant

OFFICERS OF ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION Margaret Clapp,

ph.d., ll.d..

Ella Kj;ats Whiting,

Lucy Wilson,

President

Dean

ph.d.,

Dean

ph.d.,

Ruth Hutchinson

of Instruction, and Professor of English of Students, and Professor of Physics

Lindsay, ph.d.,

Dean of Residence, and * *

Appointed for the Absent November

first 1

to

semester only.

March

1.

Associate Professor of Botany

Officers of Administration

18

Delaphine Grace Rosa Wyckoff,

ph.d.,

Dean of the Class of Virginia

Mayo

1952,

and Associate Professor of Botany

Fisbce, ph.d.,

Dean

Jeanette McPherrin,

Kathleen Elliott,

of the Class of 1953, and Assistant Professor of

Dean of Freshmen, and

m.a.,

b.a.,

Carol Mary Roehm

Recorder

Foreign Student Adviser, and Lecturer in Spanish

b.a..

^',

^oolo^

Lecturer in French

OFFICERS OF GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Margaret Clapp, ph.d., ll.d., Henry Austin Wood, Jr., b.a., m.b.a.,

Mary Evans

Chase,

Executive Vice President and Director of Admission

b.s..

Donald Watson Height, Joan

President

Treasurer

Business

b.s.,

Fiss Bishop, m.a.,

Manager and

Assistant Treasurer

Director of the Placement Office

Vannevar Burt, b.s., Maerice Elizabeth Capen, b.s., Philip

Purchasing Agent Dietitian

Mary Ellen Crawford, b.a., Essee May Van Leuven Decker, Margery Somers Jean Glasscock,

Foster,

Director of the

Employment

Office

Comptroller Director of the College Development

b.a..

m.a..

Fund

Director of Publicity

Frederick John Holm,

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds

b.a..

Mabel Powell McGinley, Florence Irene Tucker,

Household Supervisor

b.s.,

b.a.,

Purveyor

Administrative Staff Helen Bates Anderson, Grace Ethel Arthur,

Assistant in the

b.s..

b.a.,

Constance Clark Covey, Virginia Downer,

b.a..

Assistant Director of the College Development

Marion Johnson, Marion Lewis,

Assistant b.a.,

'

Director of the College Development

Fund

Assistant Secretary

to the

Deans

Placement Counselor in the Placement Office

b.a.,

b.a.,

Secretary to the

Deans

Assistant Recorder Associate Director of Admission

b.a..

Absent November

to the

Assistant Secretary to the President

b.a..

Jane Saxon Pate,

Fund

Assistant to the Treasurer

Marion Kenniston Grant, Betty Louise Hosmer,

Office

Secretary to the President

Warren Andrews Dodge, Virginia Phillips Eddy,

Employment

1

to

March

1.

19

Officers of Administration

Tyler Robinson,

Assistant to the Director of Admission

b.a.,

Edith Alden Sprague,

b.a., b.s.,

Barbara Maynard Twombly,

Rhoda

Ziegler,

Placement Counselor in the Placement Office

Manager of

b.a.,

the Information

Manager of

b.a.,

Bureau

Multigraph

the

Office

Physicians Elizabeth Louise Broyles,

Katherine Sarah Andrews,

Edna Ruth Breitwieser,

Resident Physician

m.d.,

Associate Physician

m.d..

m.d.,

Associate Physician

Margaret Riogh Anthonisen,

Consultant in Mental Hygiene

m.d.,

Heads of Houses Sophie Agnes Roche,

Head

m.a.,

Mildred Conrad Comegys, Frances

May

Beggs,

b.a.,

Head

b.a.,

Head

of Shafer Hall

of Severance Hall

of Claffin Hall, and Chairman of Special Functions of Cazenove Hall

Head

Margaret Culbertson Myers,

Head

Emma Leigh Rhett,

Head

Helen Farr Robertson, b.a., Clara Wackenhuth Stobaeus, Ellen Burditt McKey,

Head

of Beebe Hall

of

Head

b.a.,

Munger Hall

of Koanett House of Stone Hall

Louise Deiglmayr, m.a.. Director of Horton, Hallowell, Shepard Houses,

Mary Lord Harlow, b.a., Madelyn Worth Gamwell,

Head

b.a..

Head

Ellen Kallman Carter,

Head

Margaret Bigelow Eldred, Olive Shaw Bailey, b.a..

Ruth McLeish Leland,

Mary -Ann

LeBedoff,

of

of Joslin House

b.d., ph.d..

of

Assistant

to the

Dower House

of Wiswall House

Head

b.a..

of Homestead

of Crofton House

Head

b.a..

Webb House

Head

Head

MiNDA Moore, Louise Reynolds Bradner,

of Little House

Head

Head

Lucy Gordon Wolfe,

Navy House

of Olive Davis Hall

Head

b.a.,

Judith Beach Welles,

of

of Washington House

Head

Hildreth,

of Eliot House

Norumhega Hall

Head

Florence Barr Titus,

Henriette Sebring,

of

Head

Doris Wetherbee Scott,

P.

Tower Court

of

Head of Pomeroy Hall

EuDORA Smith Sale,

Florence

and Cedar Lodge

Head

Katharine Mailler Wygant,

Head

of

Elms House

of Tower Court

Faculty Resident in the Graduate Club House

Officers of Administration

20

Departmental Secretaries and Custodians Frances Kiefer Bragg,

Wanda Marie

Shirley Hotchkiss Clark,

Ruth Trethaway Grout, Phyllis Henry,

May

Assistant in the Department of Education

Administrative Assistant on the Library Staff

b.a.,

Eleanor Martha Garvey,

Emily

Assistant in the Department oj French

b.a.,

Broussard, m.b.a.,

Custodian oj the Art Library

m.a..

Assistant in the Departments of Economics

and

Sociology

Assistant in the Department of Biblical History

b.a..

Secretary and Custodian in the Department of Chemistry

Hopkins, m.a..

Marion Dorothy Jaques,

b.a.,

Registrar in the Department of Hygiene a?id Physical Education

Alta Densmore Kempton,

Mary Anna

Assistant in the Department of

mus.b.,

Music

Assistant in the Department of Psychology

Lattanzi,

Kathleen Millicent Leavitt, Secretary

and Custodian

in the

Ruth JoANN Levine, b.a., Margaret Jean McCabe,

Department of ^oology and Physiology Assistant in the Department of English Assistant in the Department of Physics

Agnes Louise McSweeney, Assistant to the Registrar of the Department of Hygiene

Alice Churchill Moore,

Lucy

E.

Mulhall,

Gv\t:nyth

Museum

Assistant in the Department of History

Morgan Rhome, Secretary

Marian Rider Robinson,

m.a.,

and Custodian, and Assistant Custodian of the

m.a..

Elizabeth Hill vVeatherby,

Marion Wing,

and Physical Education

First Assistant in the Art

Edith

in Geology!

and Geography

Hemenway

Eustis Library

Cataloguer in the Art Department

m.a..

Assistant in the Department of Political Science

m.a..

NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE DEVELOPMENT FUND Katharine Timberman Wright, Phoebe Mills Brown,

Helen D. Harbison,

Chairman of Geographical Representatives

b.a..

Chairman of Class Representatives

b.a..

Louise Saunders France, b.a., and from the

Margery

Chairman

b.a..

Special Gifts College,

Margaret Clapp, Mary

Foster, Jean Glasscock

E. Chase,

Officers of Alumnae Association

21

OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION Mrs. William Crawford White, 103 East 86 Street, New York 28, New York Mrs. Walter W. Allen, 155 Roxbury Road, Garden City, New York

Mrs. George F. Jewett, West 612 Sumner Avenue, Spokane

President

First Vice-President

Second Vice-President 9,

Washington Secretary

Mrs. Herbert Elsas, 3510 Paces Ferry Road, N.W., Atlanta, Georgia Mrs.

E.

Treasurer

Norman Staub,

110 Loring Road, Weston 93, Massachusetts

Committee Chairmen Alumnae Fund

Miss Helen D. Harbison,

The

Barclay, Philadelphia

3,

Pennsylvania

Mrs. William L. West, 2976 Falmouth Road, Shaker Heights Mrs. Charles D. Post, Jr., 15 Clark Road, Wellesley

Wellesley College

Ohio Publications

Hills 82, Massachusetts

Mrs. Paul W. Burkholder, 21 West 46 Street, Indianapolis Mrs. Paul L. Mansfield,

Class Presidents

22,

Clubs 8,

Indiana Alumnae

Secretary

COMMITTEES OF THE ACADEMIC COUNCIL The President

is ex-officio

a member of all committees of the Academic Council.

Administrative Board: Dean Wilson {Chairman), Misses Garrison, Sleeper, Welles, K. F. Wells; Messrs. Bradley, Mitchell; and {ex officiis), the Dean of Residence, the Class Deans, the Recorder, and a College Physician. Board of Admission: Miss Chase {Chairman), Misses Eiselen, Grahame, Taylor; Mr. Mitchell; and {ex officiis) the Dean of Freshmen, and the Dean of Students.

Committee on Curriculum and Instruction: Dean Whiting {Chairman), Misses Ball, H. T. Jones, Treudley; Mrs. Wyckoff; Messrs. Heyl, La Rue; and {ex officio) the

Dean

of Students.

Committee on Discipline: President Clapp {Chairman), Mrs. Goodman; and {ex officiis) the Dean of Students, and the Dean of Residence. Committee on the Faculty Fellowship and Research Awards: President Clapp {Chairman), Misses Kohn, Law; Mrs. Goodman; and {ex officio) the Dean of Instruction.

Committee on Faculty Publications: Dean Whiting {Chairman), Misses Boyce, Heidbreder, E. F. Wilson; Mrs. Curran, Mrs. Ruiz-de-Conde. Committee on Graduate Instruction: Miss Robathan {Chairman), Misses Gilchrist, Goodfellow, E. F. Wilson; Messrs. Houghton, Lacheman, Zigler; and {ex officio) the Director of the Department of Hygiene and Physical Education.

Committee on Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships: Miss Bosano Waterman; Mrs. Haring; Mr. La Rue. Lecture Committee: Mr. Curtis {Chairman), Mrs. Houck; Mr. Kerby-Miller; and the Dean of Residence and two student representatives. Library Committee: Miss Balderston {Chairman), Misses LaPiana, L. P. Smith, Williams; Mrs. Mallory; and {ex officiis) the Librarian; Misses Boyce, {Chairman), Misses E. E.Jones,

French, Quartz, Sleeper.

Nominating Committee: Miss Abbot {Chairman, 1st sem.), Miss Creighton 2nd sem.), Miss Heidbreder; Mr. Gale; and {ex officio) the Dean of

{Chairman,

Instruction.

Committee on Reappointments, Promotions and Dismissals: President Clapp H. T. Jones, Hawk (2nd sem.), McCarthy (1st sem.), Russell; Mrs. Killough (1st sem.); Mr. Hinners (2nd sem.), Mr. Houghton; and {Chairman), Misses

{ex

officio)

the

Dean

of Instruction.

Committee on Scholarships: Dean Wilson {Chairman), Misses Coolidge, Michael, Onderdonk; Mr. Jenks; and {ex officiis) the Class Deans, the Dean of Residence, the Recorder, the Director of Admission, and the Adviser to Foreign Students.

Committee on Student Records: Dean Wilson {Chairman), Misses Child, McCosh, Russell; Mrs. Guernsey; Mr. Denbeaux; and {ex officiis) the Dean of Instruction, the Class Deans, and the Recorder. Representatives on Joint Committees Misses Beall (2nd sem.), Bosano, Coe, Frisch; Mrs. V. R. Miller (1st sem.), Mrs. Stephens, Mrs. Wilson; Messrs. Denbeaux,

Alumnae Council:

Lambie, La Rue. 22

Committees Chapel Board: Misses

23

Creighton, Onderdonk; Mr. Denbeaux.

Social Schedule Committee: Misses Eiselen (2nd sem.), E. K. Wells (1st sem.); Mr. La Rue; and {ex qfficiis) Dean Lindsay; Miss Glasscock; Mrs.

Twombly. Conference of Seven Colleges: Miss Hawk; and

the

Dean

of Instruction,

by appointment of the President. The Senate of the College Government Association Misses Roehm (to Nov. 1 and after Mar. 1), Taylor (from Nov. 1 to Mar. 1), Tompkins; Mrs. Rhett; Mr. Gale; and {ex officio) the Dean of Residence (non-voting). Student Organization Fund Subcommittee: Miss Corsa. Service Organization: Miss D.Jones; Mr. Stoodley. The Superior Court of the College Government Association: Misses Evans, Prentiss (2nd sem.); Mrs. Colburn (1st sem.), Mrs. Robertson. :

HISTORICAL SKETCH WELLESLEY CoLLEGE

is

One of that group of women's colleges estab-

lished in the nineteenth century to offer to

young women the edu-

cational opportunities "equivalent to those usually provided in colleges

young men." The motive of its founder, Henry Fowle Durant, was, however, something more than the enrichment of the experience of young women for their own sake. Addressing the first students in the fall of 1875 he said, "You mistake altogether the significance of the movement of which you are a part if you think this is simply a question I believe that God's hand is in it; of a college education for girls. that He is calling to womanhood to come up higher, to prepare herself for great conflicts, for vast reforms in social life, for noblest usefulness." To the end of preparing women for positions of responsibility, Mr. Durant insisted from the beginning on the maintenance of high academic standards, and of healthy community life in beautiful surroundings. He built an impressive College Hall on his own spacious estate twelve miles west of Boston, and spared no pains to make his gift confor

.

.

.

development of students. He began to beautify hundred acre campus which has become one of Wellesley's distinctive assets. He encouraged the inclusion in the student body of repHe resentatives from all parts of the country and from foreign lands. placed more emphasis on personal quality than on the accident of economic status, and he maintained a real democracy within the college family. He opened unusual professional opportunities to women on He introduced laboratory work in science before it was the faculty. tribute to the aesthetic

the four

widely recognized as academically necessary. He recognized the significance of the arts in education and encouraged "learning by doing." He assumed that religion was a normal part of the life of educated people and made provision for its study and expression in the program of

new community. From the beginning

the

the Board of Trustees has been composed of men and women whose interests have been far-reaching in New England and around the world. The present board includes ministers, educators, all of financiers, businessmen, lawyers, an architect, and a doctor them men and women of wide cultural interests. It is a working board. Four of its regular members are nominated by vote of the Alumnae Association. An unusual feature of organization is the membership



of a "faculty trustee" who is not a nated by the Academic Council.

The and

history of the College

falls

after the College Hall Fire.

member

of the faculty but

is

into

two

The

College was chartered on

24

nomi-

fairly distinct periods, before

March

Historical Sketch 17, 1870,

25

but the planning of the program and the construction of Coland the opening did not occur until

lege Hall required five years of effort

September, 1875. of President

In a surprisingly short period, under the leadership (1881-1887),

Ada Howard (1875-1881) and Alice Freeman

became established as a well-known college. It borrowed ideas and methods from various institutions, notably Mount Holyoke Seminary's program of domestic work for each student. It drew heavily on the resources of Harvard University but at once assumed responsibility for copying nothing blindly and for introducing a type of instruction which gave scope to the initiative of students. During the presidencies of Helen Shafer (1887-1894) and Julia Irvine (1894-1899) the curriculum was expanded and what had been an experimental venture became accepted as a permanent part of the President Caroline Hazard (1899-1910) brought educational scene. to the academically mature College the graciousness of the artist. Music, art, gracious living were re-emphasized as important factors in a community of educated people. On the night of March 17, 1914, College Hall burned to the ground. The orderly evacuation of the building with no injury to any occupant won world-wide fame for the already well-known College, In the emergency created by this catastrophe President Ellen Fitz Pendleton (1911-1936) came to the position of leadership which made her indeed the builder which she will always be in the grateful memory of WellesWithin twenty-five years the College grew into a beautiley women. More significantly, Miss fully equipped and well-endowed college. the institution

Pendleton guided the reorganization of the faculty into a democratically body which worked consistently to maintain

controlled policy-making

and develop a

vital

curriculum and community

the formation of a vigorous

Alumnae

life.

She

assisted in

Association and presided over the

magnificent efforts of the trustees and alumnae to raise money to rebuild, expand, and endow the College. The emphasis on Wellesley as a residential college in which young scholars and older scholars together "apprehend truth and discover permanent values by which to live" was continued and increased during the

McAfee Horton (1936-1949). Mrs. Horton a sense, symbolized the complete emancipation of Wellesley from any vestiges of insularity. As she said, " Wellesley's 'ivory tower' administration of Mildred

also, in

From has clear windows and outward swinging doors. students see a wide and profoundly interesting world.

its windows Through its doors they emerge to serve that world with faithful honesty and honest faith." She herself was internationally known as an educator and administrator, and during World War II was the first director of

the

WAVES.

Margaret Clapp, the second alumna president

in the history of the

Historical Sketch

26

A historian and biographer, she College, took office on July 1, 1949. was awarded a Pulitzer prize in 1948 for her biography, Forgotten First Citizen: John Bigelow, originally written as her thesis for the Ph.D. degree from Columbia University. Wellesley College started with three hundred students, most of them in a preparatory department which was part of the College until 1879. Its first graduIt has become a college of seventeen hundred students. Today its more than 20,000 alumnae ating class numbered eighteen. represent every state of the United States and some sixty-five foreign countries.

Commensurate with

this

growth, the external aspects of the Starting with one building, Durant's private library of Its over 269,000 volumes.

College have changed almost completely. It began with Mr. it now has forty-eight. 8,000 volumes; its present library numbers one gymnasium room has been replaced

provide instructional and recreational

by two large buildings

facilities for

to

the graduate depart-

of Hygiene and Physical Education and for the enlarged undergraduate group. In all the externals Wellesley College has changed, but through the

ment

years

it

has retained

its

distinctive character.

It

continues to mainand to moti-

tain the intellectual disciplines underlying our civilization

vate Wellesley women to prepare themselves "for great conflicts, for vast reforms in social life, for noblest usefulness."

THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY Wellesley

is

The

a residential college.

are designed to facilitate

conditions of

and supplement the

life

at Wellesley

scholar's activity.

The Deans are the officers most directly concerned with the organiIn addition to the Dean of Inzation of the academic community. struction, the Dean of Students, and the Dean of Residence, there is a dean for each class. The Dean of Freshmen is ex officio a member of the Board of Admission and

is,

therefore, in a favored position to help en-

tering students take their places in the

life

of the College.

At the be-

ginning of the sophomore year, each class is assigned to a member of the teaching staff who is relieved from some duties in order to assume responsibility as the academic adviser for the class during its last three undergraduate years. The Dean of Students is chairman of the class deans and is especially responsible for the interpretation of educational The Dean of Instruction is in charge of those policy to the students. matters of educational policy and administration which relate especially to the faculty.

Halls of Residence are maintained for all undergraduates except commuting distance who prefer to live at home. A Head of House presides over each residence and cooperates with the student Most officers to develop the house group as a congenial social unit. of the campus halls have resident faculty members, and other members of the faculty are frequently entertained in the houses by students. those within

There are thirteen freshman not far from the campus, and class. Each freshman house her adviser. In each of the

houses.

Nine of these are

accommodate more than

in the village,

half the entering

has a freshman president with a junior as other campus houses, members of at least Rooms are assigned to new students three classes are in residence. in the order in which their original application fees have been received.

Since 1943 each student has contributed her services to the work of first because of the war-time shortage of domestic employees, and later because of the necessity for economy in operating the dormitory,

In addition to cleaning their own rooms, all students give two week to cover the service in the dining rooms and to answer bells. The schedule for this work is made and directed by a student Head of Work in each house. Married students may be given permission by the Class Dean and the Dean of Residence to live in college houses provided (a) that they pay the full semester fees in advance, not on the partial payment plan; (b) that they understand there will be no refund if withdrawal is caused by conditions directly related to their marriage; (c) that they agree to ask no special favors or exceptions to house rules, on the grounds of

costs.

or three hours a

27

28

The College Community

their marriage, for themselves or their husbands; (d) that

if

they are

scholarship recipients they will submit revised applications to the

Scholarship Committee. Religious Services are held daily in the College Chapel. On week days these are conducted by some member of the faculty, except on

Thursday when a member of the senior class is the leader. The Sunday morning services are led by visiting clergymen of many denominations. In all these services the college choir, led by a member of the department of Music, participates; and, in addition, there are a number of special musical vesper services during the year.

Community Chapel

The

Wellesley Col-

an organization which has an active part in all religious services, programs, and activities on the campus. The Health Service is directed by the college physicians in coopThe eration with the department of Hygiene and Physical Education. medical staff includes four physicians, one of whom is a psychiatrist. A visiting nurse is available for visits to student houses, and a clinic is open without charge to all students at Simpson Infirmary, where eight lege

is

The proximity of the College Boston permits frequent conference with other doctors, and early conHospitals in Boston and sultation in case of serious illness is assured. Newton are so accessible that immediate care can be given to any type In case of serious illness, parents are notified by of illness or accident. telephone or telegram. Seven days of infirmary care are allowed without charge to resident students provided no extra service is required. Emphasis is laid on preventive medicine and on the maintenance of healthy living conditions on the campus. Campus employees are examined by a college physician, and the doctors cooperate with the dietitian and purveyor in the selection of food. The Placement Office, established by the Founders of the College as the Teachers' Registry, includes in its scope the placing of seniors and alumnae in teaching and other professions, and in business, government, and industry; the supplying of information about training courses, apprenticeships, and assistantships; the arranging of lectures and discussions on occupations; and the scheduling of interviews with emRegistration for placement is open to all ployers who visit the College. who have taken courses in Wellesley College. Undergraduates are welcome to use the oSice for information, suggestions, and advice at any time. Each senior is invited to register and is assisted in formuA library of books, pamphlets, current lating plans for the future. magazine and newspaper articles of vocational interest is maintained and is available to any interested student or alumna. Additional information can be secured from members of the placement office staff. The office maintains files, collects credentials, and is the source of information concerning the vocational equipment and experience of trained nurses are in constant attendance. to

The College Community

29

women. The registration fee is two dollars for life memberand no commission is charged for placement. The office also registers undergraduates and alumnae for summer work, and has charge of undergraduate employment during the school year. The College Government Association is responsible for the maintenance of efficient organization of the undergraduate community. It is directed largely by students, though it receives its charter from the Academic Council of the Faculty, which has representatives on its governing boards. Other student organizations foster a variety of inWellesley

ship,

Barnswallows (dramatic) AssociaForum; the Cosmopolitan Club; Flying Club; Radio; and numerCarillonneurs; Guild of Group; Dance The Wellesley College Service Organizaous departmental clubs. terests: the Athletic Association; the

tion; the

Community Chapel;

tion participates in the

borhood.

It

also

work of numerous service agencies in the neighand distributes funds for educational and

raises

philanthropic agencies.

the

ACADEMIC AND COMMUNITY BUILDINGS (Listed in order of construction)

College Hall, the it

gift

was

the

first

of the founders,

finished

academic building of Wellesley College, was

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fowle Durant.

and equipped under the

In 1875

close personal supervision of the

On March 1 7, 1 9 1 4, all but one wing of this historic building was destroyed by fire. That wing, in constant use since 1914, was remodeled in 1936 and houses the department of Geology and GeograIt is located on the hill overlooking Lake Waban. phy.

founders.

Music Hall and Billings Hall are large brick buildings devoted department of Music. Music Hall, built in 1880, contains oflftces, practice studios, and listening rooms, and includes in its equipment thirty-five pianos, six phonographs, a recording machine, and a two-manual organ. The ground floor of Billings Hall (opened in 1904) is given over to the department offices, two classrooms, and a small audito the

These are equipped with six pianos, a clavichord; a Ghallis two-manual, five-pedal harpsichord; two phonographs, a microfilm The second floor is occupied by the Music reader, and a projector. Library and the office of the Research Librarian in Music.

torium.

Simpson Infirmary, a brick building erected in 1881, was used as a residence hall until 1908.

It

now

provides living quarters for the Resi-

dent Physician and the infirmary staff. Adjoining this building is a thoroughly modern hospital unit comBesides the doctors' offices and wellpleted in February, 1942. equipped clinic, there are twenty-three patients' bedrooms, lounges, and a solarium.

The Farnsworth Art Building was the gift of the late Isaac D. Farnsworth in 1889. It contains lecture rooms and exhibition galleries and is used by the department of Art for its library, study rooms, laboratories

Through

and

studios.

the active interest of friends of the College, the

contains a small but representative selection of ent periods and styles: Egyptian minor arts; the

Museum

monuments from

differ-

M. Day Kimball

collec-

tion of classical sculpture, including a Polyklitan figure of

an

athlete;

Graeco-Buddhist stucco sculpture from Kashmir; one large mosaic from Antioch, and a small fragment of an Antioch mosaic; a fragment of a mosaic from the Baths of Caracalla; a few Italian primitives; a 16th century tapestry; the James J. Jarves collection of textiles and laces; several pieces of Romanesque and Gothic sculpture; four fragments of stained glass; a polychrome terracotta bust of the Virgin attributed to Silvestro dell'Aquila; a Terborch, Furini, Magnasco and Crespi; a Flemish painting c.1550; a Kolbe and a Lehmbruck; a large 30

Academic and Community Buildings

31

sculpture by Maria; an early Corot; a water color by Cezanne; a late Renoir; a water color by Prendergast; a Berman; two miniatures by

Artemis Tavshanjian; a few etchings by Durer, Rembrandt, and Whistler; and somx very fine Old Master drawings.

The Chapel was presented in 1899 by Miss Elizabeth G. Houghton and Mr. Clement S. Houghton as a memorial to their father, Mr. William S. Houghton, a trustee of the College from 1880 to his death in 1894. Its windows include memorials to the Founder of the College and to various alumnae and members of the faculty. Behind the memorial tablet (by Daniel Chester French) in honor of Alice Freeman Palmer are the urns holding her ashes and those of her husband, Professor George Herbert Palmer, trustee of Wellesley College from 1912 The three-manual, Aeolian-Skinner organ of ninety-one to 1933. stops was dedicated in the fall of 1936. The Whitin Observatory is a one-story building of brick, faced with white marble, situated on a small hill on the college grounds and devoted entirely to the use of the department of Astronomy. The Observatory House, a faculty residence, is nearby. The Observatory, the House, and much of the astronomical equipment are gifts of the late Mrs. John C. Whitin.

Mary Hemenway Hall, on the western border of the campus, was erected in 1909 as headquarters of the department of Hygiene and Physical Education when the Boston Normal School of Gymnastics became a part of Wellesley College. It contains lecture rooms, laboratories, offices, and the library of the department of Hygiene and Physical Education.

The Library of the College, originally endowed by Eben Norton now numbers over 269,000 volumes, including the departmental libraries. The building of the Main Library was the gift of

Horsford,

Andrew

Carnegie.

It

was opened

for use in

1910 and was enlarged to

The present size in 1916, with seating capacity for 539 readers. books in the Main Library form a collection chosen primarily for the use of students and faculty in literature and languages, the social sciits

ences,

The

philosophy, mathematics, Biblical history, and geography. following departmental libraries are located in the buildings of

Eduand Zoology. approximately eleven hundred American

the respective departments: Art, Astronomy, Botany, Chemistry, cation, Geology, Hygiene, Music, Physics, Psychology,

The Library

subscribes to

and foreign periodicals, including representative daily newspapers, and to the official printed documents of the United Nations. Since 1943 the Library has been designated to receive for deposit on a selective basis publications of the United States Government.

The

Special Collections in the Library offer the undergraduate

Academic and Community Buildings

32

and graduate student a rich field for investigation and research. In addition to the Rare Book Collection, rare and semi-rare books form a part of the Ruskin Collection, and the English Poetry Collection. To the original George Herbert Palmer Collection of English Poetryhas been added the Katharine Lee Bates and the Elizabeth Manwaring Collections of modern poetry. Other gifts, including the Sara Teasdale bequest, have augmented this Poetry Collection. The Elbert Collection on the Negro in Slavery is another separate collecThe Book Arts Collection supports a special tion worthy of mention. book arts program of extracurricular interest. The Laura Hibbard Loomis Collection of Medieval Literature and the Mayling Soong Foundation's Collection on the Far East, while not separate collections, deserve recognition for their contribution to these special subject fields.

The Brooks Memorial Room provides comfortable and beautiful surroundings with carefully selected books for leisure hours of reading. The resources of the Library are readily discovered and located through the divided card catalogue of author and title entries, and subject entries, supplemented by standard printed indexes and bibliographies. Special effort is made to teach students the techniques of With the exception of those library use and methods of research. special collections containing rare

and semi-rare

items, the Library's

resources are directly available to readers.

the college campus has two small devoted to the education of young children. It is a center for child study, observation, and participation for students from all departments of the College.

The Page Memorial School on

buildings

and

is

Founders Hall, a building for lecture rooms and department offices pertaining to instruction in the liberal arts, was opened for use in 1919. The hall was built from the Restoration Fund, secured for the College through trustees, faculty, alumnae, and other friends, and replaces in some part College Hall, the first and main building of the College. The building is dedicated as a memorial to the Founders of the College.

Alumnae Hall,

built in

1923 as the

gift

of the

alumnae

for a recrea-

an auditorium seating 1,570, a ballroom, the office of the Director of the Theater, and the studio of the College Radio. There is also a recreation room, known as "The Well", which contains a soda fountain, tables for light refreshments, and a nick-

tion center, contains

elodeon.

Sage Hall was built to house the departments of Botany and Zoology and Physiology. The first unit for the department of Botany was The erected in 1927, and the Zoology and Physiology unit in 1931. Sage. Russell Mrs. donor was principal

Academic and Community Buildings

Hetty H. R. Green Hall, part the

gift

33

was in large and daughter. Colonel Edward H. R.

the administration building,

of Mrs. Green's son

Green and Mrs. Matthew A. Wilks. It contains the administrative and seminar rooms, the faculty assembly hall, and offices of student organizations. The Galen L. Stone Tower, named for its donor, contains a carillon which was the gift of Mrs. Charlotte Nichols offices, class

Greene.

Pendleton Hall was opened

in 1935.

It

was named

at the request

of the undergraduates in honor of Ellen Fitz Pendleton, President This building houses the departof the College from 1911 to 1936.

ments of Chemistry, Physics, and Psychology.

The Recreation Building, containing the George Hovv^ Davenport Swimming Pool, was opened in March, 1939. It is the gift of many donors, two of whom, Mr. and Mrs. Davenport, gave large sums. This building has many facilities, including squash and badminton courts, and is used for the indoor activities of the physical education It also serves as

classes.

ministration, alumnae,

a recreation center for students, faculty, ad-

and

their guests.

RESroENCES

The

grouped into several units on and off the campus. The Hazard Quadrangle consists of four houses having approximately 100 students in each: Bee be, Cazenove, Pomeroy, and Shafer college residences are

Halls.

Munger

Hall

is

adjacent to the Hazard Quadrangle and

accommo-

dates 120 students.

The Tower Court group

receives its name from the largest of its three accommodates 240) and includes, also, Claffin Hall (with 115 students) and Severance Hall (with 145). Stone and Olive Davis Halls form one building, though each half is operated as an independent unit for 80 students. Norumbega Hall (with 50 freshmen) is centrally located on the hill with Green, Founders, and Pendleton Halls, and the Farnsworth Art

buildings (which

Building.

Dower House and Homestead are campus residences, each accommodating about 35 freshmen who take their meals at Na\'y House. Navy House, so named because it was moved from a Naval Air Station where it had been a women officers' quarters, is a temporary house for 50 freshmen.

Nine houses

in the village

Webb, Wiswall,

Little,

mately 250 freshmen.

Elms, Washington, — Crofton, —form a residence unit approxi-

and Noanett

Eliot,

Joslin,

for

Academic and Community Buildings

34

Fiske House, the Graduate Club House, accommodating 30, is the headquarters for all graduate students. Horton, Shepard, and Hallowell Houses, and Cedar Lodge are club

social

and apartment houses

for

members

of the faculty.

They

are located

campus. The President's House, Oakwoods (the home of the Dean of Students), and Crawford House (the home of the Dean of Residence), are on the campus. in close proximity to the

Each of ments.

the larger student residences contains several faculty apart-

ADMISSION interested in a course of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree should apply for admission to Wellesley College as freshmen. few students whose work in other colleges has been of high standard are accepted as juniors and seniors. Admission is com-

STUDENTS

A

and students are

by the Board of Admission on the and general promise of ability to profit by the college experience. The College accepts students from all parts of this country and from foreign countries both for undergraduate and graduate study. petitive,

selected

basis of evidence of scholarly attainment, character, personality,

Application for Admission All communications concerning admission should be addressed to the Board of Admission, Wellesley College, Wellesley 81, Massachusetts. Forms for application will be furnished on request. An application fee of ten dollars is required of all applicants and no registration is re-

corded until the

candidate cancels her registrafee is not refunded, but it may be transferred to apply to a later year if the request for the transfer is received within a reasonable time after the beginning of the year for which the candidate is registered to enter college. A report from the applicant's physician showing that she is organically sound and in good health, together with a certificate of vaccination and any required tests, must be filed with the Board of Admission well in advance of the date of entrance. The College reserves the right to reject any candidate who, in the opinion of the college physicians, is not fitted for work in the college community, and to dismiss at any time a student who does not codperate fully with the college health officers. The College reserves the right to require the withdrawal at any time of any student whose academic work is below diploma grade or who in the opinion of the College authorities is not contributing to the College or benefiting from residence in it. No more specific reason need be assigned, and no fees already paid the College will be remitted fee

is

received.

If the

tion or does not enter the College for

in

whole or

any reason, the

in part.

Admission to the Freshman Class Application for admission to the freshman class may be made to the at any time up to March 1 of the year of entrance. A student is advised to make application not later than the beginning of her junior year in secondary school so that her school

Board of Admission

program may be approved before it is too late to make schedule Since rooms are assigned according to the date of application,

changes.

35

Admission

36 there tion

is

is

an added advantage

in early registration.

The

date of applica-

not, however, a factor in determining admission.

In selecting the freshman class, the Board of Admission reviews school records, recommendations, information from the candidate concerning her interests and plans of study, and the results of the From the complete Scholastic Aptitude and Achievement Tests.

Canof applicants a class of about four hundred and fifty is chosen. didates receive notification of the results of their applications in May. Students who are interested in admission should read carefully the

list

recommendations concerning secondary school subjects to be offered and the statement concerning the College Board tests.

for entrance

Admission Units

A

study of the requirements for the college degree on pages 44 to 48 admission the relationship between her secondary school subjects and the curriculum of Wellesley College. In general, the best preparation for college work is provided by courses will indicate to the applicant for

in English, foreign languages, mathematics, history,

students are advised to include

all

and

science,

and

of these subjects in their secondary

school programs.

The Board of Admission has outlined a plan of units * of study deOther plans are, however, signed to meet the needs of most students. possible, and if a student will submit her entire program to the Board, she will be told whether is

it

is

satisfactory.

The recommended plan

as follows:

4 units

English

5 units

Foreign languages

recommended

that these 5 units be divided as follows: Latin

or Greek, 3 units; a

modern language (French, German, Spanish,

It is

Other combinations may also be acceptable, but no credit will be given for one unit of a foreign language. The Board of Admission wiU be glad to answer inquiries concerning language programs. or Italian), 2 units.

Mathematics These units should 1

.

3 units

and plane geometry, of mathematics are offered, one must be in

consist of algebra, 2 units,

When only 2 units

algebra, the other in geometry.

History This unit may be in any branch of history. Students interested primarily in languages, literature, and the arts are advised to take 2 units of history, one of which should be European. *

A

unit represents one year's study in

mately a quarter of a

full year's

work.

any one

1

unit

subject, constituting approxi-

37

Admission Science A laboratory science, biology, chemistry, or physics, General science is accepted as an elective unit.

1 is

unit

preferable.

2 units

Elective subjects

Additional units in any of the subjects listed above may be included, or courses in history of art, music, Biblical history, and social studies.

Music may be offered for 1, 2, or 3 units as follows: 1 unit, fundamentals of music; 2 units, fundamentals of music and literature of music, or fundamentals and practical music; 3 units, fundamentals of music, literature of music, and practical music.

who have fewer units may have satisfactory

Students

in

some of the

subjects than the plan

if they have Programs which differ markedly from the recommended one should be approved by the Board of Admission in advance of application. In considering an unusual preparatory course, the Board takes into account the student's special interests and the school's opinion of her ability and equipment for

calls

for

strong sequences of courses in one

preparatory programs field.

college work.

The ability to typewrite is extremely helpful to the college student in High school students should acquire taking notes and writing papers. Admission credit is not given for typing, this skill as soon as possible. but the Board of Admission considers it a valuable asset and correspondingly evaluates

it

with extracurricular

activities

and summer employ-

ment.

The Board

of Admission welcomes information concerning

ricular plans or courses

new

cur-

which secondary schools are recommending

to their students.

School Records Complete records of a student's work Blanks for records through the quired.

in secondary school are refirst

semester of the senior

Supplementary reports

year are sent to school principals in January. are sent for at the close of the final semester.

The school record must be supplemented by statements from the school principal concerning the special abilities and interests of the student, power of sustained work, good health habits, integrity, sense of responsibility, initiative

and

self-reliance in

work and

in social rela-

The

College wishes to be informed of circumstances which may have furthered or interfered with a student's work and of special honors and accomplishments.

tionships.

Tests for Admission All candidates for entrance to the freshman class are required to take

Admission

38

the Scholastic Aptitude Test and three achievement tests given by the College Entrance Examination Board. Application for these tests must be made directly to the College Board in Princeton, New Jersey, by the candidate herself. The candidate is likewise responsible for tests sent to the college.

having the scores of her

The

dates for

making

application are given below. The Scholastic Aptitude Test, which includes both verbal and mathematical sections, is designed to test a student's general aptitude for colCandidates desiring to take this test at the end of the lege work. junior year for guidance purposes are encouraged to do so. All

candidates are required to take this test in the senior year at one of the regular examination series. Achievement tests are given in English composition, social studies, (See below four foreign languages, three sciences, and mathematics. Candidates for admission to Wellesley for the complete list of tests.) are required to take the English test and two others chosen from different fields. These tests should be taken in 1951 on March 10 so that the Wellesley Board of Admission will have the results when it meets in April to select the freshman class. The Scholastic Aptitude Test should also be taken at this time if it has not been taken earlier. Attention is called to the fact that the achievement tests are designed to be taken in stride without extensive review or extra study and without any speeding up of the school program. The result of each test is judged in relation to the number of years a candidate has spent studying

These tests should not be taken until the senior year. Candidates from foreign countries are expected to take the College Entrance Examination Board tests if it is possible for them to make arrangements to do so.

the subject.

GENERAL INFORMATION CONCERNING TESTS College Entrance Examination Board will hold a complete series of examinations on each of the following dates:

The

Saturday, March 10, 1951 Saturday, May 19, 1951 Wednesday, August 15, 1951

Saturday, December 2, 1950 Saturday, January 13, 1951

On

each of the dates

listed

above, the schedule of

tests will

be as

follows 8:45 1:45

A.M.— Scholastic P.M.

Aptitude Test (Verbal and Mathematical Secdons).

—Achievement hour

tests

Tests

may

—Not

more than

three of the following one-

be taken:

English Composidon Social Studies

Spanish Reading Chemistry

French Reading

Biology

39

Admission Latin Reading

Physics

German Reading

Intermediate Mathematics

Advanced Mathematics In addition, at the March, 1951 series only, achievement tests in Greek Reading and Italian Reading will be ofTered, but only to those candidates who register in advance specifically for these tests.

Candidates

may

not offer Spatial Relations.

The schedule permits a candidate to take the morning Scholastic Aptitude Test and a maximum of three of the Achievement Tests in the afternoon.

Copies of the Bulletin of Information

may be obtained without charge

from the College Entrance Examination Board. The Bulletin contains rules regarding applications, fees and reports; rules for the conduct of the tests; advice to candidates; descriptions of the tests; sample questions; and lists of examination centers. Candidates should make application by mail to the College Entrance Examination Board. Students who wish to take the examinations in any one of the following western states, territories, and Pacific areas: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, Territory of Alaska, Territory of Hawaii, Province of Alberta, Province of British Columbia, Republic of Mexico, Australia, and all Pacific islands including Formosa and Japan, should address their inquiries and send their applications to The College Entrance Examination Board, P.O. Box 9896, Los Feliz Station, Los Angeles 27, California. All others should write to The College Entrance Examination Board, P.O. Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. Application forms will be sent to any teacher or candidate upon reWhen ordering the forms, candidates should state whether quest. they wish forms for the December, January, March, May or August tests.

Application forms for the

early in the

fall;

December

tests

will

be available

those for the January tests will be ready for distribu-

March series, January 3 forms be available immediately after the preceding series has been held. A copy of the Bulletin of Information is automatically sent to every candidate requesting an application blank. Each application should be accompanied by the appropriate examination fee. A detailed schedule of fees follows: tion about

for

November 22

any other particular

One

;

those for the

;

series will

three-hour morning program and one, two, or

three Achievement Tests

$12.00

One

three-hour morning program only One, two, or three Achievement Tests

alone

6.00

when taken 8.00

40

Admission

and fees should reach the office of the Board not than the dates specified in the following schedule:

All applications later

December

January

Alarch

May

1950

7957

7957

7957

7957

Series

Series

Series

Series

Series

Dec. 23

Feb. 17

For examination centers located In the United States, Canada, Mexico, or the West Indies Nov. 11 Outside the United States,

Canada, Mexico, or the West Indies Oct. 14 Nov. 25

Jan. 20

August

April 28 July 25

March

31

June 27

Applications received after these closing dates will be subject to a penalty fee of three dollars in addition to the regular fee.

Candidates are urged to send in their applications and fees as early weeks before the closing date, since early registration allows time to clear up possible irregularities which might otherwise delay the issue of reports. Under no circumstances will an application be accepted if it is received at the Board office later than one week prior to the date of the examination. No candidate will be permitted to register with the supervisor of an examination center at any time. Only properly registered candidates, holding tickets of admission to the centers at which they present themselves, will be admitted to the tests. Requests for transfer of examination center cannot be considered unless these reach the Board office one week prior to the date oi the examination or earlier. as possible, preferably at least several

The Board cated

will report the results of the tests to the institutions indi-

on the candidates' applications.

The

college

will,

in

turn,

upon her application for reports upon their tests from

notify the candidate of the action taken

admission.

Candidates will not receive

the Board.

Summary of Procedure The

following schedule should be observed by

all

candidates for ad-

mission to the freshman class in 1951: 1.

2.

3.

Application for admission should be made before March 1. Information blanks sent by the College to applicants should be filled in and returned within one week after they are received. Scholarship applications and requests for financial aid should be filed (A scholarin the office of the Dean of Students before March 1 ship application blank must be obtained in advance. For informa.

4.

tion on basis of award, see page 162.) Applications for the Scholastic Aptitude and achievement

tests

Admission

5.

6.

41

to be taken on Saturday, March 10, 1951, should be sent to the College Entrance Examination Board in February or earlier. The exact dates on which applications are due appear above. Three photographs are due by March 1. These should be of standard passport size, glossy prints if possible. They should show head and shoulders only. The candidate's name and address must appear on the back of each picture.

A

form

for a health report will be sent to candidates.

certificate

The

health

must be complete and approved by the health department

at the College before a student enters college.

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING a student has maintained an excellent record in an accredited and has special interests which she can follow at Wellesley College she may apply for admission to the sophomore or junior class. If

college

The number in

any

of students

year, however,

is

who can small,

be admitted with advanced standing and only students with unusually good

records are encouraged to apply.

A candidate must present evidence that she has had the subjects required for admission to the freshman class and that she has achieved a satisfactory score on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. She should submit a written statement of her reasons for wishing to transfer to Wellesley College and must secure from the college previously attended a transcript showing that she has attained a superior record in a program that is compatible with

A candidate should be enhonorable dismissal from the college which she has attended and should be recommended by her instructors and Dean. Admission to advanced standing is competitive. The Board of Admission reserves the right to reject the application of any candidate who falls below the standard of any given year, set by the records of that year's candidates. A candidate whose application for admission as a sophomore has been rejected will not be considered for admission as a freshman, nor may a rejected applicant for junior standing be considered for admission as a sophomore. Students who have carried an adequate college program for at least one year in an approved institution, whether a four-year college or a junior college, may not disregard that record and apply for admission as freshmen, but must apply under the conditions governing admission with advanced standing. To obtain the B.A. degree, a student must be in residence at Wellesley College for at least two years, one of which must be the senior year. the requirements indicated on page 44.

titled to

The work

of these two years must include all the prescribed work (see page 44) not covered by the credentials submitted and such courses as

42

Admission

are needed to meet the requirements for distribution and concentration (see page 45). Credit for courses completed at another college is tentatively granted early in the first year of residence, but determination of

which

credit,

will

Wellesley College,

Application for

depend upon the quality of the student's work at not made until the end of the year. admission should be made to the Director of Admisis

sion as early as possible and, in general, not later than April

1

of the year

which admission is sought. The selection of students for admission with advanced standing will be made in July of the year in which enin

trance

is

desired.

READMISSION No

student who has withdrawn from college Application for readmission should be

mitted. of the

is

automatically readto the Secretary

made

Committee on Student Records.

ADMISSION OF FOREIGN STUDENTS Students living in foreign countries who wish to enter Wellesley Colmake application before February first of the year in which they wish to enter college. An application should be accompanied by a letter written by the student giving her reasons for wishing to study in the United States and a detailed statement of her previous educational experience or a transcript of her record. Inquiries concerning admission and scholarships should be sent to the Foreign Student Adviser, Wellesley College. lege are asked to

ADMISSION OF CANDIDATES FOR THE M.A. AND M.S. DEGREES Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts, Master of Arts in EducaMaster of Science in Hygiene and Physical Education must hold the Bachelor's degree from a college of satisfactory standing, and must present adequate credentials signifying their ability to carry on tion, or

the

work

for the degree.

Application for admission as a graduate student in any department should be made upon forms which will be furnished by the Chairman of the

Committee on Graduate

application be sent by

March

Instruction.

first

It

is

desirable that the

which the student by the official record

of the year in

It should be accompanied (1) and grades, (2) by a copy of the catalogue of the institution attended, marked to indicate the courses taken, and (3) by letters of recommendation from two professors in the applicant's major depart-

proposes to enter.

of courses

ment.

Admission

Graduate scholarships are described on page 165. For requirements for the M.A. and M.S. degrees see page cular containing

full

application to the

43

50.

A cir-

information for graduate students will be sent on

Chairman

of the

Committee on Graduate

Instruc-

tion.

Admission of Candidates for the Teaching Certificate in

Hygiene and Physical Education

A

two

years' course, especially designed for the training of teachers

and physical education, and leading to the teaching certifiDepartment of Hygiene and Physical Education, is offered to graduates of approved colleges who meet the requirements. Full information will be found on page 109. Correspondence should be addressed to the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Instruction, of hygiene

cate of the

DEGREES The

following degrees are conferred by the Trustees

upon recom-

mendation of the Academic Council: Bachelor of Arts.

Master of Arts. Master of Arts in Education. Master of Science in Hygiene and Physical Education. Certificate in Hygiene and Physical Education.

THE CURRICULUM has been planned to assure for the student the acquisition of certain skills which are of general use; to secure for her a broad foundation of liberal study by acquainting her with methods of

The curriculum

work and ways of thinking in several representative fields of knowledge; and finally to develop in her a degree of competence in one field of knowledge through her study of her major subject and work related to the hours required for the degree, a certain number is number must be elected to fulfill the requirements for distribution and work for concentration; the rest may be

the major.

Of

prescribed; a certain of

work

elected without restriction.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

B.A.

DEGREE

for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must complete semester hours of academic work. The normal 114 before graduation program consists of five courses carrying 1 5 semester hours of credit in

Every candidate

each semester of the

first

three years of the college course,

and four

In addition, courses, 12 hours, in each semester of the senior year. in education, health in requirements fulfill the must student every physical education,

and

in speech.

Prescribed

Work

Required courses which carry academic

credit:

English 100 (freshman year) Biblical History 104 (sophomore year)

6 hours* 6 hours

semester meets certain standards set by the If a student the second semester of the course. be required to fails to pass with credit the second semester of EngHsh 100, she will take an additional semester course in the sophomore year. *

A

student whose work in the

department

first

may be exempted from

44

Degrees Requirements without academic

45

credit:

Freshmen will be required to attend a series of lectures on the fundamental principles of health, given under the direction of the health officer of the College.

Freshmen and sophomores must complete successfully the prescribed work in physical education, two periods a week. The Department of Speech will give speech tests to incoming freshmen. Those students whose speech habits are definitely below standard will be required to attend a speech clinic until their defects have

been corrected.

Work

for Distribution

two year courses or their equivalent from each of the three groups of subjects given below. At least 24 of the 36 hours required for distribution must be elected in the freshman and sophomore years. Twelve hours, not more than six in each of two groups, may be postponed until the junior or senior years.

Twelve semester hours, that

is,

in semester courses, shall be elected as indicated

and Music. French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin, Russian, Spanish, Art, Music.

Group

I.

Literature, Foreign Languages, Art,

Departments of English,

t

Twelve hours shall be elected in Group I, six in one department and one or two other departments. Of the 12 hours in this group, Literature at least six must be in literature (English or foreign).

six in

courses shall be understood to include

all

courses in English literature,

and Russian literature in translation, and a foreign language in which the main emphasis is on litera-

courses in Greek, Latin, courses in ture.

Group IL

Social Science, History,

Departments of Economics,

and Philosophy.

Political Science, Sociology, History,

Philosophy.

Twelve hours shall be elected in Group H. Six hours must be in one of the following: economics or political science or sociology. The other six hours must be in either history or philosophy.

Group

HL

Science.

Departments of Astronomy, Botany, Chemistry, Geology and Geography, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology, Zoology.

Twelve hours shall be elected in Group HI, six in one department, and the remaining six in one or two other departments.* Of the emphasis on writing may not count for distribution. Course 103 or 106 is elected, the remaining six hours must be taken in departments not included in the interdepartmental course. t English courses with * If Interdepartmental

Degrees

46

12 hours in this group, at least six shall be elected in a laboratory This shall be understood to mean astronomy, botany, chemisThe combination of Geology 101 and try, geology, physics, or zoology. Geography 102, as well as the interdepartmental courses, An Introductory science.

Course in Physical Science

elected to

fulfill

and An

Introductory Course in Biology,

may

also be

the requirement of a laboratory science.

Work

for Concentration

Forty-two semester hours shall be elected in one field of concentration, of which a major of 24 to 30 hours shall be in one department, and 18 to 12 hours shall be in courses related or supplementary to the major but falling in one or more departments other than that in which the

major

is

taken.*

All courses are classified in grades

I,

II, III;

grade

I

indicating ele-

mentary courses and grade III the most advanced courses. Of the courses off'ered to fulfill the requirement of work for concentration, at Of the 42 least six hours of grade III must be taken in the senior year. hours required, at least 18 hours must be above grade I and at least 12 hours must be of grade III. Courses offered as prescribed work, or as work for distribution, with the exception of French 101, German 101, Italian 101, Latin 102, Russian 100, and Spanish 101, may be counted as part of the 42 hours of work for concentration, unless otherwise specified by the department. In the second semester of the sophomore year every student shall choose a major subject and shall prepare a provisional statement of the While in the courses to be included in the work for concentration. process of making her plans, she shall have a personal interview with the chairman, or with someone delegated by the chairman, of the department in which she plans to take her major. The student must obtain the signature of the department chairman, or her representative, indiit to the Recorder. The plan of the work for concentration shall be presented not later than the spring of the junior year.

cating approval of her plan before she presents final

Foreign Language Requirement Every candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must show before graduation that she has some proficiency in the use of at least one forThis requirement may be met by eign language, ancient or modern. passing one of the language tests of the College Entrance Examination Board at an appropriate score, or by passing one of the special language examinations given at Wellesley, or by the completion of a course in colThe following courses are of lege at the second year level or higher. *

In the interpretation of this requirement the Department of Geology and Geogshall count as two departments.

raphy

47

Degrees

the second year level: French 102, German 102, Greek 201, 202, 205, ItaHan 201, 202, Latin 103, Russian 200, Spanish 102.

Exemption Examinations

To enable those students who are best prepared for college to anticipate some of the required work or to enter advanced courses as soon as Eligipossible, some departments will offer exemption examinations. ble students who pass these examinations satisfactorily will, in certain In certain departments, be admitted direcdy to grade II courses. the distriof part satisfy fields these examinations may also be used to than six more anticipate thus may student No bution requirement. of the 12 hours required for distribution in each of the three groups. Such an examinadon, if given by a department, is described in a paragraph following the directions for election of work in the department.

General Examination Every candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must pass a general examination in the major subject. A candidate for the degree with honors must pass special honors examinations in place of or in addition to the general examination.

general examination is intended to test (1) the accuracy, extent, and depth of a student's knowledge of one subject (or field) (2) her intellectual initiative and independence in analyzing, organizing, and

The

;

relating the material of that subject; (3) her assimilation of to apply leading ideas met in that subject.

and

ability

Course Examinations examination period occurs at the end of each semester. Examinations for the removal of conditions and deficiencies and for advanced standing may be taken during any examination period and at other

An

specified times.

A student who wishes to take an examination upon a course which is not a part of her approved schedule for the year must apply to the Recorder for the requisite card of admission to the examination. Standard for Graduation

A certain quality grade is required for graduation and, for the purpose of determining this quality grade, numerical values called "points" are given to the grade letters as follows: for grade A, eight points for each semester hour of the course in which the grade is received, A-minus seven points, B-plus six points, and so on to C-minus one point; for (passing), no points; for a grade below D, no points and not grade counted in hours toward a degree. In order to be recommended for the degree of Bachelor of Arts a student must in each semester attain a

D

Degrees

48

(The credit ratio is the ratio of the number of quahty points earned to the semester hours carried.) Deficiency of points in any semester may be made good only in accordance with regulations adopted by the faculty. In general, students who are deficient in quality points at the end of the third year or who are otherwise not of diploma-grade standing will not be permitted to continue. The College reserves the right to require the withdrawal at any time of any student whose academic work is below diploma grade or who in credit ratio of 1.75.

the opinion of the College authorities

not contributing to the College specific reason need be assigned, and no fees already paid the College will be remitted in or benefiting from residence in

whole or

it.

is

No more

in part.

Honors

The

College offers to quahfied juniors and seniors an opportunity under the special direction of one or more instrucAlthough there is considerable flexibility in the kinds of pro-

to study for honoi's tors.

grams which may be arranged for candidates for honors, they tend to conform to one or the other of two types. (1)

The

student will elect a

minimum

will

of 42 hours in her special field.

These 42 hours or more must be unified by the subject of her investiga-

The

tion.

student's

program

will include at least six

pendent work, designated by the number 350

in her

hours of inde-

program, and

may

include 9 or 12 hours. The results of her investigation will usually be reported in the form of a thesis, and her work will be tested at the end of the senior year by a comprehensive examination, in part or

wholly (2)

oral.

The

student will elect a regular program with a major normally

of 24 to 30 hours

and related work

of 18 to 12 hours.

Her program

will

include at least three hours of 350 work and may in some cases include as much as 12 hours. The 350 work will be planned to suit the needs of the student, but in all cases it will be designed to enrich her knowledge of and develop her competence in her major field. In the 350

course she may undertake work in a period or field not studied in her regular courses, or work designed to develop connection with a related field, or work to extend and deepen her knowledge of a subject already

Such work will be tested by discussions with instructors, or written essays, or examination questions, sometimes At the end of the senior year the student will be given set in advance. either the general examination or a special comprehensive written examination, and a short oral examination.

studied in one of her courses.

General Instructions for Selecting Courses

The program

in the

freshman year

is

as follows:

Degrees

49 6 hours 24 hours

English 100 Electives, 4 six-hour courses Hygiene 121 (no academic credit)

30 hours

Total

five courses each semester and Hygiene education which has two appointments a physical in course 121, a week. In addition, students whose speech habits are found to be defective will be required to take remedial work in speech.

Freshmen normally carry

ELECTIVE COURSES OPEN TO FRESHMEN, ARRANGED BY GROUPS Group I. Art 100, 105, 106; English 100, 101, 102, 104, 107*, 108; French 101, 102, 103, 104, 200, 201, 202; German 101, 102; Greek 101, 104, 201, 202, 205; Interdepartmental 103, 106, 107*; Italian 101, 201, 202; Latin 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 201; Music 101, 200, 201; Russian 100*; Spanish 101, 102, 104; Speech 101, 102, 202. Economics 101; History 101, 102, 103*; Philosophy 103, Group 11. 104, 107*; Political Science 100; Sociology 102, 103. III. Astronomy 101; Botany 101, 103; Chemistry 101, 103, Geography 102; Geology 101, 103; Interdepartmental 103, 106; Mathematics 106, 107; Physics 101, 104, 105, 106, 205; Psychology

Group

106;

101*, 103*, 207*, 209*; Zoology 101, 102*, 103.

Preparation for Teaching

A student wishing special preparation for teaching may plan a fiveyear integrated course leading to a Bachelor of Arts at the end of the fourth year and a Master of Arts in Education at the end of the fifth. Such a student should consult her class dean about her plans as early in her course as possible. The courses in a student's field of concentration and her free electives will be chosen to provide preparation in the subjects which she especially Her program will include also courses in education desires to teach. which states.

will

enable her to meet requirements for certification in

Practice teaching will be included in the

work

many

of the fifth year.

Pre-Medical Course

A student who is planning to study medicine is advised to elect two pre-medical sciences in the freshman year. Attention is called to the fact that 24 hours are required as a basis for the general examination in any department, and that, in general, requirements for admission to medical schools of Class A can be met by 18 hours in chemistry and It is possible to fulfill the 12 hours in physics and zoology respectively. *

Requires special permission of Dean of Freshmen.

Degrees

50

minimum requirement for medical school and to take the general examination in a field not required for entrance. Since medical school requirements are in the process of change, each student should study carefully the most recent catalogue of the particular school which she has chosen.

Preparation for Hospital and Public Health

Work

Students planning to prepare for work in hospital or public health and zoology in their freshman for advanced courses. foundation necessary year in order to have the Directions for election, given under the Departments of Botany, Chemlaboratories should begin both chemistry

istry, Physics,

and Zoology, should be consulted. Preparation for Civil Service

A

student wishing to qualify for examinations offered by the United Commission or various state and local civil service agencies should consult with her major department and the placement States Civil Service

office

about appropriate combinations of courses.

some training

in statistics

For

and public administration

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

M.A.

AND

is

M.S.

many

positions

desirable.

DEGREES

Wellesley College ofTers graduate work leading to the degrees of

Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Education, and Master of Science in Hygiene and Physical Education. A candidate is required to comThe program may include a thesis plete twenty-four hours of work. embodying the results of original research or reports based on independIn general, a candidate is required to work in one departent work. ment. A candidate for the degree of Master of Arts or Master of Arts in Education is required to have a working knowledge of either French or German, to be tested by examination at entrance. Individual departments may require a second language. At least one year of is required of all candidates, but more time may be One year in residence is reof the work. completion needed for the quired of all candidates for the Master's degree. Information regarding requirements for admission, theses, final examinations, etc., will be found in the Graduate Circular which will be

graduate study

sent

on application

Instruction.

to the

Chairman

of the

Committee on Graduate

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 1950-51 '"T'he following courses of instruction are offered by the several de-'partments. The College reserves the right to withdraw the offer of any course not chosen by at least six students. All courses are classified in grades I, II, III; grade

mentary courses and grade courses are numbered 100,

I

indicating ele-

most advanced courses. Grade I grade II courses 200, etc.; grade III

III the etc.;

courses 300, etc.

The

first

semester

is

indicated by (1) following the course number, Courses not so designated are year courses.

the second semester by (2).

ART Professor:

Associate Professors:

Assistant Professors:

Instructors:

Bernard Chapman Heyl, m.f.a. (Chairman) Agnes Anne Abbot John MgAndrew, m.arch. DIRECTOR of THE ART MUSEUM Sydney Joseph Freedberg, ph.d. Elizabeth Holmes Frisch Teresa Grace Frisch, ph.d. Diether Thimme Arnold Geissbuhler* Natalie Elizabeth Park, m.a.

Hyman Bloom Christine Mitchell, m.a.

History of Art laboratory work in the one or more The department believes that concerned. laboratory training has great value in developing observation and understandIt ing of artistic problems, and for this reason requires it of majoring students. should be stated, however, that no particular natural aptitude is required and

Many of the courses in art include some

mediums with which

that the

100.

work

is

the course

is

adjusted to the student's ability.

Introductory Course. The major styles in Western architecand painting from ancient times to the present. A

ture, sculpture,

foundation for further study of the history of art. Simple laboratory work (requiring no previous training or artistic skill) planned to give Open to the student a greater understanding of artistic problems. *

Appointed

for the first semester only.

51

Courses of Instruction

52

freshmen, sophomores, and juniors without prerequisite.

The Teaching

Six hours.

Staff.

The development of Greek sculpture through the Hellenistic age. Study of focal monuments and artists in each successive period. Laboratory work, consisting Open to sophomores who have taken largely of modehng and carving. 100 and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Three hours.

201

(1).

from

its

Greek Sculpture.

origins

Mr. Thimme, Miss Park. Western European sculpture of the (1). Medieval Sculpture. Romanesque and Gothic periods, introduced by a brief study of preRomanesque art. Laboratory work consisting largely of modeling 202

and carving. Frisch,

203

Prerequisite,

same

as

201.

for

Three hours.

Miss

Miss Abbot.

(2).

Medieval Architecture.

Europe from the

Fall of

Rome

The

architecture

of

Western

to the beginning of the Renaissance,

with particular concentration on the great Romanesque and Gothic monuments. Occasional laboratory work. Prerequisite, same as for Three hours. Mr. McAndrew, Miss Park. 201.

207

(2).

Art of the Far

A

East.

study of the art of India, China,

and Japan, with particular emphasis on China. No laboratory work. Open to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Three hours. Miss

Frisch.

209

(2).

Art of the Roman

architecture, sculpture,

formation of the

Roman

The major monuments

in the

Roman Empire

of

from the Emphasis

through the Late Antique. main tradition of Western art. Three hours. Prerequisite, same as for 201. style

upon Roman contributions laboratory work.

Empire.

and painting to the

No Mr.

Thimme.

215 (1). Renaissance Art. The art of the Italian Renaissance, with emphasis on painting. Brief introductory consideration of ancient and medieval art. No laboratory work. Open to sophomores who have taken History 101 or Italian 101 or 103, and to juniors and Three hours. seniors who have not taken or are not taking Art 100.

Mr. Freed berg, Miss

Frisch.

Post-Renaissance and Modern Art. Western art from No laboratory the beginning of the seventeenth century to the present. work. Open to sophomores who have taken 215 and to juniors and Three hours. seniors who have not completed or are not taking 100. Mr. Thimme, Miss Mitchell.

216

(2).

European painting (1). Baroque Painting. and eighteenth centuries. No laboratory work. 218

of the seventeenth Prerequisite,

same

Art

Two

as for 201.

week with a third Mr. Heyl.

periods a

Three hours.

instructor.

53 at the pleasure of the

A study of painting in (2). Nineteenth Century Painting. Europe and America from about 1780 to about 1870. No laboratory work. Prerequisite, same as for 201. Two periods a week with a Three hours. Mr. Freedberg. third at the pleasure of the instructor. 219

Studies in Ancient Art. Intensive treatment of (2). Seminar. a few topics of primary importance in the history of Ancient Art. The selection will vary from year to year and may be determined by the No laboratory work. Open to juniors and interests of the class. 301

who have completed 201 or 209. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

seniors

302

(1).

Three hours.

Mr. Thimme.

Studies in Italian Painting: the 14th and 15th Centuries.

A

brief exposition of late medieval style in Italian painting, followed by studies of selected artists whose work significantly illustrates the

character of Early Renaissance

style.

Particular attention to Floren-

Laboratory work included. Open to juniors and seniors who have taken 100 and, by permission, to especially quahfied Three hours. Mr. Freedberg, Miss Park. students. tine

303

masters.

(2).

Studies in Italian Painting: the 16th Century.

Studies

of the major masters of the High Renaissance style, followed by the examination of some selected Mannerist painters, and of those developments within 16th century painting which lead in the direction of the

work included. Freedberg,

Laboratory Three hours. Mr.

Considerable attention to Venetian masters.

Baroque.

Prerequisite,

same

as for 302.

Miss Park.

Renaissance, Baroque, and Modern Sculpture. A study Labof the major sculptors from the fifteenth century to the present. oratory work consisting largely of modeling and carving. Open to students who have taken 100 or 215 and, by permission, to especially Three hours. Miss Frisch, Miss Abbot. qualified students.

304

(2).

305 (1). Modern Painting. A study of painting in Europe and America from about 1870 to the present. Prerequisite, same as for Laboratory work included. Three hours. Mr. Heyl, Mrs. 302. Frisch.

ENGRANaNG and Etching from the Renaissance to the The rise and development of engraving and etching including comparisons with the allied arts of woodcutting, mezzotinting, and lithographing, and a brief study of technical processes. Frequent visits to the Boston and Fogg museums. Open to juniors and Three hours. (Not offered in seniors who have completed 100. 306

(1).

Present Time.

1950-51.)

Courses of Instruction

54

307 (2). Problems in Medieval Style and TECHNiquE. Study of medieval manuscripts, mosaics, and wall paintings in Italy, with experiments in the medium concerned, for closer stylistic and technical analysis. Open to juniors and seniors who have taken 100 and Three hours. Miss Abbot. either 201 or 202. (1). Renaissance and Baroque Architecture. High Renaissance, Mannerist and Baroque styles

308

The Early and of the

fifteenth

through the eighteenth centuries, with particular emphasis on Italy. No laboratory work. Prerequisite, same as for 304. Two periods a week with a third at the pleasure of the instructor. Three hours. Mr. McAndrew. (Not offered in 1950-51.) 309

(2).

Modern Architecture.

architecture in requisite,

same

Europe and America

Two

as for 302.

The

development

modern Pre-

week with a third at the Mr. McAndrew, Miss Park.

periods a

Three hours.

pleasure of the instructor.

of

in the last seventy years.

(Not offered in 1951-52.) 311 (1). Painting of Northern Europe. The period from the late fourteenth century to the mid-sLxteenth century in France, Germany, and the Low Countries. Prerequisite, same as for 304. Three hours.

Mr. AfcAndrew, 325

(2).

Airs. Frisch.

The Nature and

Criticism of Art.

different approaches to the study of art,

theory, history,

An

analysis of various

and a consideration

and practice of art criticism.

Open

to seniors

of the

who have

completed or are taking six additional hours of grade III work in Three hours. Mr. Heyl and the Teaching Staff.

art.

Independent work on special 350. Research OR Independent Study. problems under direction of one or more members of the department. Open, by permission, to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking a course of grade III. Three hours for a semester or six hours for a year.

Studio Courses Six hours of studio work

may

count toward the degree after six hours have been completed; and twelve hours after twelve hours history of art have been completed. history of art

in the in the

105 (1). Dr A wtng AND Sculpture. Study of drawing and sculpture, with strong emphasis on design. Abstract problems in line and in Open to sophomores, relief, as well as portraiture and figure sketching. juniors, and seniors and, by permission, to freshmen who have studied art before entering college.

Six periods of class instruction

ward the degree after six Mr. Geissbuhler.

and three

This course may count tohours in the history of art have been completed.

of studio practice, counting three hours.

Art

55

Introductory Painting. Strong emphasis on design. and tonal problems partly abstract, partly representational, worked out in a variety of mediums. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors and, by permission, to freshmen who have studied art Six periods of class instruction and three before entering college. 106

(2).

Spatial

This course may count toof studio practice, counting three hours. ward the degree after six hours in the history of art have been completed.

Mrs.

206

Watercolor and Oil Painting. Landscape, still life, and Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have

(1).

Frisch.

portraiture.

completed 101, 105, or 106. Six periods of class instruction and three This course may count toward of studio practice, counting three hours. the degree after six hours in the history of art have been completed. Miss Abbot, Mrs. Frisch. Composition. Principles of design related to various types Problems may take the form of book illustration, Open to sophomores, juniors, and painting and mural decoration, etc. Six periods of class inseniors who have completed 105, 106, or 206. This struction and three of studio practice, counting three hours. course may count toward the degree after six hours in the history of art

208

(2).

of composition.

have been completed. 300

(1).

Mr. Bloom.

The Imaginative Method

and development

of ideas in the

in

making

Painting. of a picture.

The projection Open by per-

mission to juniors and seniors who have completed 105 or 106 and 206 Three hours. Mr. Bloom.

or 208.

Directions for Election

Course 100 is the basic introductory course for later work in the department and is required, except by special permission, of majoring (See Exemption Examination, below.) students. Students planning to major in the department must elect at least one course in each of the following four epochs: ancient, medieval (either 202 or 203), Renaissance and baroque, and modern (nineteenth

and twentieth

centuries).

Students majoring in the department must elect at least 24 hours in the history of art.

A

reading knowledge of French, German, or Italian, though not reis very strongly recommended. The attention of students is called to the interdepartmental honors

quired,

program

in Classical

Archeology or Medieval Studies.

Exemption Examination Freshmen and sophomores, who secure the permission of the chairman, may qualify for entrance to grade II in art by passing an ad-

Courses of Instruction

56

vanced standing examination, thus waiving the requirement

for taking

course 100.

Related Courses Related courses for concentration may be chosen from many departments. The following are typical examples of sound related work: Ancient Art: History 203, 204; Philosophy 107; many courses in the classical departments. Medieval Art: French 204; History 101, 309; Latin 106; Philosophy 323.

Renaissance and Baroque Art: English 101, 316; History 206, 217; French 301; Spanish 301, 305. Modern Art: English 210, 219, 230; French 306, 307; German 305. The following courses offer general related work: English 104, 107; History 101 or 200, 103; Music 103; Philosophy 203. Italian 103;

ASTRONOMY Assistant Professor:

101.

James Walter Warwick,

m.a.

(Chairman)

General Astronomy.

Ageneralsurvey of the facts of astronomy, which they are obtained and of the theories that them; facts with which every educated person should be

of the methods by

account for familiar in order to understand the astronomical allusions occurring in literature and to be alive to the beauty of the order that is about us. Open to all undergraduates. Three lecture appointments, one twohour laboratory appointment, and an average of about an hour of evening observations. Six hours. At times, an evening meeting of Mr. Warwick. the class is substituted for a daytime appointment.

200

(2).

Descriptive Astronomy.

The appearance

of the sky

and

changes; interpretation of observed appearances through the work Open to of astronomers; structure and behavior of the universe. Courses 101 and 200 may juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Three periods of lectures and not both be taken by the same student. On this evening, discussions, one of which will be on an evening. when the weather is favorable, the stars will be studied with the tele(Not offered in scope and otherwise. Three hours. Mr. Warwick. 1950-51.) its

206 (2). The History of Astronomy. Development of the science from ancient times to the present, with special emphasis on the peThree hours. (Not offered Prerequisite, 101. riod since Copernicus. in 1950-51.)

57

Astronomy

Practice in the use of astronomical (1). Practical Astronomy. instruments and methods: the equatorial telescope; elements of celestial Three hours. This course Prerequisite, 101 or 200. navigation. Mr. involves both daytime and evening work at the Observatory.

207

Warwick.

Practical Astronomy.

Determination of time, longitude,

208

(2).

and

latitude; astronomical principles of navigation.

Prerequisite, 101

This course or 200, and a knowledge of trigonometry. Three hours. Mr. involves both daytime and evening work at the Observatory. Warwick. 300 (1). Stellar Astronomy. Studies of the number, brightness, distribution,

ture of the seniors

who

and motions of the

double and variable

stars; struc-

Mr. Warwick.

Three hours.

nometry.

stars;

Galaxy; extra-galactic systems. Open to juniors and have completed 101 and who have a knowledge of trigo-

301 (2). Astrophysics. Astronomical spectroscopy; the laws of radiation; determination of radial velocities; physical properties and conThree hours Prerequisites, 1 1 and Physics 30 1 stitution of the stars .

.

with Physics 301 it may be counted toward a major in astronomy or physics. Mr. Warwick.

When combined 302.

Determination of Orbits. Equations of motion of two gravitaDetermination, from three observations, of the elliptic

ting bodies.

and parabolic

orbits of bodies in the Solar System.

Orbits of binary

and a knowledge of calculus. This course may be counted toward a major in either astronomy or mathematics. Mr. Warwick. (Not offered in 1950-51.) Six hours.

stars.

Prerequisite, 101

The attraction of bodies of various forms 303. Celestial Mechanics. under Newton's law of gravitation. The problems of two and of three bodies. culus.

Perturbations. Six hours.

Prerequisite,

Mr. Warwick.

differential

and

integral

cal-

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

Astronomical Seminar. Open to graduate students. Mr. Warwick. (Not offered in 1950-51.) narily, six hours. 304.

Ordi-

Work under one or more 350. Research or Independent Stltdy. members of the department on subjects to be determined by the This course may interests and capabilities of the individual student. be taken repeatedly. Open, by permission, to graduates and other advanced students. for a year.

Two

The amount

or three hours for a semester, or two to six of work contemplated must be indicated at

the time of handing in electives.

Directions for Election All students

who

desire a general

the universe around them

knowledge of astronomy and of

as a part of their general education should

Courses of Instruction

58

Those for whom this course is insufficient but who would avoid technicalities may well continue with 207 or 206. A major in astronomy should ordinarily include 101, 207, 208, 300, This combination of courses demands as prerequisites 301, and 302. twelve hours in mathematics and nine hours in physics. Astronomy 301 may be counted toward a major in physics, and Astronomy 302 toward a major in mathematics. elect 101 or 200.

BIBLICAL HISTORY, LITERATURE, Professor:

Associate Professors:

Assistant Professors:

Instructors:

AND INTERPRETATION

Louise Pettibone Smith, ph.d.

Ernest Rene Lacheman, b.d., ph.d. Herbert Morrison Gale, s.t.b., ph.d. Mary Lucetta Mowryi, b.d., ph.d. Ferdinand Joseph Denbeaux, s.t.m., b.d. (Chairman) Judiih Beach Welles, b.d., ph.d.

Frank Moore Cross, Jr., b.d., ph.d. Theodor Marcus Mauch, b.d., s.t.m. Hugh Stewart Barbour, b.d. Lecturers:

Beatrice Allard Brooks, ph.d.

Katharine McElroy Kent

*,

b.litt.oxon., b.d.

The requirement in Biblical history is met by course 104. Students with a knowledge of Greek may substitute course 210 for the second semester of 104.

the Old and New Testaments. Basic material: Old Testament; the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Aim: to acquire a knowledge of these materials, of their

104. Stltdies in

selected parts of the

and Luke.

Hebrew-Christian tradition and society. Required of sophomores except as indicated above. Six hours. Miss Smith, Mr. Gale, Mr. Lacheman, Mr. Denbeaux, Miss Welles, Mr. Cross, Mrs. Brooks, Mr. Barbour, Mr. Mauch. historical-critical analysis, of the rise of the

and the relevance of

this tradition to the individual

Elementary Hebrew. The elements of Hebrew grammar, with and the memorizing of a vocabulary. Reading At the end of the course the of selections from the Old Testament. student should be able to read simple Hebrew and to use the language Open to juniors and seniors. in the study of the Old Testament. 203.

practice in translation

Six hours.

Mr. Lacheman.

This course is de(1), (2). The Beginnings of Christianity. signed to enable those students who have already studied the synoptic gospels in 104 to continue their study of the New Testament and to see The Christianity in contact with the life of the Grasco-Roman world.

204

rise ^

*

and

earliest

development of the Christian

Absent on leave. Appointed for the

first

semester only.

religion.

Emphasis

59

Biblical History the thought of Paul and of the Fourth Gospel. Three hours. Mr. Gale.

upon

Prerequisite,

1

04

or 210.

The history of religions from the earliest through such leading religions as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Shintoism, and Islam, including a study of comparative developments and values. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed the required work in Biblical history. Six hours. Mrs. Brooks.

207.

History of Religions.

historical period

208 (1). Survey of the Application of Christian Ethics to Social Problems. A study of the attitudes of the Christian church toward social and political problems in certain periods of her history, past and An investigation of the opportunity of modern Christianity present. as

an agent of

social reconciliation

and reconstruction

in the light of

Open to the teachings of Jesus and the developments of history. students who have completed the required work in Biblical history and who have taken or are taking Economics 101, History 101 or 102 or any other coarse in medieval or modern history, or Sociology 102. Three hours.

Mrs. Kent.

This course covers the second semester of 104, and is planned for those students who, in fulfilling the Biblical history requirement, prefer to Open study the gospels in Greek rather than in English translation. to students who have completed the first semester of 104 and have Greek course. Students choosing completed or are taking a grade this way of fulfilling the requirement in Biblical history may postpone

210

The

(2).

First

same material

Three Gospels in Greek.

as the

H

the

work until their junior year without Mr. Gale.

special permission.

Three

hours.

211

The Old and New Testaments

(2).

The

ology.

results of

archeology

in

the Light of Archeupon Biblical

in their bearing

Emphasis upon the value of archeology in and making vivid the Biblical records. Chief emphasis on the discoveries in Palestine as portraying the life and customs of the people in that land. The inscriptions of Palestine and surrounding countries which have significance for Biblical history are Open to juniors and seniors who have comstudied in translation. Three hours. Mr. pleted the required work in Biblical history. history

and

illustradng,

Lacheman.

religion.

testing,

(Not given in 1950-51.)

Religious Education. A course meant for those who in or in church schools may be responsible for the guidance of children in understanding of the Christian faith, in prayer,

212

their

(1).

own homes

in the use of the Bible, in the worship, fellowship, and work of the church, in development of character and a sense of social responsibility.

Courses of Instruction

60

Suitable aims and methods in

work with children

of different ages.

Examination of best books available. Open to students who have completed the required work in Biblical history. Three hours. Miss Welles.

213

(1).

Judaism

Development in

its

The history of Graeco-Roman world, Christendom and

Judaism Since 70 A.D.

in

relation to the

Reading (in translation) of significant portions of Talmudic, Midrashic, poetic, and speculative literatures. Open to students who have completed the required work in Biblical history. Three hours. Mr. Lacheman. (Not offered in 1950-51.) Islam.

214

(2).

Studies in Christian Biography.

and women important

Studies of certain

men

development of the Christian religion and such as St. Augusillustrative of the varieties of Christian experience tine, St. Francis of Assisi, Luther, Loyola, George Fox, John Wesley, Cardinal Newman, Albert Schweitzer, General William Booth, Kagawa. Light is thrown on the origins and characteristics of presentday denominations. Prerequisite, 104. Three hours. (Not offered in the



in 1950-51.)

301.

Seminar

in

History of Religions.

Readings and discussions in

the history of religions other than Judaism

and

Christianity.

Each

student will be expected to investigate some particular problem. First semester: India and Islam; second semester: China and Japan. Open to seniors by permission. Six hours. Mr. Lacheman. (Not given in 1950-51.) 302. Interpretations of Christianity.

The varying

conceptions of

the essentials of Christianity as formulated in some of the most important periods of the history of the church; the relation of these conceptions to the religion of the New Testament and to the religious thought of the present day.

303.

203.

305

Open, by permission, Miss Smith.

to seniors

who have completed

to students

who have completed

Six hours.

204.

Second Year Hebrew. Open Six hours. Mr. Lacheman. (1),

(2).

Trends

in

Contemporary Christianity.

Studies of

contemporary conceptions of the Christian religion, as interpreted in Liberal and Neo-Reformation the light of modern life and thought.

and Neo-Thomism, Mysticism, SciHumanism, and Social Christianity. Prerequisite

Protestantism, Anglo-Catholicism entific

and

Classical

or corequisite, 204.

Three hours.

Air. Denbeaux.

the Old Testament. More detailed Old Testament. Both content and emphasis (historical, literary, religious) are determined by the interests Open to juniors and seniors who have taken or of the students. 306

(2).

work on

Further Studies

in

selected portions of the

Botany

61

are taking a grade II course in the department. Required of those who major in the department. Three hours. Mr. Cross.

Open

to

New

Testament. Intensive impact on the early church. Three hours. juniors and seniors who have completed 204.

307 (1). Advanced Stltdies in the study of the content of the gospels and

its

Mr. Lacheman.

Two to six hours. The 350. Research or Independent Study. amount of work contemplated must be indicated at the time at which electives are due.

Directions for Election After finishing the required course a student desiring to major usually In either junior continues her work by 204 and 305 in her junior year. orsenioryear shemay take any other of the grade II courses, 306 (required Students who for majors); in the senior year 301, 302, 307 or 350. the senior year. in in Hebrew 303 continue may juniors choose 203 as

Philosophy 211 may count toward a major in Biblical history. A year of Greek or Hebrew is strongly recommended for students majoring in Biblical history.

BOTANY Professor:

Associate Professors:

Howard Edward

Pulling, ph.d.

Grace Elizabeth Howard,

ph.d.

CURATOR OF HERBARHBI. Harriet Baldwin Greighton, ph.d. (Ghairman) Delaphine Grace Rosa Wyckoff, ph.d. Ruth Hutchinson Lindsay, ph.d. Assistant Professor:

Rhoda Garrison,

ph.d.

Instructors:

Dorris Jeannette Hutchison, ph.d.

Assistants:

Margaret Paige, b.a. Margaret Helen Emmerling, Elizabeth Hays Scheufele, Carol Wright Haff, b.a. Rosalie Ruth Schiferl, b.s.

Secretary

101.

and Custodian:

Jane Noyes Shaw, b.s. Alita Ann Zimmerman, Ellen Weiser Daggy

General Botany.

the principles of biology

An

b.s.

b.a.

b.s.

introduction to plant science presenting of plants in

and emphasizing the importance

our economic and social life. Topics considered include: growth and development of flowering plants; plant nutrition and its relation to animal and human nutrition; heredity and plant breeding; bacteria and other microorganisms; soil fertility; conservation of soil and forests; Practice is given in growing utilization of plant products in industry.

Courses of Instruction

62

Open to all undergraduates plants in the greenhouses and gardens. except those who have had Interdepartmental 103. Six periods a week, one of lecture, five of discussion and work in laboratory, greenand

house,

field.

Six

hours.

Miss

Creighton,

Miss

Garrison,

Miss

Howard, Miss Paige, Miss Lindsay.

An Introductory Course

103.

in

Biology.

For description and

prerequisites, see Interdepartmental Courses 103.

The study of cultivated plants with (1). Landscape Gardening. emphasis on their use in landscape gardening. Practice in applying the principles of design to gardens and to home and community plantOpen to sophomores who have completed 101 or 103 and to ings. Three hours. Miss Creighton. juniors and seniors without prerequisite. 201

202 (1), (2). Plant Biology. Principles that govern growth, development, and behavior, of organisms; practical use of these principles in gaining and applying knowledge to the care of plants and soil. Open to students who have completed 101 or 103 and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Six periods a week, three of lecture and three of laboratory.

Three hours.

Field Botany.

203

(1).

and

characteristics of the

Mr.

Pulling.

A course common

acquaint the student with names wild and cultivated ferns, flowers,

to

and trees, together with the study of the woodland, meadow, and pond associations of plants. Open to students who have completed 101 or 103 and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Three Six periods a week, three of lecture and three of laboratory.

shrubs,

bog,

hours.

Miss Howard.

204 (2). Basic Horticulture. The fundamentals of cultivation and propagation of house and garden plants and the methods of control Open to students who have completed of plant pests and diseases. Six 101 or 103 and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. periods a week, two of lecture and discussion and four of practice in greenhouse and laboratory. Three hours. Miss Garrison. 205 (2). Survey of Bacteriology. An introduction to the study of microorganisms in relation to man's physical and economic welfare, emphasizing their importance in daily living as well as in the larger fields

of agriculture,

industry,

public health,

and

disease control.

group III. Five periods a week, three of Three hours. Mrs. lecture and discussion and two of laboratory. Wyckof, Miss Hutchison. Prerequisite, six hours in

A

study of the agricultural and forest 207 (1) Plant Resources. resources of the world with emphasis on those of the United States considering the scientific basis for the production of plants for foods, and

Botany

63

A

discussion of the growth of ecoby soil, climatic, and influenced nomically important human factors. Open to sophomores who have completed 101, or Interdepartmental 103, or Geography 102, and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Counts toward a major in botany and for the

raw materials

for the

of industry.

plants, as

it

is

group III distribution requirement as a non-laboratory science. Three periods a week, in general two of lecture and one of demonstration. Three hours. The Teaching Staff. 301 (2). Advanced Landscape Gardening. Advanced work in the Open design of planting around houses, parks, and public buildings. to seniors who have completed 201 and six additional hours of grade Six periods a week, two of lecture and four II or grade III in botany. Three hours. (Not given in of practice in drafting room or field. 1950-51.)

302

(1).

Cytology and Morphology.

and organs,

their functions

and

The

study of

their role in the

cells,

tissues,

development of form

Practice in the preparation of plant tissues for micro-

in the organism.

to students who have completed twelve hours in Five periods a week, two of lecture and discussion and three Three hours. Miss Garrison. of laboratory.

scopic study.

Open

botany.

303

(2).

The study

Genetics.

of inheritance, considering

its

cellular

which knowledge of heredity is obtained, and Laboratory the application of this knowledge to biological problems. Open to juniors and seniors who have experimentation with plants. completed six hours in botany and six additional hours in botany or Five periods a week, two of lecture and discussion and three zoology. Three hours. Miss Creighton. of laboratory. basis,

304

the methods by

(2).

Plant Diseases.

The study and

ture, their physiological processes,

to students

modern methods

who have completed

periods a week, two of lecture,

house.

Three hours.

their eff"ects

on ornamental and

Practice in the cultivation of patho-

economically important plants. genic fungi and

of pathogenic fungi, their struc-

combating plant diseases. hours of grade II in botany.

of

six

and three of laboratory,

field,

Open Five

or green-

Miss Howard.

those fundamental processes that must be understood if knowledge of plant behavior is to be applied. Second semester: lectures on the chief processes by which plants are Exaffected by their environment and those by which they respond. 306. Physiology.

periments are in the

First semester:

fields that

each student

selects,

such as

cell physi-

ology, gardening, horticulture, non-infectious plant disease, plant nuOpen to juniors and seniors who have completed trition, soil-testing.

hours of grade II in botany and year of either chemistry or physics.

six

who have completed or are taking a Students who have completed 101

Courses of Instruction

64

or 103 may take this course and the prerequisite of grade II at the same time. Six periods a week, two of lecture and four of discussion and laboratory. Six hours. Mr. Pulling. 308.

General Bacteriology.

ological processes of bacteria

responses to the environment. fertility,

The study of the structure and physiand other micro-organisms, and their Consideration of their relations to soil and milk supplies, food spoilage and

industrial processes, water

and immunity. Practice methods and techniques that are essential for bacterioOpen to students who have completed one year of logical work. chemistry or physical science and either one year of botany, zoology, or preservation, sanitation, infectious disease, in laboratory

Six periods a week, in general

biology, or a second year of chemistry.

two of lecture and four of laboratory including two Mrs. Wyckoff, Miss Hutchison. hours.

field trips.

Six

312 (1). Advanced Bacteriology. The systematic study of the important groups of bacteria, including their serological relationships, with special reference to their roles in infectious diseases and in immunity. Presentation of selected topics from recent developments in Laboratory practice in bacteriological and serological bacteriology. Six periods a week, Prerequisite, 308. techniques and procedures. two of lecture and four of laboratory. Three hours. Mrs. Wyckoff,

Miss Hutchison.

The content of this course depends 320. Theoretical Physiology. upon the needs and interests of the students who elect it. The reading and discussions are concerned with the abstract and logical aspects of the subject; the methods by which research problems should be analyzed, the significance of explicit and implicit assumptions, the treatment of data, physiology as a field for deductive reasoning, etc. Open Mr. Pulling. Six hours. to graduate students only. 322.

Botanical Seminars.

The work

botanical background of each student

in the seminars

and on her plan

depends on the

for further study.

A field of botanical science

is scrutinized from the standpoints of modern achievement, method of investigation, and the theories and reasoning involved in reaching the present-day conclusions: (a) anatomy; {b) bacteriology; (c) comparative morphology; {d) cytology; {e) ecology; botany; (0 (/) genetics; {g) geographical distribution; {h) history of pathology; (j) physiology; {k) plant materials; (/) taxonomy. Open to Three to six hours for a semester or six to graduate students only.

twelve for a year.

The Teaching

Staff.

The study will be under the an instructor in the student's field of interest. The nature of the work will depend upon whether the student is an undergraduate Open to seniors and or a graduate student, and upon the field. 350.

Research or Independent Study.

direction of

Chemistry

65

Two

graduate students and, by permission, to juniors.

to six hours

for a year, or three for a semester.

Directions for Election

The courses

offer opportunities for the student to gain

an understand-

ing of living organisms that will be useful to her as a citizen and as an individual using plants and plant products, and to develop her ability to acquire

knowledge and

to use

it

intelligently

and purposefully.

In

who

plans for professional biological work, the courses provide a basis for employment and for postgraduate training. Students planning to continue their botanical work after graduation in teaching, research, technical laboratory work, horticulture, landaddition, for the student

scape gardening, or nature

museum

work, can select courses that will

satisfy their needs.

For students interested in bacteriology, public health, medical laboratory work, or related professional fields, courses 205, 308, and 312 Other courses, such as present the basic viewpoints and techniques. 302, 303, 304, and 306 in this department, as well as courses in chemistry

and zoology, supplement

these offerings.

Students interested in plant resources, their proper use and conservation will find courses in this department supplemented by courses in geology, geography, and zoology, or they may find the interdepartmental major in Natural Resources and Conservation suited to their needs.

(See page 154.)

A

reading knowledge of French and of students in graduate schools.

German

is

ordinarily required

CHEMISTRY Professor:

Associate Professor:

Assistant Professors:

Helen Thayer Jones,

Phyllida Instructors:

Assistants:

ph.d. (Chairman)

Garth Gilchrist, ph.d. Margaret Kingman Seikel, ph.d. Philippa

Mave

Willis, ph.d.

Janice Marilyn Cunliffe, m.a. Ann Dorothy Dubicke, ph.d. Roberta A. Stewart, ph.d.

Mary Herrick Ashworth, Ruth Elizabeth Johnson,

Mary Catherine Dorothy Boyd,

Mary Secretary

101.

and Custodian: Emily

Phillips

May

Elementary Chemistry.

b.a.

b.a.

O'Brien,

b.a.

b.s.

Towne,

b.a.

Hopkins, m.a.

The fundamental

laws and theories

of chemistry, in connection with the study of the non-metals and a brief survey of the metals. Open to students who do not present chemistry

Courses of Instruction

66 for admission.

Three periods of lecture and discussion and one threeMiss Jones, Miss Cunliffe, Six hours.

period laboratory appointment.

Miss Boyd. 103.

General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis.

A

survey

on preparatory work in laws, and problems are considered dur-

of fundamental chemical principles based

General theories,

chemistry.

ing the first semester and are applied in the second semester to the study Prerequisite, the admisof inorganic semimicro qualitative analysis. Three periods of lecture and discussion with one sion requirement. three-period laboratory appointment a week for the first semester, and two periods of lecture with six periods of laboratory for the second seThe second semester may be taken separately Six hours. mester.

by those who have completed 101 christ,

Miss

or,

by permission, 106.

Miss

Gil-

Stewart, and Assistants.

An Introductory Course in Physical Science. For descripand prerequisites, see Interdepartmental Courses 106. This course will, by special arrangement, serve as prerequisite for grade II courses Miss Jones, Miss L. Wilson, Miss Boyd, Miss Towne, Mrs. in chemistry. Hulswit, Miss Loud. 106.

tion

A study of the principles which (1). Qualitative Analysis. govern the reactions of electrolytes in solution, as illustrated by the chemistry of inorganic semimicro qualitative analysis. Prerequisite, Two periods of lecture and six periods of 101 or, by permission, 106. Three hours. Miss Dubicke, Miss Ashworth, Miss Johnson. laboratory.

201

202 (1), (2). Quantitative Analysis. A study of the fundamental methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis with emphasis on the Pretheory, laboratory technique and calculations of each method. Two periods of lecture and six periods of labrequisite, 103 or 201. Three hours. Miss Dubicke, Miss Willis, Miss Cunliffe. oratory.

A study of the methods of analysis (2). Quantitative Analysis. complex mixtures correlating the theory and techniques of analytical

207 of

chemistry with a few special instruments in modern usage. site,

202.

Two

Three hours.

periods of lecture

and

six

Prerequi-

periods of laboratory.

Miss Dubicke.

A systematic study of both the aliphatic 301. Organic Chemistry. and aromatic series. The laboratory work introduces the student to the fundamental methods of preparation and purification of typical organic compounds. Course 311 provides additional laboratory work Prerequisite, 103 or 201 or, by permission, in organic preparations. Three periods of lecture and discussion and one three-period 101. laboratory appointment.

Six hours.

Miss

Seikel,

Miss O'Brien.

Chemistry

67

Identification of Organic Compounds. A study of the qualitative analysis of organic substances. Since each student identifies individual compounds and mixtures, independent work is encouraged. The course offers a good introduction to research

302

(1).

systematic

methods and attitudes. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 202 and 301. Two periods of lecture and discussion, six periods of laboratory. Three hours. Miss Seikel. 303

(2).

A

Advanced Quantitative Analysis.

tative analysis in

which the emphasis

is

semester of quanti-

on instrumental analysis and

the theories underlying the use of the instruments. Much of the laboratory work includes individual analyses and may vary from year to year. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 202 and have

Two

completed or are taking 301. of laboratory. Three hours. 305

Miss

periods of lecture

and

six periods

Seikel.

Physical Chemistry,

{a) This course summarizes, and approblems, the laws of matter in its various stages of aggregation, and also the laws governing solutions, including the colloid state and thermochemistry. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 202 and have completed or are taking 301, a year of college

(1).

plies to practical

and Mathematics 106 or 107. {b) The subject matter is the A fuller knowledge of calculus is expected. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 202 and have completed or are taking 301, a year of college physics, and Mathematics 202. Three periods of lecture and discussion and one three-period laboratory appointment. Three hours. Miss Willis, Miss Cunliffe. physics,

same

306

as in {a).

(2).

Physical Chemistry,

especially chemical equilibrium,

and

theories of atomic

seniors

A continuation of 305, including reaction velocity, electrochemistry,

{a)

and molecular

who have completed

305.

Open

structure.

{b)

The

and same

to juniors

subject matter

is

the

as in {a). A fuller knowledge of calculus is expected. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 305 (b) and Mathematics 202. Three periods of lecture and discussion and one three-period laboratory appointment. Three hours. Miss Willis, Miss Cunliffe.

307

(2).

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.

A

of the different classes of inorganic substances retical interpretation of their interactions. seniors

301.

comprehensive survey

and

the

Open

modern

to

who have completed 202 and who have completed Three periods of lecture and

discussion.

juniors

theo-

and

or are taking

Three hours.

Miss

Jones.

308 (1). Biochemistry. Chemistry of representative substances occurring in living organisms. Nutritional values, including energy content, of food materials are considered. Open to juniors and seniors

Courses of Instruction

68

who have completed 202 and

301.

Two

cussion and five periods of laboratory.

periods of lecture and dis-

Three hours.

Miss

Gilchrist.

Chemistry of the more important organs of the changes which occur in the processes The laboratory work includes analysis of digestion and metabolism. Open to juniors and seniors who have comof body tissues and fluids. pleted 308 and who have completed or are taking Zoology 101 or 308. Well qualified students who have completed 202 and 301 and have completed or are taking Zoology 308 may, by permission, be admitted without the prerequisite of Chemistry 308. Two periods of lecture and discussion and five periods of laboratory. Three hours. Miss 309

and

(2).

Biochemistry.

tissues of the

body and

Gilchrist.

(1). Quantitative Org.^nic Microanalysis. Methods of elementary microcombustions, as well as micromethods for the quantiOpen, by tative determination of certain groups in organic molecules. permission, to a limited number of juniors and seniors who have comOne period of lecture and discussion, six to seven pleted 202 and 301. Three hours. Miss Cunliffe. periods of laboratory.

310

Organic Preparations. A laboratory course using semimicro methods and designed to supplement the training of students of organic Open to students who are taking or have completed 301. chemistry. 311.

One

three-period laboratory appointment.

Two

hours.

Aliss Stewart.

312 (1). Use of the Literature of Chemistry. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the published sources of chemical knowledge in order that she may use them more effectively in advanced work. Experience is gained by the solution of individual library problems of many types. Open to majors who have completed or are taking 202 and 301. hour.

Miss

One

period of lecture and discussion.

One

Seikel.

Reports on recent developments in chemistry. Open 320. Seminar. This course usually meets every other week for to graduate students.

two hours

in the evening.

Two

hours.

The Teaching

Staff.

An individual problem 350. Research or Independent Study. under the direction of the instructor in the field chosen. Laboratory work and reading. Open to graduate students and, by permission, to undergraduates who have completed at least 18 hours in the department. Three hours for a semester or six hours for a year.

Directions for Election

Members of the department will be glad to advise students concerning courses which would best prepare for graduate study, for teaching,

Economics for

work

69

in industrial or hospital laboratories, for nursing, or for public

health work.

Premedical students are referred to the requirements as given on page 49. The American Chemical Society has established a set of requirements which it considers essential for the training of chemists, especially for Students wishing to meet the standard of an acindustrial work. credited chemist as defined by this Society should consult the chemistry department. For any major in chemistry one of the following sequences of courses is essential: Physical Science 106 or Chemistry 101, and 201, 202, and Any other courses in the department may 301; or 103, 202, and 301. be added to these to complete the 24-hour major. For admission to most graduate schools Chemistry 305 and 306 with prerequisite of Mathematics 202 are required. It is advisable that all students majoring in chemistry should complete at least one year of college physics and one year of college mathematics, and acquire a reading knowledge of French and German before the For graduate work in chemistry a reading knowledge of senior year. French and German is required. Students not majoring in chemistry who intend to use their chemistry after graduation will be recommended by the department only if they have completed at least 1 8 hours of chemistry.

Exemption Examination Unusually well-qualified students may apply for an examination covering the year's work in Chemistry 101. A college textbook of general chemistry should be used in preparation for this examination. The passing of this examination may be used as the prerequisite for Chemistry 201 or as the equivalent of Chemistry 101 in the work for distribution.

ECONOMICS Professors:

Assistant Professors:

Instructors:

Lawrence Smith ^, m.a. Lucy Winsor Killough', ph.d. (Chairman) Richard Vernon Clemence, ph.d. Joseph Thistle Lambie, ph.d. Hilda Rosenbloom, m.a. Virginia Buckner Miller, m.a.

Carolyn Shaw Solo,

ph.d. (lond.)

Nicholas Aston Beadles, m.a.

A course which assists the student in 101. Introductory Economics. understanding contemporary life through a study of the economic foun2 3

Absent on leave Absent on leave

for the first semester. for the

second semester.

Courses of Instruction

70

The national income and its relationship to dations of our society. Economic principles and the institutions prosperity and depression. within which they operate. The American economic system compared with other existing or theoretical systems of economic organization. Open to all undergraduates. Sections for freshmen will be arranged. Six hours. Mr. Smith, Mrs. Killough, Mr. Clemence, Mr. Lambie, Mrs. Rosenbloom, Mrs. Miller, Mrs. Solo, Mr. Beadles.

A study of the consumer consumer activities on the economy and Inthe impact of economic conditions and policies on the consumer. studies; family budget expenditures; consumption and distribution come costs of living and standards of living; marketing policies as they affect the consumer; consumer cooperatives; legislative protection of the consumer. Prerequisite, 101. Three hours. Mrs. Rosenbloom. 203

The Economics

(1).

of Consumption.

in our society: the influence of

204 (2). Economic History of the United States. Our national development in its economic and social aspects, with special emphasis upon the struggle between agrarian and business interests, the growth of business combinations and labor unions, and the development of government control of business. Open to sophomores, juniors, and Three hours. Mr. seniors who have completed or are taking 101. Lambie.

209

Economic History of England, A study of the economic which have influenced the development of modern British ideas

(1).

factors

This institutions since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. course applies historical perspective to the economic and social problems which face the Labor government today. Open to sophomores, Three juniors, and seniors who have completed or are taking 101.

and

Mrs.

hours.

Solo.

Organization of Society. Money, credit, general Emphasis on monetary systems and price levels, and business cycles. current monetary problems. The work of commercial banks and the 210. Financial

functioning of the Federal Reserve system.

Business cycles are dealt

with historically and theoretically, and methods of stabilization are Mr. Beadles. Six hours. Prerequisite, 101. analyzed.

Introduction to Social and Economic Statistics. methods as used in the social sciences. Organization and Frequency distributions and simple presentation of statistical data. Introduction to time series analysis and index numbers. correlation. Open to students who have completed 101 and, by permission of the chairman of the department, to juniors and seniors who are taking 101. 211

(2).

(1),

Statistical

Credit for this course will not be given to a student receiving credit for Mathematics 205. Laboratory conferences will be required. Three hours.

Mr.

Clemence, Mrs. Rosenbloom.

Economics 212

(2).

Principles of Accounting.

71

A

survey of the fundamental on the relation of accounting economic theory and contemporary economic

principles of accounting with emphasis

theory and practice to problems. The aim of the course is to enable the student to interpret and utilize accounting data in other fields of economics and in analyz(Not offered ing public policy. Prerequisite, 101. Three hours. in 1950-51.)

300

(1).

Economic Analysis,

Methods

of defining

Modern

techniques of analysis ap-

and employment. and reaching conclusions with respect to economic

plicable to problems

of prices, output, income,

problems, and of appraising the significance of results. Open to juniors seniors who have completed 101 and six additional hours in economics. Three hours. Mr. Clemence.

and

Comparative Economic Systems. An examination of capiand proposed or attempted economic systems such as socialism, fascism, communism, and planned economy. A comparison of the economic programs of the United States, Great Britain, and Russia. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 101 and have com301

(2).

talism

pleted or are taking one of the following: 204, 209, 300, 305, 308, History 202, 209, 222, 306, Political Science 316, 318, Sociology 316.

Three hours.

Airs. Miller.

305 (2). Public Regulation OF Business. The policy of government toward business. Special fields of regulation: the "natural monopolies" (transportation, public utilities, and communications), petroleum, and the declining industries of bituminous coal and agriculture. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 101 and have completed or are taking one of the following: 203, 204, 209, 210, 300, Political Science 201, 202, 204, 304.

306

(1).

Three hours.

Mr. Lambie.

Corporations and Combinations. Corporate structure and The market for corporate securities, including invest-

operation.

ment banking, other investment

institutions, the stock

exchange, gov-

ernment regulation of security issues and exchanges. Problems arising fi-om the development of great corporations, through both concentration and combinations; anti-trust policy in the United States. Open to students who have completed 101 and have completed or are taking one of the following: 204, 210, 211, 212, History 222, Political Science 201, 304, Sociology 205. Three hours. Mrs. Miller.

Labor Economics. Problems of the worker in modern soincluding the problems of technology, unemployment, wages, hours, the substandard worker; attempts to solve labor problems, including recent trade union developments and labor legislation. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 101 and have completed or 308

(1).

ciety,

Courses of Instruction

72

are taking one of the following: 203, 204, 209, 210, 300, Sociology 205, Three hours. 206, Political Science 201, 202, Psychology 309, 310. Mrs. Rosenbloom.

and problems of government and the national income; the shifting and incidence of taxation. Special emphasis on the tax system of the United States. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 101 and have completed or are taking one of the following: Three hours. Mrs. 203, 204, 209, 210, Political Science 201, 304. 310

(1).

Public Finance.

revenues, expenditures,

and

Principles

debts.

Fiscal policy

Killough.

312 (2) *. Economic Statistics. Economic statistics, with special emphasis on the techniques of time series analysis and the construction Probability theory and multiple and partial of index numbers. Consideration of the place of the quantitative method in correlation. economics. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 211 or, by permission of the chairman of the department, to students who have completed Mathematics 205, and have completed or are taking any other course of grade II in economics. Laboratory conferences will be arranged. Three hours. Mr. Clemence. 313 (2). Seminar. Selected Topics in Economic Movements and Theories. Each year a different field of research is selected. Open to seniors and graduate students, approved by the chairman of the department, who have taken eighteen hours in economics. Two consecutive hours each week with a third at the pleasure of the instructor. Three hours. Mrs. Solo. 314

(2).

International Economic Relations.

tions of international trade.

movements.

Industrial foundaTheories of international trade and capital

Institutions of international

trade

and

international economic position of various countries.

and

seniors

finance.

Open

The

to juniors

who have completed 101 and have completed or are taking who are majoring in geography, history or political

204, 209, or 210, or

and have completed or are taking a grade major subject. Three hours. Mrs. Solo.

science

II course in their

315 (2). History of Economic Thought. The development of economic thought from ancient to modern times. A brief survey of early economic ideas, followed by a more detailed examination of the The systems of the leading economists history of economics since 1776. Open to juniors in the light of their own times and of the present day. and seniors who have completed 101 and who have completed or are (Not offered taking six additional hours in economics. Three hours. in 1950-51.) *

Offered in alternate years.

Education

73

316 (2) *. Modern Economic Thought. Recent developments in economic thought, and their significance for theory and policy. Reading and discussion of contemporary economic literature. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 101 and who have completed Three hours. Mr. or are taking six additional hours in economics. Clemence.

320

(2).

Population Problems. (Not offered

see Sociology 320.

For description and prerequisites, in 1950-51.)

Research or Independent Study. To a limited number of advanced students wishing to do individual work outside of regular courses the department is prepared to offer a course of directed reading, Students desiring to registo be tested by examination or final paper. ter for such a course must secure the approval of the chairman of the department in advance of the time at which electives are due. Two to three hours for a semester or four to six hours for a year. 350.

Related Course

The

attention of students

who

are interested in the teaching of eco-

nomics is called to Education 308, The Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School.

Exemption Examination prepared to offer an examination for advanced standing covering the field of introductory economics.

The department

is

EDUCATION Associate Professor:

John

Pilley, m.a. oxon. (Chairman)

Instructor:

McLaughlin Stephens, m.a. Wilbury Arthur Crockett ^ m.a.

Lecturers:

Myrtle Agnes Stuntzner,

Assistant Professor:

Isabella

m.a.

director of the ANNE L. PAGE MEMORIAL SCHOOL Richard Walden Hale, Jr., ph.d.

The department

of Education offers both undergraduate and graduate A Eighteen hours of work may be counted toward the B. A. degree. more detailed statement of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Education may be found in the Graduate Circular. courses.

200

(1), (2).

Principles OF Education

Human

I.

A preliminary study of the

development contrasted with organic growth. Education as training and as self-directed activity. The meaning of a liberal education. Open to sophomores who have had or are taking a course in philosophy or psychology, and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Three hours. Mr. Pilley, Mrs. Stephens, Mr. Hale. educative

* ^

process.

Offered in alternate years. for the second semester only.

Appointed

Courses of Instruction

74 201

(2).

Principles of Education

Three hours.

Prerequisite, 200.

202

A continuation of course 200.

II.

Mr.

Pilley.

Social Aspects of Education. The school and its reThe teacher's work. Conflicting educational poliThe future in education. Visits to neighboring schools. PrereqThree hours. Mrs. Stephens. 200.

(2).

lation to society. cies.

uisite,

212

(1).

Religious Education.

For description and prerequisites,

see Biblical History 212.

300

(1).

Secondary Education.

The

r61e of secondary schools of

Their aims, government, and economic for the students prepare is intended to course The backgrounds. method courses offered in the second semester. Prerequisite, 200 and Mrs. Stephens. 201 or 202, and a course in psychology. Three hours.

various kinds within the educational system.

and organization

in relation to their social, political,

301 (2). The Teaching of Latin in the Secondary School. The Improved methods place of Latin in the secondary school curriculum. read in high authors Review of language. ancient the teaching of school with study of the historical and social background of their times. Evaluation of texts. Practice in prose composition. Observation of Latin classes in neighboring schools. Open to seniors who have taken Education 300, and who are taking a grade III course in Latin; or by permission. Latin.

This course may be counted toward a 30-hour major in Miss Rohathan {Professor of Latin)

Three hours.

302 (2). History of Educational Ideas and Institutions. The development of educational ideas and institutions from the sixteenth century to the present. The main emphasis is upon the developments accompanying the rise of the middle class and of industrialism. The course includes readings from the works of leaders in educational Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Education 200 thought.

and Philosophy 303

(2).

107.

Three hours.

The Teaching

Mr. Hale.

of French in the Secondary School.

The

principles underlying the teaching of French, with special reference to The integration of the learning capacities of secondary school pupils.

modern

foreign languages with other studies in the curriculum.

The

equipment of the teacher and her department. The organization of courses in French, including the choice and use of texts and other Observation of French classes in neighboring schools. materials. Open to seniors who have taken Education 300 and who are taking French 301, 305, 306, or 307; or by permission. This course may be counted toward a major in French. Three hours. Miss Dennis {Professor of French)

75

Education

of the Young Child. The study of the young A child at successive stages of growth: physical, social, and mental. educain the procedures actual and of theories fundamental of survey school tion of children at the nursery school, kindergarten, and primary their and study, child of Critical examination of techniques levels. problems. current and findings recent on Emphasis interpretation.

The Education

305.

Opportunities for observation and special study at the Page Memorial Open to seniors who have taken 200 and 201 or 202, and a course in psychology, and to graduates. Six hours. Miss Stuntzner. School.

307

(2).

The Teaching of English

in

the Secondary School.

A

study of the role of language in thought and communication. Recent trends in English teaching and modern methods of encouraging secondary school pupils in the arts of reading and writing. A study of the contribution that literature can make to the personal development

young people. Visits to schools, libraries, etc. Open to seniors whose college course includes at least 18 hours in the department of Three hours. Mr. English, and who have taken Education 300.

of

Crockett.

308 (2). The Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School. Methods of encouraging high school students in an understanding of the society in which they are living and of its historical development.

The

relations

social studies

between the kinds of knowledge developed in the separate and the methods whereby a preliminary understanding of

may be encouraged in high school students. The particuproblems that arise in teaching the social study in which students have specialized. Visits to neighboring schools. Open to seniors majoring in history, economics, political science, sociology, or geography, who have taken Education 300. Three hours. Mr. Hale. these relations

lar

Subject determined by the preparation and interests Open to graduates and seniors approved by of the individual student. Mr. Pilley. Six hours. the department. 310. Seminar.

Research or Independent Study. Subject determined by the preparation and interests of the individual student. The work will be under direction of one or more members of the department. Students wishing to study methods of teaching special subjects in which 350.

the department does not offer courses are advised to consult the chairman of the department as to possibilities of their making such study

under

Two

this

heading.

Open, by permission,

to graduates

and

seniors.

to six hours.

Directions for Election Students

who

intend to teach should (in their sophomore year if member of the department concerning city and state

possible) consult a

Courses of Instruction

76

requirements for the certificate to teach. In a majority of states these requirements include from fifteen to eighteen hours in education; a few Plans should be made in the sophostates require twenty-four hours. more year for completion of the necessary courses in education in the junior and senior years. A student wishing special preparation for teaching may plan a fiveyear integrated course leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree at the end of the fourth year and a Master of Arts in Education at the end of the fifth.

Such programs fifth I.

as those indicated

below

may

be arranged for the

year:

Primarily for secondary school teachers. 12 hours in any of the following: 300, 301, 302, 303, 307, 308, 310, a course in psychology chosen in consultation with the depart-

ment; 12 hours in one department other than education. II.

Primarily for teachers of young children. 305, 310, and 12 hours in one or more departments other than education, to be arranged in conference with the department.

ANNE

L.

Director:

PAGE MEMORIAL SCHOOL

Myrtle Agnes Stuntzner,

m.a.

The Anne L. Page Memorial School, as the college laboratory school, is an integral part of the Wellesley College educational program. It is a center for child study, observation, and participation for students from all departments of the College. The Its

is for children from three through eight years of age. based on the recognition of the value of child study in the

school

work

is

education of children and in their development as free and responsible

human

beings.

The program

of the school

that the early years of a child's

whole pattern of

his personality.

life

is

one which recognizes

are significant in laying

down

the

77

English

ENGLISH Professors:

Associate Professors:

Assistant Professors:

Instructors:

Edith Christina Johnson, ph.d. Katharine Canby Balderston, ph.d. Ella Keats Whiting, ph.d.

Grace Ethel Hawk, b.litt.oxon. Walter Edwards Houghton, ph.d. Emma Marshall Denkinger^, ph.d. M. Eleanor Prentiss'', m.a. Charles William Kerby-Miller, ph.d. Mary Ruth Michael, ph.d. Evelyn Kendrick Wells «, m.a. (Chairman) Ruth Carpenter Child, ph.d. Roberta Margaret Grahame, ph.d. Katherine Lever, ph.d. Sylvia Leah Berkman i, ph.d. Mary Doyle Curran, ph.d. Virginia Fleming Prettyman, ph.d. Helen Storm Corsa, ph.d. Seymour Betsky, ph.d. Cathleen O'Conor Epstein, m.a.oxon. Mary Joan Ellmann, ph.d. John Lewis Bradley, ph.d. Beverly Joseph Layman, m.a.

Dargan Jones,

m.a.

Patrick Francis Quinn, m.a. Justine Dexter Dyer, m.a.

Renate Christine Wolff, m.a. Mary Elkins Moller, m.a.

Required Composition. First semester: exposition. Emphasis on use of source materials. Weekly themes or their equivalent. Second semester: critical and interpretative writing; description; simple 100. t

^

Required of Fortnightly themes or their equivalent. This course may not count toward a major in English. Miss Child, Miss Grahame, Miss Lever, Mrs. Ellmann, Miss Corsa, Mr. Bradley, Mr. Layman, Miss Jones, Mr. Quinn, Miss Prettyman, Miss Dyer, Miss Wolf, Mr. Betsky, Mrs. Epstein.

narration.

freshmen. Six hours.

A

practical Continuation Course in Composition. training give to designed writing expository of types various in course in analysis, and in the organization and efTective presentation of ideas.

100a

(1).

Absent on leave (Faculty Fellow) Absent on leave for the first semester. ' Absent on leave for the second semester. ^

^

D

in the first semester of 100 will be placed in a special them more practice in writing. her work in any If a student submits papers notably deficient in English as part of department, she may be referred to the Department of English for such remedial t

Students making only

section for the second semester to give

work

as

is

necessary.

Courses of Instruction

78

Required of students who have made of 100. Three hours. Miss Jones.

D

grade in the second semester

101. English Literature of the Renaissance. A study of Elizabethan literature with emphasis on Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare. Designed to illustrate the spirit of the age and its literary achievement, and to develop a critical understanding of important continuing types of literature. Open to all undergraduates. Six hours. Miss Hawk, Miss Michael.

The Interpretation of Literature.

102.

and drama, studied

of poetry, fiction,

The

The

in the

theory and practice

work

of certain major

designed to teach students to read and evaluate literature. In 1950-51, the reading will center on a seventeenth century poet, Pope, and T. S. Eliot for poetry; Dickens, Henry James, and James Joyce for fiction; Shakespeare, Congreve, and Ibsen for drama. Open to all undergraduates. Six hours. Mrs. Curran, Mrs. Ellmann, Mrs. Epstein, Mr. Betsky, Miss Prettyman.

writers.

course

is

Survey of English Literature. The analysis, through lecand discussion, of representative English authors and works, chosen primarily to illustrate: the permanent spirit and developing characteristics of a people; the moods of successive periods; shifts and varied emphases in taste and ideas. Open to all undergraduates. Certain sections will be reserved for juniors and seniors. Six hours. 104.

tures, reading,

Miss

Mr.

Child,

Bradley,

Miss Grahame, Mr. Layman, Mrs. Ellmann, Miss

Dyer.

107. Interpretations

Man

of

also

and prerequisites, footnote on page 84.

108

(1).

description

in

Ballads and Folk Songs.

tional songs today.

Western

Literature.

see Interdepartmental Courses 107.

For See

English and American tradifolklore, legend, connection

Their poetry, music,

with other folk expressions (dance,

Their reflection Conditions of survival, as observed especially in the southern Appalachians. Open to all undergraduates. Three hours. Miss Wells. of earlier societies

201

(1

),

(2).

The

and

tale, play, etc.).

their influence

Essay.

on present

culture.

A study of the development of the technique

of the English essay through the letter, the character,

and other

literary

Varied reading in contemporary essays and frequent practice in writing diff~erent types of essays. Open to students who have completed the requirement in English composition. Not open to students majoring in English who have completed three semesters of grade II work Three hours. in writing or who are taking another writing course.* Miss Johnson. (Not given in 1950-51.)

forms.

* If

such students were exempted from course 100 at midyears, they

fourth semester of grade II

work

in writing.

may

take a

79

English 203

(2).

(1),

Studies in Journalistic Writing.

news

selected types of journalistic writing:

A

critical

study of

story, editorial, special ar-

book review, dramatic review, as exemplified in typical newspapers and weekly periodicals. Constant practice in writing. Preticle,

requisite,

same

as for 201.

Three hours.

Mr. Kerby-Miller.

Critical Writing. Practice in writing analytical and Study of modern critical theory, with ilPrerequisite, same as for 201. lustrative reading of modern criticism. Three hours. Miss Child. 205

(2).

interpretative criticism.

206

(1).

writing



Informative Writing. Practice and interpretative

and needs of individual members of the Three hours. Miss Wolff. 201. 207

(1), (2).

in several forms of prose



critical, factual,

in relation to the interests

class.

Varied Forms OF Writing.

Prerequisite,

Practical

and

same

as for

creative forms

Types of writing seof prose composition with illustrative reading. Four long papers lected in accordance with the interests of the class. Special division as for 201. same Prerequisite, reports. and short open to freshmen exempted from 100 at midyears. Three hours. Miss

Prentiss,

Miss

Child,

Mrs. Moller.

Problems form of literary Emphasis on the contemporary biographer's way of handling art. Writing varied and frequent. Prerequisite, same as for his materials. Three hours. Miss Prentiss. 201. 208

and

Studies in Biography and Literary Portraits.

(2).

practices that distinguish biography as a developing

209

Verse Composition. Study of the principles of English and frequent practice in the techniques of verse. Prereqsame as for 201. Three hours. Miss Grahame.

(2).

versification uisite,

210

(2).

(1),

poets,

taken

recent

Modern Poetry.

English and American poetry and

and contemporary.

Open

to

sophomores who have

hours of literature in the department, and to juniors and without prerequisite. Three hours. Miss Grahame, Mrs.

six

seniors Curran.

This history of the drama of own day, with study of the our England and America from 1879 to influence of Ibsen and other continental dramatists. Prerequisite, same as for 210. Three hours. Miss Denkinger.

212

(2).

Modern English Drama.

A critical study of Milton as a master of lyric, (2). Milton. and dramatic poetry, and as a writer of notable prose. The character and genius of the poet, as influenced by the political and Three Prerequisite, same as for 210. religious conflict of the time. Miss Hawk. hours. 217

epic,

(1),

Courses of Instruction

80

The English Novel: The Rise of the Type. The growth EngHsh novel from Elizabethan times through Scott, with special consideration of the outlook and narrative technique of the greater 218

(1).

of the

Section

novelists.

Smollett, Sterne, b

will

figures

will

deal with Defoe, Scott,

concentrate, with collateral

who

century. Miller,

a

Jane Austen,

illustrate

Prerequisite,

Miss

Richardson,

Fielding,

and a few minor writers. Section reading, on two or three major

the principal developments in the eighteenth

same

as for 210.

Three hours.

Mr. Kerby-

Corsa.

IN THE Nineteenth Century. A study and of the reflections in their works of artistic, social, and intellectual movements during the period. Section a will deal with eight or nine novelists from Dickens through Conrad. Section b will concentrate, with collateral reading, on two or three figures who illustrate some of the principal developments in the century. Prerequisite, same as for 210. Three hours. Mr. Ker by-Miller, Miss Corsa, Mr. Bradley.

219

(2).

The English Novel

of the greater novelists

220 (1). Chaucer. A study of Chaucer's poetry, tracing the development of his art and showing the relation of his work to the social and literary background of his time. Prerequisite, same as for 210. Three hours. Miss Whiting.

A study of the (1). History of English Drama to 1642. growth of English drama from its beginnings to its culmination in the work of Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists. Prerequisite, same Three hours. Miss Lever. as for 210.

221

History of English Drama, 1660-1900. A study of and eighteenth and nineteenth century drama, with emphasis upon the intellectual and social forces that shaped it. Open Three hours. Miss Lever. to students who have taken 221. Ill

(2).

Restoration,

American Literature. The beginnings of American literaand the social conditions out of which it grew, followed by a consideration of American writers through Melville. Emphasis upon major figures. Prerequisite, same as for 210. Three hours. Miss Michael, Mr. Quinn. 112) (1).

ture

114

American Literature. American writers from Whitman Emphasis upon major figures. Open to students

(2).

to the present time.

who have

taken 223.

The Age

Three hours.

of Dryden.

ALiss Michael,

The

Mr. Quinn.

revolt against Puritanism and poetry of Dryden, Waller, and others; the diaries of Pepys and Evelyn; John Bunyan; the satire of Butler, Dryden, and the Restoration Wits; developments in prose

225

(2).

the growth of rationalism.

The

lyric

English

81

and the rise of periodical literature, with emphasis upon Defoe, and Addison. Prerequisite, same as for 210. Three hours.

style;

Steele,

Mr. 230.

Kerby-Miller.

The Romantic

Major emphasis upon the poetry and

Poets.

criticism of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, and Keats. Mr. Houghton, Miss PrettySix hours. Prerequisite, same as for 210.

man.

Study of the specific technical prob301 (1), (2). The Short Story. lems of the short story, with some consideration of its historical development and of contemporary trends in England and America. Four Open to juniors original short stories and occasional critical reports.

and seniors who have completed six hours of grade Three hours. Mrs. Curran, Miss Prentiss.

II

work

in writing.

Theories and TECHNiquES of Literary Criticism. Study and of selected writings representative of NeoAnalysis of classical, Romantic, and contemporary critical theories. Lectures, class various literary works in the light of these theories. Open to juniors and seniors who have comdiscussion, short papers. pleted or are taking six hours of grade II in English and, by permission, to specially qualified non-majors who have not met the prerequisites. Three hours. Miss Johnson. 303

(1).

of Aristotle's Poetics

304. Seminar and narrative

in

Writing.

Advanced study

of techniques of dramatic

—which may be —and a sustained

writing, with their application in a play

original or a dramatization of

an approved work

long narrative which involves artistic interpretation. Open to seniors who have completed 301, and to graduate students. Six hours. Miss Johnson.

The magain Journalistic Writing. and other types of expository and journalistic writing. Stress on original and effective methods of presentation and the development of a finished expository style. Reading in the best contemporary journals. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are tak305

(1).

Advanced Studies

zine article

ing six hours of grade II in English, including three hours of grade II work in writing, and, by permission, to specially qualified non-majors who have not met the prerequisites. Three hours. Mr. Kerby-Miller.

308 (1), (2). The Modern Novel. Major trends in the development of the novel in the twentieth century with relation to its shifting points Representative authors will be of emphasis in form and purpose. studied to indicate the influences of modern psychological and social

and of movements in allied arts upon the novel of this century. and seniors who have either (1) completed a course of grade I literature and are taking six hours of grade II literature in the

forces

Open

to juniors

Courses of Instruction

82

department, or (2) completed six hours of grade II literature in the department. Specially qualified non-majors who lack the prerequisite may be admitted to this course by permission of the department. Three hours. Miss Johnson. Shakespeare's development as dramatist and through twenty plays. Some consideration of his debt to his contemporaries, his use of Elizabethan ideas, his theater, representative source studies, Shakespearian criticism, theories of tragedy. Miss Balderston, Miss Six hours. Prerequisite, same as for 308.

309. Shakespeare. poet, studied

Michael.

310

Pope and Swift considered as representaand rationalism, and as masters of satire. Three hours. Miss Balderston. 308.

Pope AND SwaFT.

(1).

tive writers of neo-classicism

Prerequisite,

same

as for

311 (2). The Age of Johnson. The second half of the eighteenth century studied as a period of transition between the neo-classic and romantic eras. Dr. Johnson will be the center of the course, and the periphery will include Goldsmith, Boswell, Burke, Gray, Gowper, Blake,

and Burns.

Prerequisite,

same

as

for

308.

Miss

Three hours.

Balderston.

312

(2).

History of the

English

A

Language.

study

of

the

English language with emphasis upon growth and structure and upon the relation of the language to the literary expression of English-speakOpen to juniors and seniors who have completed or are ing people. of grade II in English and, in addition, to students who hours taking six Miss Whiting. are concentrating in foreign languages. Three hours.

Victorian Prose. The prose of Macaulay, Huxley, Garand Newman, studied with special reference to Victorian conceptions of politics, science, religion, and aesthetics. Prerequisite, same as for 308. Three hours. Mr. Houghton. 314

(1).

lyle. Mill,

315(2).

Victorian Poetry and Griticism.

The

poetry of Tenny-

son, Browning, Arnold, Morris, and Hopkins studied in connection with the criticism of Ruskin and Arnold. Prerequisite, 230 or 314. Specially qualified non-majors who have not completed the prerequisites

may

be admitted by permission.

Three hours.

Mr. Houghton.

Seventeenth Gentury Poetry and Prose Exclusive of The stress and conflict of an age of transition, presented through the innovations of Donne and Jonson in poetry, and of Bacon, Browne, Burton, and Taylor in prose. Brief study of Gavalier and Three hours. Prerequisite, same as for 308. religious poetry. Miss Hawk. 316

(1).

Milton.

83

English

American Literature. Intensive study of a few writers. The subject for 1950-51 material will vary from year to year. will be the beginnings of realism, 1865-1910, with emphasis on Howells, 317

(1).

The

Mark Twain, and James.

Prerequisite,

same

for

as

308.

Three

Miss Michael.

hours.

323 (2). Seminar. The subject for 1950-51 will be Religious and Secular Literature in England from the Conquest to Chaucer with special consideration of the Arthurian Romance, the works of Richard Rolle and of the

"Gawain Poet".

who have completed

Open, by application,

to seniors

hours of grade III in literature, to specially Three hours. Miss qualified juniors, and to graduate students. Corsa. (In 1951-52 the subject will be chosen from American Litsix

erature.)

325 (1). Seminar. Intensive study of a period or an author. In 1950-51 the subject will be Edmund Spenser. Prerequisite, same as Three hours. Miss Wells. (In 1951-52 the topic will be for 323. chosen from the eighteenth century.) In 329 (2). Seminar. Intensive study of a period or an author. 1950-51 the subject will be Matthew Arnold. Prerequisite, same as Three hours. Mr. Houghton. (In 1951-52 the topic will be for 323.

chosen from the seventeenth century.)

Research or Independent Study. Permission to register for course must be obtained before electives are handed in. Three or The amount of work contemplated must be indicated at the six hours. time of handing in the electives. 350. this

Directions for Election

To

fulfill

the literature requirement in group

any of the above courses

except

"iXl

I,

students

may

elect

and courses with emphasis on

writing, namely: 100, 201, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 301, 304, 305. choice of two majors is offered to students interested in working in

A

the field of English: The regular major in language, literature, 1 2.

A

major

and composition. study of drama. the Bachelor of Arts degree but do

for students especially interested in the

Courses 100 and 100a count for not count toward either major. All students majoring in English will be expected (1) to know representative works of a variety of great writers in English; (2) to relate these (3)

works to the culture of their times; with ease and accuracy but with regard

to write not only

literary

form and expression.

for

Courses of Instruction

84

Regular Major

in

Language, Literature, and Composition

This major will include a concentration of at least 30 hours. * Every student must elect at least three hours from each of the following five groups. At least 18 hours must be chosen from groups I, I la, lib, and Ilia. Of these, at least 15 hours are to be taken in English (and,

desired,

if

student

may

American)

literature before the

modern

period.

A

take one course from Illb each semester, but only one

at a time.

Extensive courses. 104, 2l8a-2\9a, 221-222, 223-224, 303, 312. Intensive study of author or period.

I.

II.

a.

b.

Single figures: 217, 218^, 219^, 220, 309, 310, 325, 329. period: 101, 225, 311, 314, 315, 316, 317, 323.

A

Study of forms and types. a. With emphasis on reading: 102, 108, 210, 212, 230, 308. b. With emphasis on writing: 201, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208,

III.

209, 301, 304, 305.

Note There :

this

are three courses

which may serve

as

an introduction

to

major: 101, 102, and 104. f

Because

it

is

necessary to limit seminar groups to small numbers,

application for enrollment in these courses, by students of at least B — standing in the work of the department, will have first consideration.

Exemption Examination Freshmen and sophomores who secure the permission of the chairman may qualify for entrance to grade II work in literature by passing an advanced-standing examination. The department will offer two such examinations, covering the material of courses 101 and 104 respectively.

Related Courses Related courses for concentration may be chosen from many fields. of English history, of at least one foreign literature, and of the outlines of European thought are of great value to the students of English. See, in particular, History 103, 213, 217; Philosophy 203 and 214; Greek 104 and 203; Latin 105, Italian 103, Russian 201, Education 200 and 307; and, when not considered as part of the major in English, Interdepartmental 107.

A knowledge

* In special cases, with the permission of the department, a major of 24 hours may be permitted. t Since Interdepartmental 107 deals primarily with literature in translation, a student deciding to major in English after taking this course may count it in the major only if she follows a course of summer reading under the direction of the department.

85

French major with emphasis on drama Distribution of work:

This major should ordinarily be

made up

as

follows

II

18 hours of English literature, including 101 or 104; six hours of grade (221-222 or 212 supplemented by any semester course of grade II);

six hours of grade III (309). 15 hours chosen from elective courses in writing and in criticism, including 207 (taken preferably in the junior year); 301 or 303; and 304.

and

Speech 203, Theater Workshop

(to

be taken before the senior year).

General examination: Students taking this

the general examination

major

will

upon 30 hours of work

be examined in from the

selected

courses listed above.

Students

who wish may

include other courses in

drama

in the field of

French 212, 213, German 308, Greek 203, 301, Italian 307, 310, Latin 203, Music 323, Spanish 104, 204, 301, Speech

concentration,

e.g.,

201, 205.

FRENCH Professors:

Ruth Elvira Clark,

litt.d.

AnDREE BrUEL, DOCTEUR DE l'uNIVERSITE DE PARIS. Dorothy Warner Dennis, b.a., dipl.e.u. Franqoise Ruet Livingstoni, M.A., agregee de l'universite. Associate Professor: Visiting Associate Professor:

Assistant Professor: Instructors:

Edith Melcher, ph.d. (Chairman) Alice Bourgois Coleno, agregee de l'unfversite. Marie -Antoinette Quarre, b.a., c.e.s., dipl.e.s. Jean Guedenet, lic. es let., dipl.e.s. Josephine Louise Ott, b.a. Genevieve de Bidart Merrill, m.a. Marise Collignon Thompson, agregee de l'universite

Lecturers:

Jeanette McPherrin, m.a. Anne Cutting Jones, ph.d. Francois Lauriau, agrege de l'universite.

All courses of the department are conducted in French.

Oral expression

is

stressed.

Attention

is

called to the opportunity for residence in the

French Center,

Tower Court. Well qualified juniors

will

be allowed to spend the year in Paris with the

foreign study group of Sweet Briar College.

101.

Elementary Course.

institutions, ^

an introduction

with special study of Paris.

Absent on leave.

comand students who do not

Intensive oral work,

position, reading of selected texts as

Open

to

training in

to

French

life

Courses of Instruction

86

Three class periods and one period of Miss Dennis^ Miss Jones, Miss Ott.

present French for admission. Six hours. laboratory work.

{a) Provence, Brittany, the Basque 102. Paris and the Provinces, country, and other regions of France studied in modern authors. Short stories and novels serve as a basis for intensive oral and written (b) This work. Prerequisite, 101, or two admission units in French, section is intended for freshmen who have presented less than two admission units in French or have had no French for the two years

preceding their entrance to college, and for sophomores who have had no French in their freshman year. The method, both in the oral and written work, is similar to that used in {a). The subject matter is

same but the material covered is less extensive and Three class periods and one period of laboratory Miss Clark, Miss Qjiarre, Miss Jones, Mr. Laiiriau, Six hours.

substantially the

the pace slower.

work.

A4rs. Thompson.

103.

French Life and Institutions. French contemporary life modern authors: biography, novels, and drama. Stress

presented by

on grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. Prerequisite, three admission units in French.

room work has been conducted mainly this

course rather than 104.

Mr.

Guedenet,

in English are advised to elect

Six hours.

Mrs. Coleno, Miss

Ott,

Frequent written work. Students whose class-

Miss

Clark,

Miss McPherrin,

Mrs. Thompson.

Introduction to the Study of French Literature. The aim is to prepare students for inore advanced work in language It provides an historical background and acquaints literature. and the student with French methods of literary study through the reading Frequent practice in the written language. of works of various periods. Outside reading. Prerequisite, three admission units in French or 102. Students whose classroom work has been conducted mainly in French Not open to students are advised to elect this course rather than 103. who have taken 103. Six hours. Miss Melcher, Miss Bruel, Mr. 104.

of this course

Guedenet,

Mrs. Merrill.

French Literature Through the Centuries. First semester: an introductory study of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance; the 200.

seventeenth century, and the eighteenth century to Voltaire. Second Class discussion of sesemester: Voltaire to the twentieth century. Emphasis on lected masterpieces, short papers, outside reading. Prerequisite, 103, 104, Primarily for non-majors. oral expression. Six hours. or four admission units in French; by permission, 102.

Miss Melcher, Miss 201.

Clark,

Mrs. Merrill.

Background of French Culture.

interpreting the social

and

French art and literature This course

political history of France.

French serves as a basis for

advanced

87

literature courses

and

for

an understand-

Emphasis on oral expression. Recommended ing of modern France. Prerequisite, 103, or 104 to students planning to major in French. Six hours. or four admission units in French; by permission, 102. Miss Dennis, Mr. Lauriau.

Language. I. Composition, translation, grammar. Weekly written work. Prerequisite, 103 or 104 or four admission units

202. Studies in in French.

Two

hours.

Miss

Qi/arre.

The Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Landmarks in early French literature, including La Chanson de Roland, Tristan ei Iseult, Le Roman de la Rose, and works by Villon, Rabelais, Montaigne, and la The medieval texts are read in modern French versions. Pleiade. Recommended to students planning to major in French. Prerequisite, Six hours. Miss Bruel. 103, 104; exceptionally 200, 201. 204.

Language. IL Composition, translation, grammar. Weekly written work. Stress on translation. Prerequisite, 202 or 200 or 201 or 204 or 212-213; open to others by permission. Two Mr. Lauriau. hours. 205. Studies in

French Speech. L A comparison of French and English speech habits with scientific training in French diction and intonation. Individual and choral recitation. Work with phonograph records. Frequent recording of students' voices on soundscriber discs. Open to students who have completed 104, to those who have taken or are taking a grade II or a grade III course in French, and, by permission, to stu206.

dents

who have completed

102,

students majoring in French. Two hours. of practice work.

Two

recommended to week and one hour

Specially

103.

class periods a

Miss Dennis.

Conversation. Intensive practice in the spoken language to build up the student's vocabulary while giving some insight into French Class discussion current events and various aspects of French life. based on French periodicals, newspapers, or recent books. PrereqTwo hours. Miss uisite, 103, 104, or any grade II course in French. 209

(1).

Ott,

Mrs. Coleno, Mrs. Merrill.

The method of this course is the same as and the subject matter is similar. Both 209 and 210 may be taken in the same year. Prerequisite, 103, 104, or any grade II

210

(2).

Conversation.

that of 209

Two hours. Miss French Drama before the

Mrs. Coleno, Mrs. Merrill.

course in French.

Ott,

212

Revolution.

(1).

A

survey of the

theater in the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the seventeenth and Prerequisite, 104 or a six-hour course of grade eighteenth centuries. II, or, by permission, 103. the instructor, three hours.

Two

hours.

By

Miss Melcher.

special

arrangement with

Courses of Instruction

88

213

(2).

turies.

French Drama

A

in

the Nineteenth and Twentieth Cen-

study of the drame romantique, the comedy of manners,

the problem play, the

theatre libre,

and trends

in

modern drama.

Pre-

requisite, 104, 212, or a six-hour course of

Two

103.

hours.

grade II, or, by permission, By special arrangement with the instructor, three

hours.

Miss Melcher.

301. Classicism and the Age of Enlightenment (1600-1750). The development of French classical literature in the seventeenth century, and the awakening of liberal and democratic ideas during the early

years of the eighteenth century.

Among

the authors studied are:

Malherbe, Descartes, La Rochefoucauld, Corneille, Pascal, Moliere, La Fontaine, Mme. de La Fayette, Boileau, Bossuet, Racine, La Bruyere, Fenelon, Montesquieu, Voltaire. Open to students who have completed 200 or 201 with a grade of at least C, or 204 or 212-213; also to seniors who are taking six hours of grade II. Six hours. Mr. Guedenet, Mrs. Coleno. 303 (2). The Teaching of French in the Secondary School. For description and prerequisites, see Education 303. 305.

The Evolution

of the French Novel.

Intensive reading of

representative masterpieces; medieval romances

and

Pantagruel;

such as VAstree,

and stories; Gargantua novels of the classical period and eighteenth century, la Princesse de Clhes, Manon Lescaut, la Nouvelle Heloise;

nineteenth century, including works of Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, Maupassant, and Barres. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 204 or 212-213, or who are taking a course of grade III. Six hours. 306.

Miss

Bruel.

The Pre-Romantic and Romantic Period

awakening of

(1750-1850).

The

romanticism in nineteenth century French literature. Among the authors studied are Diderot, Rousseau; Chateaubriand, Mme. de Stael, Benjamin Constant; Lamartine, Vigny, Victor Hugo, Musset; Balzac, Stendhal. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed a full grade III course, and to approved juniors and seniors who have completed 204 or 212-213. Six hours.

Mr.

sensibility;

Lauriau.

307. Contemporary French Literature. The evolution of French poetry from Baudelaire to the present day, with special studies of Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Mallarme, Claudel, Valery, and the surrealists. The masters of French prose during the same period: Gide, Proust, Mauriac, Colette, Montherlant, etc. Open to seniors who have completed 301, 305 or 306. Six hours. Mrs. Coleno.

308

(1).

Studies in Language.

translation.

Open

to juniors

and

III.

seniors

Advanced composition and

who have completed

or are

French

89

taking a six-hour course of grade III, and, by permission, to juniors and seniors who have completed 205. Two hours. Miss Quarre.

310

(2).

Studies in Language.

Advanced composition and and texts. Primarily for Prerequisite, same as for 308.

III.

translation as in 308, with different subjects

students

Two

who have completed

hours.

Miss

308.

Qiiarre.

A study of living condiin France. with a survey of the economic, political and cultural background. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed six hours of grade II or by special permission of the department. Two Miss Bruel. (Not given in 1950-51.) hours. 313.

Present-Day Problems

tions in France,

Advanced scientific training in French II. and intonation with the aid of modern recording equipment. Study of varied texts and practice in oral composition and self-expression. Open to students who are taking 308 and 310, or by special 316.

French Speech.

diction

permission.

Two

hours.

(Not given in 1950-51.)

Currents of Thought French Literature. The analysis and 320. Seminar.

in

Their Relationship to

interpretation of a selected

and evolution of the democratic ideal in France, the French Renaissance, conflicts of ideas in the eighteenth century,

subject such as the rise

the evolution of French romanticism, trends in present-day literature. Open to graduates and approved seniors. Six hours. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

Open to graduate who have completed twenty-four hours of college French, and, by permission, to seniors who have completed the same amount of work. 321.

Medieval Language and Literature.

students

Six hours.

322 life

(1).

Miss

Bruel.

Seminar.

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

Intensive Study of

and works of a prose writer

One Author.

Prose.

in relation to the social history

The

and

lit-

erary trends of the period. A single author of outstanding importance will be selected, such as Montaigne, Pascal, Moliere, Voltaire, Rousseau, Open to graduates and approved seniors. Balzac, Flaubert, or Proust. Three hours. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

323 (2). Seminar. Intensive Study of One Author. Poetry. Similar to 322. The author studied might be one of the following: Racine, Lamartine, Victor Hugo, Baudelaire, Paul Valery. Open to (Not offered in graduates and approved seniors. Three hours. 1950-51.) 350.

Research or Independent Study.

Open, by permission,

to

graduates and to approved seniors who have completed at least one full grade III course in French and are taking another full grade III course.

Courses of Instruction

90

Two

The to three hours for a semester or four to six hours for a year. of work contemplated must be stated at the time of handing in

amount

electives.

Directions for Election Courses 104, 200, 204, 212-213, and grade III courses (except 308, 310, 313, 316) may be elected to fulfill the literature requirement in

group I.

I.

Course 101 counts for the degree but does not count towards a

major.

Course 102 counts for the major only if directly followed by a sixhour course of grade 11. Students planning to major in the department (with the exception of those who carried a grade II course in their freshman year) should not carry two six-hour courses of grade II without permission of the department.

Course 202 taken in the sophomore year, 205 in the junior year and 308, 310 in the junior or senior year will be valuable to students majoring in French. Courses 206 and 316 will give intensive training II.

in diction.

Students majoring in French literature are advised to include Students proposing to elect French 307 in the 301 in their program. senior year are advised to elect 306 in the junior year. III.

IV. Special attention is called to Education 303, which seniors who are taking French 301, 305, 306, or 307.

is

open

to

Related Courses Suggested for Election Students intending to take French 301 or 306 are urged to elect History 210 and/or 211. These history courses are especially important for French majors.

Greek 203 (Greek Literature in English Translation), Latin 105 (Latin Literature in English Translation), and History 210, courses in Italian and Spanish literature including the sixteenth and the seventeenth centuries; Philosophy 214. French 305: English 218 and 219; Spanish 302. French 306: History 211, English 230, German 305, Italian 202, French 301

:

Spanish 301.

French 307: English 210, Spanish 204, Italian 201.

Geology and Geography

91

GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY Professor:

Associate Professors:

Instructors:

Custodian and Assistant: Lecturer:

Margaret Terrell Parker^, ph.d. Louise Kingsley, ph.d. (Chairman) Elizabeth Eiselen, ph.d. Alice Dowse WeeksS ph.d. Margaret Meda Pendleton, m.s. Dorotha Jeanette Garrison, m.a.

Gwenyth Morgan Rhome,

m.a.

Russell Gibson^, ph.d.

101.* General Geology. First semester: physiography. A course designed to develop understanding of the physical features of landscapes, by explaining the processes by which land forms originate and are modified, and the rocks and minerals of the earth's crust upon which Many areas in the United States and elsewhere these processes work.

Foundations are laid for interpreting past are studied as illustrations. geologic history, and for understanding the relations of topographic features to human occupation. Second semester: historical geology. The origin of the earth and the sequence of geologic events by which its present characters have been developed, including the origin of valuable mineral deposits. evolution of

Open

life

on the

earth.

to all undergraduates.

of lecture or discussion

The

and three

Six periods a week: in general, three Occasional afternoon of laboratory.

be substituted for laboratory work. Miss Garrison. Kingsley, Miss

field trips will

Six hours.

Miss

Pendleton,

Geology

a

study of precious and semi-precious stones: 103 (1). Gemology. geologic occurrence; properties necessary for identification and apHistory of gems preciative understanding of relative value and beauty. and gemology. Laboratory work includes some cutting of semi-

Open to all undergraduates. Two periods of lecture precious stones. Counts toward a major in geology but not for of laboratory.

and two

distribution.

Three hours.

Miss

Kingsley.

202 (1 ) Mineralogy. A study of minerals, including those which are economically valuable and those which are essential constituents of .

1

Absent on leave.

The first semester of Geology 101 may be elected, to be followed by Geography 102 in the second semester (see Geography, page 93). Students more interested in geography than in historical geology are advised to elect this combination. The have taken a first semester may be elected separately by juniors and seniors who full year of laboratory science in another department. *

Courses of Instruction

92 Identification

rocks.

and determination of the composition of

all

the

known minerals by means of physical properties and blowpipe The modes of occurrence of minerals and the industrial uses analysis. better

to

which they are

put.

Prerequisite,

Geology 101 or 103, Chemistry

101, or Interdepartmental Courses 106.

ments

for lecture

Rhome.

and laboratory.

Two

three-period appoint-

Three hours.

Mr.

Gibson,

Miss

(Not given in 1950-51.)

203 (2). Cartography. ography 203.

For description and prerequisites, see Ge-

Advanced study of land forms, with ilfrom many parts of the world, and reading from original Comparison of the conceptions of American and European sources. Shore processes and glacial features studied in the geomorphologists. Emphasis in laboratory work on methods by which the developfield. ment of land forms is determined, such as study of aerial photographs and making of projected profiles. Prerequisite, 101. Four hours a week; in general, two of lecture and two of laboratory. Occasional Three hours. (Not given field trips will be substituted for class work. 204

(1).

Geomorphology.

lustrations

in 1950-51.)

Paleontology. The facts and principles of organic evoluby the life of the past. The steps in the development from simple, generalized forms to more complex and specialized types Prerequisite, Geology 101, illustrated by a comparative study of fossils. Zoology 101, or Botany 101. Four hours a week of lecture and laboraThree hours. Miss Kingsley. tory. 205 (1)*.

tion as revealed

Regional Geology of North America. A systematic study United States, Canada, and Mexico by physiographic provinces, of the dealing with the geologic history, the kinds of rocks (including the economically important rocks), the structures and their relations to topography. Prerequisite, 101. Four hours a week; in general, three Three hours. Miss Kingsley. of lecture and one of laboratory. 206

(2).

312 (2)*.

Crystallography.

Crystal systems.

Principles of op-

Determination of minerals by means of their Students interested in minerals will find good correoptical properties. Open to juniors and seniors lation between Geology 202, 103, and 312. who have completed 202. Juniors and seniors majoring in chemistry or in physics may be admitted to the course upon the recommendation of Two two-period appointments for the two departments concerned. Three hours. Miss Kingsley. lecture and laboratory. tical

314

crystallography.

(1).

Structural Geology. The origin and

rock structures. *

Offered in alternate years.

Description and interpretation of structure of

mountain ranges.

Op-

Geology and Geography

93

portunity is offered for individual study of areas of special interest. Laboratory work includes interpretation of geologic maps, the drawing Open to juniors of cross-sections, and graphical solution of problems. and seniors who have completed 101 and a grade II course in geology. Two two-period appointments for lecture and laboratory, with ocThree hours. Miss Kingsley. casional field trips.

315

(2).

Extrusive and intrusive and origin of igneous

VuLGANiSM AND Igneous Rocks.

phases of vulcanism.

Description, identification,

rocks. Particular emphasis is placed on portion of the work will consist of individual re-

and related metamorphic regional studies.

on

ports

A

Open

special areas.

pleted 101

and 202.

Two

to juniors

and

seniors

who have com-

two-period appointments for lecture and

laboratory, with occasional field trips.

Three hours.

Miss

Kingsley.

316 (2)*. Economic Geology. A study of economically valuable mineral deposits, both metallic and non-metallic. The origin, composition, and geological and mineralogical relations of these deposits; their geographic distribution and political significance. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 101 and 202, Two two-period appointments for lecture, class discussion, and laboratory. Three hours. Miss Kingsley. (Not off"ered in 1950-51.)

The subject of study will be 350. Research or Independent Study. determined by the preparation of the student and by her special interests. Her work will be under the direction of the member of the department in whose field the subject lies. Open, by permission, to juniors and seniors who are majoring in the department. Three hours for a semester or six hours for a year. Summer Field Courses.

The department

will

recommend summer

given by other colleges (dealing chiefly with the Rocky Mountain region) to interested students who have completed one year or more of geology at Wellesley. Credit may be given for such courses provided the student's plans are approved in advance by the departfield courses

ment.

Geography 102

(2).

Introductory Geography.

World

distribution,

and the

principles underlying distribution, of the various elements of the natural

environment: relief features, soils, climates, natural vegetation, water and mineral resources. Types of human adjustments to environment. Resultant world cultural patterns. Open to students who have completed the whole or only the first semester of 101. Six periods a week; in general, three of lecture or discussion *

Offered in alternate years.

and three of laboratory.

Oc-

Courses of Instruction

94

casional afternoon field trips will be substituted for laboratory work.

Three hours.

Aliss Eiselen,

Miss

Garrison.

Principles governing choice of projection, (2), Cartography. scale, and grid in map making; methods of depicting relief; use of aerial

203

photographs in photomapping; evaluation of source materials. Opportunity in laboratory for map projects chosen to suit the special inOpen to juniors and seniors without prerequisite, terests of the student. and to sophomores who have completed 101 or 102. Four periods a week; in general, two of lecture and two of laboratory. Three hours. Miss Pendleton.

208 (1), (2). The Geography of Europe. A study of man's adjustments to physical environment in Europe. Topography, climate, and other environmental factors in their relation to the early rise of civilization in Europe, the distribution of races and languages, the partition of Dethe continent into political units, and economic development. tailed study of selected countries of major interest to American students. Consideration of geographic relationships involved in postwar reconOpen to juniors and seniors without prerequisite, struction problems. and to sophomores who have completed 101 or 102, or who are planning Three hours. to major in history, economics, or political science. Miss Garrison. 209 (1), (2). The Geography of the United States, Canada, and Alaska. A study of man's economic activities as related to environmental factors in the major geographic regions of the United States, Canada, and Alaska. Particular consideration is given to geographic Open to juniors factors concerned with current economic problems. and seniors without prerequisite, and to sophomores who have completed 101 or 102, or who are planning to major in history, economics, Three hours. Miss Eiselen. or political science. 303

(2).

The Geography

of Middle America.

A

geographic study

of Mexico, the countries of Central America, and the Caribbean Islands; the environmental background for the formation of the many

and for the economic development of the various counand natural regions. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 102 or a course in regional geography; also to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking History 214 or are majoring Three hours. Miss Eiselen. in Spanish. political units

tries

of South America. The physiographic and resources of South America; the influence of these factors upon the colonization of the continent by Europeans, upon the formation of independent political units, and upon the present and posOpen to sible future economic development of the various countries.

304

(1).

The Geography

features, climates,

Geology and Geography

95

and seniors who have completed 102 or a course in regional geography; also to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking Miss Eiselen. History 214 or are majoring in Spanish. Three hours.

juniors

306

(1).

Conservation of Natural Resources.

A

study of the

natural resources of the United States with a view to understanding the

need for and the principles governing their conservation.

The

course

includes consideration of the problems of floods, soil erosion, utilization of arid

and semi-arid

lands, preservation of forests,

and

intelligent use of

mineral and fuel supplies. Open to juniors and seniors who have had 101, 102, or a course in regional geography or are majoring in economics or botany. Counts toward a major in geography but not for distribution.

Three hours.

The Geography

Miss

Eiselen.

of Asia.

A

geographic study of Asia as a Eurasian continent. These units are Asiatic countries with the exception of the Soviet Union, of which the European, as well as the Asiatic, portion is studied. The course examines the geographic background of various problems of current world importance which have their roots in the geography of Asia. It gives opportunity for application of principles developed in earlier regional courses in interpreting human adjustments to environment in oriental countries. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 208. Three hours. Miss Garrison.

308

(2).

whole and of selected

political units of the

305 (1). Seminar in Geography. Topics are assigned to students for independent investigation. Reports of individual work are presented weekly. Open to graduate students and to approved -seniors. Three hours. (Not given in 1950-51.)

The subject of study will be 350. Research or Independent Study. determined by the preparation of the student and by her special inHer work will be under the direction of the member of the terests. department in whose field the subject lies. Open, by permission, to juniors and seniors who are majoring in the department. Three hours for a semester or six hours for a year. Directions for Election

Geology. A geology major must include 101. Grade II courses should be selected with a view to the type of advanced work which the student desires. Advice from the department should be secured. A summer field course in western United States is suggested as a good background for advanced courses. Geography 306 and the regional courses correlate well with geology. Chemistry is desirable for students majoring in geology. Those intending to do graduate work should consult the department for advice in the selection of related courses.

Courses of Instruction

96

Geography.

A

geography major should include the first semester of and at least twelve hours of grade III work in geography. Students who wish to major in geography will find that this work correlates well with Geology 204 and with work in history, economics, and other social sciences. For advanced work in the subject, both French and German are useful. 101, 102, 208, 209,

By permission, six hours of closely correlated work in history will be accepted as part of a major in geography. The attention of students who are interested in the teaching of geography is called to Education 308, The Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School.

An interdepartmental major program in Natural Resources and Conservation is described on page 154. Exemption Examination Students with exceptional preparation in either geology or geography apply for an exemption examination.

may

GERMAN Professor:

Associate Professors:

Marianne Thalmann^, ph.d. Magdalene Schindelin, ph.d. Barbara Salditt, ph.d. (Chairman)

Instructor:

The language of the classroom in all courses is almost exclusively German. The student thus has constant practice in hearing, speaking, and writing Capable students in 101 have the opportunity, by doing special reading during the summer and upon approval of the Chairman, to omit 102 and proceed with 202, an introductory course in German literature. A sum-

German.

mer term

at the

German

School, Middlebury College,

is

recommended

as

stimulating and helpful.

A

limited

number

of qualified students are permitted to spend the junior

year in Zurich or Basel.

Study of fundamental elements of German 101. Elementary Course grammar; frequent written exercises; reading of short stories; special emphasis on oral expression. Open to students who do not present .

German for admission. Four class periods. mann, Miss Schindelin, Miss Salditt.

Six hours.

Miss Thal-

Extensive reading with emphasis on 102. Intermediate Course. vocabulary building; review of fundamental principles of grammar; frequent composition and oral expression; discussion of German culture. Six hours. Miss Prerequisite, 101 or two admission units in German. Schindelin, Miss Salditt. '

Absent on leave

for the

second semester.

German

97

Outline History of German Literature. First semester: an German literature from its beginning to the seventeenth Second semester: an introduction to the seventeenth and century. Open to freshmen who eighteenth centuries, Schiller and Goethe. Six hours. Miss present three or more admission units in German. 104.

introduction to

(Not offered

Salditt.

in 1950-51.)

History of German Literature. Introduction to German literature; the parallel development of literature, social conditions, and ideals of the times. Works read and discussed are: the Hildebrandslied, selections from the Niebelungenlied, the works of Wolfram, Gottfried, Hartmann, the Minnesingers; Volkslied, selections from Lu202.

ther,

Hans

Prerequisite, 102

Sachs, Lessing, Herder, Schiller, Goethe.

by permission, 101. Open to freshmen who present three or more admission units in German. Six hours. Miss Salditt, Miss Schindelin. or,

204.

Goethe and Schiller.

literary

Their lives and their works. Their growth studied with emphasis on their development from "Sturm

und Drang"

to classicism

and considered

century literature in general.

Miss

in relation to eighteenth

Prerequisite, 104 or 202.

Six hours.

Salditt.

206. Conversation.

Practice in the use of the spoken language.

and by permission,

Class discussions based on readings in newspapers, periodicals, Prerequisite, 102 other contemporary materials. 101. Two hours. Miss Schindelin.

207 in

(1).

or,

Advanced Composition AND Conversation. Intensive work and oral German; composition, translation, grammar.

written

Prerequisite, 202 or 206, or,

by permission, 104.

Two

hours.

(Not

offered in 1950-51.)

German Life and Thought in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. The development of intellectual and aesthetic trends in Varied literary texts; pamthe nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 208.

memoirs of musicians, scholars, artists, and statesmen. who have completed 104 or 202 and, by special perSLx mission, to other students with sufficient knowledge of German. hours. Miss Thalmann. (Not offered in 1950-51.) phlets, letters,

Open

to students

209 (2). Linguistics. Study of the structure of the German language: advanced syntax, morphology, semantics, with emphasis on synonomy. Two hours. (Not Prerequisite, 202 or 206 or, by permission, 104. offered in 1950-51.)

304

(1).

Goethe's Faust.

the Faust legend in

its

of Goethe's Faust, Part

Study of the pre-Goethean development of

more important I;

literary forms.

extensive study of Part 11.

Intensive study

Open

to seniors

Courses of Instruction

98

who have completed

six

Three hours.

mission.

hours of grade II and Miss Thalmann.

to juniors

by

special per-

305 (2).* The German Romanticists. A study of early romantic philosophy and significant writers of the period: Schelling, Novalis, the Prerequisite, Schlegels, Tieck, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Schopenhauer. Three hours. Miss Thalmann. (Not at least one course of grade III. offered in 1950-51.)

306 (2).* century.

Open Miss

From Lessing TO Herder. Literary trends in the eighteenth Extensive selections from Lessing, Herder, and Winckelmann.

to juniors

and

seniors

who have completed

304.

Three hours.

Salditt.

308

Seminar.

(1).

Studies of Representative Authors in NinePrerequisite, one course of grade III.

teenth Century Literature. Three hours. Miss Thalmann. 312

(2).

Literature of the Modern Period.

Aspects and tenden-

Introduction to the literary work Open to students who have comRilke. M. and R. Mann of Thomas Three hours. pleted 204 or 208 and to seniors by special permission. twentieth century literature.

cies of

Miss

Schindelin.

350.

Research or Independent Study.

and, by permission, to seniors.

Open

Three hours

to graduate students,

for a semester or six

hours

for a year.

Directions for Election

To

fulfill

the literature requirement in group

courses 104, 202, 204, 208,

and grade

I,

students

may

elect

III courses.

may be counted for the degree but not for the major. may count for the major. Students who start with 101 in college and desire to major in German

Course 101 Course 102

should consult the department in order to obtain permission to omit 102 and take 202 and 206. Students intending to major in the department are requested to take 104 or 202 and at least twelve hours of grade III work. Students intending to teach German will be recommended by the department only if they have taken from six to twelve hours of grade III. *

Courses 305 and 306 will be offered in alternate years.

Greek

99

GREEK Professors:

Helen Hull Law, ph.d. (Chairman) Barbara Philippa McCarthy,^ ph.d.

The fundamental facts of Greek grammar 101. Beginning Greek. with practice in reading and writing. Selections from the great Open to students who do not present writers of prose and poetry. Greek for admission. Six hours. Miss McCarthy, Miss Law. 102.

Modern Greek. Practice in speaking and writing the Greek Open by permission of the instructor. Two hours. Miss

of today.

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

McCarthy.

104

(2).

Classical Mythology.

The more important myths

classical period in relation to the literature, art,

and

of the

religion of ancient

on the literatures of succeeding periods. This Open to all course may not be counted toward a major in Greek. undergraduates. Three hours. Miss Law. times; their influence

201

(1).

Plato.

hours.

205

(2).

and selections from other dialogues. two or three admission units in Greek. Three

Apology, Crito

Prerequisite, 101 or

Miss Law.

Homer.

;

202

(2).

Homer.

and by per-

Prerequisites, 101

Selected books of the 7/zW.

or two admission units in Greek and 201 mission. Three hours. Miss Law.

201

;

open

to others

Selected books of the Odyssey or other material

meet the needs of the class. Prerequisites, three admission Greek and 201, or 205. Three hours. Miss Law.

selected to

units in

Greek Literature in English Translation: Epic, TragReading of the Iliad and Odyssey, and plays of yEschylus, SophoLectures on the origin of epic poetry and tragedy cles, and Euripides. and their influence on later literature. This course may not be counted toward a major in Greek. Open to juniors and seniors without prerequisite, and to sophomores who have completed a course in literature in any department. (This does not include a beginning course in a Three hours. Miss McCarthy. foreign language.) 203 edy.

(1).

Review of the essentials of grammar (1). Writing of Greek. and syntax. Written exercises based on prose selections to be read at sight in class. Open to students who have completed 101 and are taking another course in Greek other than 203 and 104. Three hours. 206

Miss McCarthy. 301.

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

Greek Drama.

Reading and study of dramas of ^schylus, Prerequisite, 201 and 205 Miss Law.

Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes.

or 202. *

Six hours.

Absent on leave for the second semester.

Courses of Instruction

100

Epic, lyric, 302. Greek Poetry from Homer through Theocritus. and pastoral poetry. Prerequisite, 201 and 205 or 202. By permission, students

may

Six

a semester course. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

elect either semester as

Miss McCarthy.

hours.

Reading 306. Greek Prose from Herodotus through Lucian. from Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato and Lucian, varying from year to year according to the needs and desires of the class. Prerequisite, 201 and 205 or 202. By permission, students may elect either semester (Not offered in 1950-51 .) as a semester course. Six hours. Miss Law.

Research or Independent and to graduate students.

350.

mission,

Stitoy.

Open

Three hours

to seniors

for

by

per-

a semester or

six

hours for a year.

Directions for Election

To

fulfill

any course

the literature requirement in group Greek except 101, 102, 206.

I,

students

may

elect

in

Students majoring in Greek are advised to elect some work in Latin.

Their attention art,

is

also called to the courses in

Greek

history, classical

and Greek philosophy.

Students eligible for honors work may elect an interdepartmental honors program in classical archeology (see page 156). Qualified students may fulfill the second semester of the Biblical history requirement by electing Biblical History 210, The First Three

Gospels

in

Greek.

HISTORY Professors:

Edward Ely

Curtis, ph.d.

Judith Blow Williams, ph.d. Evelyn Faye Wilson, ph.d. (Chairman) Associate Professors: Henry Frederick Schwarzi, ph.d. Charlotte Elizabeth Goodfellow, ph.d. Assistant Professors: John Hewitt Mitchell, ph.d. Edward Vose Gulick, ph.d. Joseph Lewis SuLLrvAN, m.a. Instructors: Alice Birmingham Colburn, m.a. Theodore Stephen Hamerow, m.a. 101.

Medieval and Early Modern Europe.

A

study of the origins

European civilization and the modification of political, social, and economic institutions and concepts under changing conditions: the development of Christianity and Christian churches; the assimilation of the heritage of the ancient world; feudalism and the rise of the middle class; and the development and expansion of the national state.

of modern

*

Absent on leave.

History

Open

to all undergraduates.

Six hours.

later election.

102.

Modern European

101

This course, 102 or 103 is prerequisite to Miss Wilson, Mr. Mitchell.

A

History,

The determined by such movements as in the seventeenth century.

survey of the European world

evolution of

political revolutions, ideological changes,

The emergence

and international

Open

of present world problems.

uates.

This course, 101 or 103

hours.

Mr.

Gulick,

Mr.

Sullivan,

is

modern Europe as economic and

colonial expansion,

to all

relations.

undergrad-

prerequisite to later election.

Six

Mrs. Colburn, Mr. Hamerow.

103. History of Western Thought. moulded western civilization traced in

The their

basic ideas which have development from classic

times in relation to the major trends in western European history. Illustrated by reading from works of great historical importance. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have not taken History 101 or 102 and, by permission, to freshmen who have some knowledge of

European

200.

history.

Six hours.

Miss Williams.

History of Europe from the Decline of Rome to the Present

Time.

The development,

industrialization,

out of medieval society, of national

European expansion

overseas, world conflicts.

states,

Mod-

ern efforts to restore a sense of unity to society. (Primarily for nonmajors.) Open to juniors and seniors, except those who have taken 101 Six hours. or 102. Mr. Hamerow.

202 (1), (2). Europe in the Twentieth Century. The causes and course of the War of 1914-18, the peace settlements, revolutions and the emergence of communism, fascism and national socialism, social and economic tension, rivalries among the powers, the recent conflict. Prerequisite, six hours in history or political science or economics.

Three hours.

Mrs. Colburn.

203*. History of Greece. A brief survey of the oriental civilizaby which the Greeks were influenced. A study of the social, economic, and political development of the Greek State; museum trips, illustrated lectures, and readings from works of the great writers Preto illustrate the most significant aspects of Greek civilization. requisite, six hours in history; no prerequisite to those who are giving Six hours. special attention to the classics or Greek philosophy. tions

Miss Goodfellow 204*.

History OF Rome.

conclusions of earlier period,

A

general survey of

Roman

history.

The

modern archaeologists and historians with regard to the with main emphasis upon Rome's experiments in govern-

* Offered in alternate years.

Courses of Instruction

102

ment, the attempts of her statesmen to solve the social and economic problems of the Republic, and the Empire, and upon the development Prerequisite, six hours in of Rome's legacy to the modern world. history; no prerequisite to those who are giving special attention to the (Not offered in 1950-51.) classics. Six hours. Miss Goodjellow.

Colonial America. The foundation and growth of the America. Emphasis upon colonial policy and administration, and upon the causes and course of the American Revolution. Open to juniors and seniors without prerequisite, and to other students who have completed six hours in history or who have completed or are taking Economics 204. English 223, Geography 209, Philosophy 204. Three hours. Mr. Curtis. 205

(2).

British colonies in



Central Europe. A survey of Central Europe Germany, Poland, Bohemia, and the Danube Valley since the fourteenth century; the political evolution of the states in this area, with emphasis on Open to students social and cultural developments and relationships. who have completed six hours in history or who are giving special Six hours. Mr. Hamerow. attention to the study of German. 206*.



History of Russia. A survey of political, social, and economic from the earlier times to the present, including the conflict between forest and steppe, the development of the Muscovite autocracy, expansion and consolidation under Peter and Catherine, reaction and revolution in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and First semester, the emergence of the Soviet Union as a world power. to the end of the eighteenth century; second semester, the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By permission either semester may be taken independently. Open to all seniors, to juniors who have completed or are taking another course in history, and to sophomores who have completed six hours. Six hours. Mr. Sullivan. 209.

life

210

in Russia

(1).

The Age OF Louis XI V IN France.

Society

in France during the "golden age" of absolutism.

and government

An extensive review

of Religion and the development of France under Henry Louis XIII. Intensive study of the nature of the absolute monarchy and foreign relations under Louis XIV, with analysis of the Prerequisite, six hours of hissocial and intellectual life of the age. tory; no prerequisite to those giving special attention to the study of French. Three hours. Mr. Mitchell.

of the

Wars

IV and

211 (2). The Enlightenment, The French Revolution, and Napoleon. An analysis of the intellectual, social, and political forces in France after 1715 which combined to produce the crisis of 1789. Followed by a study of the era of the Revolution and Empire, with empha*

Offered in alternate years.

103

History sis

on the new

social

and

political ideals of this period

tions of

France with Europe.

hours.

Mr.

same

and on the relaThree

as for 210.

Mitchell.

213. History of political,

Prerequisite,

social,

England. A general survey of English history, economic, and cultural, with special emphasis on

England's contributions to the modern world. Some attention to England's oversea expansion and the formation of the British Empire. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed six hours in history or are giving special attention to English literature, Miss Williams. Six hours. political science, economics, or sociology.

A

survey of (1). The Rise of the Latin-American Repiiblics. the exploration and conquest of the New World by the Spaniards. Spanish colonial policy and the causes of the revolutionary movement. The wars of liberation and the emergence of the present republics, with special reference to the recent history of Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina.

214

Prerequisite, six hours in history.

No

prerequisite to sophomores,

and seniors who are majoring in Spanish, or have completed Geography 303 or 304, Political Science 207, or Sociology 306. Three hours. Mr. Curtis.

juniors,

A study of in Europe. between economics, politics, and culture in western Europe, 1300-1600: the rise of capitalism and the middle class, the In the second renaissance state, and humanism in its various aspects.

217.

The Renaissance and Reformation

relationships

and the Catholic reformation. By perbe taken independently. Prerequisite, Miss Wilson. Six hours.

semester, the Protestant revolt mission, either semester six

hours in history or

may

art.

221 (1). The Founding OF American Nationality, 1787-1865. The framing and adoption of the Constitution, the founding of political parties, the westward movement, the rise of the slave power, irrepressOpen to juniors and seniors without ible conflict and the Civil War. prerequisite, and to other students who have completed six hours in history or who have taken or are taking Economics 204, Geography Three hours. 209, Philosophy 204, or Political Science 201 or 202.

Mr.

Curtis.

222 (2). The Emergence of Modern America, 1865 to the Present Time. Political and economic reconstruction, the New South, the Cleveland era, the rise of progressivism, global wars and retreat from Prerequisite, same as for 221. isolationism, the advent of the New Deal.

Three hours. 304.

Mr.

Curtis.

England Under the Tudors and Stuarts.

and Reformation

in

cratic ideals; the constitutional struggles

The Renaissance

accompanying demoof the sixteenth and seven-

England; Puritanism and

its

Courses of Instruction

104

teenth centuries; social and economic changes initial to the founding of Open to juniors and seniors who have completed the British Empire. (Not offered in 195012 hours in history. Six hours. Miss Williams. 51.)

History OF Europe SINCE 1789. Problems of Eurostatecraft from 1789 to the present, with emphasis and diplomacy pean on the Congress of Vienna, the Eastern Question, the effect of Italian and German unification on European diplomacy, Bismarck, the causes of World War I, peacemaking in 1919, and the causes of World War II. Open to juniors and seniors who have had twelve hours of history, including three hours of modern history; by permission, to specially qualified students in political science or economics who have had History 102 or 200. Six hours. Mr. Gulick. 305. Diplomatic

History since 1815. Postwar problems and conditions England in 1815. The significant developments in the political, social, and intellectual history of Great Britain and the British Empire, and England's part in world affairs, until the present. During the first semester, political, social, and cultural developments in England will be emphasized, while foreign relations and imperial afiairs will be stressed 306. British

in

in the second.

By permission

may who have

of the instructor, either semester

Open

to juniors

and

be taken independently. completed nine hours in history or Economics 209.

seniors

Six hours.

Miss

Williams.

American Foreign Relations. The most significant diplomatic problems which have arisen as the result of war, westward expansion, the growth of foreign commerce, immigration, and the challenge of totalitarianism. The origin of important treaties, the de-

307.

velopment of the Monroe Doctrine, and the evolution of the United Open to juniors and seniors who have States into a world power. completed 12 hours in history or nine hours in history and Economics 314, or who have taken or are taking Political Science 208 or 301. Mr. Curtis. Six hours. 308

(1).

European Imperialism

since 1870.

A review of theories and

attitudes concerning imperialism as developed during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. An analysis of the motives, forms, and character of

European expansion

in Africa, the

Middle East, and the Orient

A review of the

present situation in the European colonial Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 12 hours empires. Three hours. in history or nine hours in history and Economics 314.

since 1870.

Mr. 309.

Gulick.

Medieval Culture from

society, thought,

and learning

St.

Augustine to Dante. A study of middle ages, the influence of

in the early

History

105

Byzantine and Moslem civilizations in the West, the medieval renaissance,

and the synthesis of the thirteenth century. Open to juniors, and graduates who have had a course of grade I or II, or are

seniors,

taking a course of grade III, in medieval history, art, or literature (for example, History 101, Latin 106, Art 205, French 201, 321, Italian 301, Six hours. Miss Wilson. Biblical History 302, English 220).

International Relations: The Far East. China and and twentieth centuries, with emphasis on their distinctive cultures, the impact of the West on those cultures, the Chinese revolution, Japanese expansion, and the emergence of Chinese communism. Special attention to the interests of Europe and America Open to juniors and seniors who have either (1) in the Far East. completed a course of grade I and have completed or are taking six 310

(2).

Japan

in the nineteenth

grade II in history, or (2) completed six hours of grade II in Specially qualified non-majors who have not completed the Three hours. Mr. prerequisites may be admitted by permission. houi's of

history.

Gulick.

312 (1). International Relations: the Near East. A general view of international relations in the Near East since the Congress of Berlin, with special reference to postwar settlements and to present conditions.

313

(1).

tion.

Prerequisite,

same

as

for

310.

Three

hours.

Mr.

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

Guligk.

Russia in Transition. A Century of Russian Civilizaand thought in Russia since the middle of the nineteenth

Life

century.

Changes

in political institutions, social structure, ethical

and

standards, with special attention given to prominence and significance in Russian history of Tolstoy, Dostoyevski, and Lenin. artistic

Prerequisite,

same

as for 310.

Three hours.

Mr.

Sullivan.

Political and Cultural History of Germany since the Seventeenth Century. A study of German society, and the evolution of the intellectual and artistic life of Germany against the background of political institutions and relationships, from the middle of the 314*.

seventeenth through the nineteenth century. Attention will be given to the diversity of German culture and to the effect of outside influences

and

their assimilation.

Open

to juniors

and

seniors

who have com-

Specially qualified pleted or are taking six hours of grade II in history. students who have not completed the prerequisite may be admitted by Mr. Schwarz. (Not offered in 1950-51.) Six hours. permission.

315

(2).

Seminar.

The changing conceptions

of history

and

history-

writing as illustrated by a study of selected historians from Herodotus Emphasis upon the relation of these conceptions to the present time. *

Offered in alternate years.

Courses of Instruction

106

background out of which they developed and their upon contemporary historical thought. Open to graduate students and approved seniors who are majoring in history. Three to the intellectual

influence hours.

The Teaching

Staff.

Research or Independent Study. By consultation with the department, students may arrange for from two to six hours of individual work. Open, by permission, to juniors and seniors who have comTwo to six hours. pleted or are taking a course of grade III in history. The amount of work contemplated must be indicated at the time at which electives are due. 350.

Directions for Election

may

choose any of the introductory courses of these courses may be counted These courses are designed to help the student to acquire in a major. methods of historical work, and to furnish a basis for the more detailed study of particular periods. For purposes of the general examination in history required of major students, the work of the department has been distributed among five fields: (1) Ancient, (2) Medieval and Early Modern to 1648, (3) Modern European, (4) American and Latin-American, (5) International relations (includes also foreign policy, diplomatic history, imA student concentrating in history will perialism, British Empire). normally distribute her elections so as to include at least a semester's work above the level of grade I in three of these fields. A maximum of six hours of closely related work in political science, economics, or geography may, by permission, be included as part of Students electing history

101, 102 or 103, but not

more than one

a major in history. Students proposing to teach history are advised to take at least four courses in the department. Their attention is called to Education 308, The Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School.

Exemption Examination had unusual preparation in European history with regard to both amount and type of training may apply for examination for exemption from the requirement for Students

who

before entering college have

distribution, or for entrance directly into grade II work.

In addition

by the examination, they will be expected to give further indication of their training by submitting papers prepared in secondary school for their classes in history.

to the evidence offered

Hygiene and Physical Education

107

HYGIENE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Ruth

Elliott, ph.d. (Chairman) Elizabeth Beall*, ph.d. Ada Roberta Hall, ph.d. associate professor of physiology. Katharine Fuller Wells, ph.d. Marion Isabel Cook, m.a. Elinor Marie Schroeder', ph.d.

Professor:

Associate Professors:

Assistant Professors:

Instructors:

Evelyn Kathryn Dillon, Jean Knapp Marsh, m.a.

ph.d.

Marian Kinnaird Solleder, Beverly Anne Bullen, m.s.

m.a.

Sylvia Virginia Lisberger, m.a. Margaret Lois Reynolds, b.s. Frances Evans Camp, b.s.

Teaching Assistants:

Anne Lee Delano, m.a. Andrew Roy MacAusland,

Lecturer:

Special Lecturers:

m.d.,

orthopedics.

Clifford L. Derick, m.d., internal medicine. Samltel R. Meaker, m.d., menstrual function. Britton F. Boughner, b.p.e., recreation.

Marion Dorothy Jaques, Kathryn R. Hodgson.

Registrar:

Musician for the Dance:

I.

The Department

b.a.

Undergraduate Courses*

of Hygiene

and Physical Education, through

its

program

aims to help each student to build up sufficient strength and vitality to meet the demands of a normally active life; to appreciate and practice fundamental health habits; to develop a normal carriage, a sense of rhythm, coordination and motor judgment; to be a cooperative and contributing participant in group activity; and to acquire skill and a lasting interest in wholesome forms of recreation. Two hours a week of physical education activities are required for freshmen and sophomores. The activity program of each year is divided into three

adapted to individual needs and

seasons:

fall,

abilities,

winter, spring.

The department requires that during their first tw^o years at college students should take: (1) at least two seasons of individual sport (either the same or different sports); (2) at least one season of group activity (i.e. team sport, modern dance, or square dance); (3) fundamentals of Activity Requirement:

movement and

conditioning in the winter of the freshman year.

A student's choice of activity is subject to the approval of the department,

on

the basis of the results of the medical and physical examinations, and the student's previous experience. If a student can demonstrate a fair degree of skill

Absent on leave for the first semester. Absent on leave for the second semester. * See Section II, page 109, for opportunities ^

'

professional courses

and

and

physical education.

for juniors

and

seniors to enroll in

for information relative to the five-year course in hygiene

Courses of Instruction

108 in

an individual

she

may

sport, or if she

has a Junior or Senior Life Saving Certificate,

substitute other activities for individual sports.

Posture Requirement: Every student is expected to attain a grade of at least G minus on her posture photograph. Failure to meet this standard at the end of the second year of indoor work will necessitate enrollment in course 125 until the standard is attained or until the end of the winter season of the senior year. The 122 winter grade will be withheld until this requirement is fulfilled.

121. Activities

for Freshmen.

Choice of the following: Fall: Arch-

modern dance, rowing, swimming (elementary), tennis, volley ball. Winter: Fundamentals of movement and conditioning (conditioning exercises, modern dance techniques, swimming). Spring: Archery, canoeing, golf, modern dance, rowing, swimming (elementary), tennis. Required of freshmen, two periods ery, canoeing, golf, hockey,

a week.

The

Staff.

for Sophomores. Choice of the following: Fall: under 121. Winter: Badminton, basket ball, modern dance, senior life saving, square and round dancing, squash, swimming, water safety instructor training course. Spring: Activities listed under 121. Required of sophomores who have completed 121. Two periods The Staff. a week. 122. Activities

Activities listed

124. Posture and Body Mechanics for Freshmen. Required of freshmen whose orthopedic condition indicates the need of individually planned exercise. Two hours a week in the winter, with 121 fall and spring. Miss Wells, Miss Lisberger.

Posture and Body Mechanics for Sophomores. Required whose orthopedic condition indicates the need of individually planned exercise. Two hours a week in the winter, with 122 fall and spring. Miss Wells, Miss Lisberger. 125.

of sophomores

126. Voluntary Activities for all Students. Students may elect with the permission of the department any of the activities listed under 121 or 122. Open to all students and faculty. Two hours a week in the fall, winter, or spring terms. The Staff.

Modified Activities for Freshmen.

131.

canoeing,

golf,

tennis, volley ball.

Winter:

Fall: Choice of archery, Fundamentals of move-

ment and conditioning.

Spring: Choice of archery, canoeing, golf, Required of freshmen whose physical condition indicates the need of modified activities. Two hours a week. Miss Schroeder. tennis.

132.

Modified Recreational Activities for Sophomores.

Fall:

Choice of archery, canoeing, golf, tennis, volley ball. Winter: Recreational activities. Spring: Choice of activities listed under 131. Required of sophomores whose physical condition indicates the need of modified activities. Two hours a week. .

Hygiene and Physical Education II.

109

Professional Training in Hygiene and Physical Education for

Undergraduate and Graduate Stltdents Professional courses in hygiene and physical education are offered to both undergraduate and graduate students. The courses are designed

become specialists in the field of physical education, and health work; (2) to provide basic training for those who wish to combine with other teaching work as assistant in physical education, or camp and recreational work. (1) to

fit

students to

recreation

undergraduate electives

Though

there

is

no major in hygiene and physical education, 207,

303, counting toward the B.A. degree, and courses 202, 203, 204, 217, 218, may be elected with the consent of the instructor of Successful work in selected the course and the student's class dean. 208,

and

theory and activity courses should enable such students to

assist in

physical education or recreation imder the guidance of trained specialists.

WHO ARE CANDIDATES FOR THE B.A. DEGREE, AND FOR THE TEACHING CERTIFICATE AND M.S. DEGREE IN HYGIENE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

SUGGESTIONS FOR UNDERGRADUATES

The work for the B.A. degree may be completed in four years. An additional year beyond the Bachelor's degree is necessary to complete the requirements for the Teaching Certificate and M.S. degree.

A student may enter this five-year course at the beginning of her freshman, sophomore, or junior year. The Recorder will furnish the student with a form to be presented to the chairman of the department, since permission to register for the five-year course must be obtained from the chairman by each applicant. By the end of the sophomore year a student should have completed Hygiene and Physical Education 121, 122, Biblical History 104, Chemistry 101, Psychology 101, the prescribed course in English composition, and six additional hours from one or more of the following fields: bacteriology, biology, hygiene, physics, sociology, and psychology. The following electives are suggested: courses in economics, education, sociology, psychology, bacteriology, zoology, physics, Hygiene 202, Students wishing to meet the requirement for state teach217, 218. A full major ers' certificates should consult the education department. in zoology is an advantage. It is essential for candidates to develop basic skills in the following activities as prerequisites for the required methods courses: swimming and modern dance before the junior year; basketball, hockey, badminton or tennis, and one additional sport from the follov^dng: archery, badminton, canoeing,

golf, tennis,

before the senior year.

It

is

desirable

Courses of Instruction

110

to attain skill in as large a variety of physical education activities as possible.

The American Red Cross Standard First Aid Certificate and the Senior Life Saving Certificate are required for the Teaching Certificate in Hygiene and Physical Education and should be secured before the junior year.

SCHEDULE OF PROFESSIONAL COURSES

IN

THE FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM

Freshman and Sophomore Tears: Specially qualified students

may

elect

methods courses 202, 203, 204 in lieu of the required courses 121 and 122. Students are advised to consult the chairman of the depart-

ment concerning such a

plan.

126, 202 c, 204, 210, Education 200, Zoology 301, Hygiene 207 and Zoology 302 may be taken in the junior or

Junior Tear: 313.

in the senior year. Senior Tear: 126,

following: d,

302

if

e,

f,

202 g,

i;

d or

a, b;

e;

and one additional sport from the and Hygiene 207 and Zoology

203, 208, 303,

not completed in the junior year.

214, 304, 306, 309, 321, 322; and for candidates for the M.S. degree in Hygiene and Physical Education one of the following graduate courses: 318, 324, 350, an approved graduate course Fifth Tear:

in

an

allied

department, or a

thesis.

Students are referred to the Bulletin oj

the

Graduate Department of

Hygiene and Physical Education.

-Graduate (For a

full

Work

description, see the Bulletin of the Graduate Department of Hygiene and Physical Education)

Graduates of colleges of satisfactory standing are admitted to the graduate work of the department. For the full professional course leading to the teaching certificate and to the master's degree, two Students, however, who as undergraduates have years are required. completed a major in hygiene and physical education may fulfill the requirements for the master's degree in one year.

TEACHING CERTIFICATE

IN

HYGIENE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Candidates should present for admission one year of chemistry (chemistry completed in secondary school may be accepted), one semester of psychology or educational psychology, one semester of principles of education, and six additional hours from one or more of the following fields: bacteriology, biology, hygiene, physics, sociology, and psychology. Whenever possible the equivalent of mammalian anatomy (Zoology 301 and 313) and physiology (Zoology 302) should

Hygiene and Physical Education

The

be presented for admission.

111

following electives are suggested:

courses in economics, education, sociology, psychology, bacteriology, Students planning to teach in public biology, physics, and music. schools should include education courses required for state certification in their undergraduate program.

candidates attain skill, before admission, in basket hockey, life-saving, modern dance, swimming, badminton or tennis; and as many as possible of the following: archery, badminton, canoeing, golf, tennis. The methods courses in these activities deal It is essential that

ball,

primarily with teaching method, organization, and related theory. If a student lacks skill needed for profitable work in any of these methods courses, additional practice will be required in undergraduate classes at Wellesley College. It is desirable to attain skill in other activities,

such as

folk,

square and tap dancing, gymnastics and apparatus, fencand winter

ing, lacrosse, rowing, soccer, Softball, squash, volley ball sports.

The American Red Cross Standard First Aid Certificate and the Senior Life Saving Certificate are required for the Teaching Certificate in Hygiene and Physical Education and should be secured before admission. master of science

in

hygiene and physical education

Graduate students who have qualified for advanced study and rewho have completed or are completing the requirements for the Teaching Certificate, may register for and complete in one or two years the twenty-four hours required for the M.S. degree in Hygiene and Physical Education. This requirement may be fulfilled by electives from the following: Hygiene and Physical Education 303, 318, 321, 322, search,

324, 350, thesis, and, with special permission, graduate courses in closely allied fields.

Technique of Teaching Sports.

Teaching methods, officiatequipment: (a) Basket ball two hours a week in the fall, (b) Hockey two hours a week in the fall, (c) Swimming two hours a week, second semester, (d) Badminton one hour a week in the winter, (e) Tennis two hours a week in the spring. (J) Archery one hour a week in the spring, (g) Canoeing one hour (h) Fencing two hours a week in the winter, seca week in the spring, ond semester, (z) Golf two hours a week in the fall. (J) Lacrosse one hour a week in the spring, (k) Squash one hour a week in the fall, (m) Synchronized swimming one hour a week, first semester. (p) Water Safety Instructor Training course -three hours a week, first semester. Required of first or second-year graduate students: a, b, c; d or e; and one additional sport from the following: d, e,f, g, i. Prerequisite, basic skills in each one of the activities elected by the student 202.

ing, organization,

























Courses of Instruction

112 except in squash. Schroeder,

Miss

Wells,

Prerequisite for (m), 202

Miss

(c).

Miss Delano, Miss

Dillon,

Miss

Beall,

Solleder.

(

Miss

(A)

not

offered in 1950-51.)

203. Techniq^ue of

Teaching Gymnastics, Apparatus, and Tum-

Lectures on gymnastic terminology, selection and adaptation of material, progression; methods of presentation with practice in teaching. Required of first-year graduate students. Two hours a bling.

week

in the winter.

Miss

Beall,

Miss

Bullen.

of Teaching Rhythmic Activities. Rhythmic fundamentals; methods, materials, and practice teaching for elementary school level; music in relation to movement; technique of percussion; folk, square, social, modern and pre-classic dance for various age levels. Required of first-year graduate students. Prerequisite, elementary modern dance. Six hours. Mrs. Marsh, Mrs. Hodgson. 204.

Technique

Physical Education. The development, measurement and statistical methods in physical education. Required of first- year graduate students. This course counts three hours toward the B.A. degree. Miss Schroeder. 207

use,

(1).

Measurement

and interpretation

in

of objective

in Play and Recreation; Camp Counseling. Growth and development of the child and adolescent; play in education. Selection and adaptation of play activities for different age Social recreation properiods. Principles and methods of teaching. grams and municipal recreation departments. Gamp counseling.

208. Leadership

Required of

Psychology or educational first-year graduate students. psychology is prerequisite. This course counts six hours toward the B.A. degree for students in the five-year program. Other students may elect one semester only for credit. Miss Beall, Miss Cook, Miss Dillon.

Organization, purpose, and tech(1). Physical Examination. niques of the physical examination; types of records; interpretation of findings. Required offirst-year graduate students. Two hours. Miss

210

Wells.

Responsible teaching experience, under and physical education programs of elementary and secondary schools, recreation centers, and in college undergraduate classes. Required of first-year graduate students four hours a week. Required of second-year graduate students four to eight hours a week. Miss Cook and the Staff. 214. Supervised Teaching. supervision, in health

217

(1).

Modern Dance Workshop.

Analysis of technical exer-

intermediate and advanced modern dance classes; development of technical studies in dance form organization and function of dance groups; the collaborative project on the secondary school and college cises for

;

Hygiene and Physical Education dance production.

level;

projects.

Open

to

113

Lectures, discussion, observations, practical

second-year graduate students, and to under-

graduate students by special permission. Two hours. Mrs. Marsh. unit of 204.

Prerequisite,

modem

dance

218 (2). Problems in Dance Composition. Thematic material, form and design, methods of development, criteria for evaluation. Open to second-year graduate students, and to undergraduate students by special permission. Prerequisite, modem dance unit of 204. Two hours.

301

(1).

Mrs. Marsh.

Mammalian Anatomy.

—See

Department of

—See

Department of

(Zoology 301

Zoology and Physiology.) 313 (2). Mammalian Anatomy. (Zoology 313 Zoology and Physiology.) 302. Physiology.

(Zoology 302

— See

Department of Zoology and

Physiology.) First semester: study of joint and muscle funcfundamental movements. Second semester: mechanical principles of human motion; anatomical and mechanical analysis Required of posture, physical education skills and everyday activities. Course 301 or its equivalent is prereqof first-year graduate students. Course 301 may be taken concurrently. Physics, while not uisite. This course counts six hours torequired, is strongly recommended. ward the B.A. degree, or the M.S. degree in Hygiene and Physical Education. Miss Wells.

303. Kinesiology. tion; analysis of

Study 304. Principles and Philosophy of Physical Education. and discussion of the aims and objectives of physical education, including historical development, relation to the general field of education, and analysis of present-day programs and methods in terms of obRequired of second-year graduate students. Four hours. jectives.

Miss

Elliott.

The study of proce(2). Organization and Administration. dures upon which the teaching situation depends; i.e., selection and adaptation of activities, examination and grouping of pupils, testing the results of teaching, evaluation of the teacher and leader, provision Illustrative problems selected of equipment, department organization. from elementary, secondary schools, colleges, and recreation agencies. 306

Required of second-year graduate students.

Two hours.

Miss

Elliott.

Orthopedic and Remedial Physical Education. The study of body mechanics, corrective exercise, and massage. Preparation for 309.

teaching corrective physical education. Supervised teaching in the Lectures by an orthoWellesley College Posture Clinic for Children.

Courses of Instruction

114

and observation

pedist

graduate students. prerequisite.

Required of second-year semester of course 303 or its equivalent is Miss Wells, Dr. MacAusland.

in orthopedic clinics.

The

Six hours.

first

318. Problems in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. Open in the Discussion of trends and current problems in these fields. first semester to second-year graduate students who have had the Open to all second-year graduate equivalent of courses 304 and 306.

students in the second semester. By permission students may elect This course counts six hours either semester as a semester course. toward the M.S. degree in Hygiene and Physical Education. Miss Elliott,

Miss Cook. Physiology. The application of problems of hygiene and physical education.

321. Applied to the

human The

physiology

physiological

aspects of exercise, fatigue, coordination, training, growth, functional tests, nutritional standards, and other topics related to the teaching of health and physical education. Required of second-year graduate

Hygiene 207 and Zoology 302, or their equivalents, are Course 207 may be taken concurrently with the perThree hours a week of lecture and recitation instructor. mission of the for a year, and one two-hour laboratory period in the winter, counting This course counts six hours toward the M.S. degree in six hours. Hygiene and Physical Education. Miss Hall.

students.

prerequisite.

Health Problems of School and Community. Social, economic, and educational influences on health; health agencies at work. Health Principles and procedures in conducting a health program. curriculum guidance, and instruction hygiene, services, environmental Special problems in construction, methods and materials, appraisals. Required of second-year graduate various areas of health education. This course counts six hours toward the M.S. degree in students. Hygiene and Physical Education. Miss Cook and Special Lecturers. 322.

324 (1). Methods of Research. Survey of research methods and techniques applied to and illustrated by various types of study in Problems in reporting health, physical education, and recreation. Open to second-year research; evaluation of completed studies. graduate students. This course counts three hours toward the M.S. degree in Hygiene and Physical Education. Miss Schroeder and other

Members

of the Staff.

With the permission of the Stitoy. department, qualified graduate students may arrange for directed inOpen to seconddividual study in hygiene and physical education. year graduate students. Three to six hours. This course counts toward the M.S. degree in Hygiene and Physical Education. 350.

Research or Independent

115

Italian

INTERDEPARTMENTAL COURSES An Introductory Course in Biology. A course

designed to 103. introduce the student to fundamental biological principles as a basis for an understanding of the nature and the unity of living things and of the Open to students who have not place of man in the biologic world. In general, two hours of lecture and offered biology for admission. Mrs. WilSix hours. discussion and four of laboratory or field work. son,

Miss

Creighton,

Miss Hutchinson.

A

course de106. An Introductory Course in Physical Science. signed to acquaint the student with some of the basic concepts of physics and chemistry, the characteristics which these sciences possess in common, and an appreciation of the methods by which the concepts have been developed. Selected fundamental concepts and principles will be studied in a setting which includes both the circumstances surrounding Open to their evolution and their effect on modes of scientific thought. students

who do

not present chemistry or physics for admission. Three and discussion and one three-period laboratory ap-

periods of lecture

Miss H. Jones, Miss Lucy Wilson, Miss Boyd, Six hours. Miss Loud, Mrs. Martin, Miss Towne. pointment.

107.* Interpretations of

Man

Western Literature.

in

Repre-

man, and of his relation to the universe the work of major writers of the western world;

sentative views of the nature of

and

society, reflected in

the expression of their thought in significant artistic form, such as epic, drama, essay. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and to specially qualified

hours.

Miss

freshmen by permission of the Dean of Freshmen. Miss Lever, Miss D. Jones.

Six

Taylor,

ITALIAN Professors:

Gabriella Bosano,

dottore

in

filologia

moderna,

(Chairman) Angeline La Piana, dottore in lettere. LiTT.D.

The language of the classroom is Italian except for occasional necessary explanations of grammar and idioms. A limited number of qualified students are permitted, when practicable, to spend the junior year in Italy with the foreign study group of Smith College.

A summer term at the

Italian School,

101. Elementary Course. grammar and a general view oral

and written

exercises.

correct pronunciation. *

This course

may

Four

be elected to

Middlebury College,

is

recommended.

The fundamental elements

of Italian

of Italian civilization through fi-equent

Reading aloud with special emphasis on class periods and five hours of preparation fulfill

the literature requirement in group

I.

Courses of Instruction

116

each week. Six hours.

Open to students who do not present Italian Miss Bosano, Miss La Piana.

for admission.

Introduction to the Study of the Italian Renaissance. language and of the background for a general knowledge of Italy in the Renaissance. Second semester: reading and discussion of selections from outstanding Italian authors of the period such as: Petrarca, Boccaccio, Vasari, Leonardo da The Vinci, Machiavelli, Castiglione, Bandello, Tasso, and Guarino. 103.

First semester: intensive study of the Italian

language used in the classroom is English. No prerequisite. Open to and, by special permission, to juniors. Six hours. Miss

seniors

Bosano.

History of Italian Literature in the Twentieth Century. drama and fiction as represented by the works of D'AnPrerequisite, 101 or equivanunzio, Pirandello, Deledda, and others. Miss La Piana. Six hours. lent. 201.

Empliasis on

202. History of Italian Literature in the Nineteenth Century. A study of the literature of the nineteenth century as the expression of the political and philosophical thought of the period. Special emphaPresis on the works of G. Mazzini, A. Manzoni, and G. Carducci. requisite, 101 or equivalent.

Six hours.

Miss Bosano.

(Not offered

in 1950-51.)

205. Composition.

Difficult parts of Italian

grammar and

syntax.

Free composition with special attention to letter writing. The subject matter will deal chiefly with contemporary Italy. Open to students who have completed 101. Two hours. Miss La Piana.

and Conversation. Practice in the spoEmphasis on rhythm and melody and clear phrasApplication of practical phonetics to radio work by means of ing. Open to students who have completed records and soundscriber discs. 101. Four hours. Miss La Piana. 206. Practical Phonetics

ken language.

The Realistic and Psychological Novel in the Nineteenth Century. An intensive study of the work of G. Verga of the school of Additional realism, and of A. Fogazzaro and the psychological novel. reading and analisi estetica of selected poems of G. Parini, U. Foscolo and G. Leopardi. Prerequisite, 101 or equivalent. Six hours. Miss

207.

Bosano.

Dante and His Time. The outstanding characteristics of the Middle Ages and its writers. The reading of Dante's Divina Commedia and Vita Nuova in the original and in full. Open, by permission, to 301.*

* It will be the privilege of students in grade III courses to liave access to the manuscripts and early often contemporary— editions of Italian authors contained in the Frances Pearsons Plimpton Collection.



117

Italian juniors

and seniors who have completed or are taking 201 or 202 or 207.

Six hours.

Bosano.

A^liss

Translation from English into Italian and vice Emphasis literary and scientific works. on specific, technical vocabulary. Open to students who have completed 101, 201, 202, or 207. Two hours. Miss La Plana.

304.* Translation.

versa of passages

drawn from

306.* Conversation. Conversation based on reading and critical study of articles from Italian newspapers and reviews. The purpose of this course is to familiarize the students with the language used in current publications. 202, or 207.

Open

Four hours.

who have completed

to students

101, 201,

Miss La Plana.

307.* Drama and Short Stories in the Italian Renaissance. Emphasis on the plays of Poliziano, Guarini, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Aretino, and Lasca, and on the short stories of Boccaccio and Bandello. Open, by permission, to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking 301. Six hours. Miss Bosano.

308.* History and Epics in the Italian Renaissance. A detailed study of Machiavelli's and Guicciardini's works, considered as literary masterpieces, and the poems of Pulci, Boiardo, Ariosto, and Tasso.

Open, by permission, taking 301.

to juniors

Six hours.

and

who have completed or are (Not offered in 1950-51.)

seniors

Miss Bosano.

309.* Seminar. Revival of Classic Learning in Italy and Especially IN Florence During the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries. Development of Italian Humanism from F. Petrarca to A. Poliziano traced so that students may estimate the achievements of a new era in Italian civilization. Open to graduate students and, by permission, to seniors. Six hours. Miss Bosano. (Not offered in 1950-51.) 310.* Seminar.

drama during

Modern Italian Drama. Development of the the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, from the

Commedia deWarte to Goldoni and Alfieri. and, by permission, to seniors. Six hours.

Open

to graduate students Miss La Plana.

By consultation with the arrange for individual work. Open, by permission, to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking a course of grade III in the department. Two to six hours. 350.

Research or Independent Study.

department students

may

Directions for Election

To

fulfill

the literature requirement in group

courses 201, 202, 207,

and grade

I,

students

may

elect

III courses (except 304, 306).

* It will be the privilege of students in grade III courses to have access to the manuscripts and early often contemporary editions of Italian authors contained in the Frances Pearsons Plimpton Collection.





Courses of Instruction

118

A

major in Italian

is

generally based on 101.

It is

very desirable

had or be taking a college course in one of the ancient or modern languages, and should elect such courses in history and art as deal in whole or in part with Such courses will be required of Italian civilization and culture. that students majoring in Italian should have

students working for honors.

Students taking a 24 hour major should include 201 or 202 or 207, 205, 206, 301, 307 or 308. Students taking a 30 hour major should include 201, 202 or 207, 301, 304, 306, 307 or 308.

Note:

—101

may

not count toward the major.

LATIN Professor:

Associate Professors:

Dorothy Mae Robathan, ph.d. Margaret Elizabeth Taylor, ph.d. (Chairman) Charlotte Elizabeth Goodfellow,

ph.d.

The aim of the course is to acquire in one 102. Beginning Latin. year sufficient knowledge of grammar and syntax to enable the student Reading will include simple Latin and selecto read Latin authors. Open to students who do not present Latin tions from classical writers. for admission.

Six hours.

Miss Robathan.

{a). Epic: Selections from 103. Vergil or Cicero; Lyric Poetry, {b). Readings from Cicero's the Mneid; Lyric: Catullus and Horace, Letters and Orations and from other authors selected to meet the needs of

Prerequisite, Selections from Catullus and Horace. three admission units of Latin, or for especially recommended students, two units, or 102. Those who read poetry in the third year will elect By permission, properly (ft); those who read prose will elect {a).

the students.

qualified students

Six hours.

may

elect the

second semester without the

first.

Miss Robathan.

104 (1). Roman Life and Customs. A study of Roman civilization through the medium of its social conditions, religious customs, educaLectures illustrated by lantern tion, amusements, buildings, etc. photographs, coins, and other Roman antiquities. The required reading will be in English. No prerequisite. Three hours. Miss (Not given in 1950-51.) Robathan.

slides,

105 (2). Latin Literature in English Translations. The most important poets and prose writers, with emphasis upon those authors who have especially influenced modern forms of literature. Lectures on the development of Latin literature. No prerequisite. Not open Three hours. Miss to students who have had or are taking 201. Goodfellow.

Latin

119

Medieval Latin.

106.

Readings from Latin writers in the fields of and philosophy of the Middle Ages, including Gassi-

literature, history,

odorus, Gregory the Great, Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Erasmus, Abelard, the chroniclers of the Crusades, the romancers of the Gesta

Romanorum, religious drama, songs of the Goliards, and church hymns. Only so much attention will be given to linguistic study as the reading requires. Prerequisite, three or more admission units of Latin, or for Six hours. Miss especially recommended students, two units, or 102. Goodfellow.

The reading will be 201. The Golden Age of Latin Literature. chosen from the following topics: studies in mythology from Ovid's Metamorphoses or Fasti; Livy's History; Cicero's philosophy in the De De Amicitia; lyric verse in the shorter poems of Catullus and and Epodes of Horace. Prerequisite, four admission units of Latin or 106; or, by permission, three units including one of Vergil.

Senectute or

the Odes

Miss

Six hours.

Taylor.

202 (2). Vergil. Selections from the Eclogues, Georgics, and Mneid. Study of the poet's early work in pastoral romance, and his later development through didactic epic, the Georgics, to the heroic epic of the Prerequisite, 103 or 201. Three hours. Miss Taylor. /Eneid. 203

Plautus and Terence.

Comedy.

(1).

plays followed by the rapid reading of others.

comedy,

its

204

linguistic

and

Pliny and Martial.

(2).

and its influence upon later Three hours. Miss Goodfellow.

literary features,

Prerequisite, 103 or 201.

literature.

Careful study of two sources of Latin

The

A

study of

Roman

society in the early

and the Epigrams of Martial. Reports on special topics connected with the literary style and social background of these authors. Prerequisite, 103 or 201. Three hours. Empite

as reflected in the Letters of Pliny

(Not given

Miss Robathan.

in 1950-51.)

Cicero. Selections from the philosophical works and Three hours. Miss Goodfellow. Prerequisite, 103 or 201.

205 301

(1).

(2).

The Teaching

description

and

letters.

of Latin in the Secondary School. Education 301. Miss Robathan.

For

prerequisites, see

Horace and Juvenal.

The

and developupon the satires of Horace and Juvenal; other Roman satirists studied by topics and reports. Three hours. Prerequisite, six hours of grade H exclusive of 201.

302

(1).

ment

Satire.

of satire as a literary form.

Miss Robathan.

origin

Special emphasis

(Not given in 1950-51.)

303 (2). Latin Epigraphy. Selected inscriptions studied both for form and content as sources for the study of Roman public and private Three hours. life. Prerequisite, six hours of grade n exclusive of 201. Miss Robathan. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

Courses of Instruction

120

304 (1). Topography of Rome. The early history of Rome, its development, the construction and furnishings of typical public and Such study of private buildings in the capital and in provincial towns. the material surroundings is connected with the literary and social

development of the

people, and is introductory to further work Prerequisite, six hours of grade II exclusive of

Roman

in classical archeology.

Three hours.

201.

Miss Robathan.

306 (2). Studies in Roman Religion. The changing religious experience of the Republican period and of the early Empire; the influence of Readings from the sources, especially from Livy, CicOriental cults. Prerequisite, six hours of grade II exclusive of 201. Ovid. and ero, Three hours. Miss Taylor. (Not offered in 1950-51.) 309

(2).

Prose Literature of the Early Empire.

History: Livy,

Reading based on choice of Tacitus, Suetonius, Velleius Paterculus. Three Prerequisite, six hours of grade II exclusive of 201. topics. Miss Goodjellow.

hours.

(Not given in 1950-51.)

Poetry of the Republic. The beginnings of Latin poetry, the earlier poets, with main emphasis upon poets of the Ciceronian Age, Prerequisite, six hours of grade II exclusive of Catullus and Lucretius. 310

201.

(1).

Three hours.

Miss

Taylor.

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

Elegy: TibuUus, Propertius, Ovid. from representative poets of the later period. The course may be given in one weekly appointment. Prerequisite, six hours of grade II exclusive of 201. Three hours. Miss Robathan.

312

(2).

Poetry of the Empire.

Selections

350.

Open

Research or Independent Study.

and, by permission, to juniors and seniors.

Two

to

graduate students

to six hours.

Directions for Election

The

literature requirement in

group

I

may

be met by electing from

the following list of courses: 103, 105, 106, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 302, 309, 310, 312. Courses 102, 104, 105, count for the degree but do not count

toward a major in Latin. Students intending to major in Latin are advised to take at least one course in Greek and History 204. Art 201 and 209 may be counted toward a 30 hour major in Latin by students who are at the same time taking a grade III course in Latin. No students are recommended to teach Latin who have not had at least six hours of grade III and Education 301. Students eligible for honors work may elect an interdepartmental honors program in classical archeology (see page 156).

Mathematics

121

MATHEMATICS Professor: Visiting Professor:

Associate Professor:

Assistant Professor:

Marion Elizabeth Stark, ph.d. (Chairman) Dorothy Maharam Stone, ph.d. Helen Gertrude Russell, ph.d. Miriam Clough Ayer, ph.d.

who have not had a course in trigonometry, 107 spent a half-year in studying this subject. Students should consult the announcements of the departments of astronomy, chemistry, economics, philosophy, and physics for courses to which matheCourse 106

is

matics

is

either

is

for students

who have

for those

an absolute or an alternative prerequisite.

Introductory Mathematics.

Topics from intermediate algetrigonometry. Analytic geometry of the Elementary differentiation and straight line and the conic sections. Not integration. Prerequisite, tw^o admission units in mathematics. open to students who present three units in mathematics. Six hours. 105.

A

bra.

brief course

in

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry, Introduction to the

106.

Plane trigonometry, plane analytic geometry, elementary and integration with applications. Prerequisite, three admission units in mathematics. Six hours. Miss Stark, Mr. Warwick

Calculus.

differentiation

{Assistant Professor of Astronomy)

Analytic Geometry, Introduction to the Calculus. This is similar to 106, but a prerequisite of trigonometry makes it possible to consider additional topics and applications connected with Prerequisite, four admisanalytic geometry and elementary calculus. 107.

course

sion units in mathematics or a course in trigonometry equivalent to that As the work outlined by the College Entrance Examination Board. covered by the fourth unit is not uniform in all schools, students in this

course

v\all

Stark,

201.

Elementary Mathematical Analysis.

Miss

Russell.

Selected

advanced algebra, analytic geometry, and the calculus. Six hours.

105.

and the

tions.

203

and Integral Calculus.

integral including their geometric

Prerequisite, 106 or 107.

(2).

topics

from

Prerequisite,

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

202. Differential tive

Six hours.

as far as possible be given individual instruction.

Miss

Six hours.

A

study of the deriva-

and physical interpretaMiss

History of Elementary Mathematics.

Russell.

The

evolution of

Great mathematicians and A brief survey of their chief contributions to elementary mathematics. modern developments in mathematics and its literature. Prerequisite (Not offered in or corequisite, 201, 202, or 220. Three hours.

the fundamental concepts of mathematics.

1950-51.)

Courses of Instruction

122

205 (1), (2)*. Introduction TO Mathematical Statistics. Fundamental statistical methods, with special emphasis on the use of elementary mathematics and the calculus in the development of theory and in Preparation will include assigned laboratory work. Prepractice. requisite or corequisite, 201, 202, or 220.

be given to a student receiving credit for

Credit for this course will not Three hours.

Economics 211.

(Not offered in 1950-51.) 206 (1)*. tectural

Descriptive Geometry

and engineering drawing.

The theory underlying archiI. Problems involving the use of two

of projection in representing points, lines, and planes. Prerequisite or corequisite, 201, applied to measurement. Revolution All students must have a knowledge of the elements of 202, or 220. The department will give directions for gaining readily solid geometry. Three periods of lecture the necessary acquaintance with this subject.

or

more planes

or discussion with two laboratory periods. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

Three hours.

Miss

Stark.

208 (2) *. Descriptive Geometry II. Artists' perspective and photogrammetry, basic to the interpretation of aerial photography. Intersection of surfaces, development, shades and shadows. Prerequisite, Three periods of lecture or discussion with two laboratory periods 206. Three hours. Miss Stark. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

and Integral Calculus. A study of the derivaand the integral. The course is similar to 202 but places more emphasis on multiple integration, partial differentiation, and geometry Open by permission to students who have completed of three-space. 220. Differential

tive

106 or 107.

Six hours.

302. Functions of a

Miss

Ayer.

Real Variable.

Continuity and other proper-

of functions; convergence of series; representation of functions by power series and definite integrals. Infinite products, infinite integrals, Prerequisite, 202 or 220. Fourier series, and other allied subjects.

ties

Six hours.

Mrs.

Stone.

303 (l).t Differential Equations. An introductory course in ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisite, 201, 202, or Three hours. Miss Russell. 220.

Introduction to Modern Algebraic Theory. Topics in algebraic theory which are of importance in the study of geometry and Prerequisite, analysis as well as in the development of higher algebra. Three hours. Miss Russell. 201, 202, or 220. 304

*

(2).

Offered in alternate years.

Astronomy 302 or Physics 304 or 308 counted toward a major in mathematics. t

if

preceded by Mathematics 303,

may

be

Mathematics 308. Functions of analytic functions.

mapping.

a Complex Variable. Infinite

series,

Prerequisite, 302.

123

Elementary treatment of and conformal Miss Ayer.

transformations,

Six hours.

Concepts and theorems of projective 309. Projective Geometry. geometry developed by both synthetic and analytic methods. Prerequisite, 201, 202, or 220. Six hours. Mrs. Stone.

Research or Independent Study.

350.

department

to qualified seniors.

Open by

Three hours

permission of the

for a semester or six

hours for a year.

Directions for Election

A

major must include

It is

at least 12 hours of

advisable for students

who

grade

III.

are planning to do graduate

work

in

French or German. Only those students who have completed satisfactorily at least six hours of grade III in mathematics will be recommended as teachers of mathematics to acquire the

ability to read

mathematics.

Exemption Examination

An

examination for exemption from a course in mathematics to satisfy partially the distribution requirement in group III will be offered to students who have been unusually well prepared in algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and the elements of differentiation and integration.

Students desiring to enter directly into grade II work may either apply for the exemption examination or give evidence of having completed the work in secondary school in a satisfactory manner.

Courses of Instruction

124

MUSIC Professors:

Associate Professor:

Research Librarian: Instructors:

Howard

Hinners, b.a.

Hubert Weldon Lamb, b.a. Jan La Rue, m.f.a. (Chairman) Helen Joy Sleeper, m.a., mus.b. Susan Godoy, m.a.

John Doane Wicks, Lecturer:

m.a.

Margaret Macdonald Winkler,

m.a.

(Director of the Choir)

Richard Burgin

Instructors in

Practical

(Violin)

Music: David Barnett, b.a. (Piano)

Alfred Zighera (Violoncello) Harry Kobialka (Violin; Conductor Director of Chamber Music) Melville Smith, b.a. (Organ) Paul Matthen, b.a. (Voice) Klaus Goetze (Piano) 101.

of the Orchestra

Fundamentals and Elementary Analysis.

intervals, chords.

and

Notation, modes,

An analytical study of the elements of music and

the

principles of harmony as exemplified in the forms of the classical period. ear-training,

clef-reading, and transposition. Four periods a week, one of lecture and Six hours. Miss Godoy.

sight-singing,

Drill

in

Open

to all undergraduates.

three section meetings. 103.

Introduction to Musical Literature.

An

historical survey

course designed to develop the student's musical understanding, insight, and powers of observation through the study of music of various styles and periods. No previous knowledge of music is required. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have had no other course in the

department. Not to be counted toward a major. Three hours of lecMrs. Winkler, Mr. ture and one section meeting a week. Six hours. Wicks.

History of Musical Style. A survey of materials and methods from the earliest times to the present. Open to students who have completed 101 or who have been exempted from 101 on the basis of the test in fundamentals. Two two-hour periods of lecture and conference a week. Mr. La Rue. Six hours. 200.

of composition

201. Elementary Harmony. Triads and their inversions, secondary dominants, modulation, and non-harmonic tones. Harmonization of Open to students who Ear-training. melodies and unfigured basses. have completed 101 or who have been exempted from 101 on the basis of the test in fundamentals. Students taking the course must have Six sufficient facility at the keyboard to play hymn tunes at sight.

hours.

Mr.

Hinners.

Music 209

The

(1).

125

The development

Classical Period.

sonata, string quartet, symphony, and concerto.

Not

103.

toward

counted

be

to

a

major.

of the classical

Prerequisite, 101 or

Three hours.

Mrs.

Winkler.

210

The Larger Instrumental Forms

(2).

The development

Century.

of the

in the Nineteenth symphony and the concerto from 101 or 103. Not to be counted

Schubert to Brahms. Prerequisite, toward a major. Three hours. Mrs. Winkler. 300. Design

Music.

analysis of representative works and structural procedures in the music of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. The main emphasis will be on the period from Bach through Beethoven. Prerequisite, 200 or 201 or 211. Six hours. Mr. Hinners. in

Detailed

illustrating the evolution of forms

301. Counterpoint.

Composition

in

The

small

week with a Mr. Lamb.

periods a hours.

principles of two-

forms.

Analysis.

and three-part

Prerequisite,

writing.

201.

third at the pleasure of the instructor.

History of Style

Two Six

Music from the Middle Ages to the and methods of composition and their relation to social and cultural backgrounds. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 211 or 318 and 319, and also 212 or 301 or 310. Six hours. Mr. Lamb. 302.

Present.

305

The

in

materials

The Sixteenth Century.

(1).

associated with the Renaissance.

A

study of the musical traditions

Open

and Three hours.

to juniors

have completed 200 or 201 or 211 or 212. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

seniors

who

Mr. Lamb.

Bach. The style of J. S. Bach and its place in the history of Analysis of selected vocal and instrumental works. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 200 and 201, or 201 and 211, or 211 and 212, or 300. Three hours. Mr. Lamb. 309

(2).

music.

Advanced Harmony.

Dominant sevenths and ninths, the augand secondary sevenths. Harmonization of more extended melodies and basses involving some of the elementary principles of composition. Ear-training and advanced analysis. Prerequisite, 201. Six hours. Mr. Hinners. 310.

mented

315,

sixth chords

Orchestration. The technique of the principal orchestral Composition in small forms for chamber groups.

instruments. Analysis.

One

Open to graduates and, who have completed 301 and 310.

Exercises in scoring for orchestra.

by permission,

to juniors

and

seniors

three-period class a week.

in 1950-51.)

Six hours.

Mr. Lamb.

(Not offered

Courses of Instruction

126

318 (1). Seminar: Beethoven. The development of the style of Beethoven to its culmination in the Ninth Symphony, the Missa Solemnis, and the last quartets. Open to juniors and seniors who have com-

and 201, or 201 and 211, or 211 and 212, or 300. Mr. Lamb.

pleted 200 hours.

Three

The Nineteenth Century.

Evolution of the romantic Impressionism. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 200 and 201, or 201 and 211, or 211 and 212, or One three-period class a week. Three hours. Mr. Lamb. 300. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

319

(2).

Nationalism.

style.

A

study of The development of dramatic music. 323. The Opera. operatic traditions as represented by selected works of the more important composers. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed One three-period class a week. Six six hours of grade II in music.

Mr. La Rue.

hours.

Seminar: Stravinsky.

A study of the more important works

325

(2).

and

of their place in the music of the

Open

to juniors

212.

Three hours.

and

seniors

first

half of the twentieth century.

who have completed 200

or 201 or 211 or

Mr. Lamb.

On consultation with the 350. Research or Independent Study. department, properly qualified students may arrange for directed study Three hours for a in theory, composition, or the history of music. semester or six hours for a year.

Practical Music (Instrumental and Vocal Lessons)

Work is

in practical

an extra charge Instruction

is

music

is

not credited toward the B.A. degree, and there

for it.*

provided in piano, organ, violin, violoncello, and voice, for private instruction in other instru-

and arrangements may be made

Students in piano who wish to do so may supplement their private lessons with group study which is available to them without Vocal instruction is additional charge as part of the piano course. In the case of elemengiven both in classes and by individual lessons. ments.

Advanced students of tary students, class instruction predominates. string instruments or piano are eligible, also without additional charge, for

group instruction

in the

performance of chamber music.

* Students who elect practical music are charged at the rate of $90.00 for a halfhour lesson per week throughout the year. The charge for the use of a practice studio is S20.00 per year for one period daily. The charge for a daily period of organ Practical music fees are payable in advance by semesters, and practice is $25.00. are not subject to return or deduction except upon recommendation of both the Dean of Students and the department chairman.

Music

127

Candidates for the B.A. degree may take practical music provided they take or have already taken a course in the theory or history of music. Practical music is an elective, and students wishing to take it should notify the department in accordance with the procedure required for the election of an academic course. Instruction in practical music is available to graduates of Wellesley College and to residents of the town of Wellesley by special arrange-

ment. Practical music study is normally undertaken on a yearly basis, though with the permission of the chairman of the department it may be elected for a single semester only. Students whose work proves unsatisfactory may be required to discontinue their lessons. The College subscribes for eight seats in the Saturday series of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Students taking music courses are given

preference in the use of these tickets.

Directions for Election

For a 24 hour major, the following courses are required: 101, 200, 300, 305, 325.

For a 30 hour major, one of the following sequences is required: (a) 101, 200, 300, 305, 325, and six hours from among the

fol-

lowing: 201, 309, 318, 323. (b) 200, 201, 301, 305, 310, 325 (101 prerequisite; those taking this sequence are strongly advised to elect six hours of additional grade III courses in the literature of music).

Sequence

(b) is

recommended

to students interested in

an intensive

study of the technical aspects of music. Students preparing for graduate study, teaching, or other professional work in music should take this sequence. Suggested correlative subjects for students majoring in music: Euro-

pean

history, literature, art.

A

knowledge of German, French, Italian, and Latin is, in the order named, important for graduate work in music. While the B.A. degree requires a reading knowledge of only one foreign language, students planning to do graduate work may find it necessary to acquire at least an elementary knowledge of a second foreign language.

Preliminary Test

in

Fundamentals

In the week prior to the opening of classes, the department requires students who elect a first course in music other than 103 to take a short test in fundamentals. The results of this test will be used as a basis for placement in sections of 101 and to admit students of sufficient advancement to grade II courses. all

Courses of Instruction

128

PHILOSOPHT Thomas Hayes Procter, ph.d. Mary Lowell Coolidge, ph.d. (Chairman) Virginia Onderdonk, b.a.

Professors:

Associate Professor:

Assistant Professor: Instructor:

Ellen Stone Haring, m.a. Nathaniel Walker Roe, b.a.

A

study of the principles of valid 103 (1), (2). Bases of Knowledge. thinking together with a critical examination of the ultimate sources of knowledge. Some study of logical inference and of scientific method Open to all students except those who have taken will be included.

104

Mrs. Haring, Mr. Roe.

Three hours.

108.

Theories of the Good Life.

(1), (2),

A

study of typical ethical

by Miss

theories in their relation to the metaphysical assumptions implied

Open

them.

to

students.

all

Onderdonk, Mrs. Haring,

Mr.

Three hours.

Miss

Coolidge,

Roe.

A

107. Introduction to Philosophy Through Greek Thought. course based on the material presented by the Greek thinkers. An introductory discussion of the various Pre-Socratic schools. Special attention to Plato's Apology, Crito, Phaedo and Republic and to Aristotle's Ethics

and

and

to parts of the Metaphysics.

Six hours.

202

Open

to sophomores, juniors,

by permission of the Dean of Freshmen, to freshmen. Mr. Proctor, Mrs. Haring, Mr. Roe.

seniors, and,

(1).

Aristotle on

Man

and Nature.

The

principal topics of

this course will be (1) Aristotle's conception of scientific inquiry, (2) his analysis of change, (3) his theory of substance, (4) his account of man as a specially endowed natural being. Some consideration will be given to Aristotle's ethics and politics. Prerequisite, 107 or 307.

Three hours.

Mr.

Roe.

(Not given in 1950-51.)

A

study of philosophical problems concerning (1). i^sTHETics. the nature of beauty, of artistic creation, and of standards in criticism. Some attention will be given to the relation of aesthetic to other values. Readings in such classical philosophers as Plato and in such contempo-

203

Open to sophomores who have rary writers as Croce and Santayana. philosophy and to juniors and seniors without in course completed a prerequisite.

Three hours.

Miss

Coolidge.

Studies in the development of phi(2). American Philosophy. losophy in the United States from Colonial times until the present. The work will include an examination of the philosophical assumptions

204

of such

Open

to

authors as Edwards, Jefferson, Emerson, James, Dewey. sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have taken or are taking

Philosophy

129

a three-hour course in philosophy or a course in American history or Hterature. Three hours. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

Introduction TO Philosophy Through THE Problems A brief historical and psychological study of the religious consciousness leading to a discussion of the nature and validity of religious experience in contrast with other types of experience and of the philosophical problems involved in this contrast. Open to sophomores who have completed a course in philosophy, and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Three hours. Mr. Procter, Miss Onder211 (1), (2). OF Religion.

donk.

the Development of Modern Philosophy. A study European philosophies from Descartes to Nietzsche designed to give students a knowledge of the chief philosophical systems and to provide some philosophical background for the understanding of related movements in literature and the natural and social sciences. Open to sophomores who have completed a course in philosophy, and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Open also, by special arrangement, to graduate students. Six hours. Miss Coolidge, Miss 214. Studies in

of important

Onderdonk.

A study of the forms on the analysis and symbolic formulation of ordinary English sentences and the deduction of simple conclusions. There will be some discussion of such notions as implication, proof, consistency, definition, postulate. Open to sophomores who have completed a course in philosophy or mathematics, and to juniors and seniors without prerequisite. Three hours. Miss Onderdonk. 216

(1).

Fundamental Principles of Logic.

of valid reasoning with emphasis

306

(2).

Advanced Logic.

A

study of modern developments

of

logic including a discussion of the nature of a deductive system, the logic of classes,

and the calculus

of propositions.

Open

to students

who

have taken 216. Two periods a week with a third at the pleasure of the instructor. Three hours. Miss Onderdonk.

The History of Greek Philosophy. An advanced study of Greek philosophy, offering more extended and more detailed readings in Plato (with emphasis on the later dialogues) and also in Aristotle, the Stoics, Epicureans, and Neo-Platonists. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed six hours in philosophy and, by permission, 307.

other seniors majoring in related departments. Open also to approved graduate students. Not open to students who have taken

to

course 107.

Six hours.

Mr.

Procter.

311 (2). Leibniz and Kant. An intensive study of the philosophies of Leibniz and Kant. Open to students who have taken or are taking course 214. Three hours. Mr. Roe.

1

Courses of Instruction

30

Studies in Regent Philosophy. Papers and on the writings of representatives of naturalism, pragmatism, and realism. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 214 and to graduate students. Three hours. Miss Coolidge. 321

Seminar:

(1).

discussions based

Seminar: Studies in Recent Philosophy. Papers and disbased upon the writings of Bradley, Bergson, and Whitehead. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 214 and to graduate students. Three hours, Mr. Procter. 322

(2).

cussions

A

study of medieval thought, emThomas Aquinas. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 107 or 307, and by permission to seniors taking 307, and to juniors and seniors with adequate prepa-

323

(1).

Medieval Philosophy.

phasizing the works of Augustine and

ration in related fields such as art. Biblical history, history,

Three hours.

ture.

350.

and

and

litera-

Mrs. Haring.

Research or Independent Study. Open by permission. Two to six hours.

to graduate students

seniors

Directions for Election

A 24 or 30 hour major in philosophy must include 107 or 307, 214 and 321, 322. Course 214 should be elected in the sophomore or junior year. As courses supplementary to a philosophy major, the department strongly recommends Psychology 101 or 103. Certain courses

in

political

Latin,

mathematics, natural science, history. Biblical history, and sociology, and in English, French, German,

science,

and Greek

literature are also suggested.

Students who expect to do graduate work in philosophy are strongly advised to take French or German and a course in logic (216). The department recommends that students electing philosophy to fulfill the distribution requirement choose either 103-104, 107, or 214.

PHYSICS Hedwig Kohn, ph.d. Lucy Wilson, ph.d. Alice Hall Armstrong^, ph.d. Dorothy Heyworth, ph.d. (Chairman)

Research Professor: Professors:

Associate Professor:

Janet Brown Guernsey, m.a. John Franklin Hersh, m.a.

Assistant Professors:

Assistants:

Research Assistant:

Mary Molloy Martin, b.a. Ella Georgia Loud, b.s. Janette Katherine Furman,

b.s.

A course designed to give an intelligent 101. Elementary Physics. understanding of man's physical environment and the everyday appli^

Absent on leave.

Physics

131

cations of the fundamental laws of mechanics, heat, electricity,

sound and light. Open to students who do not offer physics for admission. Three periods of lecture and discussion with one three-period laboratory appointment.

Miss Heyworth, Mrs.

Six hours.

Guernsey, and Assistants.

104. Elementary Physics. The same topics as in course 101, but with greater emphasis upon the mathematical development of the subject. Open to students who do not offer physics for admission. Prereqviisite, three admission units in mathematics. Three periods of lecture and discussion with one three-period laboratory appointment. Six hours. Mrs. Guernsey, Miss Heyworth, and Assistants. (Not given in 1950-51.)

105 (1). Fundamental Principles of Physics. Selected topics in mechanics; wave motion and its applications in sound and light; current electricity.

Open

to students

who

offer physics for admission.

Three periods of lecture and discussion, with one three-period laboratory appointment. Three hours. Mrs. Guernsey, Mrs. Martin. 106.

An Introductory Course

tion

and

in Physical Science. For descrip* Interdepartmental Courses 106. This course will, by special arrangement, serve as prerequisite for grade II courses in physics. Miss Wilson, Miss H. Jones, Miss Boyd, Miss Towne, Mrs. Martin, Miss Loud. prerequisites,

see

Direct and alternating current phenomena. (1). Electricity. Methods of measurement; general circuit theory. Open to students who have completed 101, 104, or 105, and, by permission, to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who pass an examination for exemption from 105. Additional prerequisite or corequisite. Mathematics 106 or 107. Three periods of lecture and discussion, with one three-period laboratory appointment. Three hours. Mrs. Guernsey, Mr. Hersh.

201

202

(2).

Atomic Physics.

A

brief introduction to the kinetic theory

and atomic energy, and of and structure of the atom, nuclear and extra-nuclear. Evidence offered by the phenomena of cathode rays, photoelectricity, of gases, to theories of the nature of radiant

the constituents

Open to who have completed 201 and, by permission, to sophomores, and seniors who have completed 101, 104, or 105, or who have

ionization, optical spectra, x-rays, radioactivity, isotopes.

students juniors,

passed an examination for exemption from 105.

Three hours.

Mrs.

Guernsey.

203

(1).

Meteorology.

Air pressure, temperature, winds, clouds,

precipitation, progress of storms, cold waves, atmospheric optics; chief

concepts of air mass analysis with application to weather forecasting; study and practice in the use of meteorological instruments. Open to freshmen who have passed an examination for exemption from 105,

Courses of Instruction

132

and

to sophomores, juniors,

and

seniors

who have completed

or are

taking 101 or 104 or 105 or who have presented one admission unit in Three periods of lecture and discussion with one threephysics. Miss Wilson and Asperiod laboratory appointment. Three hours. sistant.

(Not given in 1950-51.)

205 (2). Sound. Vibrations and sound waves; musical scales and musical instruments; architectural acoustics; reproduction of speech and music. Open to students who have completed 101 or 104 or 105; to freshmen who have passed an examination for exemption from 105; and to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have offered physics for Three periods of lecture and discussion and one two-period admission. laboratory appointment. Three hours. Mr. Hersh, Mrs. Martin. 301 (1).* Light.

The wave

theory and

its

application to the phe-

nomena and

of interference, diffraction, double refraction, polarization, dispersion; theory and use of optical instruments; nature of light

Open to juniors and seniors who have completed a course of grade II in physics, or a year course of grade I in physics and a year course of grade I in astronomy. Additional prerequisite or corequisite. Mathematics 106 or 107. Three periods of lecture and discussion with one three-period laboratory appointment. Three hours. Miss

sources.

Kohn.

302

(2).

Electronics.

electron flow in diodes, triodes,

vacuum

Non-linear circuit theory; fundamentals of vacuum tube as a circuit element;

tubes; the

as amplifiers, oscillators,

modu-

Electronic circuits in radio communication.

Pre-

and multi-element tubes

lators, rectifiers.

Three periods of lecture and discussion, with one three-period laboratory appointment. Three hours. Mr. Hersh. requisite,

201.

304 (1).| Electromagnetic Theory. Mathematical treatment of and magnetic fields; electromagnetic waves and electromagnetic

electric

radiation.

Methodsof vector analysis. Three hours. Mr.

matics 202 or 220.

Prerequisites, 201

and Mathe-

Hersh.

Introduction to Spectroscopy. Experimental study of and absorption; spectroscopic instruments, light sources, intensity measurements; application to qualitative and quantitative analysis; term analysis of atomic and molecular spectra. Explanation, on the basis of quantum theory, of the structure of spectra Prerequisites, 201, in relation to the structure of atoms and molecules. 301. Two periods of lecture, one period of discussion, and one threeMiss Kohn. period laboratory appointment. Three hours. 307

(2).

optical spectra in emission

* Astronomy 301, to which Physics 301 is prerequisite, may be comited toward a major in physics. % Mathematics 303, if followed by Physics 304 or 308, may be counted toward a major in physics.

133

Physics

308

(2) *.

ment

Mechanics and Thermodynamics.

Mathematical treatand thermodynamics. 101 or 104 or 105 and Mathematics 202 or 220. Three

of fundamental principles of mechanics

Prerequisites,

hours.

Miss Heyworth.

309 (1). Experimental ATOiuc Physics. Fundamental experiments such as the determination of the charge on the electron, the ratio of charge to mass of the electron, Planck's quantum constant, critical

and

potentials; verification of photoelectric laws; x-ray

radioactivity

measurements; experiments involving use of Geiger counters and cloud chamber. Prerequisites, 201, 202. Six periods of laboratory a week. Three hours. Mr. Hersh. 350.

Research or Independent Study.

direction of the

Opportunity

member be

The work

of the department in

whose

will be

field the

under the

work

lies.

a series of experiments as well as for investigation of a single problem. Open to graduate students and, by permission, to juniors and seniors who have completed eighteen hours in physics. To count two to three hours for a semester or four to six hours for a year. By permission the work may be arranged to count one hour for the first semester in case two or three hours are elected for the second semester. The amount of work contemplated must be indicated at the time of handing in electives. will

off"ered for

Directions for Election

A major in physics should ordinarily include 201, 202, 301, 302, 304, and 308. Mathematics 202 or 220 and a year of college chemistry are required for a major in physics. A reading knowledge of German and French, whUe not

required,

is

desirable.

Pre-medical students are referred to the requirements as given on page 49.

Exemption Examination

An examination for exemption from Physics who

105

is

present one admission unit in physics

offered to qualified

and

also present an acceptable laboratory notebook when applying for the examination. Freshmen who pass this examination are eligible for Physics 203 or 205 in the freshman year. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who pass this examination and also satisfy the mathematics requirement are eligible for Physics 201 or, by permission, 202. Students who pass the exemption examination may count it as the

students

equivalent of Physics 101 in the work for distribution. * Mathematics 303, major in physics.

if

followed by Physics 304 or 308,

may

be counted toward a

Courses of Instruction

134

POLITICAL SCIENCE Professors:

Assistant Professors:

Instructors:

Louise Overacker, ph.d. (Chairman) M. Margaret Ball, ph.d. Alona Elizabeth Evans, ph.d. Owen Scott Stratton, ph.d. Pauline Tompkins, ph.d. Howard Louis Jamison, ph.d. Phillip Leonard Sirotkin, m.a.

Pearl Handshuh Hack,

m.p.a.

Fundamental political 100. Introduction to Political Science. principles developed through a study of the governments of the United States, Great Britain, Soviet Russia, and other selected countries. Special emphasis upon the theory and functioning of democracy.

Open

By permission, the to all undergraduates. be taken separately by sophomores and juniors who ary school course in American government; by semester may be taken separately by seniors. Six acker, Miss Evans, Mr. Stratton, Miss Tompkins, Sirotkin, Mrs. Hack. 201

(1).

Public Administration.

An

first

semester

may

have had a secondpermission, either

Miss OverMr. Jamison, Mr.

hours.

analysis of the principles of

drawn from contemporary government practice. The problems involved are approached through the study of the organization and methods of opOpen to students who have eration of selected government agencies. completed 100 and, by permission, to those who have completed or are taking another grade II course in the department. Three hours. Mr. Stratton. public

administration with illustrative material

The nature (1), (2). Political Parties AND Pressure Politics. and functions of parties; factors determining political action; the role and techniques of pressure groups; party organization; bosses, machines, and the spoils system; the use of money in elections; party leadership and responsibility. Emphasis upon trends in the United States, with some consideration of parties in other democracies. Open to students who have completed 100 and, by permission, to those who have com202

pleted or are taking another grade II course in the department.

Three hours.

Miss

Overacker.

Legislative Problems. Analysis of systems of representaincluding proportional representation; legislative organization and procedures; leadership and responsibility; proposals for the reorganization of Congress; relation of legislature and administration;

204

(2).

tion,

regulation of lobbying.

Comparison of legislative bodies

completed 100 and, by permission, to

in the

United

Open to students who have those who have completed or are

States with those in other democracies.

135

Political Science taking another grade II course in the department.

Mr.

Three hours.

Stratton.

A study of the political Japan, and other selected Asiatic countries, including some comparison with those of western countries. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have had or are taking 100, or, by permission, to students who have had or are taking 208, History 310, or Sociology 207. Three hours. Miss Evans. 206

(1).

ideas

Government and

and

Politics of Asia.

institutions of China,

A study of Politics of Latin America. and institutions of Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and other selected Latin American countries, including some comparison with those of the United States and Europe. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have had or are taking 100, or, by permission, to students who have had or are taking 208, and to juniors and seniors majoring in history or Spanish. Three hours. Miss Evans. 207

(2).

Government and

the political ideas

A

study of contemporary world poli208. International Politics. tics with special attention to problems of international security and economic, social, and cultural cooperation; the League of Nations; the structure, functioning, and development of the United Nations; the Inter- American system; dependent areas and international trusteeship. Open to students who have completed 100, 206, 207, or six

hours in history, economics, sociology, or geography.

Miss 301

Six hours.

Ball. (1).

International Law.

A

study of the general principles of

international law, treating of the legal relations of states and of individuals, as invoked in diplomatic practice and international ad-

judication together with a consideration of the defects of international law and the trends in the development of the international legal system. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 100 and a grade II course in political science, economics, history, or sociology; or 208.

Three hours.

Miss Evans.

Law and the Administration of Justice. The nature, and sanction of law; development of common law principles and institutions; organization of English and American courts; civil and criminal procedure in the United States; the growth of administraOpen to juniors and seniors who have completed 100 tive justice. and a grade II course in political science, economics, history, or sociology. Three hours. Mr. Sirotkin.

303

(1).

sources,

304

(2).

The Supreme Court and the

Constitution.

The

Consti-

by the Supreme Court. The President's powers, interstate commerce, "due process," the "police power," protection of civil rights and liberties; theories of constitutional interpretation

tution as interpreted

Courses OF Instruction

136

r61e of the Supreme Court in the American constitutional system. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 100 and a grade Three II course in political science, economics, history, or sociology.

and the

Mr.

hours.

Sirotkin.

310 (2). Public Administration: Advanced Course. An advanced study of the principles and problems of public administration, with emphasis upon the problems of administrative organization, personnel and financial management, administrative regulation and adjudication, the role of administrators in the determination of policy, and the problem of maintaining a responsible bureaucracy. Open to juniors and seniors

who have completed

201.

Three hours.

Mr.

(Not

Stratton.

offered in 1950-51.)

314

(2).

Advanced Comparative Government. An analysis of based upon a study of selected countries including

political institutions

Germany and forces

seniors

upon

Italy; consideration of the

political

and

ideas

who have completed

impact of economic and

institutions.

Open

social

and

to juniors

100 and a grade II course in political

science, economics, history, or sociology.

Three hours.

Miss Tomp-

kins.

316

(1).

History of Social and Political Thought.

tion

and

prerequisites, see Sociology 316 (1).

For descrip-

the Nineteenth Century. A study from the period of the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution, primarily in terms of the problem of formulating a coherent and significant conception of democratic government. Open to senior majors in political science, history, and philosophy; to juniors and seniors who have completed 316; and to Three hours. Mr. Jamison. others by permission. 317

(1).

Political

Thought

in

of the theoretical issues arising

319

Political

(2).

Thought

in

the Twentieth Century.

An

ap-

praisal of the prevalent patterns of political thought since 1900, emphasizing the impact of social science and scientific method on tradi-

and international. Mr. Jamison.

tional political ideas, national as for 317.

Three hours.

Prerequisite,

same

322 (2) Seminar. Intensive study of one problem or a series of related problems. Emphasis upon use of source material. Topic for the year Open by permission to to be announced before the spring recess. juniors, seniors, and graduate students majoring in political science or related fields, who have completed twelve hours in political science. .

Three hours. 323

(1).

Mr.

Seminar.

related problems.

Stratton.

Intensive study of one problem or a series of Emphasis upon use of source material. Topic for

137

Political Science the year to be announced before the spring recess. Three hours. Miss Tompkins. as for 322.

Prerequisite,

same

Seminar. Intensive study of one problem or a series of problems. Emphasis upon use of source material. Topic Prerequisite, for the year to be announced before the spring recess.

324

(1).

related

same

as for 322.

Three hours.

Mr. Jamison.

350 (1), (2). Research or Independent Study. The department is prepared to offer a course of directed reading to a limited number of

Open, by permission, to juniors and seniors who have comThree pleted or are taking a course of grade III in political science.

students.

hours.

Directions for Election Political Science 100 or the equivalent

The

is

required of all majors. meet the needs of the

courses in political science are arranged to

following groups of students: those intending to do graduate work in political science or law; those planning to qualify for certain civil service examinations and other types of public service; those wishing to supplement their work in other fields with a knowledge of political science; students

prepared to take an intelligent part in communities after college. The departsuggest combinations of courses to meet particular

who wish

to be

the political activities of their

ment

will be glad to

needs and

By

interests.

special permission, a limited

number

economics, history, geography, or sociology

of closely related courses in may be included as part of

the major in political science. The attention of students who are interested in teaching is called to Education 308, The Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School.

Exemption Examinations A. American Government. herself qualified, either

by work

Open

any student who considers by individual

to

in preparatory school or

reading and study. The examination will cover approximately the Stumaterial studied in the second semester of Political Science 100. dents whose preparatory school program has included a half-year course in American government, a year course in American history and government, or a year in the social studies, might be in a position to pass

such an examination

satisfactorily.

It

would exempt students from

the distribution requirements in group II or admit them to Political Science 201, 202, or 204. B. An examination including the governments of Great Britain and at least one other European government, as well as American govern-

three hours of

ment. Open to any student who considers herself qualified, either by preparatory school work or individual reading and study. This

Courses of Instruction

138

examination would exempt students from the distribution requirement in group II or admit them to any grade II course in political science.

PSYCHOLOGY Professors:

Associate Professor:

Edna Heidbreder, ph.d. Michael Jacob Zigler, ph.d. (Chairman) Edith Brandt Mallory, ph.d.

Jean MacDonald Arsenian ^ ph.d. Ruth Page Edwards, m.a. Irene Rita Pierce, ph.d. Assistants: Barbara Visscher Brush, b.a. Anita Goldberg Miller, b.a. Edythe Marie Scales, b.a.

Assistant Professor: Instructors:

101 (1), (2). Introduction to Psychology: Semester Course. A survey of the general field of psychology. A study of intelligence, learning, memory, perception, sensory processes, emotion, imagination, Open to sophomores, motivation, personality, and related problems. juniors, and seniors and, by permission of the Dean of Freshmen, to freshmen. Not open to students who have completed 103. Three Mr. ^igler, Mrs. Mallory, Miss Pierce. hours. 103.

Introduction to Psychology: Year Course.

A

survey of the

general field of psychology, more complete than that given in 101. Emphasis on the more complex psychological processes. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have not taken 101, and, by permission of the Dean of Freshmen, to freshmen. Six hours. Miss Heidbreder, Mrs. Edwards.

201 (1). Psychological Statistics. Training in the use of statistical techniques as they have been especially adapted to the handling and evaluating of representative types of psychological data. Emphasis on developing in the student an understanding of the possibilities and Prerequisite, 101 or limitations of the use of statistics in psychology. 103. Three hours. Miss Pierce.

207 (2). Psychology of Child Development. The psychological development of normal children: physical bases, modes of learning, Problems and goals. Preinterests, motives, personality patterns. Three hours. Mrs. Mallory. requisite, 101 or 103.

Typ(1), (2). Experimental Psychology, Laboratory Course. experiments in each of the main fields of psychological investigaLaboratory work supplemented by occasional lectures. Training tion.

209

ical

in psychological

ratory *

method.

Prerequisite, 101 or 103.

work a week, counting three hours.

Absent on leave;

Mr.

Six periods of labo-

Zigler,

Mrs. Mallory.

Psychology

139

213 (2). Physiological Psychology. A survey of the existing information concerning mechanisms basic to behavior. Prerequisite, 101 or 103. Three hours, Mr. ^igler.

219

(1).

The Psychology

of Learning.

An

examination and eval-

uation of current theories of learning, with special attention to those centering about the concepts of the conditioned reaction, trial and Emphasis on recent studies of the psychology error, and insight. of learning.

Laboratory experiments on human and animal subjects. Three hours. Miss Pierce.

Prerequisite, 101 or 103.

220

(1).

Comparative Psychology.

A

survey of the field of com-

parative psychology emphasizing changes in capacity for adaptation from lower to higher animal forms. Lectures supplemented by laboraPrerequisite, 101 or 103, One or two lectures a week, tory work. supplemented by laboratory work. Three hours. (Not offered in

1950-51.)

A survey of the (2). Problems in Experimental Method. methods employed in the experimental investigation of psychological problems. Examination of underlying principles of psychological method. Training for subsequent research and for the critical evaluaThree hours. Prerequisite, 209. tion of psychological literature. Miss Pierce. 222

Schools and Systems of Psychology. Historical and critiand systems. Special emphasis on current movements in behaviorism, gestalt psychology, and theories of personality. Three hours. Miss Heidbreder. Prerequisite, 101 or 103.

224

(2).

cal survey of schools

History of Experimental Psychology. A study of psytheir inception, growth, and bearing upon modern Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are psychology. Mr. Z^gler. taking two grade H courses in psychology. Three hours. 301

(1).

chological trends



Experimental Problems in Psychology. An experimenwhich each student investigates a special problem under the direction of an instructor. Open to graduate students and to juniors and seniors who have shown in 209 an aptitude for laboratory work. Six periods of laboratory a week, including one or two with Three hours. Members of the Staff. instructor. 303

(1).

tal-project course in

Experimental Problems in Psychology. An experimenwhich may be taken either as a continuation of 303 Open to graduate students and to juniors and or as a substitute for it. Six seniors who have shown in 209 an aptitude for laboratory work. periods of laboratory a week, including one or two with instructor. Three hours. Members of the Staff. 309 (1), Abnormal Psychology. The psychology of abnormal peo308

(2).

tal-project course

Courses of Instruction

140

way as to throw light on the psychology of normal study of symptoms and their significance, of various kinds of neurotic and psychotic behavior, and of the principal theories and interpretations of such behavior. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 101 or 103 and have completed, or are taking, at least six hours of work above grade I in one of the following: psychology, sociology, zoology and physiology. Also open to seniors by permission pie studied in such a

people.

A

of the instructor.

310

(1).

settings.

Three hours.

Social Psychology.

The

effects

Miss Heidbreder.

An

of culture

analysis of social acts in social

on personality.

The

individual's

and sex roles. Group membership and interaction. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 101 or 103 and have completed, or are taking, at least six hours of work above grade I in psychology or sociology. Also open to seniors by permission of the instructor. Three hours. Mrs. Edwards. adjustment to

class,

race,

313 (1). Psychological Testing. Individual differences in intelligence and personality. Review of methods by which psychologists have studied these differences; survey and evaluation of their findings.

Examination of selected tests. Some practice and seniors who have completed 209.

in testing.

juniors

Open

Three hours.

to

Mrs.

Mallory.

314 (2). Psychological Tests and Measurement. Advanced Course. Principles of psychological measurement. Interpretation of test results. Special study of tests used in clinical, vocational and educational fields. Open to students who have completed 313. Three hours. Mrs. Mallory. in Current Psychology. Methods of approach problems in the fields of personality, clinical and social psychology. Readings in periodical literature, discussion, and reports from professional persons actively engaged in research. Open to graduate students, to seniors who are taking 24 hours in psychology, and, by permission, to seniors who are taking 18 hours. Three hours. Mrs. Edwards.

320

(2).

Readings

to current

323 (2). Seminar. Personality as Studied by Projective Techniques and Related Methods. An introduction to current methods of studying personal drives and adjustment, with special emphasis on projective tests

and

related techniques.

ate students, to senior majors,

Three hours.

and

Open by

permission to gradunon-majors.

to specially qualified

Mrs. Mallory.

Seminar. The Psychology of Thinking. Selected topics in the psychology of thinking. Open by permission to graduate students and senior majors. Three hours. Miss Heidbreder. 325

(2).

141

Russian 326

Seminar. Selected Topics in Experimental and Applied Current problems in experimental and applied psychol-

(2).

Psychology,

Prerequisite,

ogy.

as for 325.

Three hours.

Research or Independent Study.

350.

and

same

Two

by permission.

seniors

to three

Mr.

^igler.

Open to graduate students hours for a semester or two

to six for a year.

Directions for Election

A major in psychology must include 209.

Courses 303, 308, and 350 not be included in a minimum major of 24 hours. Courses supplementary to a psychology major may include courses in philosophy, economics, education, mathematics, political science,

may

sociology, physics, physiology,

and zoology.

A

reading knowledge of French and German is desirable for undergraduates, and is required of students in most graduate schools.

RUSSIA^f

Waclaw Jedrzejewicz

Associate Professor:

100.

Elementary Course.

iors,

and, by permission of

hours.

Mr.

Open to sophomores, the Dean of Freshmen,

and

sen-

to freshmen.

Six

juniors,

Jedrzejewicz-

200. Intermediate

Course.

100.

Prerequisite,

Six

hours.

Mr.

Jedrzejewicz-

201. Russian

the nineteenth

Literature in Translation. Russian literature of and twentieth centuries, with chief emphasis upon the

great writers of the nineteenth century. the works of selected Polish, Czech,

and

seniors.

Six hours.

Mr.

Some comparative study of Open to juniors writers.

and Serb

Jedrzejewicz.

300 (1), (2). Individual Study. Advanced language exercises and reading suited to the needs of the student. Open by permission to Mr. Jedstudents who have completed 200. Three or six hours. rzejewicz-

Directions for Election

The

College does not offer a major in Russian language and litera-

ture.

Course 201 may be elected group I. Students registering preceding Punishment

summer and

the

Tolstoi's

to

fulfill

the literature requirement in

should read during the Dostoyevsky's Crime and

for this course

following

War and

novels:

Peace.

Courses of Instruction

142

SOCIOLOGY Professors:

Assistant Professors:

Instructors:

Leland Hamilton Jenks, ph.d. (Chairman) Mary Bosworth Treudley, ph.d. Mary Ellen Goodman, ph.d. Bartlett Hicks Stoodley, ph.d. Gertrude Huntington McPherson, m.a. William James Cousins, b.a.

Introductory Sociology. An introduction to the soof looking at society. Contemporary social situations Open in terms of culture patterns, social structure, and social relations. Three to all undergraduates. Sections for freshmen are planned. hours. Mr. Stoodley, Miss Treudley, Mrs. McPherson, Mr. Cousins. 102

(1), (2).

ciological

way

103 (2). American Culture. A sociological analysis of the dominant themes and of rural-urban and regional variations in American culture Three hours. in the light of community studies. Prerequisite, 102. Mrs. McPherson, Mr. Stoodley, Mrs. Goodman, Mr. Cousins.

An introduction to the science (1). General Anthropology. man: man's place in nature, his physical history and physical varieties; the nature of culture; some major phases in the growth and spread of cultures; the relation between culture and personality. 104

of

Open

to all

undergraduates

sion, to others.

who have completed

Three hours.

Cultural Anthropology. Studies and the range in complexity of

203

(2).

The

diversity

102 and, by permis-

Mrs. Goodman. in cultural perspective.

selected

non-European

Studies of such tribal groups as Trobrianders, Bedawin, Aztecs. The present cultural heterogeneity of such areas as India,

cultures.

and

Africa,

and South America.

Prerequisite, 104.

Three hours.

Mrs.

Goodman.

Social Systems in Latin America. Factors and processes development of society and culture in selected Latin-American countries. Emphasis upon population, standards of living, land and labor systems, class and occupational structure, rural-urban variations, and dominant culture themes. Open to sophomores, juniors, and Three seniors who have completed one year's work in sociology. hours. Mr. Jenks. 204

(2).

in the

205

(1),

(2).

Group Organization.

ized groups with emphasis

Laboratory work

An

analytical study of organ-

upon problems

of

human

tion or of case material.

Open

to juniors

and

seniors

who have com-

pleted either one year in sociology or Economics 210,

mores who have completed nine hours Mrs. McPherson.

relationships.

will consist of the analysis of a functioning organiza-

in sociology.

and to sophoThree hours.

143

Sociology

The use of anthropological theory (1). Applied Anthropology. and techniques in study of such contemporary social problems as the administration of dependent peoples, military governments, and other 206

situations involving directed cultural change.

and

juniors,

Three hours.

who have completed one

seniors

Open

to

sophomores,

course in sociology.

Mrs. Goodman.

of Chinese Society. An analysis of the and the empire, with emphasis upon factors and processes in current change. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed one year's work in sociology. Three hours. Miss Treudley. (Not offered in 1950-51.)

207

(1).

The Structure

structure of the family, the market area,

Social Welfare.

The

organization, technical development,

208

(2).

and

professionalization of social work.

Field study of social agencies.

nity.

seniors

who have completed one

hours.

Miss

Its functions in the commuOpen to sophomores, juniors, and

work

year's

in sociology.

Three

Treudley.

A survey of the salient in the United States. American Negroes, of their changing geographical distribution, and of the significant social and cultural facts and processes which condition the lives of Negroes in the contemporary United States. Open to juniors and seniors who Field work on selected problems. have completed 103 or any course of grade II in sociology. Three hours. Mr. Cousins. 209

(1).

The Negro

characteristics of

211

Introduction TO Social and Economic Statistics. For and prerequisites, see Economics 211. This course, al-

(1), (2).

description

though it may be included in the major, grade II prerequisites for later election.

is

not to be counted

among

302 (1). Social and Cultural Change. Theories of social change such as those of Kroeber, Sorokin, Marx, Toynbee, and Spengler. Processes of change in historical perspective.

human behavior, culture, and social structure in Open to seniors who have completed 102 and

work to be chosen from the fields of economics, and political science. Three hours. Mr. Jenks.

also twelve hours of

sociology, history,

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

305

(1).

The Sociology

of Occupations.

Analysis of occupational

structure in selected societies, with special emphasis upon change in The place of business leadership in typical entrepreneurship roles.

the firm, and in the have completed 205.

307

(2).

social system.

Three hours.

Open

to juniors

and

seniors

who

Mr. Jenks.

Ethnic Groups in the United States. A study of the culand social relations of ethnic groups and their Integra-

ture, institutions,

Courses of Instruction

144

American community. An analysis of the personality patOpen to life history of upwardly mobile ethnic types. juniors and seniors who have completed 103 or any course of grade II Three hours. Miss Treudley. in sociology. tion in the

terning and

308

(1).

sites,

see

312

(2).

Modern Labor

For description and prerequi-

Relations.

Economics 308. Public Opinion and Mass Media of Communication.

A

and effect upon public opinion of certain mass media of communication such as motion picEmphasis on the techniques of research in this tures and the radio. Research projects will be developed. Open to juniors and field. Three seniors who have completed any course of grade II in sociology. Mr. Stoodley. hours. sociological analysis of the structure, control,

315 (2). Seminar in Sociology. Related individual research topics. Problems of method and approach in sociology. Open to seniors majoring in sociology. Three hours. (Not offered in 1950-51.) 316

(1).

History of Social and Political Thought.

trends of thought from the Greeks to

modern

Outstanding

times, as reflected in the

and political philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Locke, and Rousseau. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed nine hours in sociology, or Political Science writings of such social

100 and a grade II course in political science, sociology, history, economics, or philosophy. Three hours. Mr. Jenks.

319

(2).

Modern

Sociological Theory.

Assumptions relevant

to

Excurrent sociological theory. Development of sociology as a field. Marx, as sociologists such of theories systematic the amination of

Durkheim, and

Max Weber.

Open

320

(2).

Population Problems.

who have completed Three hours. Mr. Jenks.

to seniors

hours of grade II in sociology, or 316.

Socio-economic

six

problems arising

out of the increase, the distribution, and the movement of population. Principles, goals, and techniques for a population policy with special Open to juniors and seniors who have reference to the United States. completed 102 and any course of grade II in either economics or sociology.

Three hours.

Miss

Treudley.

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

A study of American family structure and the and individual influences operating to change this Emphasis placed on the demands of the family institution structure. upon the individual and the expectations of the individual with reference to the family. Material from other societies used to set the American family in sociological perspective. Open to juniors who 322

(2).

The

Family.

historical, social,

Spanish

145

have completed a grade II course in sociology, and to seniors who have completed any course in the department. Three hours. Mr. Stoodley. Criminology. Crime and the social structure. Prison culand the prison community. Field study of agencies dealing with

323

(1).

ture

Open to who have taken

criminals.

or

Miss

who have

seniors

taken nine hours in sociology

or are taking Psychology 309.

Three hours.

Treudley.

350

(1),

and

seniors

(2).

Research or Independent Study.

by permission.

Three or

Open

to juniors

six hours.

Directions for Election All

members

of the staff are prepared to confer with students with and closely related fields.

respect to sequences of courses in sociology

The department

minimum

majors where supported by a Majors are advised to elect either Economics 101 or Political Science 100 as well as work for distribution early in their programs. will

approve

strong concentration of closely related courses.

SPANISH Professors:

Jorge Guillen

i,

doctor en letras, catedratico de

UNrVERSIDAD.

Ada May Coe,

m.a.

Anita Oyarzabal, m.a. JusTiNA Ruiz-de-Conde, lic. EN DERECHO, PH.D. (Chairman) Instructors: Lucinda Moles, m.a. Maria Luisa Antuna, lic. en letras Janet Stearns Aronson, m.a.

Associate Professors:

Lecturer:

Carol Mary Roehm i,

All courses of the

b.a.

department are conducted in Spanish; oral expression

b

stressed.

Attention

is

called to the opportunities for residence in the Spanish Cor-

ridor of Wellesley College, College.

and

Qualified students

summer school of Middlebury advantage of the Junior Year in

for study in the

may

also take

Mexico. 101.

Elementary Course,

tation, practical conversation

Four

{a)

Grammar,

on everyday

reading, composition, dic-

life,

short lectures in Spanish.

and five hours of preparation a week, {b) The subThe teaching method stresses the the same as in (a).

class periods

ject matter

is

approach (mimicry-memorizing). Five class periods and four hours of preparation a week. Open to students who do not

intensive oral

present Spanish for admission. '

Absent on leave.

Students electing this course should

Courses of Instruction

146

indicate choice of (a) or

Six hours.

(b).

Miss

Coe,

Mrs. Ruiz-de-Conde,

Miss Moles.

and Spanish American Life, {a) The oband cultural. Grammar, read-

102. Aspects of Spanish ject of the course

two-fold: Hnguistic

is

ing from modern authors with emphasis on vocabulary building for oral and written expression. Prerequisite, 101. Three class periods and one group conference. {b) The subject matter is the same as in {a). The teaching method Five class periods and four hours stresses the intensive oral approach. of preparation a week.

Prerequisite,

two units

in Spanish for admis-

sion.

Miss

Six hours.

Antufia,

Miss Aronson.

A

study of 104. Prose and Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. Conthe literary trends of this period and of some outstanding works. Prereqstant practice is given in the written and spoken language. uisite, three units in Spanish for admission or, on recommendation of the department, 101.

Six hours.

Miss Ojarzdbal, Miss

Antufia.

Emphasis on the acquisition of a large work(1). Composition. Prerequisite, 102, 104, or three hours of grade II. ing vocabulary. Three hours. Miss Oyarz&bal. 203

204.

Contemporary Spanish Literature.

poetry; second semester, theater

Six hours. course.

By permission

and

essay.

either semester

First semester, novel

and

Prerequisite, 102 or 104.

may be

counted as a semester

Miss Oyarzabal.

Themes and forms 206. Main Currents of Spanish Literature. which have characterized Spanish literature studied in their general development. Correlation of history and literature. First semester: Second semester: eightthe Middle Ages to the seventeenth century. Prerequisite, 104, and, by eenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. permission, 102.

207

(2).

The

Six hours.

Mrs. Riiiz-de-Conde.

Civilization of Mexico.

A

presentation of

Mexican

civilization: the literature of the country, the other arts, together

with

which have produced in Mexico a blend of Spanish and Indian institutions and ideology. Special atPrerequisite, three hours of grade tention to the contemporary period. Three hours. Miss Coe. II or by special permission. the economic

and

sociological factors

Conversation. Intensive practice in the spoken language improve pronunciation and intonation, and to build a practical vocabulary. Class discussions based on various aspects of Three Prerequisite, 102 or 104. life in Spanish-speaking countries. hours. Miss Oyarzabal. 208

(2).

to gain fluency, to

147

Spanish

Analysis and interpretation of the works of by permission, 102. Six

209. Poets of Spain.

major Spanish Miss Moles.

poets.

hours.

Prerequisite, 104 and,

(Not given in 1950-51.)

of the Seventeenth Century. The characteristics Analysis of Spain's ideals of of the Golden Age. Representative masterpieces this period as revealed in the drama. of the great dramatists: Lope de Vega, Castro, Alarc6n, Tirso de Molina, Calderon. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 301 (2).

Drama

drama

of the Spanish

206, or 204

and

207.

Three hours.

Miss

Coe.

Study of Cervantes and his work, representing (1). Cervantes. in Spain and the opening of a new era in of the novel culmination the 302

the history of the European novel. and discussion of Don Quijote.

analysis

have completed 206, or 204 and 207.

Reading of Novelas Ejemplares; to juniors and seniors who Three hours. Miss Oyarzdbal.

Open

Spanish Literature from 1100 to 1500. Study of El Cantar de Mio Cid, El Libra de buen amor, La Celestina. Open to graduates and to approved seniors who have completed at least one course of (Not given in 1950-51.) grade IIL Six hours. Miss Coe.

303. Seminar.

Spanish Poetry. A study of the principal movements and outstanding poets. Open to graduates and approved seniors who have completed at least one course of grade IIL Six hours. (Not given in 1950-51.) 304. Seminar.

305.

The Spanish Novel of the Golden Age.

The development

of

the Spanish novel in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in its Open to graduates and approved seniors different types and tendencies. who have completed 302. Six hours. Miss Oyarzdbal. (Not given in 1950-51.)

Spanish American Literature. Reading and discusworks in prose and poetry with a special study of the main literary currents, their historical background and their relation First semester: novel and essay. to the problems of the present day. Second semester: poetry. Open to juniors and seniors who have com306.

Modern

sion of representative

pleted Spanish 206, or 204 hours.

Miss

and 207, or by

special permission.

Six

Coe.

A course designed to trace the nacharacter in order to develop an appreciation and understanding of Spain's present-day problems. Prerequisite, six hours of grade II. Three hours. Mrs. Ruiz-de-Conde. 309

(2).

Spanish Civilization.

tional ideals

and

traits of

Advanced composition based on the reading and magazines. Prerequisite, six newspapers of articles from current hours of grade 11. Three hours. Mrs. Ruiz-de-Conde. 310

(1).

CoMPOsmoN.

Courses of Instruction

148 350.

Research or Independent Study.

Open, by permission,

to

graduates and to approved seniors and juniors who have completed one full grade III course in Spanish and are taking another full grade III course. Three hours for a semester or six for a year.

Directions for Election

To

fulfill

the literature requirement in group

courses 104, 204, 206,

and grade

I,

students

may

elect

III courses (except 309, 310).

Course 101 counts for the degree but does not count toward a major. Students majoring in Spanish are required to take courses 206, 301, and 302, and six additional hours of grade III work in literature.

related courses suggested for election Art 100, 215, 216; English 102, 104, 107, 210, 212, 218, 219, 221, 230; French 200, 212, 213, 301, 305, 306; Geography 208, 303, German 104, 202, 208; Greek 203; History 101, 102, 200, 202, 214, Italian 103, 202; Latin 105; Philosophy 214; Political Science 202,

222,

304; 217; 207,

208; Sociology 204.

SPEECH Associate Professor: Assistant Professor: Instructors:

Cecile de Banke (Chairman) Virginia Rogers Miller, m.a. Katharine Taylor Loesch, m.a. Priscilla Alden Okie, m.a. Theater Workshop

Arthur Eldon Winkler, Assistant: J. Randolph Campbell Director:

b.s.,

m.f.a.

Certain limitations are placed upon the hours in this department. Not more than 12 hours of grade II work may be counted within the minimum number of hours for the B.A. degree, and three to six hours of grade I work, with no dupliStudents may elect for credit either 101 cation permitted at the grade I level. or 102 plus 12 hours in grade II work. All freshmen and transfer students are required to attend a private conference at which a diagnostic test and an analysis of the student's speech and voice will be made. For those students who would benefit by instruction, the kind of work that would be most helpful will be suggested. Students who are found to have speech defects or speech disorders will be required to attend the speech clinic.

The

courses are designed to help the student to acquire: (a) effective use of

voice and good pronunciation in spoken English, (b)

skill in

public address on

and dramatic an appreciation of the art of the theater. The courses are armake possible systematic and progressive study in the speech arts.

the platform and over the

air, (c)

the

power

to interpret poetry

literature, (d)

ranged

to

Speech Clinic.

Analysis of speech defects, with special remedial work who require such help. The

for their correction, for those students

149

Speech work

be conducted in private conference or in small groups. Mrs. Miller, Mrs. Loesch, Miss Okie.

will

credit.

No

Study of physiological processes in 101. Fundamentals of Speech. Guidance, voice production and the phonetic bases of spoken English. practice, and criticism in the fundamentals of oral interpretation, Open to all undergraduates. Six hours. public address, and drama. Miss

de Banke,

102 (1), phonetic

(2). skills

Mrs. Miller, Mrs. Loesch, Miss Okie.

requisite for the speech arts.

Not open

ates.

Study of vocal and to all undergraduThree hours. 101. completed have who students

Voice and Speech Techniques. to

Open

Mrs. Loesch, Miss Okie. Presentation of 201. Oral Interpretation of Modern Drama. selected scenes illustrating the more important trends from Ibsen's day Emphasis on character delineation. Development, to the present.

by laboratory method, of fundamental acting techniques. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have had one course in the department or adequate preparation elsewhere. Six hours. Miss de Banke.

202

(2).

Principles and Practice in Public Address. Emphasis on making, round table and panel discussion,

briefing, outlining, speech

Open to students who have completed one debate, and open forum. course in the department, and, by permission, to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Three hours. Mrs. Miller. 203.*

Theoretical and practical study of the Presentation of one-act plays in the workshop.

Theater Workshop.

art of the theater.

Open, by permission of the instructor, to sophomores, juniors, and who have completed one course in the department or to those who have an adequate background in speech, drama, and art. Three Director, Mr. Six hours. periods of class work and two of laboratory. Campbell. Mr. Assistant, Winkler;

seniors,

of Shakespearean Drama. Approach Elizabethan repertory theater through dramatic Scenes from plays of Shakespeare presented with special presentation. regard to contemporary background. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have completed one course in the department or have had adequate preparation elsewhere, and to those who are taking or have completed English 309. Six hours. Either semester may be

205.

Oral Interpretation

to the study of the

counted as a semester course.

A

Miss

de Banke.

special fee of $15.00 is charged for Speech 203. this fee are available for a limited chairman of the department should be consulted. *

Bennett Fund for

Loans from the Malvina

number

of students.

The

Courses of Instruction

150 206

(1).

English Phonetics.

A

study of speech sounds in English.

Practice in the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Compari-

son of stage diction and the three types of American pronunciation. Some consideration of the application of phonetics to speech re-educa-

and

tion

Open

to acting.

to

sophomores who have completed one

course in the department, and to juniors and seniors without prereqThree hours. Mrs. Miller. uisite.

ZOOLOGY AND PHTSIOLOGT Professors:

Harriet Cutler Waterman, ph.d. Gladys Kathryn McCosh, ph.d.

Eva Elizabeth Jones,

ph.d. (Chairman) Austin, ph.d. Louise Palmer Wilson, ph.d. Ada Roberta Hall, ph.d. Assistant Professor: Virginia Mayo Fiske, ph.d.

Associate Professors:

Instructor:

Assistants:

Secretary

and Custodian: Lecturer:

Mary Lellah

Eunice Marjorie Wood, m.a. Elizabeth Norfleet King, b.a. Ruth Eleanor Heacock, b.a. Barbara Mary Walls, b.a. Anne Stuart Cleaver, b.s. Ann Marie Grant, b.a. Ellen Sosnow, b.a. Kathleen Millicent Leavitt

Margaret Elliott Houck,

m.s.

curator of the museum

The Biology of

Animals. This course furnishes the basis for an understanding of animal life and of the place of man in the world of living things. The study of a series of forms of increasing complexity, culminating in a vertebrate, develops a conception of what an animal is and suggests probable evolutionary sequences. Cells are studied as units of structure and to demonstrate, particularly in germIn the second semester, lectures and cells, the mechanism of heredity. discussions on the evidence and factors of evolution, on heredity and eugenics. Open to all undergraduates. Six periods a week, in general two of lecture and discussion, and four of laboratory. Six hours. Miss McCosh, Miss Austin, Mrs. Houck, Miss Jones, Mrs. Fiske. 101.

intelligent

102. Principles of Zoology. A course designed for students who already have some scientific knowledge of animal life. A study of invertebrate and vertebrate animals serves as a basis for the consideration of important biological principles and for an appreciation of man's Opportunity for individual studies and reports on place in nature. In the subjects determined by interests and preparation of students. second semester, special emphasis on evolution and heredity. Stu-

Zoology and Physiology

151

offered for admission a course in biology which was on animals and which included careful dissection of several forms by the individual students should apply to the Dean of Freshmen Six periods a week, in general two for permission to take this course. Miss Six hours. of lecture and discussion, and four of laboratory.

who have

dents

largely

Wood. 103.

An Introductory Course

in

Biology.

For description and

prerequisites, see Interdepartmental Courses 103.

Exceptionally well prepared students are advised to consider the possibility of entering Zoology 203 or 204 instead of a grade I course. (See last paragraph

under Directions

for Election.)

Vertebrate Zoology. Evidences of evolution from the study anatomy and the development of the vertebrates, based upon a careful dissection of dogfish, necturus, and cat. The

203.

of the comparative

evolution of the vertebrate type will be traced from a primitive form to man, with particular emphasis upon the changes leading up to the Open to juniors and seniors structures found in the human body.

without prerequisite, and to other students who have completed 101, Five-year hygiene students electing this course must also 102, or 103. Six periods a week, in general two of lecture and discussion, take 301. and four of laboratory. Six hours. Miss Waterman. 204.

Animal Ecology.

ment, that

is,

Astudy of animals in

the natural history of animals.

relation to their environ-

The behavior

of animals

in their natural surroundings, their adaptations for particular habitats,

environmental factors, ecological succession, animal communities such as stream life and a meadow society, distribution and balance in nature. Open to students who have Field studies limited to nearby regions. completed 101, 102, or 103, and to juniors and seniors without preSix periods a week, in general two of lecture and discussion, requisite. and four of laboratory or field work. Six hours. Miss McCosh.

Mammalian Anatomy (Hygiene 301). The gross anatomy and muscles. Required of first-year graduate students in the Department of Hygiene and Physical Education; also of juniors who are If counted as part of a major registered as five-year hygiene students. Three periods a in zoology, 301 should be preceded by 101 or 102. week, in general one of lecture and discussion, and two of laboratory. 301

(1).

of bones

Two

hours.

302.

Physiology (Hygiene 302).

Miss Waterman. For description, see 308. Required Department of Hygiene and

of first-year graduate students in the

Physical Education; also required of students registered for the five-year hygiene course, either in the junior or senior year. If counted as part Open of a major in zoology, 302 should be preceded by 101 or 102.

Courses of Instruction

152 to

hygiene students only; others take 308.

Six periods a week, in gen-

two of lecture and discussion, and four of laboratory.

eral

Six hours.

Miss Hall. 303 (1). Histology and Histological Techniqjoe. A study of the microscopic structure of the tissues and organs of mammals. Emphasis

on the relation of structure and function.

Some training in the preparation of tissues for microscopical study. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking 203 or 204 or 308. Six periods a week, in general one of lecture and discussion, and five of laboratory.

304

(2).

Three hours.

Embryology.

Miss

Jones.

The development

of

an individual from

its

origin as a fertilized egg through the time of formation of the principal

organs and systems. Laboratory work chiefly on a study of chick and pig embryos. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed or are taking 203 or 204 or 308. Six periods a week, in general two of lecture

and

discussion,

and four

of laboratory.

Three hours.

Miss Jones,

Miss Wood. 305 (2). The Development of Modern Zoology. A study of the outstanding biological contributions from the early Greek period to the twentieth century, leading to a consideration of representative theories and problems of zoology of the present day. Open to students completing a 24-hour major in zoology, and to others with the approval of the department. Thi^ee hours. Aiiss Austin.

The principles of heredity, based on the cytolog(1). Genetics. and genetical evidence found in animals; the application of these principles to human inheritance and to the practical problems of eugenics. The class work is supplemented by a few breeding tests with Drosophila. Open to students completing a 24-hour major in zoology, and to others with the approval of the department. Three hours. 306

ical

Miss

Austin.

The course gives a fundamental knowledge of general physiological processes. Simple physical and chemical studies of living matter. Observations of more complex physiological proc308. Physiology.

esses



nutrition, circulation, respiration, excretion, nerve-muscle re-

reproduction, endocrine activities. Open to students who Zoology 101 or 102 or 103, and Chemistry 101 or 103; or to students who in addition to fulfilling the chemistry requirement have completed or arc taking Zoology 203 or 204. Open by permission without prerequisite to students majoring in chemistry.

sponse,

offer as prerequisites

Chemistry 301 is recommended as a parallel course. Six periods a week, in general two of lecture and discussion, and four of laboratory. Six hours. Mrs. Wilson.

153

Zoology and Physiology

310 (2). Advanced Histology. A continuation of the study of organs not included in 303. Various aspects of histological research are Individual probconsidered in a series of reports on original papers. lems afford practice in special methods of technique. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed 303. Six periods a week, in general one oflecture or discussion and five of laboratory. Three hours. Miss Jones.

312 (2)t. Physiology of Nutrition. for the normal functioning of the body

A

study of the foods necessary

and the physiological processes by means of which they are utilized for growth, repair, and energy Normal and faulty nutrition compared by feeding experirelease. ments with animals.

Prerequisite, or corequisite, 308 or 302.

Chem-

Six istry 301 is not required as a prerequisite but is recommended. periods a week, in general two of lecture and discussion, and four of Three hours. Miss Hall. laboratory.

313

(2).

Mammall\n Anatomy (Hygiene

313).

The

digestive, re-

and nervous systems. the Department of Hygiene

spiratory, excretory, reproductive, circulatory,

Required of first-year graduate students in and Physical Education; also of juniors who are registered as five-year hygiene students with the exception of those students who have already completed 203. If counted as part of a major in zoology, 313 should be preceded by 101 or 102 and 301. Three periods a week, in general one of lecture and discussion, and two of laboratory. Two hours. Miss Waterman. 316 (2)t. Physiology of the Endocrine Glands.

The chemical

control of the animal organism through the secretions of the endocrine Prerequisite or corequisite, 308 or 302. Individual problems. glands. Six periods a week, in general two of lecture and discussion, and four

of laboratory.

Three hours.

Miss Hall.

(Not offered in 1950-51.)

Research or Independent Study. Open to graduate students and, by permission, to seniors and juniors. Three hours for a semester or six hours for a year. The amount of work contemplated must be 350.

indicated at the time of handing in electives.

Directions for Election

These courses are designed

to provide for the general student a basis

At in the world of living things. same time they may furnish a foundation for students who plan to follow professionally some phase of biological work, such as teaching,

for the interpretation of

phenomena

the

research, laboratory technique, medicine, public health, physical education, nursing, t

medical social service.

Offered in alternate years.

Courses of Instruction

154

Five-year hygiene students wishing to major in the department should elect 101 in the freshman or sophomore year, and 301, 313, and 302 in the junior and senior years. Pre-medical students are referred to the requirements as given on

page 49. For public health work, students are advised to elect 101 or 203, 308 and 303 in this department and to include Botany 308 among the courses related to the major.

A

knowledge of chemistry is required of all students taking work and is desirable for all students majoring in the department. A reading knowledge of French and German is desirable for undergraduates, and is required, ordinarily, of students in graduate

in physiology

schools.

Students majoring in the department may under certain conditions obtain permission from the chemistry department to take Chemistry 301 after having taken 101. The department will admit properly qualified freshmen and sophomores to Zoology 203 or 204 without examination but by special permission after consultation with the chairman of the department.

Exemption Examination

The department will offer an examination for exemption from zoology any student who offers for admission

as a distribution requirement to

a year course, taken in either the junior or senior year and carried at a grade of B (85) or more, and who presents an acceptable laboratory notebook when applying for the examination.

INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR PROGRAM NATURAL RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION The program

is

designed to give an understanding of the biological

geological processes which, together, have produced the world's natural resources, and to form a background for intelligent interest in

and

the preservation

and use of

these resources.

Prescribed Program:

Grade

I.

Choice of 6 hours from: Biology 103. An Introductory Course Botany 101. General Botany Zoology 101. The Biology of Animals Zoology 102. Principles of Zoology

and

in Biology

6 hours from:

Geology 101. General Geology Geology-Geography 101 (1), -102

(2)

12 hours

155

Interdepartmental Courses Grade

Choice of 6 hours from:

II.

Botany Botany Botany Botany

and

202 203 204 207

Plant Biology

(1), (2). (1).

Field Botany

(2).

Basic Horticulture

(1)-

Plant Resources

6 hours

6 hours from:

Geology 204 (1). Geomorphology Geology 202 (1). Mineralogy. Must be Economic Geology followed by 316 (2). Geology 206 (2). Regional Geology of North America Geography 208 (1), (2). The Geography of Europe Geography 209 (1), (2). The Geography of the United States, Canada and Alaska and: Zoology 204. Animal Ecology Grade

Geography 306

III.

hours hours

Conservation of Nat-

(1).

hours hours

ural Resources

Integrating Seminar

and

6 hours of related

work from:

Botany 306. Botany 303 (2) or Zoology 306 Physiology

(1).

Ge-

netics

Geology 316

Any

An

(2).

Economic Geology Geography course

other Grade III

6 hours

additional 6 hours from:

Economics 101.

Introductory Econom-

ics

Pol. Sci. 100.

Science Pol. Sci. 201

(1).

Introduction to Political Public Administration

6 hours

48 hours

Recommended

related courses:

Interdepartmental 106. An Introductory Course in Physical Science Elementary Chemistry or Chemistry 101. General Chemistry and or Chemistry 103. Qualitative Analysis Students interested in this program should consult Professor Department of Zoology and Physiology.

of the

McCosh

Courses of Instruction

156

INTERDEPARTMENTAL HONORS PROGRAMS Several interdepartmental honors programs are open to qualified Conditions of admission to candidacy and of award are the same as for other candidates for honors. See page 48.

students.

ARCHEOLOGY

CLASSICAL The purpose erature,

and

program is to correlate work in classical art, litand so ofTer opportunity for a comprehensive study

of this

history,

It will also serve as a basic preparation for graduate and field work in classical archeology. Emphasis may be placed on either the Greek or Roman period. The field of concentration should normally include 48 hours divided as follows: 18 hours in art; either 18 hours in Greek and 6 in Latin or The 18 hours in Latin and 6 in Greek; 6 hours in ancient history. following courses may be counted in this program:

of ancient civilization.

Art: 101, 201, 209, 301, 350

Greek: Latin:

all all

courses except 104 courses except 104

and 203 and 105

History: 203, 204

Three hours of 350 must be included, which should as a rule correlate work in art and literature. Students contemplating field work in archeology are advised to elect some work in geology. Students interested in this program should consult Professor Barbara P. McCarthy of the Department of Greek.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES The

field of

concentration will include courses dealing with Latinwill be pointed toward the study of language,

America, and the work culture,

and international

relations.

The standard minimum requirement

for this

program

shall include

the following courses.

Economics 101. Introductory Economics Geography 304 (1). The Geography of South America 303 (2). The Geography of Middle America History 214(1). The Rise of The Latin American

tics

of Latin

3 hours

3 hours 3 hours

Republics Political Science

6 hours

207

(2).

America

Government and

Poli-

3 hours

,

Medieval Studies Sociology 204

157

Social Systems in Latin

(2).

Amer3 hours

ica

Aspects of Spanish and Spanish

Spanish 102.

American 208 207 306.

6 hours

Life (2).

Conversation

(2).

The

Modem

Civilization of

3 hours

Mexico.

3 hours

Spanish American Litera-

ture *

.

6 hours

Research or Independent Study

* Integrating

Seminar

3 hours 3 hours

45 hours

For students concentrating in Latin American Studies, the prerequisites will be waived for all the courses in the standard minimum requirement except for Sociology 204 and for Spanish 306. For Spanish 306 these students may offer as a prerequisite 6 hours of literature (Spanish, English, American, or another foreign literature). Students interested in

this

Evans of the Department of

program should consult Assistant Professor Political Science.

MEDIEVAL STUDIES The

program is to provide a broader understanding of the formative period of European culture than can be gained within a piirpose of this

single department.

The

field of

concentration shall consist of 42 to 45 hours divided as

follows: 1.

2.

Required courses (30 to 33 hours): History 101, Medieval and Early Modem Europe, and 309, Medieval Culture From St. Augustine to Dante; Latin 106, Medieval Latin; Philosophy 107, Introduction to Philosophy Through Greek Thought, or 307, The History of Greek Philosophy, and 323 (1), Medieval Philosophy; and an integrating seminar (3 to 6 hours) will normally ** be required. 9 to 12 additional hours selected from courses in the medieval field in art. Biblical history, or literature.

Ordinarily this additional department; but exceptionally, combinations of courses in more than one department may be approved.

work

will fall within a single

If a student elects 24 hours or more in the Department of History, Latin, or Philosophy, the additional hours taken to fulfill the require* In planning the work of the 350 course and of the seminar, the Committee on Latin American Studies will take into consideration the special interests of individual

students.

A student whose interests are primarily in art or literature may, as an excepbe permitted to substitute for the philosophy requirement 9 hours selected from courses in the medieval field in another department. **

tion,

Courses of Instruction

158

for concentration in medieval studies may be chosen from more than one department. Students interested in this program should consult Associate Professor Charlotte Goodfellow of the Department of Latin.

ment

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS The purpose

of this

program

is

to facilitate the study of international

relations for those honors students

who wish

to follow a

more compre-

hensive program in this field of study than can be accomplished by

majoring in any one department.

The

field of

concentration shall consist of 54 hours as follows:

36 hours in courses listed below, 18 hours of related courses, of which at least 3 shall be 350 work. A seminar in any department may be substituted for 350 work, if

approved by a student's

director.

Required courses:

Economics 101. Introductory Economics Economics 314 (2). International Economic

3 hours

Relations

Geography 208 Europe History 102. History 200. of

Rome

6 hours

(1), (2).

The Geography

of 3 hours

Modern European

History, or

History of Europe from the Decline to the Present

Time

History 305. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1789 or History 307. American Foreign Relations Introduction to Political Political Science 100. Science (either semester) International Politics Political Science 208. International Law. ... Political Science 301 (1).

6 hours

6 hours 3 hours 6 hours 3 hours

36 hours

permitted by a department, a student may meet any of the above requirements by an exemption examination. The honors committee may require of individual students a reading knowledge of one language in addition to that required for graduation. A regional emphasis may be given to this program by the selection, within the 1 8 hours of related work, of courses dealing with a particular If

region. this program should consult Professor Williams Department of History.

Students interested in of the

EXPENSES For STUDENTS RESmENT Basically Wellesley

who

students

is

IN

COLLEGE HOUSES

$1600

a residential college.

The

are not in residence.

Occasionally it accepts fee in such cases is reduced to

$700.

Undergraduate students who are permitted to take seven semester less of classroom work a semester, and who do not live in college buildings, pay tuition by the course as follows: for two semester hours or

hours, $70; four semester hours, $185; six semester hours, $262.50. Payment is due at the beginning of the year.

For graduate students,

the charge for full tuition is $225 a semescovering a program of eight or more semester hours. Tuition for the year is payable in two installments of $225 each, one at the opening of college and the other at the beginning of the second semester. Students in the Department of Hygiene and Physical Education are allowed a remission to be applied against tuition in return for four hours a week ter,

work of the department. Fees for a program of less than eight semester hours, and for residence in the Graduate Club House may be found in the Graduate Circular. of assistance in the

Times and Amounts of Payment Payments must be made before

No

exception will be

made

the student can take her place in the classroom.

to this rule

without written permission from the Assist-

ant Treasurer.

Checks or money orders should he made payable by mail, they should be addressed

The College reserves the right make it necessary.

to the

to Wellesley College.

If sent

Assistant Treasurer.

to revise fees at the

end of any semester if condi-

tions should

There are no deductions for absences, and no refunds save which the College shall be the sole judge.

FOR STUDENTS RESIDENT

IN

in exceptional cases

of

COLLEGE HOUSES:

Standard Plan:

July 10 Deposit to reserve a place in college for the ensuing year. Failure to make such deposit will mean loss of enrollment. .

$50

No

part of any scholarship or loan awarded by Wellesley College and ordinarily no part of a grant from the Wellesley Students' Aid Society may be applied on this payment.

The

deposit is not refundable.

September (at the opening of college) February (at the beginning of the second semester) 159

$775 $775

1

Expenses

60

Alternative Plan:

July 10

(see

under Standard Plan)

First semester: four installments, in

$50 September, November, De-

cember, January, each $194.75 Second semester: four installments, in February, March, April, May, each $194.75

FOR STUDENTS NOT RESIDENT

IN

$779 $779

COLLEGE HOUSES:

Standard Plan:

July 10 Deposit to reserve a place in college for the ensuing year. Failure to make such deposit will mean loss of enrollment. No part of any scholarship or loan awarded by Wellesley College and ordinarily no part of a grant from the Wellesley Students' Aid Society may be applied on this payment. The

$50

deposit is not refundable.

September (at the opening of college) February (before the opening of the second semester)

....

$325 $325

Alternative Plan:

July 10 (see under Standard Plan) First

semester:

$50

four installments, in September, November,

December, January, each $82.25 Second semester: four installments, in February, March, April, May, each $82.25

$329

$329

and special students who do not live in college buildings make room and board directly to the management of the private houses in which they have secured lodging and meals, at such rates and Information times as the parties to the arrangement may agree upon. regarding boarding places may be obtained by addressing the Dean of Graduate

payment

for

Residence.

Fees 1.

Application

fee.

An

application fee of $10 is required from all candidates for admisand no application is recorded until the fee is received. The same fee is required from all former students who apply for readmission. If the application is Application fees will not be credited on any bill. cancelled for any reason, by the candidate or the College, the fee is forsion,

feited to the College.

A student who postpones entrance until the year

following the one for which she tion fee.

first

appUed may

transfer her applica-

Expenses 2.

161

Matriculation and diploma fees for graduate students.

A matriculation fee of S5 is payable when an applicant is admitted to graduate work. The diploma fee of %5 is payable upon receipt of the Master's degree or the Certificate in Hygiene and Physical Education. 3.

Music

fees.

Fees for instruction in instrumental and vocal music are given on

page 126. 4.

Infirmary

The

fees.

privileges of the infirmary,

when

prescribed by the Resident

Physician, are open to resident students without charge for a period not

exceeding seven days, provided no extra service is required. An infirmary fee of S7.00 a day is charged for periods exceeding seven days. Charges for extra services will be determined by the amount required. JVo student

may

college fees has been

receive

a diploma until a satisfactory settlement of

all her

made.

Other Expenses 1.

Health and accident insurance.

Arrangements policy are

for a

made by

group student health and accident insurance

the College with a reputable insurance

company.

The

College allowance of seven free days in the infirmary per year together with the benefits of the group student health and accident insurance, should meet the greater part of the necessary medical expenses ordinarily incurred at the College. Details in regard to this insurance

be mailed with first semester bills by the Assistant Treasurer, who be glad to answer questions about it. This insurance is strongly recommended to students, but is not a requirement. will

will

2.

Books, supplies, subscriptions, etc.

A

student should plan on an annual expenditure of $40 to $75 for

books, supplies,

and

subscriptions,

and

at least $100 for incidentals

and

recreation. 3.

Room

furnishings.

Student rooms are supplied with the essential articles of furniture. Students are expected to furnish rugs and couch covers. A small They may also table and a comfortable chair are permissible additions. bring radios, record players, clocks, and additional reading lamps upon the payment of $1.00 a year for each piece of electrical equipment. A student who leaves personal possessions in the house does so at her own risk. Articles remaining unclaimed after notice by the Dean of Residence or after a student has left college, either by

disposed of by the College.

withdrawal

or graduation, will be

FINANCIAL AID Students of real intellectual interest and ability can find the means a Wellesley degree through scholarships, loans, and various kinds of self help. College scholarships form a substantial basis for obtaining

These scholarships granted by the faculty committee may be augmented by awards from the Students' Aid Society. It is also possible for students to earn money for incidental expenses by obtaining work through the Placement OflBce. for aid.

Scholarships: Scholarships maintained by income from permanent funds are awarded annually to undergraduate students, and grants are made from other funds which the trustees set aside for this purpose each year. Awards are made in recognition of intellectual ability, of good college citizenship and character, and of genuine financial need. Regular scholarships range from $100 to S600. Holders of Pendleton Scholarships may receive awards as large as $1,000. There are also a few larger scholarships for foreign students.

A limited number of scholarships are offered to incoming freshmen. Awards are based on financial need and on credentials which give promise of academic success and good college citizenship. The largest awards available

freshmen are the Pendleton Scholarships of $600 honor of Ellen Fitz Pendleton who was President of Wellesley College from 1911 to 1936. There are fifteen of these scholarships, eight of which are granted on a regional basis: one in New England, one in the Middle Atlantic States, two in the South, two in the Central States, and two in the Far West. The remaining seven are open to students from all parts of the country. As funds permit, sums ranging from $100 to $500 are awarded to other freshman to $1,200,

named

to

in

applicants.

Applications from students in college must be filed with the Dean of who is Chairman of the Faculty Committee on Scholarships, on forms furnished for the purpose and in accordance with the instrucStudents,

tions posted near the close of the first semester.

Applications from candidates for admission must be made to the More of Students before March 1 of the year of admission. detailed information about scholarships may be obtained from the

Dean

Dean

of Students. Wellesley College

is a member of the Seven College Conference which has established National Honor Scholarships for Women. These scholarships may be competed for by students from the three following districts: Middle West, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska; South, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas; West, California, Oregon, Washington.

162

Financial Aid

163

Information about these scholarships may be obtained by writing to Mrs. F. Murray Forbes, Jr., Executive Secretary, Committee on National Scholarships for Women, 21 Beaver Place, Boston 8, Massachusetts.

Cooperative House: A house on the campus has been established on a cooperative basis where students may earn $95 toward their fees by doing an hour's work a day at household tasks. Since students in all houses spend two to three hours a week at such work without remuneration the additional effort asked of members of the cooperative house amounts to not more than four hours a week.

awarded to scholarship applicants met by grants and who give promise of being

Places in the cooperative house are

whose needs cannot be

fully

members of the household. The $95 is divided equally for between the two semesters. Experience of long duration has shown that this kind of regular work can be carried by freshmen as well as by upper class students without presenting any hazard to their academic standing or their responsible credit

health.

Work

Scholarships:

A limited number of awards are available to arships for

work done

in the

holders of regular schol-

Library and in departments.

Loan Funds: There are available several specific funds from which the College loans to assist worthy undergraduate students. Detailed information about loans may be obtained from the Dean of Students.

may make

The Wellesley

Stltdents' Aid Society:

This organization is maintained by alumnae and former students of the College, aided by the faculty and undergraduates, as their contribution toward keeping the opportunities of Wellesley open to students of moderate means. Awards are made in some combination of gift and loan to supplement college scholarships, and are made on practically

same basis as college grants. They ordinarily range from $50 to Loans and occasionally gifts in small sums, $5 to $25, are also made for incidental expenses and emergencies. the

$200.

Opportunities for Employment:

The Placement Office offers assistance to students who wish to earn money toward their college expenses. The types of employment are mainly caring

work, library work, and assisting in and departments of the College. Within the College three exchanges dealing in furniture, books, and food afford regular work for a number of students. Agencies for newspapers, magazines, for children, clerical

the various offices

1

64

Financial Aid

and dry cleaning yield substantial returns to students. While the Placement Office makes every effort to obtain places for those who wish for any to work, it cautions students against depending upon this source upon draft distinct a makes employment Such considerable income. strength and time, and freshmen are advised not to undertake more than one kind of remunerative work.

GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS yielding an income of not David P. Kimball. The Mrs. founded in 1903 by was than less $1,400, holder of this fellowship must be a graduate of an American college of approved standing, a woman of good health, not more than twenty-six years of age at the time of her appointment, unmarried throughout the whole of her tenure, and as free as possible from other responsibilities. She must have completed at least one year of graduate study. The same person will not be eligible to the fellowship for more than two years. The fellowship may be used for study abroad, for study at any American college or university, or privately for independent research. A form to be used in applying may be obtained from the Secretary The application must be filed to the President, Wellesley College. before February first.

The Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship,

The Fanny Bullock Workman Scholarship,

yielding

an income of

not less than $1,200, was founded in 1929 by the bequest of Mrs. Fanny Bullock Workman. The holder of this scholarship must be an alumna of Wellesley College who has completed at least one year of graduate study. She must present evidence of good health, character, financial need, and ability; and must be free from personal obligation which would interfere with The scholarship may be used to assist preparation for any useful study. work. Forms to be used in applying may be obtained from the Secretary to the President, Wellesley College.

February

Applications must be filed before

first.

The Anne

Louise Barrett Fund, yielding an income of not

less

than

$1,100, was founded in memory of her sister, by bequest of Mrs. Helen The income is to be awarded, Barrett Montgomery of the class of 1 884. preferably in the field of music, to a woman who is a graduate of an

American college of approved standing and who is a candidate for an advanced degree or has completed at least one year of graduate study. At the discretion of the trustees it may be awarded in any other field. On presenting evidence of notable accomplishment, the same person will

be

eligible to

apply for the fellowship for a second year.

In the

case of candidates of equal ability, preference will be given to a Wellesley

graduate.

The fellowship may be used for study abroad, for study at any American college or university, or privately for independent research. Work in music must be primarily in musical theory, or composition, or the history of music.

Forms

to be used in applying

may 165

be obtained from the Secretary to

Fellowships

166

the President, Wellcsley College.

February

The

application must be filed before

first.

The Harriet A. Shaw Fund, yielding an income of not less than $800, was founded by Mrs. Elizabeth Cheney Kaufmann. The income is awarded in the field of music, art, and allied subjects to a woman who is a graduate of an American college of approved standing and not more than twenty-six years

In

of age at the time of her appointment.

the case of applicants of equal merit in different

fields,

preference

is

given to the music candidate. The scholarship may be used for study abroad, for study at any American college, university, or art school, or privately for independent research. Work in music must be primarily Work in art in musical theory, composition, or the history of music. may be in history of art or in the creative field (painting, sculpture or architecture), provided the applicant has

had undergraduate work

in

history of art.

Application forms

may

dent, Wellesley College.

ruary

be obtained from the Secretary to the PresiThe application must be filed before Feb-

first.

The Horton-Hallowell Fellowship has been established by the Alumnae Association of Wellesley College in honor of Mary E. Horton, the

first

and Susan M. Hallowell, the first professor alumnae of Wellesley College in need of finan-

professor of Greek,

of Botany.

It is

open

cial assistance for

to

graduate study in candidacy for the degree of Doctor

of Philosophy or for private research of equivalent standard.

amount

of the fellowship

is

$1,500.

A

candidate for

The

this fellowship

must present evidence of good health. Forms to be used in applying may be obtained from the Chairman Apof the Fellowship Committee, Alumnae Office, Wellesley College. plications must be filed before February 15.

The Vida Button Scudder Fellowship,

yielding an income of not than $700, was established by the Class of 1913 to be awarded to a recent Wellesley graduate who has shown interest in the interrelation of literature and political and social science and who seems qualified to engage in graduate research, writing or social experimentation. Seniors interested in this award in the fields of English, Economics, History, Political Science and Sociology should consult the chairmen Seniors and recent graduates may obtain of their major departments. from the Secretary to the President a blank to be used in making

less

application for the fellowship.

The Susanna Whitney Hawkes Teaching Fellowship, from bequest of Susanna Whitney Hawkes,

is

off"ered to

the a graduate student

Fellowships

1

67

Department of English who is seriously preparing to teach English composition as well as literature. The fellowship is open to those graduates of Wellesley College who have shown special competence in English work, and who have received their B.A. degree within six years. The fellowship, which may

in the

be awarded for two successive years, covers tuition fees for graduate and also carries with it an annual stipend

courses at Wellesley College

of $500. Applications, with

be received not the

Chairman

information about the applicant's work, must than March first and should be addressed to

full

later

of the

Department of English, Wellesley College.

The Ruth Ingersoll Goldmark Memorial Fund, come

yielding an inwas founded in 1946 by bequest of Charles J. The income from this fund is to be used to award a

of not less than S200,

Goldmark.

scholarship to a graduate student at Wellesley College or elsewhere

who

working in English literature, or English composition, or in the Should there be no deserving applicants in one of these Classics. departments of study, the income may be used to aid graduate students

is

in other departments.

Forms

applying

may

be obtained from the Secretary to application must be filed before February first. If the scholarship is to be used for graduate study at Wellesley College, the application should be accompanied by admission credentials. Blanks to be used in applying for admission may be obtained from the Committee on Graduate Instruction. to be used in

the Deans, Wellesley College.

The Loretta

The

Carney Memorial Scholarship, yielding an than $150, was founded in 1920 by the alumnae and staff" of the Boston Normal School of Gymnastics and the Department of Hygiene and Physical Education of Wellesley College; the income of this fund to be awarded, at the discretion of the teaching staff" of the department and of the President of the College, to a second-year student in the department. income of not

Fish

less

The Amy Morris Romans Scholarship Fund,

yielding an income was founded in 1924 by the Mary Hemenway Alumnae Association of the Graduate Department of Hygiene and Physical Education in honor of Miss Amy Morris Homans, pioneer and leader in physical education in the United States; the income of this fund to be awarded to a student in the Graduate Department of Hygiene and Physical Education who is in need of assistance and shows proficiency and promise. of not less than $300,

The Graduate Study and Research Fund, come

of not less than $120,

was founded

in 1931

yielding an annual inby a group of graduate

1

Fellowships

68

and increased in 1936 by the estate of Isabelle Stone, WellesThe income is available for graduate study or research. Application should be made to the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Instruction. students,

ley

'05.

The Trustee Graduate Scholarships. Two scholarships of S750 each have been established by the Trustees of Wellesley College for members of the senior class v^^ho are qualified for graduate work. The Notice scholarships may be used for study in this country or abroad. in Instruction of Dean the sent by are application of of the conditions the spring of each year to qualified seniors.

Graduate Scholarships are offered to approved candidates for a Master's degree in residence at Wellesley College. These scholarships provide for (1) one-half of full annual tuition; (2) full tuition; (3) full Application for one of these scholarships should tuition plus $100. be made before March first. A form to be used in applying may be obtained from the Secretary to the Deans, Wellesley College. The application should be

accompanied by

letters of

recommendation from

persons familiar with the candidate's college work. The award will be made after the candidate's formal application for admission to graduate work has been accepted. Students who do not maintain their work at B grade or above in all courses counting for the degree during the first semester may be required to relinquish their scholarships at midyears. Scholarships are awarded only to fully qualified candidates for a MasSpecial graduate students are not eligible for these awards. ter's degree. Laboratory assistants are granted the privileges of graduate study

without tuition charge.

Graduate

Stltdy in Classics:

The American School of Classical Studies in Athens off"ers special opporThe income of the Julia Josephine tunity for graduate study in Greek. Irvine Fund makes it possible to offer membership without tuition to done all graduates and graduate students of Wellesley College who have

Greek and archaeology to profit by the opportunity. is to furnish an opportunity to study in Greece the literature, art, antiquities, and history of the country under suitable guidance; to prosecute and to aid original research in these subjects; and to assist in the exploration and excavation of classic sites. Three fellowships of SI, 200 each are awarded annually on the basis of competitive examinations and are open to graduates of the cooperating For further information colleges of which Wellesley College is one. apply to Professor McCarthy.

sufficient

The

work

in

object of the School

The American School of

American Academy

in

Classical Studies in

Rome.

The

Rome

is

an integral part of the is to promote

object of this School

FELLOWSfflPS

1

69

the study of classical literature in its bearing upon antiquities and history; of classical, Etruscan, and Italian art and archaeology, including topography, palaeography, and epigraphy, and of the art and archaeology of the early Christian, Mediaeval, and Renaissance periods within Duly qualified graduates of Wellesley Colthe boundaries of Italy. lege are

exempt from any charge

application

may

be

made

for tuition.

For further information

to Associate Professor Taylor.

the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods approved by the student's major department). Admission to courses at Woods Hole is upon a selective Wellesley College offers annually two scholarships to applicants basis. Scholarships

Hole

who

in

(or in a biological field station

are successful candidates.

search, but in the

summer

This laboratory

is

primarily for re-

courses of instruction are offered, four in

zoology and one in botany. The purpose of these courses is to aid in the production and training of investigators, and first consideration is given to persons who, whether graduate or undergraduate, give promise Applicants must have of contributing to the advancement of science. completed at least two full college courses in the subject in which they wish to work. With the approval of the major department, fees will be paid to the amount of the Woods Hole scholarship for work at another summer biological field station.

Applicants should state the character of the work to be done, whether botanical or zoological, whether courses of instruction are desired, or investigation

under direction.

All

applications should

be sent to

Associate Professor Creighton or Professor Jones before February

These applications

March

15.

will

be forwarded to

Woods Hole

to

first.

be acted upon

DEGREES CONFERRED IN

1950

BACHELOR OF ARTS Frances Bates Abbott Mary Inglis Aitken Nancy Adair Aitken Diane Yvonne Allan

Margaret Woodbridge Allen RosLYN Alpern Hyla Ames Aline Amon Judith Harding Anderson Nancy Ellen Angell Joan Elizabeth Appel Jean Douglas Archibald Kathryn Joan Aring

Meredith Mayo Arzt Joan Ashworth Phyllis Elizabeth Babb Helen Heyden Babcock Joy Louise Bailey

Brown Martha Ellen Brumback Mary Ellen Butler Brunkow

Bettine Jullet

Barbara Crandall Bryan Marjorie Lou Bull Rose Burgunder Carol Burke Barbara Buschmeyer Joan Butler Sarah Catherine Butte Helen Stevens Buttfield Mary Jeanette Campbell Anne Whittier Carleton Barbara Warner Carlson Marjorie Burt Carroll Corine Shearer Carwile Storrow Devine Cassin Joan Cavanaugh

Alice Anne Bain Dorothy Anne Baird Mary Barbara Baird

Lucille Catherine Cervasio

Sally Chandler Barbara Lee Chrisman Marion Virginia Christian

Margaret Helen Baldwin Lila Ruth Barbash

Marjory Williams Church Patricia Ann John Cochran Claire Mildred Conover

Elaine Yaffa Baron Sarah Elizabeth Barrett

Joan Baylor Ellen Beardslee Nancy May Becker Elizabeth Buckner Bell Phyllis Naomi Bennett Sarah Willingham Biedenharn

Cynthia Belle Cooper Dorothy Louise Crane Joanne Creager Katherine June Crehore

Alice Elizabeth Blaney Barbara Ann Bleasby Patricia Ann Blech

Mary Ellen Criscitiello Joan Calhoun Cristal Arvia Brower Crosby Sara Anne Crowell Penelope Anne Cruden MiTzi Evans Dallas

Myra Bloch

Kathleen Louise Dandy

Nancy Mary Bignell

Beverly Wills Bonelli Nancy Lee Bonsall Priscilla Everett Borden Margaret Ruth Bowers Sarah Elizabeth Brackett Helen Angell Bradner Olive Day Bramhall Elizabeth Claire Broback Barbara Bronson

Elizabeth Davidson

Dorothy Alice Davis

Mary Jane Davis Diane Isabelle de Bonneval Nicole Escande de Messieres Mary Deruha Mary Aleene Desmond

VrviAN

Margaretta Austin Diggs Lenore Mary Dignam 170

Degrees Conferred Nancy Canfield Domenie Jane Ann Donaldson Mildred Ruth Donkersley Carolyn Doolittle Bettie Dean Dorsey Marian Tappan Dowling Arline Louise Doxsee Judith Irene Dreifuss Eunice Dugdale

Jane Webster Eddy Lydia Spencer Edes AiLEEN Blanche Edwards

Anne Eisaman Alice Freeman Elder Joan Elliot Doris Pruss Elliott Patricia Ann Ellis Mary Louise Ensign

Rae Ann Ernster Betty Louise Esbenshade Jane McCullough Everhart Sylvia

Withrow Farny

Joyce Rae Fineman Mary Anne Foley Amy Josephine Ford Susannah Budd Freeman Betsy

Ann Gage

Jean Louise Gans Nancy Katharine Gaver Annette George Elizabeth Ann Getzoff

Mary Hutton Gibson Alice Grace Gingles Ethel Louise Ginsburgh Anne Godfrey Muriel Goldberg Roberta Allene Good

Jessie

Betty Ann Goodman Joan Hamilton Gordon Ruth Kleist Graff Elizabeth Anne Gray Mary Lonsdale Green Joanne Thompson Greenspun Anne Frances Grimwade Diane Elizabeth Gruhler

Martha Moore Gummere Ellen Louise Gutsche Mary Zoe Hadley Ann Kirk Haggarty

171

Ina Beatrice Aronson

Hahn

Nancy Esther Halverson Sally Bow Hammond Jean Catherine Handke Jane Hanscom Terry Ann Harris Nancy Kent Harrison Harriet Cutter Haseltine Joan Hall Hauser Cynthia Joy Hausmann Miriam Ruth Heald Joanne Healy Mary Hopper Heinrichs Eleanor Blakey Helm Nancy Clare Henry Patricia Henry Martha Harris Herr Nancy Gay Highriter Beverly Virginia Hill Ann Hirshberg Alice Boardman Hitchcock Iris Gunther Hofmeister Cora Elizabeth Holley Ellen Catherine Horgan Terry Ellen Horvitz Shirley Houser Mary Knatchbull Hugessen Sally Adams Huggins Virginia

Laura Iacuzzi

Doris Maria Igler Jessie Mercer Immel Catherine Louise Infanger

Charlotte Boyd Ingwersen

Ann Catherine Jandron Jane Buchan Jewell Ruth Audrey Joel Anne Carol Johns Diana Ward Johnson Kathleen Fisher Johnson Norma Zelda Joseph Patricia Coles Kaelber DoRATHEA Elizabeth Karow Anita Joan Katz Catharine Patricia Keefer

Margaret Kennedy Margaret Deborah

Killip

Eleanor Therese Kilmain Katharine Kipp

Margaret Elaine Kittle

Degrees Conferred

172

Susan Gretchen Knight Marie-Louise Martin Knopp Fredrika Carlisle Koenig

Mary Kohn MoLLiE Pope Kramer Elaine Marilyn Lackman

Marilynn Ruth Lamb Priscilla Faith Lamb Barbara Ann Lans Eve Marie Lapeyrouse Prentice LarRieu Nan Kimball La vis Carolyn Lovell Lefevre Phyllis Renee Katz Levine Mary Hope Lewis Caroline Sylvia Linden

Ruth Hutchinson Lippitt Patricia Ann Littauer Nancy Ann Lockerty

Gertrude Sydney Munro

Mary Ann Muth Ann Muzzey Margaret Hoag Myer Christie Myers Anne Nichols Susan

Doris Nier Nancy Williamson Nolan

Jo Anne Norman Julianne Cowap Norris Marion Elizabeth Orr

Nancy Osterholt JoANN Marie Outcault Ruth Patricia Park Barbara Diane Parker Elizabeth Bailey Patterson Polly Pearse Elizabeth Anne Pemberton

Virginia Long

Renate Margarete Dorothea Pflaum

Nancy Longley Lillian Emma Look

Margaret Philbrick Ann Phillips

Barbara Katherine Loomis Caroline Jean Looney Virginia Anne Lowell Charlotte Huntington Lyman Marilyn Lorna Lyon Katherine Crawford MacDonald Alice Elizabeth Macpherson Sondra Markowitz Ann Barber Marston Barbara Mae Martha Betsey Alicia Martin

Elaine Joyce Phillips Eleanor Pope

Sally Ann Martyn

Margaret Mason Ruth Ellen May Jean Carol McCown Katharine Raynolds

McCoy

Nancy Church McDowell Barbara Anne McMaster Gail Parsons McMaster Kathryn Frances Mead

Barbara Powell

Branwen Bailey Pratt Patricia Louise Pratt Priscilla Pruden

Alice Rabiner

Carol Anne Ray Virginia Frances Rees

Claudia Overington Reid Lois Reuling Georgiana Reynolds Ruth Elizabeth Reynolds Louise Barbara Richardson Emlly Gray Robertson Paulina Jenetta Robinson

Anna

Ruth Rodale Helen Elsie Rogers Joanna Rogers Mary Hope Rogers

Guye Meyer Marjorie Ann Miller Mary Helen Miller

Virginia Elizabeth Rogers Jean Elizabeth Rose Jane Rosen baum Frances Turner Rouse

Mary Leonore Jerrems Molloy

Janine Marie

Meryll Ann Moritz Shirley Anne Munford

Mary-Lvle Ryan

Sallie

Tom Merritt

Elise

Rowe Mary Kerst Runyeon

Degrees Conferred SUSETTE WiNSLOW RyAN Caroly Rydell Evelyn Walter Savage Joan Sayward Laurene Madeleine Scheideler Virginia Karen Schwarz RUTHANN SeTEL Evelyn Haldane Sewell

Mary Ann Phyllis

Shands

Haak Shannon

Miriam Shifrin Barbara Siebert Marilyn Rita Stlverstone Mary Frances Simmons Marilyn Brooks Simons Florence Weiner Slepian Joan Stearns Smith

Margery Ann Smith Susan Anne Smith Marianne Snedeker Winifred Dorothy Sorg Elizabeth Babbitt Spelman Fay Spence

Mary Joanna

Spicer

Marilyn Jean Spoehr Patricia Stackhouse Patricia Mary Stapleton Ada Virginia Sterling

Doris Ann Marshall Steenburg Barbara Sally Feldberg Stern Eleanor Graham Stewart Mary Eloise Stewart Dorothy Jean Stock Nathalie Alice Strahan Margaret Florence Stueck Harriet Morse Sturtevant Jo Ann Summers Janet Louise Sundberg Grace Ellen Swan Joan Sweeney Carol Sweezy Helen Chantler Thomas Marjorie Evens Thompson Helen Louise Thorington Nancy Thornton Jeanne Anne Tinsley Graciela Mercedes Torres Nancy Tufel

173

Gabriella Turnay Sophie Anne Upshaw Elizabeth Valiant

Mary

Florence Atwater Van Dyke Mary Josephine Van Hoesen Patricia Louise Van Rensselaer Judith Ann Vaughan Anne Vickery Ardis Amelia Voegelem

Helen Bullock Waldie Dorothy Anne Walker Charlotte Ann Wall Elizabeth Bowe Wallace Marion Elisabeth Ward Bettie Marshall Warner

Kay Waxman Ann Gordon Webster

Judith

Elizabeth Weiner Marjorie Schwartz Weisman Elizabeth Jane Weiss Joan Elizabeth Welch Joanne Wentz Eunice Ruth Werner Elizabeth Ann Wester Elizabeth Anne Wheeler Lucie Jean Whitehead

Marjorie Ann Wiecking Elnora Harkness Wilcox Jean Elizabeth Wilcox Rosemary Wilford

Mary

Alice

Brown Wilinsky

Evelyn Allen Willard

Gwaln Ruth Williams Ann Wilkinson Wilmer Polly Stevenson Wilmer Katherine Van Duyne Winans Helen Kerst Runyeon Wiprud Elizabeth Ann Wise Patricia Caryl Wohlgemuth Mary Louise Woldenberg Janet Barbara Patricia Doris

Wood Wood

Sue Wood Harriet Manter Woods Annlouise Wright Marilyn Jean Wyard Joan O'Neil Zell Claire Aileen Zimmerman

Degrees Conferred

174

MASTER OF ARTS Gloria June Anderson, b.a., De Pauw University, 1948. Botany. Francesca Maria Arrighi, b.a., Albertus Magnus College, 1949. Italian. Frances Maud Barker, b.s.. Tufts College, 1948. Botany. Virginia Mae Beers, b.s., Simmons College, 1948. Chemistry. Marilyn Fischer, b.a.. Queens College, 1949. History. Sylvia Unterbach Green, b.a.. Temple University, 1948. ^oology and Physiology.

Betty Knickmeyer, b.a., Washington University, 1949. Economics. Maude Noel Lombard, b.s., Tufts College, 1946. Botany.

Mary Lucille Mathews, b.s., University of Illinois, 1948. Psychology. EvALENA Sharp, b.a., Sweet Briar College, 1948. Political Science. Joan Sherwood, b.a., Wellesley College, 1948. Chemistry. Joy Marguerite Sleeper, b.a.. University of Rochester, 1948. Music. Ruth Wick,

Wellesley College, 1948.

b.a.,

Joanna Elizabeth Frances Withrow,

Chemistry.

b.a.,

Oberlin College, 1948.

-Zoology

and Physiology.

Gloria Elaine Zander,

b.a.,

Milwaukee-Downer

College, 1948.

Z'^c^cgy

^^

Physiology.

MASTER OF ARTS

IN

EDUCATION

Ruth Thompson Cornell, b.a.. Mount Holyoke College, 1945. Nancy Aring Graham, b.a.. University of Wisconsin, 1948. Adelaide Luvenia Hines, Elsie-Lee

McCarthy,

Brooklyn College, 1947. Regis College, 1948.

b.a.,

b.a..

MASTER OF SCIENCE AND THE TEACHING CERTIFICATE IN HYGIENE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Nora Lee Banks, b.s., Howard Ruth Elizabeth Baxter, b.a.,

University, 1948.

Oberlin College, 1948.

Betty Beese, b.s., Purdue University, 1947. Beverly Anne Bullen, b.s.. University of Wisconsin, 1947. June Holcombe, b.s.. University of Colorado, 1947. Janet Elizabeth McAuley, b.a.. University of Chicago, 1945;

b.s..

University

of Illinois, 1948.

Eileen Marguerite Reardon, b.s., Boston University College of Physical Education for Women, Sargent, 1947. Adina Rigor y Balaoro, b.s. in education. University of the Philippines, 1940. Dorothy Davidson Robins, b.a., College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 1943. Helen Ruth Sprague, b.a., The Principia College of Liberal Arts, 1947. Roberta Tunick, b.a., Barnard College, Columbia University, 1948.

HONORS AND

CONFERRED IN

PRIZES

1950

SENIOR HONORS Meredith Mayo Arzt, Chemistry Mary Ellen Butler Brunkow, Eco-

HIGH HONORS

Frances Bates Abbott, Chemistry

nomics

Joan Elizabeth Appel, Spanish Phyllis Naomi Bennett, ^oology and

Rose Burgunder, English Marjory Williams Church,

Physiology

Nancy Mary Bignell,

Geology

and

Joyce Rae Fineman, History Ellen Louise Gutsche, Art Ann Catherine Jandron, Botany

Geography

Marjorie Burt Carroll, Physics Diane Isabelle de Bonneval, English Alice Grace Gingles,

Phyllis Renee

Biblical History

Levine, Psy-

Barbara Kathereme Loomis,

Political

Science

tical Science

Barbara Mae Martha,

Patricia Coles Kaelber, Art

Latin

Betsey Alicia Martin, Physics Mary Helen Miller, Economics Mary Leonore Jerrems Molloy,

Susan Gretchen Knight, English Elaine Marilyn Lackman, Chemistry Lippitt,

Katz

chology

Cynthia Joy Hausmann, German Mary Knatchbull Hugessen, Poli-

Ruth Hutchinson

Inter-

national Relations

^oology

Physics

and Physiology

Shirley Anne Mltnford, Economics

Virginia Long, Spanish Alice Rabiner, ^oology and Caroly Rydell, Economics

Margaret Hoag Myer, Physiology'

Marianne Snedeker, History Harriet Morse Sturtevant,

Barbara Siebert, Botany Florence Weiner Slepian, Economics Nathalie Alice Strahan, Chemistry Judith Kay Waxman, History Sue Wood, Spanish Claire Aileen Zimmerman,

Economics

Patricia Louise Pratt, English Soci-

ology

Bettie

Marshall Warner,

History

Marjorie Schwartz Weisman, English

Psychology

Ruth Werner, Political Science Helen Kerst Runyeon Wiprud, EngEunice

lish

Judith Harding Anderson, Medieval

Patricia

Caryl Wohlgemuth,

Poli-

tical Science

Studies

HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS Scholarships (without stipend) have been established by the College purpose of giving recognition to a high degree of excellence in academic work. These honors fall into two classes: students in the first, or higher class, are termed Durant Scholars; students in the second class are termed Wellesley

Honor

for the

College Scholars. These honors are awarded to seniors on the basis of two and one-half years' work, to juniors on the basis of one and one-half years' work. The standard in

each case

is

absolute, not competitive.

175

Scholarships

176

DURANT HONOR SCHOLARS Class of 1950

Frances Bates Abbott Hyla Ames

Carol Burke Diane Isabelle de Bonneval Marian Tappan Dowling Doris Pruss Elliott Betty Louise Esbenshade Alice Grace Gingles Catherine Louise Infanger Fredrika Carlisle Koenig Christie

Myers

Doris Nier

JULIANNE

CoWAP NoRRIS

Renate Margarete Dorothea Pflaum Frances Turner Rouse Garoly Rydell

Mary Ann

Shands

Barbara Siebert Nathalie Alice Strahan Margaret Florence Stueck Harriet Morse Sturtevant Sue Wood Claire Aileen Zimmerman Class of 1951

Rachel Gushing Allen EvADNE Kelso Ammen Ildiko Emmy dePapp

Norma Jeanne Schwartz Phyllis Ann Shapiro Barbara Ann Shultz

Lee Ellerich Mildred Sarah Epstein Sarah Gushing Faunce Robin Ridgway Hinsdale

Susan Skilling Claire Marie Walter Eugenia Randall Warren Ellen Phoebe Wiese Lillian Carol Zachrisson

Patricia

Huy

Anita Johanna Rothschild

wellesley college honor scholars Class of 1950

Judith Harding Anderson Joan Elizabeth Appel

Joan Ashworth Elaine Yaffa Baron Sarah Elizabeth Barrett Ellen Beardslee Elizabeth Buckner Bell

Nancy Mary Bignell

Myra Bloch Elizabeth Claire Broback Mary Ellen Butler Brunkow Rose Burgunder Marjorie Burt Carroll

Joan Gavanaugh Joan Calhoun Gristal Mary Aleene Desmond Joyce Rae Fineman Jean Louise Gans

Ethel Louise Ginsburgh Anne Godfrey Diane Elizabeth Gruhler Ina Beatrice Aronson Hahn Terry Ann Harris Miriam Ruth Heald Beverly Virginia Hill Mary Knatchbull Hugessen Virginia Laura Iacuzzi

Jessie

Doris Maria Igler Mercer Immel Ann Catherine Jandron

Jessie

Jane Buchan Jewell Norma Zelda Joseph Patricia Coles Kaelber Dorathea Elizabeth Karow Margaret Elaine Kittle Susan Gretchen Knight

Scholarships

Mary Kohn

Carol Anne Ray Joanna Rogers SUSETTE WiNSLOW RyAN Marilyn Rita Silverstone Florence Weiner Slepian

Elaine Marilyn Lackman Eve Marie Lapeyrouse

Carolyn Lovell Lefevre

Ruth Hutchinson Virginia

Lippitt

Long

Margery Ann Smith

Barbara Katherine Loomis Virginia Anne Lowell Marilyn Lorna Lyon Betsey Alicia Martin Jean Carol McCown Elise Guye Meyer Mary Helen Miller Mary Leonore Jerrems Molloy Shirley Anne Munford

Marilyn Jean Spoehr Marjorie Evens Thompson Jeanne Anne Tinsley Florence Atwater Van Dyke Charlotte Ann Wall

Margaret Hoag Myer

Rosemary Wilford Helen Kerst Runyeon Wiprud Marilyn Jean Wyard

Barbara Powell Patricia Louise Pratt Alice Rabiner

Judith Kay Waxman Elizabeth Jane Weiss Eunice Ruth Werner Marjorie Ann Wiecking

Class of 1951

Carolyn Hatheway Alcorn Carolyn Bancroft Andervont Marjorie Jane Baehr Joan Mangone Balish

Jane Maddox Lancefield Elinor Rose Levin

Mary Margaret

Nancy Mandelker Yvonne Christine Martin

Berninger

Hildegard Marla Blelbtreu Amy Jane Bunim Roberta Grower Carey Ruth Ann Clark Constance Burning Cruger Antoinette Georgine Dean Ruth Marie Dedlow Barbara Sheva Elman Hannelore Anne Falk Betty Felsenfeld

Anne Frederick Patricia Frisbee

Gretchen Frudden Gebhardt Kathanne Harter Ruth Ellen Helsell Katherine Bostwick Hess Valerie Ann Jayne Shirley Coleman Jenks Helen Janet Jockers Lois Janet

Susan Levy Edith Beate Liffman

Judith Mayer Elinor Frances Norton SoNjA Maria Flor Novak

Jean Charlotte Odence Artemis George Pazianos Dorothy Miller Perkins Phyllis Lucille Reed

Jane Frances Richards Frances Richey Elizabeth Bowdoin Robinson Letty Mandeville Russell Constance Ming Chung Shen

Marcia Leah Smith Patricia Ann Starke Anne Custis Taylor Polly Irene Taylor

Martha Webber Margaret Anne Zeller

177

Fellowships

178

PRIZES Billings Prize in Music:

Elizabeth Davidson Virginia Long

Cervantes Prize in Spanish:

Davenport Prize in Speech: Phyllis Elizabeth

Babb and Joan O'Neil Zell

Erasmus Prize in History: Judith Kay Waxman Isabelle Eastman Fisk Prize in Speech: Carol Marianne Crockett Jacqueline Award in English Composition: Diane Isabelle de Bonneval John Masefield Prize in Prose Writing: Susette Winslow Ryan

John Masefield Prize

Mary White Mary White

in Verse Writing:

Rose Burgunder Hyla Ames

Peterson Prize in Chemistry: Peterson Prize in ^oologp:

Margaret Kennedy

Mayling Soong Prize: Patricia Mary Stapleton Lewis Atterbury Stimson Prize in Mathematics: Marion Elisabeth Ward Woodrow Wilson Prize in Modern Politics: Eunice Ruth Werner Florence Annette Wing Memorial Prize for Lyric Poetry: Eleanor Drew Kelly Natalie Wipplinger Prize in German: Cynthia Joy Hausmann

FELLOWSHIP AWARDS FOR 1950-51 GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED TO MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF

1950

Alice Grace Gingles, for graduate work in Biblical History at Union Theological Seminary Claire Aileen Zimmerman, for study in the Department of Social Relations, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Radcliffe College

ALICE FREEMAN PALMER FELLOWSHIP Laura Dodson Winchester,

b.a.,

Agnes Scott College, 1947;

m.a., Wellesley

College, 1949; candidate for the degree of ph.d. at the University of

Michigan.

Biochemistry.

FANNY BULLOCK WORKMAN SCHOLARSHIP b.a., Wellesley College, 1944; m.a., Connecticut Colcandidate for the degree of ph.d. at the University of Penn-

Helen Adele Stafford, lege, 1948;

sylvania.

Botany.

ANNE LOUISE BARRETT FELLOWSHIP Helen Ann Padykula,

b.s.,

University of Massachusetts, 1946; m.a..

Mount

Holyoke College, 1948; candidate for the degree of ph.d. in the Department of Anatomy at the Harvard Medical School. Histochemistry.

HARRIET

A.

JoHONET Halsted Carpenter,

SHAW SCHOLARSHIP B.A., Mills College,

degree of m.a. at Radcliffe College.

1948; candidate for the

Music.

HORTON-HALLOWELL FELLOWSHIP {In the Gift of the

Alumnae

Association)

Wellesley College, 1929; m.a., Smith College, 1937; candidate for the degree of ph.d at the University of Massachusetts.

Helen Louise Whidden, Chemistry.

b.a.,

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS

....... ....... ...... ......

Candidates for the B. A. degree Seniors

Juniors

Sophomores Freshmen

Candidates for the M.A. degree Candidates for the M.S. degree and the Teaching giene and Physical Education Candidates for the Teaching Certificate only Non-candidates for degrees

.... .

......

Total registration October, 1950 Juniors abroad

.

365

180 India

Summary of Students

PRESIDENTS OF WELLESLEY CLUBS AND CHAIRMEN OF GROUPS Arizona Montecito Avenue Mrs. Richard H. Chambers, 333 South Alvernon

Phoenix, Dr. Lucille S. Russell, 1646

Tucson,

California Central, Mrs. Bertha S. Vawter, 5851 Chabot Court, Oakland 18 San Diego, Mrs. Francis X. Miller, 6986 Fulton Street, San Diego 11 Southern, Mrs. Frank A. M. Bryant, 4615 Gainsborough Avenue, Los Angeles 27 Foothill, Miss Marjorie Adams, 625 Auburn, Sierra Madre Santa Barbara, Mrs. John J. Rogers, 3541 East Valley Road

Canada Montreal, Mrs. Franklin E. Holland, 1700

MacGregor

Street

Mrs. Donald G. Pyle, 43 Lawrence Crescent, Toronto 12

Toronto,

Colorado Mrs. Francis G. Smith,

Jr.,

2400 Routt Road, Denver 15

Connecticut Mrs. Neil E. HumphreviUe, 1012 Ocean Avenue, New London Mrs. John B. WiUard, 92 Outlook Avenue, West Hartford New Haven, Mrs. J. Herbert Hunter, 112 Livingston Street, New Haven 11 Southern, Mrs. Waldo Sheldon, Wilson Point, South Norwalk Waterbury, Mrs. Charles V. Wynne, Waterbury Hospital Eastern,

Hartjord,



Delaware Mrs. L. Hicks Lawrence,

Jr.,

207 Ogle Avenue, Wilmington

District of Columbia Washington, Miss M. Katharine Sater, Apt. 721B, ington 16

The

Westchester,

Wash-

Florida Miami, Mrs. Henry Noyes, 1279 N. W. 41st Street Petersburg, Mrs. Nicholas Cherkasoff, 5609 21st Avenue South, Pasadena Gardens, Gulfport

St.

France Mrs.

S.

Denis Felkin, 149 Boulevard Haussmann, Paris 8

Atlanta,

Mrs. James J. Selvage, Biltmore Apartments 8-A

Georgia

Germany Dr. Trude Gunther, Exchanges Division

HICOG, APO

807,

New York

%

Postmaster,

Hawah Honolulu, Mrs.

Dudley Smith, 3867 Lurline Drive, Honolulu

16,

T.H.

Illinois Central,

Chicago,

Mrs. George C, Hoffman, 1332 South Park Avenue, Springfield Mrs. T. Kenneth Boyd, 250 White Oak Lane, Winnetka

Illinois-Iowa Tri-City, Mrs. Arthur J. Hinckley, Box 518, 48 Woodley Road, Rock Island, Illinois

Indiana

Henry Veatch Jr., 606 Park Avenue Mrs. Jack Stone, 916 S. East Second Street

Bloomington, Mrs. Evansville,

181

Wellesley Club Presidents

182

Fort Wayne, Mrs. Lyall D. Morrill, 3704

Mulberry Road, Fort Wayne 6

Mrs. Karl A. Stegemeicr, 5821 Guilford Avenue, Indianapolis 20 Terre Haute, Mrs. G. E. Ehrenhardt, 12 Potomac Avenue West Lafayette, Mrs. Robert P. Siskind, 321 Forest Hill Drive

Indianapolis,

Iowa Mrs. Ben

Willis,

2320

Japan Mrs. A. N. Slocum,

Knapp

%

Street,

General

Ames

StafT,

SGAP GHQ, SEG, APO

500,

San

Francisco

Kansas Wichita,

Mrs. Gharles Wilson Black, 1008 North Pershing

Kentucky Louisville,

Mrs. William J. Goodwin, Warrior Road, Indian

Hills, Louisville 7

Louisiana

New

Orleans,

Mrs. Justin Godchaux, 7901

Oak

Street,

New

Orleans 18

Maine Eastern,

Western,

Mrs. Edwin L. Giddings, 28 College Heights, Orono Mrs. Stephen T. Hanscom, Surf Road, Cape Elizabeth

Maryland Baltimore,

Mrs. Cecil

I.

CuUom,

201

Dumbarton Road, Baltimore

12

Massachusetts Mrs. Robert C. Foster, 251 Mill Street, Newtonville 60 Mrs. John A. Baybutt, 465 Park Drive, Boston Cape Cod, Miss Eleanor Dodge, East Orleans Fitchburg, Mrs. Harold T. Lyons, Box 336, Leominster Haverhill, Mrs. William P. Lowell, Jr., 61 High Street, Newburyport Zoz£)?//, Mrs. Raoul Drapeau, 1346 Bridge Street, Dracut Middlesex, Mrs. Francis R. Clark, 47 Indian Head Road, Framingham North Shore, Mrs. Charles W. Davis, Cranleigh, South Hamilton Southeastern, Mrs. Rodolphe A. Paradis, 42 Mount Vernon Street, New Bedford South Shore, Mrs. Charles F. Schell, 48 Ash Street, Braintree 84 Springfield, Mrs. Walter B. Gerould II, 73 Falmouth Road, Longmeadow Winchester, Mrs. Albert D. Swazey, 336 Main Street Worcester, Miss Jean Spence, 64 Sever Street, Worcester 5 Boston,

Boston, Junior Group,

Michigan Mrs. John S. Hammond, 70 Cambridge Road, Grosse Pointe 30 Grand Rapids, Mrs. Leon T. Closterhouse, Headwaters, Ada Southwestern, Mrs. Edwin T. Turner, Jr., 2308 Bronson Boulevard, Kalamazoo Detroit,

Minnesota Minneapolis-St. St.

Paul,

Miss Betty Bremer, 92 North Mississippi Boulevard,

Paul 4

Missouri Kansas

Miss Nancy Jane Martin, 431 West 55 Street, Kansas City 2 Mrs. Oliver Abel, Jr., 6336 Wydown Boulevard, St. Louis 5

City,

St. Louis,

Nebraska Omaha, Mrs. Harry Koch, 5215 California Street

New

Hampshire

Mrs. Leonard Riccio, 3185 Brown Avenue, Goffs Falls New Hampshire, Junior, Mrs. Edward D. Hurley, 594 Lake Shore Road, chester

Man-

Wellesley Club PREsroENTS

183

New Jersey Central Jersey,

Mrs. Frank T. Gorman, 142 Hodge Road, Princeton

New Jersey, Mrs. Harold New York

F. Reindel, Forest

Road, Essex

Falls

Binghamton, Mrs. Frederick V. Marsi, 6 Euclid Avenue Lida R. Brandt, 131 Joralemon Street, Brooklyn 2 Buffalo, Mrs. Cutter Davis, 19 East Avenue, Springville Brooklyn, Miss

Mrs. Henry J. Haase, 23 Cambridge Road, Albany Guy E. Stong, 208 Lovell Avenue Ithaca, Mrs. Louise Quirk, 107 Oak Hill Place Mid-Hudson, Mrs. Francis S. Peterson, Fishkill Nassau, Mrs. John J. Stephens 2nd, 97 Clinton Avenue, Mineola New York City, Mrs. Valentine H. Zahn, Jr., 1010 Fifth Avenue, New York 28 Queens, Mrs. A. C. Sugden, Dogwood Avenue, Roslyn Harbor Estates, Long Eastern,

Elmira, Mrs.

Island

Mrs. William F. Butler, Jr., 560 Antlers Drive Mrs. Ralph Marwill, 1448 Clifton Park Road, Schenectady 8 Syracuse, Mrs. E. Richard Goldberg, 301 Columbus Avenue Troy, Mrs. Austin H. Emery, 189 Manor Avenue, Cohoes Utica, Miss Ruth Weaver Auert, 813 Herkimer Road Westchester, Mrs. William H. Connor, Sussex Hall, Dobbs Ferry Rochester,

Schenectady,

North Carolina Mrs. Stephen

Asheville,

Tryon, Miss Genevieve

J. Miller, 91

North Griffing Boulevard

Washburn

Ohio Box 296, R.F.D. 7, Akron 3 Mrs. Thomas McEvilley, Jr., 1155 Beverly Hills Drive, Cincinnati 8 Cleveland, Mrs. Robert S. Cheheyl, 1226 Summit Avenue, Lakewood 7 Columbus, Mrs. David M. Postlewaite, 715 McNaughten Road, Reynoldsburg Dayton, Mrs. Zachary Abuza, 3700 Cornell Drive, Dayton 6 Toledo, Mrs. Leland B. Monroe, 3603 Indian Road, Ottawa Hills, Toledo 6 Youngstown, Miss Mary Elizabeth Graver, 2027 Felecia Avenue, Youngstown 4

Akron, Mrs. Walter F. Lineberger, Cincinnati,

Oklahoma Tulsa,

Mrs. William

J. Stewart III,

3714 East Second Street

Oregon Portland,

Mrs. Edward

land

M.

Miller, 2960 Southwest

Montgomery

Drive, Port-

1

Pennsylvania

Malcolm Blake, 1140 West Rosemont Drive, Bethlehem Mrs. Walter K. Woolman, Jr., Box 385, 500 WiUiamson Road,

Lehigh Valley, Mrs. Philadelphia,

Bryn

Mawr

Mrs. W. Glenn Srodes, 604 Pitcairn Place, Pittsburgh 32 Mrs. W. L. Schlager, 1610 Jefferson Avenue, Scranton 9 Southeastern, Miss Ruth Sener, 233 North Charlotte Street, Lancaster Wilkes-Barre, Miss Esther R. Trethaway, 39 W. North Street Pittsburgh,

Scranton,

Rhode Island Mrs. John

W.

Baker, 45 Loring Avenue, Providence

Tennessee Mrs. J. Frank McElwee, Jr., Peter Pan Road, Lookout Mountain Memphis, Mrs. W.J. E. Webber, 1420 Goodbar Avenue Nashville, Mrs. Richard D. Walker, Jr., Hood's Hill Road, Nashville 5 Chattanooga,

Wellesley Club Presidents

184 Texas

Mrs. James P. Hart, 1800 Forest Trail Mrs. Philip O. Montgomery, 3925 Beverly Drive, Dallas Houston, Mrs. Charles Dillingham, 509 Branard Street, Houston 6 Austin,

Dallas-Ft. Worth,

5

Utah Mrs. Chauncey P. Overfield, 88 Virginia

Street, Salt

Lake City

Vermont Miss

Mary

E. Fenton, 177

Grove

Street,

Rutland

Virginia

Angus Powell, 326 Albemarle Avenue Mrs. Arthur J. Winder, 52nd Street, Virginia Beach

Richmond, Mrs. E. Tidewater,

Washington Western,

Mrs. Roy Myers, Route

1,

Box lA, Woodinville

West Virginia West Virginia, Mrs. Cornelius J. Vanderwilt, 6-C Charleston 4

Southern

Wheeling, Mrs.

Edward

S. Phillips,

Washington Farms, R.F.D.

Abney

Circle,

1

Wisconsin Madison, Mrs. John I. Cole, 3227 Shore Acres Road, Madison 4 Milwaukee, Miss AUce Freeman Walmsley, 2449 North Downer Avenue, Milwaukee 11

INDEX page

PAGE Administrative Officers. Admission Advanced Standing. :

Freshman Class Graduate Students

.

17

.

...

41

....

35 42 181

Alumna Club

Presidents. American School of Classical Studies .

.

Archeology Architecture

Art Art Collections

30 56 62, 64 58 150

Bacteriology Biblical History Biology

Hebrew Historical Sketch History Courses

5

and

....

College Community College Entrance Examination Board College Government Assn. .

Committees of Trustees Committees of Faculty Degrees: B.A. Requirements for M.A. and M.S. Requirements .

.

.

for

Degrees Conferred Economics Education

in 1950.

.

37 29 7

Examinations: Admission Course Expenses

37 47 159

Faculty Fees Fellowships

French Geography Geology

German

Philosophy Physical Education Physiology Placement Office

Enrollment

8

31

.

.

.

Psychology

.

.... .

.

....

Religious Services Residence Russian Scholarships: For Graduates For Undergraduates

.

.

.

Spanish

165 85 93

Theatre Workshop Trustees, Board of

Students' Aid Society

Tuition

Zoology 185

128 107 130 150 28 134 49 178 138 28 27, 33 141

Sociology

Speech Sports

96

124 126 30

Political Science Pre-Professional Courses Prizes

159

91

.

Equipment in Observatory

44

69

.

.

Fees

Physics

73 77 179

English

31

Music

22

50 170

115 156 115 79,81 118 135

.

.

Marine Biological Laboratory 169 AT Woods Hole 121 Mathematics 131 Meteorology .

109 28,31 65 27

.

... ...

107

Italian

Library

Calendar

Chemistry

24 100 48 156

28,30

Journalism Latin

Law

Chapel

58, 60

....

tion

30

.

99 28, 30

Infirmary Interdepartmental Courses Interdepartmental Honors

61

.

42, 50

.

.

Buildings

.

.

Honors, Interdepartmental Hygiene and Physical Educa-

Botany

Certificates in Hygiene Physical Education

.

Honors 168 156 52, 54 51

Astronomy

Graduate Instruction Greek Health Service

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

...

.

165 162 142 145 148 107 163 149 6

159 150

FORMS OF BEQUEST I give to

Wellesley College, a Massachusetts corporation, free

clear of all inheritance taxes, the

I

sum

and

dollars.

of.

give to Wellesley College, a Massachusetts corporation, free

clear of all inheritance taxes, the

and

be called Endowment Fund, the income only to be used for the pay-

the

ment of teachers'

I

sum

dollars, to

of.

salaries.

give to Wellesley College, a Massachusetts corporation, free

clear of all inheritance taxes, the



sum

dollars, to

of.

and

be called

the .Scholarship Fund, the income only to be used in aid of deserving students.

If the

bequest

"All the I

de\dse

rest,

is

residuary,

residue

and bequeath

tion," etc.

it

should read:

and remainder of

my real

and personal

estate,

to Wellesley College, a Massachusetts corpora-